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atrokz mattwragg's article
Feb 24, 2017 at 9:06
21 hours
Back to the Future: Rotwild RDH P1
@Obidog: the context does not change the terminology. Stretch just means the accumulation of wear on each pin/roller/link assembly. The correct term is elongation, but stretch is used commonly to define when a chain has elongated past it's useful size. Chains generally have elongation of this assembly prior to breakage, as this is the most common failure mode for a chain (elongated hole, pin falls out, chain 'breaks' which also isn't a break if we are getting into semantics). Nothing actually 'breaks apart' rather than falls apart due to the inability for the pin to stay in the link's hole.
atrokz mattwragg's article
Feb 24, 2017 at 5:08
1 days
Back to the Future: Rotwild RDH P1
@solidautomech: ideally, timing belts should run nothing but the cam(s). the accessory belt(s) run the pumps/alt/etc. But for space considerations and in some instances motor safety the T belt can drive the W-P. Chrysler did a few T-Belt driven motors, like the 3.5L V6 from the late 90s, and there's several more mostly from japan, but it's not an ideal arrangement and usually has to do with space confinements. The benefit is that it's a fail safe as the T-Belt lasts longer than accessory belts. I can't think of a single car that runs all accessories from the T belt, thankfully.
atrokz mattwragg's article
Feb 23, 2017 at 16:06
2 days
Back to the Future: Rotwild RDH P1
@beast-from-the-east: yes, we can call wear of the roller/pin assembly 'stretch'. The term stretch is used interchangeably with wear as stretch defines the affect of that wear on the assembly (chain). http://www.parktool.com/product/chain-checker-cc-2 more accurate nomenclature is used in all chain drive systems where elongation is used to define the accumulation of wear on each link (hence 'stretching out the chain' vs 'wearing all those link assemblies' rolls off the tongue better imo).
atrokz davidarthur's article
Feb 23, 2017 at 10:16
2 days
Gore Bike Wear One Thermium Jacket - Review
Seems like there's more Gore wear reviews than actual product in the wild. I guess only people in the UK buy this stuff, because they haven't heard of Arcteryx yet I guess.
atrokz davidarthur's article
Feb 23, 2017 at 10:13
2 days
Gore Bike Wear One Thermium Jacket - Review
That's Arcteryx moneys, and I know which one I'd pick all day any day.
atrokz mattwragg's article
Feb 23, 2017 at 7:29
2 days
Back to the Future: Rotwild RDH P1
@jflb: have you tried turning a motor by hand before, or the cams in which a toothed belt will drive? Timing belts see hundreds to thousands of lbs of force for thousands of operating hours. A timing belt sees significantly more load than a bike chain under the average rider, and they last longer as well. A gates carbon drive belt runs the superchargers on top fuel nitro motors. They are significantly stronger than the dinky chains we use on bikes, which stretch to unusable lengths in merely a few hundred miles of off-road riding (aka half a season). A chain like ours used in a timing belt application will stretch in seconds and break within minutes trying to drive a cam. If you look at a timing chain, you will quickly see why.
atrokz USOpenMTB's article
Feb 18, 2017 at 4:58
Feb 18, 2017
The US Open of Mountain Biking Returns for 2017
@mts595: he is racing a few DH events this year.
atrokz paulaston's article
Feb 17, 2017 at 5:48
Feb 17, 2017
Derailleur vs Gearbox: Nicolai Ion 16 vs Ion GPI - Review
@tigerteeuwen: may be worth pointing out that a certain gearbox bike has won WC races and championships ;) But yea, hopefully more development happens on this front. a 12 speed gearbox is perfect for trails imo.
atrokz pinkbikeaudience's article
Feb 16, 2017 at 13:17
Feb 16, 2017
The UCI Revives the Mountain Bike Eliminator World Cup
Hey remember when the UCI canned 4x for this?
atrokz paulaston's article
Feb 16, 2017 at 12:59
Feb 16, 2017
Derailleur vs Gearbox: Nicolai Ion 16 vs Ion GPI - Review
what if DHers use them, and win on them?
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