Japan with Andrew Taylor and JD Swanguen

Jun 7, 2012 at 10:18
by Long Nguyen  
Andrew Taylor, JD Swanguen and Long Nguyen go on a trip of a lifetime to Japan and capture it all on video and in pictures for the rest of us to enjoy in this widescreen article. Enjoy!Andrew Taylor, JD Swanguen and Long Nguyen go on a trip of a lifetime to Japan and capture it all on video and in pictures for the rest of us to enjoy in this widescreen article. Enjoy!
Words, Photos, and Video by Long Nguyen

JAPAN, a country that was devastated by an Earthquake, a Tsunami, and Fukushima this past year. As I boarded my 5am flight to San Francisco to meet up with Andrew Taylor (aka AT) and JD Swanguen, I couldn’t have been more excited to head to Japan. This would be my second trip to Japan, and it is has to be one of my favorite countries to visit. I visited the country last year, before the disaster hit the country, and I didn’t really know what to expect, or of the riding that Japan had to offer. The 11-hour flight wasn’t too bad, compared to the 14-hour flight to Hong Kong AT and I did earlier in the year.

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We finally landed at Kansi Airport, Osaka, and made our way to baggage claim. We grabbed our things, and noticed that JD was missing his bikes. We soon found out that his bikes made their way to South Korea instead. JD wouldn’t be able to get his bikes till later that evening, so we headed out to meet up with Katsu Sera of Fun Fancy Distributing. Katsu is the reason why we all made the long journey to ride in his festival called Jagaround. It was going to be a two-day festival, filled with live music, dirt jumping, dual slalom, and downhill. But before we would head into the mountains, we would hang around Osaka for a few days to check out the local riding scene. We loaded up the van and made our way into the heart of Osaka to our hotel. Since we got in late, we thought we would just do the normal tourist thing, and explored around, before heading to bed. Before we knew it, we were at a TV station and AT and JD was on a live sports television doing interviews. After the TV show we grabbed some dinner and headed for bed.

Andrew Taylor from Marin Bikes heads to Japan for the Jagaround Mountain Bike Festival.
   None of us had any idea that we were going to be on TV. We got off the airplane, dropped off our luggage and headed strait to the Television Station

Andrew Taylor from Marin Bikes heads to Japan for the Jagaround Mountain Bike Festival
  An everyday meal for us.

The next day we all woke up a little jet lagged, but we were more than pumped to check out the local riding spots. Since Katsu was busy, he had his friends Yuu Nakamura and Gucci (from Ringo Road Bike Shop) take us around. They grabbed us from the hotel, and we headed to their friend Matasawa’s shop to build our bikes. We started to assemble everything, and riders from the area started to show up. Everyone we met was more than hospitable, and presented gifts to the riders. Once we were done, we loaded up the vans, and headed into the mountains for some DH laps. The truck dropped us off, and we had a short hike to the trailhead. There were a lot of brushes and branches on the ground, because the island had been hit by a big typhoon the week prior. We made our way down the hill, cranking out a quick shoot, as we were supposed to head to another location to go dirt jumping.

Andrew Taylor from Marin Bikes heads to Japan for the Jagaround Mountain Bike Festival.

When we were done, we headed back to Matasawa’s place to pick up the hard tails, and we were off back into the hills. On our way, we drove by a monkey sanctuary. Those monkeys didn’t move for anyone! As we drove through, they would just hang out on the side of the road, minding their own business. We made it to the dirt jumps, and also cranked out a quick session, as the light was starting to fade quickly. Japan was already blowing us away with what the island had to offer thus far into the trip. After it got dark, there was no better way than to enjoy some delicious sushi.

Andrew Taylor from Marin Bikes heads to Japan for the Jagaround Mountain Bike Festival.
Andrew Taylor from Marin Bikes heads to Japan for the Jagaround Mountain Bike Festival.

The next morning, we had a slow start to the day. The rainy skies prevented us from going riding, so we met up with our buddy Go Sekiguchi, who would take us around Osaka. First, we headed to Ringo Road to check out the bike shop, then we headed into the mountains to check out a famous Japanese temple. We all had a pretty relaxed day, and evening, before heading into the mountains.

Andrew Taylor from Marin Bikes heads to Japan for the Jagaround Mountain Bike Festival
  The Myth, The Man, The Legend, Mr. Gary Fisher. AT and Gary talked for quit awhile as JD and I roamed the bike shop. They were catching up on things.

Andrew Taylor from Marin Bikes heads to Japan for the Jagaround Mountain Bike Festival
  Yuu Nakamura from Ringo Road bike shop and AT checking out the Decline issue when AT went to the Philippines for a Adiridas trip.

Andrew Taylor from Marin Bikes heads to Japan for the Jagaround Mountain Bike Festival.
  Staying Steezy

Andrew Taylor from Marin Bikes heads to Japan for the Jagaround Mountain Bike Festival
  AT fit right in with the locals after one day.

Andrew Taylor from Marin Bikes heads to Japan for the Jagaround Mountain Bike Festival.
Andrew Taylor from Marin Bikes heads to Japan for the Jagaround Mountain Bike Festival.
Andrew Taylor from Marin Bikes heads to Japan for the Jagaround Mountain Bike Festival

The next day, we woke up early, and made our 4-hour drive to Fukui Izumi. When we finally got to the mountain we were blown away. When we showed up, the trail builders, Mr. Yuu and Hamaya had dirt jumps and a dual slalom track ready to go. They told us that it only took them a few short days to crank everything out. Hamaya was an artist in the tractor, and made everything as requested. Since we showed up a day early, we decided to head up the mountain to start shooting, and scope out the mountain before the festival was to kick off. What the mountain had to offer was less than boring. It was fast, had big snowboard like jumps, and everything flowed pretty well. As the sun started to fall, we headed back to our traditional style hotel.

Andrew Taylor from Marin Bikes heads to Japan for the Jagaround Mountain Bike Festival
  JD getting his chi on at the truck stop on the way to Fukui Izumi.

Andrew Taylor from Marin Bikes heads to Japan for the Jagaround Mountain Bike Festival.
  We definitely utilized our Tetris skills when packing up the car. I think we got everything in

Andrew Taylor from Marin Bikes heads to Japan for the Jagaround Mountain Bike Festival.
Andrew Taylor from Marin Bikes heads to Japan for the Jagaround Mountain Bike Festival
  The men behind the awesome trails at Fukui Izumi, Hamaya and Mr. Yuu. Mr. Yuu is a god behind an excavator. JD wanted to pack him in his suit case to bring back home.

Andrew Taylor from Marin Bikes heads to Japan for the Jagaround Mountain Bike Festival
  Checking out all the potential zones before pulling out the bikes the next day.

Andrew Taylor from Marin Bikes heads to Japan for the Jagaround Mountain Bike Festival
Andrew Taylor from Marin Bikes heads to Japan for the Jagaround Mountain Bike Festival.

It was the first day of Jagaround, so we made an early start to the mountain. When we rolled up to the parking lot, it was packed with tents and cars. Riders from all over Japan started coming in - late at night, and many more throughout the day. As soon as we pulled up to the mountain and got out of the van, AT and JD were greeted by everyone as if they were movie stars. Most have only seen AT and JD from movies and Internet and were more than stoked to meet the riders in person. Since the day was starting to get going, we ran into some of our buddies from Osaka, and decided to head up the hill to get some riding in.

Andrew Taylor from Marin Bikes heads to Japan for the Jagaround Mountain Bike Festival.
  The view outside our hotel. It was an awesome site to wake up to every morning.

Andrew Taylor from Marin Bikes heads to Japan for the Jagaround Mountain Bike Festival
Andrew Taylor from Marin Bikes heads to Japan for the Jagaround Mountain Bike Festival.
Andrew Taylor from Marin Bikes heads to Japan for the Jagaround Mountain Bike Festival.
Andrew Taylor from Marin Bikes heads to Japan for the Jagaround Mountain Bike Festival.
Andrew Taylor from Marin Bikes heads to Japan for the Jagaround Mountain Bike Festival.
Andrew Taylor from Marin Bikes heads to Japan for the Jagaround Mountain Bike Festival.
Andrew Taylor from Marin Bikes heads to Japan for the Jagaround Mountain Bike Festival
  Red Bull World flatland Champion athlete Matthias Dandois was also a special guest that stopped by Jagaround.

Andrew Taylor from Marin Bikes heads to Japan for the Jagaround Mountain Bike Festival.
  Matthias made some mouths dropped as he showed off his talent. He was a little ridiculous

After a few hours of cruising around, it was time to get the show on the road. AT, JD, and Woman’s World Cup rider Mio Suemasa, hiked to the top of the hill, and hit the 20-plus-foot snowboard style jump for the opening ceremony. As the riders were introduced, they all hit the jump with style, with AT flipping and JD throwing a massive whip.

Andrew Taylor from Marin Bikes heads to Japan for the Jagaround Mountain Bike Festival.
Andrew Taylor from Marin Bikes heads to Japan for the Jagaround Mountain Bike Festival.
Andrew Taylor from Marin Bikes heads to Japan for the Jagaround Mountain Bike Festival.
  JD always got the crowed going with his whips.

Andrew Taylor from Marin Bikes heads to Japan for the Jagaround Mountain Bike Festival
  Japan, BBQ, friends, and bikes. What more could you ask for?

The first competition of the event would be Slalom. It was quite unique, since it was open class. You could be 25-years-old in the gate with a 12-year-old kid next to you. On top of that, you had to play rock, paper, scissors for gate pick, since you only had one run to advance. The talent pool was more than impressive, and gave JD a run for his money. In the end, JD took home the win, and had to gear up for DH the next day.

Andrew Taylor from Marin Bikes heads to Japan for the Jagaround Mountain Bike Festival.
Andrew Taylor from Marin Bikes heads to Japan for the Jagaround Mountain Bike Festival.
  There was over a 150 riders at Jagaround. It was an impressive site to see compared to home. Riders from all over Japan knew that it was the place to be that weekend.

Andrew Taylor from Marin Bikes heads to Japan for the Jagaround Mountain Bike Festival.
  Japanese style dual slalom was awesome to see. It was all open class and you would have to Roshambo for your gate. It was a one run and done race run and winner would advance.

Andrew Taylor from Marin Bikes heads to Japan for the Jagaround Mountain Bike Festival.
Andrew Taylor from Marin Bikes heads to Japan for the Jagaround Mountain Bike Festival.
  Our buddy Yuu Nakamura battling another Japanese rider.

Andrew Taylor from Marin Bikes heads to Japan for the Jagaround Mountain Bike Festival.
   Japanese female Wold Cup athlete Mio Suemasa left most of the male athletes in the dust.

Andrew Taylor from Marin Bikes heads to Japan for the Jagaround Mountain Bike Festival.

After dual was over, AT put on a small demo for all the riders. With a small group of freeriders in attendance, it was impressive to see what talent Japan had to offer. AT, JD, Go, and many more, hit the jump over and over, until the sunset.

Andrew Taylor from Marin Bikes heads to Japan for the Jagaround Mountain Bike Festival
  It's always worth waiting for Golden Light.

Andrew Taylor from Marin Bikes heads to Japan for the Jagaround Mountain Bike Festival.
Andrew Taylor from Marin Bikes heads to Japan for the Jagaround Mountain Bike Festival

After the Jump Demo, we all headed over to the dirt jumps that we had built earlier in the week to get the jam started. By this time, it was dark, and they had the whole thing lit up with lights. There were kids of all ages jumping and having a good time. It was cool to see kids push their limits. At the end of the jam, AT got to pick out the top riders for awards, and hand out prizes. The top prize went to a 10-year-old boy who wasn’t scared to send it on his cruiser.

Andrew Taylor from Marin Bikes heads to Japan for the Jagaround Mountain Bike Festival
Andrew Taylor from Marin Bikes heads to Japan for the Jagaround Mountain Bike Festival
Andrew Taylor from Marin Bikes heads to Japan for the Jagaround Mountain Bike Festival

Once awards were done, the night was still not over. Katsu was taking us to a campsite where he was throwing a party for everyone. Since we were in the countryside, we had no idea what to expect. When we arrived, we were once again blown away. There were food vendors everywhere, a stage, and DJ’s to play till 5am. We knew it was going to be a long night, and enjoyed the evening with all our new friends.

Andrew Taylor from Marin Bikes heads to Japan for the Jagaround Mountain Bike Festival.
Andrew Taylor from Marin Bikes heads to Japan for the Jagaround Mountain Bike Festival
  Unfortunately AT & I didn't get the memo to bring a sleeping bag. We froze our butts off and made due with what we had.

Monday morning came quick, and it was the final day of the event. It was our last full day in Japan. While JD took part in the DH race, AT and I used the day to ride and shoot other spots on the mountain that we weren’t able to earlier in the week. Our last day was more than awesome, with JD taking the win in DH race, and AT and I nailing some awesome shots.

Andrew Taylor from Marin Bikes heads to Japan for the Jagaround Mountain Bike Festival.
Andrew Taylor from Marin Bikes heads to Japan for the Jagaround Mountain Bike Festival
Andrew Taylor from Marin Bikes heads to Japan for the Jagaround Mountain Bike Festival.
Andrew Taylor from Marin Bikes heads to Japan for the Jagaround Mountain Bike Festival.
Andrew Taylor from Marin Bikes heads to Japan for the Jagaround Mountain Bike Festival.
Andrew Taylor from Marin Bikes heads to Japan for the Jagaround Mountain Bike Festival.
Andrew Taylor from Marin Bikes heads to Japan for the Jagaround Mountain Bike Festival
  You don't see a SHOWA DH fork everyday.These forks felt amazing.

We said our goodbyes to our new Japanese friends, and headed to another town, as we had something special lined up for us. It was our last night, and our friend Hamaya (the man behind all the great trails on the mountain) invited us to his Japanese famous restaurant for an amazing last dinner. It was a bed-and-breakfast style place. We ate some of the best food I have ever eaten, had some drinks, and went upstairs to our beds, before leaving for the airport the next day.

Andrew Taylor from Marin Bikes heads to Japan for the Jagaround Mountain Bike Festival
  Getting the full Japanese hospitality. Thank you Hamaya for the amazing food.

The following morning we woke up early to head back to Osaka. Since we had some extra time, we spent our final hours shopping for souvenirs, and visiting Fun Fancy Distributing. It was my second time to Japan, and it was a completely different experience. One thing I took away from the trip was how nice and caring everyone is.

Andrew Taylor from Marin Bikes heads to Japan for the Jagaround Mountain Bike Festival
Andrew Taylor from Marin Bikes heads to Japan for the Jagaround Mountain Bike Festival
Andrew Taylor from Marin Bikes heads to Japan for the Jagaround Mountain Bike Festival

People always went out of their way to make sure we were taken care of, and they took hospitality to a whole new level. And when I say the people of Japan really went out of their way to take care of us, it showed when they didn’t just drop us off outside the airport. They made sure to walk us in, get checked in, and took us to a final sushi meal in the airport. This trip was an experience of a lifetime, and AT, JD, and I walked away with great memories, life-long friends, and an itch to come back again next year. Special Thanks to Katsu & Donkey from Fun Fancy, Marin, our Japanese friends, and the crew, for making this trip happen. See you next year.

Andrew Taylor from Marin Bikes heads to Japan for the Jagaround Mountain Bike Festival
  Kampai

70 Comments

  • + 16
 Having experienced showa forks on my motorbikes id say they need to jump on the band wagon quick smart! they have the technology and great quality and could easily compete with the top manufactures on the market! ....... thats if they are not already making kit for other companies already.
  • + 4
 took the words out of my mouth. i also like how it looks like a scaled down version of the moto fork. makes me miss my crf...
  • + 3
 They actually have a full DH line here in Japan! Unfortunately they're not so popular nor as easy to buy as your everyday brand. Kowa also make some super nice DH and Single crown forks too!
  • + 1
 I bet they're a fair bit cheaper than our top branded forks as well.
Do you know a website that sells them?
  • + 9
 Im not sure where you can purchase them but here is the Japanese web site.

www.kowa-ss.co.jp/mtb.html


Amongst my mates the single crown fork that is adjustable from 180 down to 100 is very popular.
and you know Kowa is the inventor of the Kashima coating so all their forks are super silk smooth!
  • + 2
 i've travelled a lot, but oh do i miss japan. Thank you again Niko for the bike and the three days ride! one of the greatest memory of this trip!
  • + 2
 No problem my friend Gabu! We still talk about when you and Busman were here all the time. If ever back this way there is tons of new trials and steep lines! RideOn buddy!
  • + 1
 a single crown that adjusts from 180 down to 100mm? the scott voltage boys would wet themselves at that! they are always wanting uber adjustability.

me on the other hand on my voltage would really love some of the showa dh forks! they look freaking awesome.

id like to add that i really enjoyed this article and love the fact that real friendships across countries have developed so well through a singular interest.

so when are you all coming to sunny england? lol
  • + 2
 Thank you mate the 180 single crown fork is super plush and adjust really easy. The fork slides right down to 100 or any where in between at the turn of a lever. Its an air fork so its really easy to set up. You have to call Tyler and tell him to stop on over in your neck of the woods, ahahahhah rideOn!
  • + 1
 Check out the kowa forks. Even their dh fork is adjustable from 200mm of travel down to 0mm and anything inbetween with a little adjuster on the top.
  • + 3
 Yes, both the DH fork and the single crown work on the same system.

I have been on the single crown many times and its super smooth.
Its unreal how the travel is so easy to move and then stop at any length.

The only down fall is sometimes if you're riding hard at a lower setting a little air gets moved and the fork lengthens very slightly but not much.
Then its really easy to just move it back down if so.


www.kowa-ss.co.jp/mtb.html
  • + 1
 nikoniko, does Showa still make that inverted dh fork? are they hard to find over there?
  • + 1
 Im sorry game, I use to see Showa forks a lot but not recently, so I dont know if showa forks are still making MTB forks. However as for Kowa forks they are still being made. Kowa is the company that coats all Fox forks with their Kashima coating!
[Reply]
  • + 4
 I had no idea there was such a good scene in Japan and it's awesome to see AT and JD having fun riding bikes with people who don't even speak his language. Mountain biking is it's own language and it speaks for itself! It's cool to see that mountain biking isn't just a European and North American thing and that people everywhere love this sport as much as we do!

My favorite photo is the dude bumming about in the domino's pizza t-shirt. No matter where yo go some things don't change... Wink I'd like to see more of this stuff!
  • + 1
 Yeah there are too many mountains for there not to be a scene. Lived and rode there for a while. The riding and riders are pretty epic and has been for quite some time.
  • + 1
 Japans bike parks look better than any of the Australian ones I have been too! There is too much BS politics behinds bike parks in Aus. They would rather everyone fly international and spend their money outside Australia. Good one wankers, just keep building those XC tracks non stop and then ruin our hidden DH trails
[Reply]
  • + 1
 http://alutech-cycles.com/Kowa-GF-UpSideDown-Federgabela href="http://alutech-cycles.com/Kowa-GF-UpSideDown-Federgabel">Kowa GF/a>

some info bout the upside down fork, unfortunately in german, alutech is the german distributor for kowa.


On the Kowa Website it says 231,000 YEN, which is pretty darn expencive. but they also have cheaper forks!

Great pictures
  • + 1
 wow link f*ck up, sorry Razz

__________________________________________________________________

a href="http://alutech-cycles.com/Kowa-GF-UpSideDown-Federgabel">Kowa GF/a>

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
[Reply]
  • + 1
 The scene in J Pan is finally starting to grow. They have the mountain and the willing rider core, but land owner, local town officials and ski resort management are real hesitant to build trails and let the riders put there input in to let the sport grow. Pretty much Japanese politics and 50 years behind the times. The three years I was there were amazing though. Beautiful mountains and great people. Now the old school politics need to let the riders do what the do and furthermore put Japan on the map!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Thankyou for the awesome story and pictures. I love Japan and its culture and the next time im there maybe I will get a chance to see the monkey sanctuary. I got some good vibes from reading that story. Once they get past those land issues I think the sport is really gonna take off! Yes those Showa forks look rad! BANZAI!!!!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Sick trip. Gotta say tho eat lots of spirulina, dulce, kelp, chlorella, and other seaweeds, ginko biloba, ginger, garlic, tumeric, pomegranate, lots of dark leafy greens like kale, and a highly probiotic diet with mostly raw food if you are in or have recently gone to japan. that place is still dumping radioactivity and is getting worse (this goes out to all those west coast rippers too) especially norcal up to bc coast. not trying to kill the rad vibe from this trip but there are loads of people being mislead on the truth about the status over there and the ocean just trying to show some love to the shredders! hit me up if anyones wants some advice on how to use food to get stronger faster and more energized in life and on the trail. peace
[Reply]
  • + 4
 Cool seeing the ride scene in other countries. We all just love dirt! Cool photos
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I am a member of one of the MTB rider from Osaka.
Can you please take off the picture with a name of the mountain ASAP!!!
Japan is a such a small place and most of the courses are made by the local riders which they want to keep trails secret.
If we disclose, f*ckin' MTBer will ruin them all! Many trails are already f*cked up!
Most of us never shovel but ride through the nature as is!
The shop is run the course we've made for his barker and his f*ckin business only.
We are calling them "IITOKODORI!!"

I believe that you are an awesome and the true rider, probably have some your own hidden trails, so you could understand us where we are coming from?!

Will be awesome to have you visit here in Osaka! Hope to bump into you next year perhaps! Well I can't speak much english though...

On behalf of your fans
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Hmmmm. 61 comments to this point, and not one 'below threshold' thread. Tribute to a fun story and destination 'westerners' are amped to visit. Lived in Japan (Saitama, graduated from CAJ in '83 for those who care to know) for 7 years... too bad it was before the mtb existed... But oh to rail Japanese roads again on my RD 400...
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I am a member of one of the MTB rider from Osaka.
Can you please take off the picture with a name of the mountain ASAP!!!
Japan is a such a small place and most of the courses are made by the local riders which they want to keep trails secret.
If we disclose, f*ckin' MTBer will ruin them all! Many trails are already f*cked up!
Most of us never shovel but ride through the nature as is!
The shop is run the course we've made for his barker and his f*ckin business only.
We are calling them "IITOKODORI!!"

I believe that you are an awesome and the true rider, probably have some your own hidden trails, so you could understand us where we are coming from?!

Will be awesome to have you visit here in Osaka! Hope to bump into you next year perhaps! Well I can't speak much english though...

On behalf of your fans
  • + 2
 Hiding tracks is not the solution…
Many mountains around but not many riders… only angry hikers…
We all share the same passion, it’s not in this way that our sport will grow.

We shred local trails (Osaka / Kobe) every weekend, if you join sometime, you r welcome Wink
  • + 1
 Thank you for your quick response!!
[Reply]
  • + 2
 If any riders are heading to Japan or are already there and want to ride in Hokkaido, check out www.nisekocycles.com The team there are trying to push the scene!
[Reply]
  • + 3
 Very nice pictures! Hope to see more of this in the futureWink Keep on Pedaling!
[Reply]
  • + 3
 it took me awhile to get to the bottom of the page
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Write ups like this are excellent- love to see the world cultures and getting a new perspective on the MTN bike world out side of US. Keep these going!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 JD seems like one of those people you wanna be friends with in life, always outgoing and trying to make people laugh. Looks like everyone had a blast.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 oh man, Japan is my dream...I want to go to Niseko on winter, the powder there is just sick. But trip like this from Ukraine will cost near $4000 for 2 weeks =(
[Reply]
  • + 2
 God Japan is so beautiful, I would love to ride there!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 the Kowa forks cost $231,000 yen so $2987 canadian! not really in my price range :'(
  • + 2
 In europe it costs about €1850

The fox 40 is €1800 so it's actually pretty interesting pricing!!

Still isn't cheap tho
[Reply]
  • + 1
 They only MTB "event" in Osaka and nobody told us..... Thank you local "riders"
  • + 1
 Hi Dude, Yeah, cannot believe too that nobody from Ringo Road told us about such great event in Japan...
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Ive been to Japan 7 times for snowboarding- would love to do a bike trip! Anymore DH races this year?
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Excellent photo journal; If the weather holds I'll be at Izumi this weekend!
  • + 1
 Bugger; it's going to pour down!
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Showa forks, looking interesting - any info?
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Andrew Taylor and JD Swanguen?
it's so maniac, awsome
[Reply]
  • + 1
 As if i already didn't want to go to Japan a ridiculous amount! Great write up, looked like a good time.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Going back to live in Japan next month - can't wait!
  • + 1
 I'm off to Fukuoka on Kyushu.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 as they would say in essex! WELGEL!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 i didn't know that japan had such a big mountain bike scene
[Reply]
  • + 1
 colorful trip. Excellent.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Why do people turn their boxxer leg round?
  • - 1
 i think it's to keep bushing wear on the stanchions even.
  • + 3
 They're both sponsord by X-Fusion so it's to hide the fact that their forks are built by another suspension manufacturer.
  • + 1
 yeh man, seen a good few people riding with the leg turned round. Thought it would have been something to do with advertising.
  • + 1
 keeping bushing wear even? lol
m47 has it right
[Reply]
  • + 1
 im guesiin jd is back on tld?
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Nihon o hisashiburi!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 i wanna go skiing there
[Reply]
  • + 1
 good choice of music
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Many POD material...
[Reply]
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