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showmethemountains pinkbikeoriginals's article
Jul 22, 2021 at 8:14
Jul 22, 2021
Video: Decoding The Best Mountain Biking Body Position - How To Bike with Ben Cathro Episode 3
@ryetoast: Great points about hardtails with steeper HTA and how it steepens further under compression. My posts above are based on a 140mm hardtail with a 65.5° HTA, the same as the FS bike I since moved to Mid stroke support is definitely critical for a fork to work well on a hardtail.
showmethemountains pinkbikeoriginals's article
Jul 21, 2021 at 14:40
Jul 21, 2021
Video: Decoding The Best Mountain Biking Body Position - How To Bike with Ben Cathro Episode 3
@quinnltd: Yes, same here! I definitely weighted my bars more and my pedals less, to take advantage of my fork. A good fork is more responsive and has better endurance over a ride than my legs do, no matter how good I am at keeping my legs and hips loose. That said, for myself that technique didn't work as well with older short and steep hardtails but worked much better once I had a modern slack and long hardtail that gave me room to move forwards without being over the bars Also, keeping my weight centered or forward helped impacts upwards on the rear wheel use my weight on the pedals as a fulcrum point to rotate the frame and push down on the fork. In other words the fork travel and tuning can be important in how the back of a hardtail behaves and feels too!
showmethemountains pinkbikeoriginals's article
Jul 21, 2021 at 14:22
Jul 21, 2021
Video: Decoding The Best Mountain Biking Body Position - How To Bike with Ben Cathro Episode 3
@SATN-XC: Geometry through the 90s was shockingly standard compared to today! This was partly because even bikes with front or full suspension were still relatively short travel, partly because XC racing was wildly popular and influenced everything, partly because this geometry that came from road bikes was seen as the "correct" way and few people deviated or innovated away from it, and more. The standard was 71 HTA (along with 38mm fork offset) and 73 STA, and this combination was so common that it got a name: "Norba geometry" It's a shame because the earliest MTB pioneers, though some did come from road biking backgrounds, were often bringing in moto influences. And many of the early klunkers were much slacker because of the cruiser frames they were built from. I wonder how different mountain biking would have looked in the 90s and today if that heritage had stayed dominant
showmethemountains pinkbikeoriginals's article
Jul 21, 2021 at 12:34
Jul 21, 2021
Video: Decoding The Best Mountain Biking Body Position - How To Bike with Ben Cathro Episode 3
@SATN-XC: ~71 HTA was the standard for 26" XC bikes for a very long time; from the beginning of the 90's and well in to the 2000's. There were still examples with 71-71.5 HTA close to 2010 (And then right as 26" XC bikes started to slack out a bit, 29ers started to take over and for a long time used steeper head angles to "fix" the steering feel. For example, the 1st gen Tallboy had a 71 HTA until 2013!)
Jul 18, 2021 at 9:43
Jul 18, 2021
quotes Morning ride, a little smokey
8.2 km - 00:28 - 1 achievements
showmethemountains dangerholm's article
Jul 1, 2021 at 11:34
Jul 1, 2021
Dangerholm's Latest: A Mountain Biker's Gravel Bike
@SeanOg: When sanding, he holds his arm rigid and just does a lot of squats to move the sandpaper. While wearing a weighted backpack
showmethemountains jamessmurthwaite's article
Jun 26, 2021 at 7:11
Jun 26, 2021
Thought Experiment: The Squishiest Mountain Bike
@friendlyfoe: I also have a Knolly Warden. The fixie is my backup bike and my change-up. I have year round riding so it’s always helpful to have a second bike and not miss a good day of riding. I did a full drivetrain replacement on my Warden this spring, and then while I had it in the stand decided to do disassemble all the pivots to clean and adjust. And now I have sealant leaking from my rim seam?! Like I said, always nice to have a second bike! One of the coolest things about any kind of more limited bike, whether it’s a fixie, single speed, xc hardtail, etc, is that riding hard is about what you are doing as a rider not just how fast your bike is going. My rides on technical trails may be slower with my fixie but they are at least as intense in effort, skill and riding on the edge on control, and usually harder in terms of abuse on body and bike. And I don’t have to go as far to seek out the gnarliest trails to go hard either.
showmethemountains alicialeggett's article
Jun 25, 2021 at 17:52
Jun 25, 2021
Pinkbike Poll: Which Top-10 EWS Racer Has the Best Looking Bike?
@lpat1717: you ask a question of personal artistic taste and you get different, personal answers.
showmethemountains jamessmurthwaite's article
Jun 25, 2021 at 15:28
Jun 25, 2021
Thought Experiment: The Squishiest Mountain Bike
@friendlyfoe: It's a big one for sure! Also, a rigid fixie with tubeless needs laughably little maintenance... just regular chain lube and occasional tire sealant even if I ride it in the worst weather (admittedly a rigid singlespeed is close to that as well, just with a freehub or freewheel added to the equation). It's also really handy to have around whenever the big bike is down for maintenance or suspension work
showmethemountains alicialeggett's article
Jun 25, 2021 at 15:26
Jun 25, 2021
Pinkbike Poll: Which Top-10 EWS Racer Has the Best Looking Bike?
@lpat1717: that's why I said "a lot of them" not "all of them". The Pivot is nice but matching colors aren't enough to make it a favorite for me. I actually prefer the complementary turquoise and orange Yeti or the forest green and orange Norco over that Pivot
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