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Will-narayan mikelevy's article
Jan 8, 2019 at 17:17
Jan 8, 2019
Review: Unno's Dash is Ultra-Exotic, Ultra-Efficient, & Ultra-Expensive
@Ktron: Well, I don’t want this to sound harsh, I don’t know how to say it properly (and it's 2AM), I agree with your last message as much as I find it hypocritical (maybe that’s not the right word). I mean, by saying this « market reflect humans », you sort of « cloud the issue », as if the market was a metaphysical entity of its own, though it’s also intrinsically true, as humans « create » the market. So we create it, but we don’t have control on it (Frankenstein obviously comes to mind). But I mean, when you see that there are taxes on everything but that a taxe on stock exchange transactions has been turned down for years (which could finance green technologies for instance), and that at the same time many farmers in Europe would go bankrupt without the CAP (common agricultural policy), everything is upside down. And it’s the same when you say this : « much of what you're saying has seen the mass market become a rapacious beast I'd argue results from technology improvements which enabled massive increases in efficiency and productive capacity. Eg. Fossil fuels » Yes technology/efficiency allowed us to use fossile fuels, then our use of it went out of control. Still I think the crisis ahead is different, it’s not like a war, a revolution, or anything ever before, it will be global. Fossile fuels have been there for millions of years, and in a mere 2 centuries (during which world population has been multiplied by 7) we’re gonna burn it all, with irreversible consequences on the whole planet. Humanity is a teen who grabs the food in the fridge but who isn’t mature enough to realize it’s not gonna fill itself up. It is a one off in the history of the planet that started 4,5 billion years ago I think, just because we always want more, moar, MOAAAR, maybe as a remnant of when we were hunter-gatherer. Well there probably was 80% of farmers in the 19th century, down to what, 10% now ? There may be 80-90% of farmers again at the end of the century (in developed countries I mean). I don’t know, maybe what annoys me is that nothing makes sense :p .
Will-narayan mikelevy's article
Jan 8, 2019 at 11:23
Jan 8, 2019
Review: Unno's Dash is Ultra-Exotic, Ultra-Efficient, & Ultra-Expensive
@Ktron: Yeah english isn't my mother tongue so I may have some weird sentences sometimes. Short post, I got to move : "There has always been cheaper labour and technology fundamental to the productive capacity of an economy and if you alter this at any point in time it would have the same effect. So what's your drama? The liveable wage? Something else?" I'd reformulate by saying there has always been people taking advantage of the weaker ones to amass useless amount of wealth. And there has always been wars. And civilisation collapsing. My drama is that the market should adapt to humans, life and environment, not the other way around. "The fallacy that economic growth is dependent on ever increasing and unsustainable resource consumption and population growth is common, pervasive and I don't think trivial or theoretical at all." Well that's like, your opinion man (just quoting the dude^^), but I could say the same of your opinion. Or at least, that the part of economic growth attributed to technology/efficiency is only a small part compared to the part attributed to resource consumption/population growth. "Global survival depends on our ability to reduce our demands on natural resources and contain population growth, but that doesn't mean we have to pull the handbrake on technology/economic development." Sure, but I wouldn't be surprised if many techno/economic development wouldn't even be considered without fossile fuels and cheap labour. Cuz' the bigger the development costs of a product, the more you'll need to sell to have a return on investment, the more you need mass market... and cheap labour... and fossile fuels. I just hope I'm too pessimistic and future proves you right, until then but we're not gonna agree :). "I can certainly agree it would be higher than a low labour cost economy, obviously as if that weren't so that wouldn't be the current state of play. But I'd certainly argue it wouldn't be anything like the cost of Unno's frame if optimised for mass market consumption." Mmh, yeah I see your point but I don't know, I agree that you could optimize the process to lower the price (and the quality), but could you optimize enough for mass market ? As carbon takes some time to setup the carbon layers, human cost is huge on those frames.
Will-narayan paulaston's article
Jan 7, 2019 at 18:13
Jan 7, 2019
Sick Bicycles Partners with Legendary Fabricator Frank the Welder on New Long Travel 29er
@Gregorysmithj1: Well, this fad that already stretched your average bike reach for a few centimeters in a few years. Size L reach used to be about 42cm I think. Now it's more about what, 46cm ? Seat tube used to be about 73°, now it's more about 75° or more. It's more that after being only a rugged version of a road bike, mtb has fully emancipated itself from its road ancestor and adopts geometry numbers more suited for its inteded use. S!ck, Nicolai, Mondraker, Pole are on the extreme end of the spectrum, but the fad from a few years ago is now the norm.
Will-narayan mikelevy's article
Jan 7, 2019 at 18:02
Jan 7, 2019
Review: Unno's Dash is Ultra-Exotic, Ultra-Efficient, & Ultra-Expensive
@Ktron: « Bollocks, bollocks, bollocks. » Well I disagree. Of course labor is not the only cost, but it’s a major one, or else 90% of what we buy wouldn’t come from cheap labour countries. « trade facilitates the availability of products not otherwise available in your region » Sure, you’re not gonna grow bananas in greenland, but what is available locally should preferably be produced locally. Buying apples from 5000km away when you can get some locally is total nonsense. « Mass market exists irrespective of trade. » You’re playing on words, or I'm missing a nuance. Of course mass market still exists, you can sell massive amounts of peanuts if you will, but without fossile fuels and cheap labour, mass markets for manufactured goods would probably massively drop to the point where it wouldn’t really be massive anymore. You simply CAN’T sell massive amount of products when the customer’s income/cost of life is the same as yours and your employees. It more or less evens out. « Growth isn't dependent on either increased resource use or population growth. All you need for economic growth is an increase in efficiency. » Well, that’s the nice theory, but the reality probably isn’t as nice. Car engine for instance got more efficient overtime, but then we pack more stuff in cars, and we buy more cars, me live further from work, so the efficiency gains are void by the change of use. Same for planes (more efficient, so travel price drops, so people travel more, so more plane fly, and the efficiency is void), and a lot of things. « We already have an energy source which is plenty efficient and produces zero green house gas emissions. Nuclear. » Nuclear will only offset the unavoidable. Look at this page : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Energy_mix Total world energy consumption by source in 2013 : Fossil fuel : 78.4% Nuclear : 2.6% Renewable : 19% And this one : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electricity_generation Electricity generation in 2016 : Fossil fuels : 65.3% Nuclear fission : 10.4% Renewable : 24.3% « It's certainly far better than pinning all our hopes on "magical" advancements in renewable energy and energy storage within the limited time frames you describe. » According to the number posted above, not so sure. If all countries start to massively use nuclear to compensate a drop of fossile fuels, there quickly won’t be much nuclear materials anymore. Yup’, that’s scary.
Will-narayan mikelevy's article
Jan 7, 2019 at 16:07
Jan 7, 2019
Review: Unno's Dash is Ultra-Exotic, Ultra-Efficient, & Ultra-Expensive
@Ktron: Well I disagree. First I wouldn’t be surprised if trade in the past was possible only because of a massive use of slaves, which is the same as local cheap labour (just like Hitler’s highways and rearmament and whatnot was made possible through the use of disposable camp prisoners), but my history sucks so I’m not sure. « Not to mention the fact that Unno isn't attempting to be a locally made, mass market brand but is deliberately a low-volume, high cost boutique manufacturer. » This I agree with, but because I think there’s no in-between. You chose to be either a mass market brand and make the production oversea, or keep it local and advertise yourself as a high cost boutique manufacturer. You can’t be a mass market brand while keeping the production local. Maybe it worked in the 40’s-70’s period (and still, mass production figures back then probably looked nothing like nowaday’s figures) but not anymore, you can’t compete. In the past you’d buy a bike and it probably was an investment. You’d keep it for years, if not decades, and repair it cuz’ buying a new one was too expensive. « Saying fossil fuels enable transport whilst ignoring that they enable manufacturing in the first place is nonsense analysis. » But, the use of energy for production is the same whether your factory is local or oversea. The big variable IS the labour cost, and this variable ONLY exists thanks to cheap fuel. Mass market is only available thanks to fossile fuels virtually bringing the low labour countries at your door step. There’s no magic in the market, money doesn’t exist out of nothing, well yes, that’s how bank do it, buy signing loans with customers, but then the financing of these loans is made through activities and products, which imply the transformation of energy (mostly fossile fuels). Growth isn’t magic, it firstly is a growth of resources use, and a growth of population (which again mean a growth of resources use). Without fossile fuels, and even with sail boats, bringing your product to your country is gonna take weeks, or months, and during that time the guy producing locally is gonna be more competitive, he’s gonna take your market share, so you’ll stop producing oversea as well, and you’ll have to find people locally to do the work. But they’ll cost much more than the cheap labour, so even if they work well your product will be much more expensive, and you’ll sell a lot less, so mass production doesn’t exist anymore. Mass market, mass production, mass whatever you want, billionaires, cheap labour, cheap products, strawberries in the winter, etc. all of this is — not a mirage, cuz’ it exists — but a parenthesis of the last 2 centuries since man discovered the amazing amount of energy contained in coal, oil & gas, but from the beginning « we » acted as if it wasn’t tied to natural resources, as if it’d be there forever, but it may come to an end in the upcoming decades (some say we’ll feel the first effect as soon as 2030, or even 2020) unless we find a new super efficient energy source that doesn’t increases global warming. And I’ll add that I don’t find this fun at all, I'm not a "green hippie" for the fun of it, but cuz’ the end of dirt cheap energy may be REALLY tough on everyone.
Will-narayan mikelevy's article
Jan 7, 2019 at 13:34
Jan 7, 2019
Review: Unno's Dash is Ultra-Exotic, Ultra-Efficient, & Ultra-Expensive
@mtbikeaddict: Ha ! Yeah I guess you get the idea of what I meant by local : Same cost of life/average income. That same bike made in the US would probably cost about the same price, unless the difference of social welfare & taxes allows for a lower price.
Will-narayan mikelevy's article
Jan 7, 2019 at 6:34
Jan 7, 2019
Review: Unno's Dash is Ultra-Exotic, Ultra-Efficient, & Ultra-Expensive
@m1dg3t: Sure, but I was talking about labor and energy costs. I mean whatever product won’t cost the same whether it is crafted by your neighbor or some cheap labour oversea. Oversea products are made available only thanks to the massive amount of energy contained is fossile fuels, making oversea products cheaper than locally made products, despite the transport cost. China is 9000km away from where I am. If it was not for fossile fuels, it would takes 450 hours at 20km to bring a product to me. Even at 10$ an hour, carrying the product would raise its cost by 4500$. Sure you could pack several products together to bring the cost down, but without fossile fuels you’d rely on a human pedaling or an animal pulling a trailer, so you couldn’t pack much products on it until the dude/beast is exhausted to death. So without fossile fuels, the product that costs 1000$ to produce locally and only 100$ oversea would cost you 1100$ locally and 4600$ from oversea (the figures are totally fictitious but you get the idea). Then in the end the way you spend your money affects your area, I mean socially (unemployment rate, crime rate, industrial knowledge, etc). In that regards, Unno’s products are not expensive.
Will-narayan mikelevy's article
Jan 7, 2019 at 3:41
Jan 7, 2019
Review: Unno's Dash is Ultra-Exotic, Ultra-Efficient, & Ultra-Expensive
Is this one expensive ? Isn't it rather carbon bikes made oversea that are super cheap ? We've lost the true value of things in this global world (what is true value ? Maybe what you would ask for if you had done the job ?), I don't know how much profit Unno does on a frame/bike, but you may be looking at the REAL price of a carbon frame if you'd want your local area bike builder to make a decent living.
Will-narayan captyvatemedia's article
Dec 15, 2018 at 10:20
Dec 15, 2018
9 Bikes from Australia's 2018 Cannonball Festival
Also if you see a swastika sprayed on a wall in Europe, whether it's turning clockwise or counter-clockwise, it very very very likely is a nazi symbol. But if you're travelling in Asia (mostly) and stumble upon a temple covered with swastika, it is not. So it's not "that" clear, it depends on what it's associated with culturally. Hitler stole the nazi salute from the romans and the swatiska from hindus.
Will-narayan RichardCunningham's article
Dec 15, 2018 at 4:01
Dec 15, 2018
Nicolai Announces New Ultra-Adjustable G1 Enduro Bike
@Mondbiker: I agree with the theory, in my case I understand there could be issues as the bike is too short, the seat angle way too slack (73°), so going to the tip of the saddle is only a mere correction on a bike to bring my weight more in front of the rear axle, but then weighting the front wheel maybe too much and the rear not enough, but in Preston case, he says he had this grip issue on a Geometron with I guess a long wheelbase and long chainstay. Or there's a problem with his position.
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