deeeight

I NEVER EVER EVVVVEEERRRR SHIP C.O.D.

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deeeight mattwragg's article
Feb 23, 2017 at 22:15
11 hours
Back to the Future: Rotwild RDH P1
@Apecush: You've never looked under a rally car or truck and seen how exposed much of the engine is have you ? Or even worked on just an ordinary car engine driven on roads for a long time. Well I have, and timing/accessory drive belts have no special covers or shielding to protect them from dirt/debris coming up from the underside. There's a reason all the best hand cleaners are sold in the automotive sections of stores. Working on engines is a very messy affair.
deeeight mattwragg's article
Feb 23, 2017 at 16:38
17 hours
Back to the Future: Rotwild RDH P1
@jflb: The belts are strong enough to rotate the water pump shaft, the power steering pump shaft, the alternator drive wheel, and often the A/C pump as well, which on most engines represent about a dozen horsepower of energy.
deeeight mattwragg's article
Feb 22, 2017 at 23:23
1 days
Back to the Future: Rotwild RDH P1
As I recall, the belt was actually taken from Pirelli's off-road parts line used on paris-dakar and baja 1000 desert racers which are exposed to a lot more abuse (heat, sand, rocks, water, mud, etc) than any mountain biker could throw at the thing.
deeeight mattwragg's article
Feb 22, 2017 at 23:18
1 days
Back to the Future: Rotwild RDH P1
"While this may look normal now, internal cable routing was virtually unheard of in 1996" Clearly a downside to an article written by someon only 34 is missing out on a whole decade when internal cable routing was everywhere in mountain biking. My first mountain bike in 1987 had it, and that was a low end model which had trickled the feature down from higher end bikes. It was around even earlier for road bikes.
deeeight mikekazimer's article
Feb 21, 2017 at 10:38
3 days
Specialized Air Tool Blast Tubeless Tire Setter - Review
"likely safer than going the DIY route with an old fire extinguisher " Actually if its a Co2 fire extinguisher... you can't really be safer since it STILL functions as just that. You're just changing the hose & nozzle on them.
deeeight mikekazimer's article
Feb 21, 2017 at 10:29
3 days
Specialized Air Tool Blast Tubeless Tire Setter - Review
Because another brand did already and likely filed a patent for it.
deeeight RichardCunningham's article
Feb 14, 2017 at 14:17
Feb 14, 2017
Crankbrothers Highline Dropper Seatpost - Review
"Crankbrothers eliminated the need to remove bolts (and the resulting shower of specialty hardware) by slotting the back of the seatpost head." Oh yeah...copying a feature used on taiwanese made 2-bolt seatposts for twenty years is really innovative apparently to someone being paid to write a glowing review.
deeeight RichardCunningham's article
Feb 6, 2017 at 21:42
Feb 6, 2017
MRP Boost Adapter Kit for DT Swiss Wheels
@FrEeZa: I have said MANY times now that "with few exceptions" most hub manufacturers never took advantage of the extra real estate afforded by wider dropout spacing of existing standards to actually widen the hub flanges. And even those few that have, they're still limited by where the disc rotor has to be, and the freehub body has to be, with how far they can move the spoke flanges. I happen to build wheels... I have a nice database of hub dimensions as a result, for when calculating spoke lengths, and among them are the numbers for Hope Evo Pro II hubs. 53mm of spacing for the front flanges and 50mm in the rear on paper sounds good. But I have other hubs from other makers with greater spacing than Hope. A set of Novatec's I built had 58mm of flange spacing in front and 54.5 in the back. SRAM X.0 Hub shells in all their non-boost axle spacings (including 20x110) are 56mm of flange spacing in front, and 54.75mm in the rear for 135QR/142 hubs. Of all the non-boost disc hubs I have, the widest flange spacing belongs to an asian brand called Circus Monkey with 59mm in front and 55mm in the rear. To put that in perspective, a set of boost specific Hope Evo Pro II hubs have 58mm of flange spacing in front and 57mm in the back and SRAM's X.0 Boost hubs are 66mm in front and 60.75mm in the rear. In other words... Hope really isn't a hub maker that falls into the "few exceptions" group for taking advantage of the available real estate in either the existing or boost standards. X0 DH rear hubs have 69.75mm between the flanges but wouldn't work in frames with the existing 73mm shell width because the chain line would be too far out of whack. 150/157 hubs are generally designed for frames with 83mm BB shell widths, not 73mm because the chain line of the hub is further outboard. The 73mm shell's chainline is designed for the existing 135 rear hub spacing (142 hubs are identical to 135 except for the extra axle length used by the clamping thru-axle dropouts). Boost compatible frames don't just have 148mm dropout spacing, but also require cranks with the chainline shifted about 3mm outboard to match the re-positioned freehub body to maintain a proper chainline. The "fudge it" method for folks not wishing to buy new cranks, but who are already riding their bikes as 1x drivetrains, is to place the chainring on the outer position of the crank spider tabs, not the inner position, or buy a new spider if you happen to own a crank which they have be changed. Trek, SRAM and other manufacturers (whether its component manufacturers or bike/frame manufacturers) don't have a problem with boost rear hubs also needing new cranks because they KNOW quite well that the majority of consumers don't custom build their new bikes using existing used parts, and they're not particularly concerned about the small minority that do. For every person who complains on a forum about how they refuse to adopt a new "standard" because none of their existing parts fit, they'll be fifty who have no such qualms. Their only concern is with moving the technology base of the industry forwards, and those who are mature and can see the big picture will follow along with that move and those who aren't, will complain about it. The vast majority of consumers get their new bikes complete, in bike stores, and thus will get their boost frame, boost compatible cranks, boost fork, and boost hubs all together. And the majority of people who take the custom build approach, are doing so because they have the money to do so, and also equally have no qualms about needing specific new parts. So really the complaining comes down to an even smaller minority who only have importance to the decisions of the bike industry, in their own imaginations. Which the complainers on pink bike for example, learned during the rise of 650B wheels to where they've now almost totally eclipsed 26ers except for a handful of freestyle/gravity/trials disciplines that really don't matter to 99.9% of the worlds cyclists. A couple thousand votes against 650B on this site did exactly what to stop Trek, Specialized, Giant and others from going whole hog with 650B ?! The answer is somewhere better zip and F all.
deeeight RichardCunningham's article
Feb 6, 2017 at 9:47
Feb 6, 2017
MRP Boost Adapter Kit for DT Swiss Wheels
@FrEeZa: Dave Weagle only said that because he didn't think to "invent" it first. There's no such thing as a 78mm BB. You're confusing what the parts of the wheel actually contribute in terms of overall strength of the wheel. Most of a wheel strength comes from the spokes. Remember again that boost hubs were designed first and foremost for 29ers, which don't use 20mm axle anything except for the rare handful of World Cup Enduro/DH 29er attempts by teams like Trek, Specialized, and possibly Lenz. 150/157 hubs again shared the same problem as 142 hubs. They're all designed around the same flange spacing and disc rotor position as 135mm were. There are very few hub makers who used the extra available real estate to widen the spoke flanges on 150 hubs.
deeeight RichardCunningham's article
Feb 6, 2017 at 1:19
Feb 6, 2017
MRP Boost Adapter Kit for DT Swiss Wheels
@FrEeZa: The 20mm axle is stiffer which helps the fork yes, but doesn't at all help how stiff/strong the actual wheel is as far as the spokes go, and as long as we're all riding wheels with laced spokes, then that's where improvements need to be focused first. Never use Josh Bender as a base for any comparison unless its how to hurt ones self by bravely hucking stuff you lack the equipment and skill to actually land successfully. Every huck he's famous for on videos only got him noticed because the bike/fork BROKE when he landed, or he couldn't handle the ride out and pogo'ed off the bike.
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