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Scurra 2 Fork Action

Scurra 2 Fork Action

10 Comments

  • + 1
 Why though? What is the practical benefit over this, to say a 34 or a Lyrik? Very unusual. They seem to be trying to solve a problem, that doesn't seem to exist. Forks are bulletproof these days, and light. Just saying.
  • + 3
 If you read the article that they posted it talks about the advantages regarding traction angles and using bearing instead of bushings.
  • + 3
 You get no stiction with these like you do with telescopic forks
  • + 1
 @mhoshal: Is stiction really that much of a problem? I mean today with the forks we have from the likes of Fox, Rockshox, Ohlins. There's a lot of moving parts here, a lot more to go wrong. It's called the Enduro I believe, a season of EWS will show any benefits or flaws to this design. Whyte did a similar thing 15 years ago, and today the Whyte PRST is on lists on YouTube called "worst mountain designs" or some such title. Along with Slingshots etc etc. GMBN do a good one actually. I know this differs from the Whyte, slightly, but it's along the same lines. I've never seen a point to these ideas. I think it's people with too much time on their hands. Just saying.
  • + 1
 @thegringo: stiction is a big problem when you ride a lot, the coatings on stanctions wears through, the tollerances increase making the fork sloppy, the bushings that keep things in place, wear, there is also an amount of force required to start the fork working, in corners/under braking the fork is under load and the friction between stanctions and bushes is multiplied, bearings eliminate these issues....try a lefty.
  • + 1
 @baggyferret: yeah I've tried a Lefty, didn't really like it. But my 34 and 36 have been perfect for years. I don't see it as that big of a problem to bring back a failed Whyte idea from the 90's. Forks have come a long way since the days of bikes like this. It's attampting to solves a 90's problem that is no longer present if you regularly service your modern fork.
  • + 1
 @thegringo: i used to ride with a bunch of guys every w/end at a set of jumps/trails, we had a certain spot that was a jump into a corner and we had to brake hard into the bend, after a few weeks we all started to have obvious stanction wear, it was because of the hard braking and turning in while taking hits from the bumps.
you made a great point about regular servicing forks, definitely prolongs fork life, but the lefty fork is an amazing design that eliminates the biggest problems that will always exist with round stanctioned forks, twist and friction. the lefty is square into square, no twist. so it's lighter, doesn't twist, it's stiffer, stronger, doesn't suffer stiction and no stanction wear because it operates on bearings..the only hard to over come part is the 'look' of it.. this (above) design is a step ahead of 'modern' forks, the modern round tubed forks are easy to mass produce and wear quickly so give quick profits to makers, if we stop believing the hype about the round tubed 'used by pro's' mantra we get fed daily, we will soon realize it's all marketing and not performance we follow.
in terms of engineering, the lefty and the above design are far superior in all areas where performance is concerned, but the 'big boys' (fox, manitou, rockshox etc) will give out 'bad press' to save sales of their inferior offerings.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=_WlRqcAQr2w
  • + 1
 @baggyferret: I don't see it that way. I have no problem with my regularly serviced forks, it wasn't even that much of a problem 10 years ago when I had a Pike and a different 36. And nowhere near enough problem to go back to a failed Whyte design from the 90's. There's top 10's on YouTube of crappy mountain designs and this design is in every one. If it's a problem with circular tubing make a fork with Lefty style stantions. When it's doing well in the EWS, I might take another look. But it would be just a look. I don't want rocks locking my "front" swingarm. It's not solving any problem, good quality forks regularly serviced do the job fine.
  • + 1
 @thegringo: that's fair enough mate, you pay, you choose! The forks of today are Sooo much better than our first offerings, I remember my old rock shox Quadra 21r's, stiff in the winter & soft in summer lol
  • + 1
 something similar was done in the mid 90's, don't recall who made it though

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