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R-M-R AJBarlas's article
Oct 26, 2017 at 23:48
Oct 26, 2017
Ridden and Rated: Six Flat Pedals
The Brooklyn Machine Works Shinburger will never be surpassed. http://blog-imgs-19.fc2.com/b/m/a/bmaniac/IMG_3393.jpg
R-M-R AJBarlas's article
Oct 26, 2017 at 23:45
Oct 26, 2017
Ridden and Rated: Six Flat Pedals
They did. And they're great. http://www.gamutusa.com/podium-pedals/
R-M-R vernonfelton's article
Oct 7, 2017 at 1:02
Oct 7, 2017
Have Your Say on the Ever-Changing Bike Standards
I would propose: 1: Maximum of three sets of standards for disc hubs, BBs, etc., being road, dirt, and fat. There will be crossover, with XC racing bikes using road parts and road tandems using dirt parts, but let's keep it to three. And let's try to skip ahead a generation, while we're at it. 2. Hubs or axles that can handle torque, such as the SRAM Torque Cap or Manitou's Hex Lock. 3. Offset frames and forks for better symmetry of spoke bracing angles. Offset them by the width allocated to the rotor. 4. Simplify disc caliper spacers by using only "+10 mm", "+20 mm", etc. 5. Freebodies that make use of the space inside cassettes, such as the Kappius design. Perhaps a road standard that would accept a minimum 25 T sprocket (does anyone still use an 11-23 cassette?) and a dirt standard that would have a minimum 40 T. 6. Integrated dropper posts. Something along the lines of the Eightpins and KS Genesys designs is the way forward, but will only be adopted if we can agree on a diameter and mounting standard. I'll take a guess at some standards we could live with for several years. They're burlier than the current norms and seem like overkill, but things always go that direction, so let's extrapolate beyond current needs: Front hub: - Road: 110 x 15 mm (current Boost). - Dirt: 120 x 25 mm. It's conceivable this could be spaced down to the road/XC race standard with end caps. - Fat: I don't know what you people need. Maybe 180 mm x 25 mm? Rear hub: - Road: 142 x 12 mm with maximum flange spacing. - Dirt: 157 x 15 mm. Super Boost with a slightly larger axle. Or maybe wider, if we decide to put the outermost bearing on the drive side outboard of the cassette. - Fat: How about 180 x 25 again to keep things simple? BB: Pressed-in bearings can work, but threaded systems have been a lot easier to live with, are easier to manufacture, and frame designers can still maximize pivot spacing. Chainline: Centre it on the cassette. Current chainlines are offset to the outside for added tire clearnace, which is why we can’t backpedal in the largest sprocket. With offset frames, we can maintain tire clearance and improve chainline.
R-M-R mikelevy's article
Oct 4, 2017 at 21:11
Oct 4, 2017
Pivot's New Carbon and Alloy Enduro Bikes - First Look
@TheRaven: Cheers on the civil discussion! My take is that SLX is below GX-12 on only two counts: the shifter and the cassette range. The shifter is crude and the range isn't on par with GX-12. I would put an XT group with SLX cranks on par with GX - and I'd run a tiny ring to compensate for the reduced range. "Value" is difficult to quantify. If you want the best component spec for your money, there are some direct sale, catalog frames that offer outstanding specs at reasonable prices. I would argue the aluminum Pivot or Santa Cruz frames being discussed are much nicer, though, and I'd rather have a posh frame with budget parts than vice versa. If a person can find a cheap bike with great geometry, though, that's the best of both worlds! Whyte and Bird are particularly good examples, in my opinion.
R-M-R mikelevy's article
Oct 4, 2017 at 20:55
Oct 4, 2017
Pivot's New Carbon and Alloy Enduro Bikes - First Look
Personally, I favour the 54 mm jump in normalized reach (factoring in the effect of stack) between sizes, as I feel most product lines don't cover enough range on the long end, but yeah, whether you like long or short bikes, the unevenness of these sizes is unusual.
R-M-R mikelevy's article
Sep 13, 2017 at 22:21
Sep 13, 2017
Cane Creek Helm Fork - Review
@coregrind: I also find the recommended pressure too high. The problem could be due to the travel setting: note how the recommended pressures on the chart decrease with increasing travel. If your Ribbon is set up for 170 mm, I recommend going down another pressure increment, compared to the other travel recommendations. This works out to about 13% lower than the pressures recommended for 150 mm travel.
R-M-R RichardCunningham's article
Aug 4, 2017 at 19:17
Aug 4, 2017
Mathias Fluckinger's Prototype Radon - Mont-Sainte-Anne XC World Cup 2017
I would guess the extra power of the Trail brakes allows him to use a smaller rotor size, which saves more weight - unsprung, at that - than is gained by the Trail levers. Or maybe he's committed to the lighter 160 mm rotors and this just provides a little more power.
R-M-R mikelevy's article
Aug 3, 2017 at 13:10
Aug 3, 2017
Kali Interceptor Helmet - Review
@tibetaneskimo: Agreed. There are a few expensive helmets that are heavy, offer little to no additional safety measures, and don't even provide superior air flow. Kali helmets may or may not be superior, but at least they're trying. One of the few companies to be introducing new thinking and new materials - and probably the most actively in this regard. Great crash replacement policy, too. There are very few helmets that justify a price over $100, but I feel this one does.
R-M-R vernonfelton's article
Jul 28, 2017 at 13:59
Jul 28, 2017
Too Long? Too Slack? Not Enough? – Pinkbike Poll
@WAKIdesigns: That's assuming 175 mm is uncompromised and correct. Maybe it's already too long and 170 mm is just correcting this long-standing error. Or maybe 170 mm (or shorter) is less detrimental than a 5 mm lower BB is beneficial. How often does everyone here spin out their biggest gear ratio? Most people I talk to rarely use it, let alone spin out, yet we all occasionally wish for lower gears. I've become a fan of shorter cranks, super low gear ratios, and a lower than average BB. Even if you think things have gone too far, the only way to find the optimum design is to go too far, then dial it back a little. I'm thankful for the experimentation.
R-M-R vernonfelton's article
Jul 28, 2017 at 13:53
Jul 28, 2017
DVO Topaz T3 Air Shock - Review
The Topaz is a great example of a product that sticks to the fundamentals and executes it properly. A higher performance may be possible with twin-tube dampers, separate circuits for every mode, variable spring and damper volumes, etc., but these designs haven't delivered. A generous negative spring, sensible positive spring compression ratio, straightforward damper and LSC adjustment, durable volume compensator, tight tolerances, and good customer service: that's all you really need.
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