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dfiler remymetailler's article
Jun 19, 2020 at 10:47
Jun 19, 2020
dfiler mikelevy's article
Jun 11, 2020 at 10:27
Jun 11, 2020
First Look: SRAM's New GX Drivetrain Offers 520% Range
@taprider: There's no need to include the front ring when calculating gear range percentage for a 1x system. And your order of operation grouping isn't correct either. It's much simpler... 52/10 = 5.2 range 50/10 = 5 range Multiple by 100 if you want a percentage range ("Percentage" means per one hundred) 5.2/5 = 1.04 Meaning, the new derailer has 1.04 times the range of the old one. Or in other words, 4% more range. Personally, i think percentage ranges are the wrong concept to use and just confuses the issue. It is just easier to say a gear range of 5.2. The largest cog is 5.2 times the size of the smallest. Then just use percentages to describe changes in the gear range. In this instance, the new range is 4% wider than the old one.
dfiler mikekazimer's article
Jun 2, 2020 at 13:22
Jun 2, 2020
Pinkbike Poll: What's the Farthest You've Ever Ridden in 24 Hours?
@sspiff: Agreed. Metric mass, volume and distance are logical. Celsius is no better than Fahrenheit. And despite being downvoted, metric time is a legitimate topic. Base 10 time would be more valuable than metric mass, volume and distance. So while we're harping on the states for not doing metric, the same issue exists with non-metric time everywhere.
dfiler mikekazimer's article
May 29, 2020 at 13:18
May 29, 2020
Pinkbike Poll: What's the Farthest You've Ever Ridden in 24 Hours?
So when are you switching to metric time?
dfiler mikekazimer's article
May 29, 2020 at 13:15
May 29, 2020
Pinkbike Poll: What's the Farthest You've Ever Ridden in 24 Hours?
60 seconds in a minute, 60 minutes in an hour and 24 hours in a day? That's effed. Wake me up when you metric evangelists switch to metric time ;)
dfiler mikekazimer's article
May 29, 2020 at 13:12
May 29, 2020
Pinkbike Poll: What's the Farthest You've Ever Ridden in 24 Hours?
What? The average looks to be about 45 miles or or 72 km. That's a solid amount for mountain biking. Are you some kind of internet high mileage tough guy?
dfiler dan-roberts's article
May 29, 2020 at 13:06
May 29, 2020
Behind the Numbers: Unno Dash
@notreallyhere: Interesting. So it looks like most of the time the term 4-bar is used to specifically mean a different type of suspension than seen here. However the term is also used in a more general sense that can include this type of design. In real life, i'd only ever seen or heard it refer to horst link / FSR / faux-bar designs. This is the first time i've seen 4-bar used to refer to solid rear triangle bikes. But there's a first time for everything. I learned something today.
dfiler dan-roberts's article
May 29, 2020 at 10:37
May 29, 2020
Behind the Numbers: Unno Dash
With a bit more reading, it seems 4-bar is mostly used to refer to a different type of suspension than on the unno dash. https://www.singletracks.com/mtb-gear/basic-mountain-bike-suspension-designs-explained/ http://ffden-2.phys.uaf.edu/211_fall2010.web.dir/Michael_Stanfill/FourBar.html https://www.bikeradar.com/features/the-ultimate-guide-to-mountain-bike-rear-suspension-systems/ https://www.pinkbike.com/news/ask-pinkbike-anything-09-30-2014.html http://www.bikeroar.com/tips/a-beginners-guide-to-mountain-bike-suspension-design
dfiler jamessmurthwaite's article
May 29, 2020 at 8:39
May 29, 2020
Video: Claudio Caluori Follows Nino Schurter Down Narrow Alpine Singletrack
@flowisforpussies: Ha! I upvote just to cancel your own downvote. Cheers!
dfiler dan-roberts's article
May 29, 2020 at 8:36
May 29, 2020
Behind the Numbers: Unno Dash
This makes me wonder if i've always misunderstood what a four bar suspension is. I've always thought it to be things resembling the specialized FSR design. Four bars were used to connect the front triangle to the rear axle. "Faux bar" designs were used to bypass the specialized patent by moving the rear pivot from the chain stay to seat stay. What we're seeing here is more of a solid rear triangle connected to the front triangle by two links rotating in the same direction. That differs from companies like santacruz which had some patents on a solid rear triangle connected by links rotating in opposite directions. (And of course other companies with various patents) Am I wrong about this? What is a 4-bar suspension?
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