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waltworks mikekazimer's article
Nov 23, 2022 at 12:55
Nov 23, 2022
We Are One Announces New Convergence Carbon Rims & Wheels
@mikekazimer: Sure, but how many "forever" wheelsets from a decade ago (or heck, even 5 years) are people still riding? I doubt most people will keep a wheelset like this long enough to realize any benefit from a warranty, though it would be cool if they did. I agree that if you want (assuming you think the company will be around) a lifetime wheel, then the no questions asked warranty is worth it, for sure. I'm personally too much of a shrimp/sissy to kill rims (I still have a 355 rim kicking around on a singlespeed) so that may be coloring my opinion. -Walt
waltworks mikekazimer's article
Nov 23, 2022 at 12:12
Nov 23, 2022
We Are One Announces New Convergence Carbon Rims & Wheels
So, retail for a Notubes Flow rim is $129, and they're often on sale for cheaper. They are 30mm internal and weigh 470g. I mean, sure, you'll eventually kill that rim, like any rim. But it's cheap to get another one and re-lace. Why would you want a carbon rim that's 4 times the price and heavier? -Walt
waltworks dariodigiulio's article
Nov 19, 2022 at 18:55
Nov 19, 2022
Bike Check: Acoustic Cycles' Steel High Pivot is a Thing of Beauty
LOL my blog hasn't been updated since 2015, where did he even dig that up? -Walt
waltworks mikelevy's article
Nov 18, 2022 at 7:16
Nov 18, 2022
[Updated with Official Response] Stanton Bikes Calls Administrators, Up For Sale
@fatduke: Sure, but your overhead for paying 11 people is significant. Even if you're paying a few of them very little, it's gotta be $300 per day per person just in salary, let alone renting your space, utilities, insurance, etc etc etc. If you're burning through a $5k/day in overhead and you are really optimistically making $1000 per bike/frame, just breakeven is 5 bikes a day. So having 8 bikes that need to get shipped out... that's really, really bad.
waltworks mikelevy's article
Nov 17, 2022 at 17:23
Nov 17, 2022
[Updated with Official Response] Stanton Bikes Calls Administrators, Up For Sale
They have 8 bikes total on order? Or am I not understanding something? I mean, I'd expect an 11 person company to be shipping out that many bikes every day, at a bare minimum. -Walt
waltworks mattwragg's article
Oct 14, 2022 at 18:51
Oct 14, 2022
It’s Time to Recalibrate Our Ideas About Chainstay Length
This is an interesting topic but a completely incoherent article. If the point is that chainstay length should generally scale with reach to allow a weight distribution balance, then just say so up front (and for the record I agree). Really, though, the underlying issue is that for 99% of us (me too) there's not an *objective* ideal. There's just a subjective one, where we feel the speed/flow/whatever and just have a blast. -W
waltworks seb-stott's article
Oct 8, 2022 at 14:29
Oct 8, 2022
Hope Say Their Super Short 155 mm Cranks Are 'The Sweet Spot'
@sdurant12: Believe it or not, if you go down to 155mm or shorter cranks with correspondingly lower BB, and you're not running a tiny chainring, what we started to find was that chainring hits (while still rare) were a bigger issue than pedal/crank strikes. In theory, you could put 110mm unicycle cranks or something on a mountain bike and run a super low BB, and while your pedal strikes wouldn't be a big problem, you'd wreck your chainring/chain unless you ride really smooth trails. Overall, though, you can basically drop the BB about the same amount as you shorten the cranks.
waltworks seb-stott's article
Oct 4, 2022 at 19:18
Oct 4, 2022
Hope Say Their Super Short 155 mm Cranks Are 'The Sweet Spot'
@justinfoil: Well, I mean, I've actually *done* the experiment (with a power meter and oxygen consumption tracking, in a lab!) with bikes purpose built for short cranks, but if what you want to argue is that getting full extension doesn't matter, that's fine, I guess. You really need to try doing a sustained ride with with short cranks with your normal (for 170/175 cranks) saddle height, then try the same ride with the saddle raised to get full extension. I think you'll find out quickly which you prefer. -W
waltworks seb-stott's article
Sep 29, 2022 at 21:21
Sep 29, 2022
Hope Say Their Super Short 155 mm Cranks Are 'The Sweet Spot'
@justinfoil: To get your usual leg extension, you have to raise your saddle. So if it's normally 75cm from the BB with 175mm cranks, you need it at 77cm with 155mm ones. The stance being shorter makes a tiny difference but it's not enough to worry about. If you want to test what it feels like on a rigid post bike, you can just wait until the top of a downhill that doesn't require any pedaling and raise your saddle 20mm and see how it feels. You probably won't like it much, and that's why nobody really tried to use shorter cranks on mountain bikes in the 80s or 90s or 2000s. With a dropper, of course, it's no problem. But those weren't common prior to 2010 or so, which is why we're all still on the same 175mm cranks still - the bike industry moves slow. -W
waltworks seb-stott's article
Sep 27, 2022 at 9:07
Sep 27, 2022
Hope Say Their Super Short 155 mm Cranks Are 'The Sweet Spot'
Without designing the frame around the shorter cranks, the biggest advantage (lowering COG when descending) is arguably lost here (unless you have a ton of pedal strikes to deal with on your existing bike). In the era of dropper posts, shorter cranks make a ton of sense. Prior to droppers/2010 or so, the reduced saddle to crotch clearance descending was just too much to deal with. I actually built some bikes for super short cranks for tests (published in Mountain Flyer about 6-7 years ago. They were pretty great and there wasn't a power output disadvantage, but it was too hard of a sell for most people.
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