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bkm303 RichardCunningham's article
Mar 16, 2018 at 15:27
Mar 16, 2018
Henty Enduro Backpack - Review
@mhoshal: wow man great point....
bkm303 RichardCunningham's article
Mar 16, 2018 at 8:53
Mar 16, 2018
Henty Enduro Backpack - Review
@mhoshal: Fun fact: your pants and backpack already have a waistband so.... no, you don't "sweat all around your waist" more than normal.
bkm303 RichardCunningham's article
Mar 16, 2018 at 8:45
Mar 16, 2018
Henty Enduro Backpack - Review
As with every enduro fanny product.... still not better than Mountainsmith. The design is like 30 years old and still as good as anything out there. A Mountainsmith Tour / Drift + Strapettes = this product, except with more volume, and you can take the straps off for short rides, or once you've drank all your water. The tool flap on this thing is a nice feature tho.
bkm303 RideCalibre's article
Mar 14, 2018 at 11:11
Mar 14, 2018
Calibre Bikes Announces Spec Updates to £999 Full-Suspension Bossnut - Video
@Floyd123: what are you smoking.... the cheapest trance is like £700 more than this. The caliber already has a single ring and improved tires, so all you need is a cheap dropper. With a Brand-X or one of the cheap ebay options you still come out like >£500 ahead.
bkm303 mikelevy's article
Mar 14, 2018 at 10:36
Mar 14, 2018
Look X-Track Race Carbon Pedal - Review
I agree with Waki. Most people starting out don't realize what a difference it makes to use a good shoe and good pedal - but even if they did, they might still be too scared of the pins slashing their shins to give it a shot. Plus it's not like running flats really saves you any money when there are shimano pedal/shoe combos that are dirt cheap and practically indestructible. My M520s are like 8 years old and still work perfectly, no maintenance. My shoes are on their 4th year and show no serious wear. I don't dislike flats - they're probably better for learning certain skills, and everyone likes the ability to easily hang/dab a foot on something tough. But there's a lot to like about clipping in too. Climbing and sprinting feel awesome, having some float in the pedal is awesome and the ability to use a single shoe for my road/cx and mtb is nice... yes, I could do that with flats too, but who wants to go for a road ride in 5.10s? Plus the pro DH field adopting clipless has made people a lot more accepting of the idea for 'real' trails.
bkm303 mikelevy's article
Feb 22, 2018 at 8:30
Feb 22, 2018
Fanny Packs For All? High Above's Lookout Pack - Review
Mountainsmith has always had the best fanny packs in the game! I use the Tour TLS for mtb, xc skiing, hiking, etc. If you're smart about packing it'll fit all you need for most full day rides - usually I can fit 2L water, rain jacket, layers, repair kit, pump, tube, and food. The only time I use a backpack anymore is for all-day desert rides (hot, no access to water) or long cold weather rides where lots of layers need to go on/off. These new mtb-specific ones don't look bad, but the better they get, the more they look like mountainsmith copies (whether intentional or not). The bottle holder clips are kinda slick though.
bkm303 RichardCunningham's article
Dec 15, 2017 at 12:13
Dec 15, 2017
Opinion: Great Rides Don't Always Have Happy Endings
@katmai: "I can't think of a spot in the lower 48 that I couldn't get to within a days walk" That's a bold statement.... I definitely believe that you can walk 15-20 miles per day in alpine terrain. That's not even remotely the same thing as covering 20 linear miles in the same time. Obviously you're an experienced hiker/navigator, but unless you're just straightlining up/down every single ridge that 20 miles turns into ~30 miles pretty quick when you're following the contours of the land, avoiding slow/dangerous terrain, etc. In heavily wooded terrain, I've taken half a day to make it just a few miles. Worse if there's snow. And even if you're a god-level hiker who CAN get anywhere in the lower 48 in a day.... is that bad? Is the land less wild because there's a road a day's walk away? Is it crowded? Is there not more terrain there than you could possibly explore in a lifetime?
bkm303 RichardCunningham's article
Dec 14, 2017 at 17:17
Dec 14, 2017
Opinion: Great Rides Don't Always Have Happy Endings
@George-k: yeah, I'm just saying if you live in/near a city and you have "easy access" to wilderness, it stops looking like wilderness pretty quick. Take away a lot of those access roads we're talking about and suddenly you get even more people crowded onto even less land. There are def parts of the US where truly wild country is easily accessed (30min), but they're nowhere near big cities.
bkm303 RichardCunningham's article
Dec 14, 2017 at 15:07
Dec 14, 2017
Opinion: Great Rides Don't Always Have Happy Endings
@gemma8788: "Driving a couple hours + hiking isn't easy access to me." Unless you're the self-reliant survivalist type, "easy access" is antithetical to wilderness. It's nonsensical to think that I/you could live anywhere near a major population center and NOT have to drive an hour or two to wilderness. Without that network of roads you see from the plane, we'd never even be able to see or experience most of the spectacular landscapes we have. If you're not willing to drive a couple hours and hike, you're damn sure not about to hoof it dozens of miles into wild country to find some peak/canyon/lake/butte/etc. You can keep it pristine or you can experience it, but almost never both. Conservation has always been this kind of balancing act. All you have to do to find wilderness and solitude is drive/hike a little farther than the next guy. If you live virtually anywhere in the west you live near enough good hiking/biking/fishing/hunting/etc to keep you busy your whole life, as long as you're motivated. I just moved back home to CO from the northeast, where it's actually crowded. In terms of wild country we don't have much to complain about.
bkm303 RichardCunningham's article
Dec 14, 2017 at 13:27
Dec 14, 2017
Opinion: Great Rides Don't Always Have Happy Endings
@katmai: yeah... 20 miles as the crow flies, over rugged mountain terrain, with thousands of square miles between roads. I don't consider 40 miles between the two nearest roads to be "a maze of roads". Not to mention, once you set foot of a well-defined trail (actual wilderness), 20 miles becomes WAY longer. I've been on bushwacks where we were working our asses off going maybe 1/2 mile per hour.
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