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R-M-R seb-stott's article
May 19, 2022 at 13:15
4 hours
First Look: Commencal Unveils Prototype Enduro Bike With An Unusual Four-Bar Suspension Design
@SpeedgoatDesigns: Chris, have you been involved with the Commencal project?
R-M-R seb-stott's article
May 17, 2022 at 14:01
2 days
Nerding Out: Why a Lower Shock Position Doesn't Make a Bike More Stable
@grotesquesque: Then you can keep chugging from bottles while I enjoy aluminum-infused Future Juice.
R-M-R seb-stott's article
May 17, 2022 at 13:04
2 days
Nerding Out: Why a Lower Shock Position Doesn't Make a Bike More Stable
@hamncheez: True, but that was standard for early 29ers.
R-M-R seb-stott's article
May 17, 2022 at 12:47
2 days
Nerding Out: Why a Lower Shock Position Doesn't Make a Bike More Stable
@o1inc: I am! The Cannondale project and Buell are full of both good and questionable ideas, combined with a healthy dose of dodgy execution. I'm glad they both existed (well, sort of existed, in Cannondale's case), and even more glad I don't own either.
R-M-R seb-stott's article
May 17, 2022 at 12:42
2 days
Nerding Out: Why a Lower Shock Position Doesn't Make a Bike More Stable
@hamncheez: It's recycling at its finest, and, as the [L=https://www.pinkbike.com/news/the-super-wheel-claims-to-offer-power-assistance-without-a-motor-and-were-very-skeptical.html]Super Wheel[/L] showed us, plenty of people are open to perpetual motion machines.
R-M-R seb-stott's article
May 17, 2022 at 12:27
2 days
Nerding Out: Why a Lower Shock Position Doesn't Make a Bike More Stable
@hamncheez: Either that or you were too exhausted to support yourself after having to actually pedal ;)
R-M-R seb-stott's article
May 17, 2022 at 12:25
2 days
Nerding Out: Why a Lower Shock Position Doesn't Make a Bike More Stable
@hamncheez: No, I'm old-school ... or maybe just old ... or maybe just cheap. If road wheels can be wider and more aero, and if Ribble can increase the frontal area of their handlebars in the name of aero benefits, surely we can market the ⌀3.5" bottles as being more aero. Turbulent boundary layers, vortex shedding, stall angles, trip surfaces, systems integration, CFD simulations of static riders ... fire up your 3D printer and I'll cut up some scraps of paper with buzzwords we can pull out of a hat - we're going to be rich.
R-M-R seb-stott's article
May 17, 2022 at 12:10
2 days
Nerding Out: Why a Lower Shock Position Doesn't Make a Bike More Stable
@Compositepro: [I]... making swoopy fancy shit is not the goal ... [/I] Are you new here? :P
R-M-R seb-stott's article
May 17, 2022 at 12:03
2 days
Nerding Out: Why a Lower Shock Position Doesn't Make a Bike More Stable
@hamncheez: Stumpjumper Evo: I've been wanting to fill the frame with water for years. Cannondale did it with their motocross project (fuel, not water, and yes, I know they weren't the first to store fuel in the frame), but weren't quite crazy enough to try it with bike frames! Weak cages: Yeah, but that's easily fixed with better cages or, in many cases, just a strap (credit to [L=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gxw6L0QmPF4]Seth's Bike Hacks[/L]). As I've mentioned before, I like the ⌀3.5" bottle standard (ex. Nalgene) because it carries so much more volume for a given length, and length is usually the most difficult constraint on bikes. A few tweaks to existing designs and we could carry more water, lower - not that the centre of mass location will make a big difference, but if the option exists to carry it low, we might as well.
R-M-R seb-stott's article
May 17, 2022 at 11:47
2 days
Nerding Out: Why a Lower Shock Position Doesn't Make a Bike More Stable
@hamncheez: Yep, I agree with those statements. Still, there [I]are[/I] elements of stability to be gained from a high ride height. The bike doesn't require as sharp a turn to correct from an unintended lateral deflection, and it makes comparatively long, sweeping turns because of the greater lateral displacement when between the line of contact and the centre of mass when turning. On the other hand, it takes more time to correct wobbles, which allows more time for things to go wrong before you can correct, and it feels like you're in a state of constantly making corrections - like how it's difficult for a performer on stilts to ever stand completely still. So, the next question would be how these things work in the context of mountain bikes. A wheelbase can be only so long before the bike handles poorly on typical trails and at typical speeds. In this context - and especially when considering fore-aft pitch stability - I favour the lowest practical BB height, frame centre of mass, and rider centre of mass. The problem of roll axis instability vs. steered yaw rate isn't a limiting factor on mountain bikes, so we're within the region of "lower is better".
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