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phutphutend mikekazimer's article
Apr 5, 2018 at 3:35
Apr 5, 2018
Trek Full Stache - First Ride
What's the point is plus size tyres, when you can run normal sized tyres with insert such as CushCore. The insert allows you to run plus bike pressure, so same contact patch size and grip. But with added puncture protection and damping. I really don't understand plus bikes!
phutphutend Starlingcycles's article
Mar 9, 2018 at 14:35
Mar 9, 2018
Starling Cycles Announces Made-In-Taiwan Murmur
@Roguee: sorry, tricky not get on the offensive in comments section!
phutphutend Starlingcycles's article
Mar 7, 2018 at 14:40
Mar 7, 2018
Starling Cycles Announces Made-In-Taiwan Murmur
@ReformedRoadie: Interesting, but you didn't answer the question. Why is steel NOT a good material for a full sus frame? Steel is not an easy material to work with when building a complex suspension frame, it is expensive to machine compared to aluminium. Titanium is even harder. The economies of this are the reason why there aren't as many suspension frames made from these materials. I agree you can make a compliant frame from any material, but thin diameter steel tubes lend themselves to this better than ally or carbon for a given strength.
phutphutend Starlingcycles's article
Mar 7, 2018 at 13:40
Mar 7, 2018
Starling Cycles Announces Made-In-Taiwan Murmur
@Roguee: Check the price of a Cotic with anything other than a super cheap X-Fusion shock and the price is almost the same as the Starling...
phutphutend Starlingcycles's article
Mar 7, 2018 at 13:07
Mar 7, 2018
Starling Cycles Announces Made-In-Taiwan Murmur
@ReformedRoadie: Please explain? Do you have any qualifications for this comment? Numerous reviews, customer feedback, best of year awards suggest steel is in fact a very good material for a suspension bike. I suspect your reply will be that you need a stiff frame and that the suspension will do the job of grip and shock absorption. But lean the bike over 45° in a corner and now the suspension only deals with half of the movement acting on it. And your laterally stiff frame cannot conform to the bumps. A fairly consistent comment on reviews of steel bikes, that typically have more lateral compliance because of the thinner tubes, is that they have amazing grip. Do you still think you are correct?
phutphutend Starlingcycles's article
Mar 7, 2018 at 13:02
Mar 7, 2018
Starling Cycles Announces Made-In-Taiwan Murmur
@n1ck: I've sold around 100 frames with steel hangers with no issues. One customer bent one, but bent it back easily with no damage. The steel hangers are designed to bend (when they very rarely do) away from the bolt thread, so they are more easily bent back. But, I know people have an irrational fear of steel hangers, like mice I suppose, so the Taiwanese frames have a replaceable aluminium hanger.
phutphutend Starlingcycles's article
Mar 7, 2018 at 12:54
Mar 7, 2018
Starling Cycles Announces Made-In-Taiwan Murmur
@lRaphl: For sales outside of EU, the no local taxes applied. For example a frame is £1682 rather than £1850. However, you will need to pick up extra postage and import duty our end. Steel doesn't mean low quality though. This is a shit hot bike with lots of considered design and built to highest quality. All of my customers so far, and press reviews have been massively positive.
phutphutend cy-cotic's article
Feb 23, 2018 at 3:35
Feb 23, 2018
New Cotic Rocket Enduro Bike
Looking good Cy...
phutphutend mattwragg's article
Feb 23, 2018 at 1:21
Feb 23, 2018
Fashion vs. Fit: Is Longer Always Better? - Opinion
I build custom sized steel full suspension bikes, @StarlingCycles. I've built over 100 frames now for customers of lots of different sizes and am getting a good handle on what fits different size riders. The first thing to note is that we are very able to accommodate small changes in size, say +/-15mm on reach with negligible impact on how the bike rides. So, being accurate to the nearest mm is not required. But I've ended up recommending, 480mm reach for a 5'11" rider like myself, about 500mm for 6'2", 530mm for 6'6". Then 450mm at 5'9", 430mm for 5'5". To be honest I've built more bikes for taller riders, so am less confident about the smaller sizing. But obviously this is a 'rule of thumb' and very dependent on other rider parameters, and specific to dynamic geometry of bike. Although the tolerance in sizing helps make it better than you'd think. My numbers also seem to agree with what a loots of the MTB media reviewers are telling me. So perhaps there's some science in there somewhere. The other thing to note is that chainstay lengths should be proportional. I currently can't offer custom chainstay lengths (I'm working on it), but my 29" Murmur with 445mm stays is better for taller riders >5,10". The Swoop with 430mm stays is better for shorter riders. A few truths: -current longer (read correctly sized) bikes, are only say 5-10% longer than older bikes. It's an iteration, not night and day. -longer bikes are not worse uphill, -longer bikes go round corners as well, if not faster, but may require more user input; -for longer reach, you need steeper seat angle to get correct pedalling position, -any more?
phutphutend StansNoTubes's article
Jan 25, 2018 at 9:27
Jan 25, 2018
Stan’s NoTubes Introduces Crest CB7 and Arch CB7 Rims and Wheelsets
That's the wrong way round. We have tyres and suspension, so no need for radial compliance. But it super important that wheels have lateral compliance to help conform to ground when cornering and allow some give from rough ground pushing wheel out of the way. Proper marketing bullshit!
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