Transition TR250 - Reviewed

Oct 6, 2011
by Derek Smith  

Located in Ferndale, Washington, Transition Bikes have evolved over the years, but the idea of creating a family among riders is still the same. That family has grown in the ten years since the company's inception and so has the number of bikes in their lineup. One of their latest releases is known as the TR250, a machine that has been designed around the idea that versatility is key. The ultimate goal with the TR250 was to offer a slimmed down version of the famed TR450, but without losing its characteristics and abilities. The same suspension layout was utilized, incorporating adjustable travel and handling, but the finished product is slimmer and with a high fun factor designed in to it.

  While the TR250 may have less travel than its big brother, the TR450, it is built to go just as big.

Transition TR250 details:
• Intended use: freeride/downhill
• Rear wheel travel: 160mm (6") or 180mm (7") (adjustable)
• Tapered head tube
• 12 x 150mm rear end
• 83mm BB shell
• ISCG 05 chainguide tabs
• Frame weight: 8.9lbs (w/o rear shock)
• MSRP $2499 USD (frame w/ rear shock), $4699 USD (complete as pictured)

  The single pivot swingarm uses a nearly hidden linkage to activate the shock and alter the leverage curve for the bike's intentions - riding hard.

Have it your way: All of the TR250's sealed bearing pivots are held in place with high quality steel hardware and make use of anodized aluminum caps to help keep the elements out. The rocker arm features two different shock mounting positions, determined by rotating an insert, that allows the rider to choose between 6”(160mm) and 7”(180mm) of rear travel. Switching the setting not only changes the travel, but feel as well. Also supplied with the bike are two sets of dropout chips that allow three different head tube angles and three different bottom bracket heights, making the TR250 one of more customizable bikes out there. Looking for a poppy bike park feel? You can have that. Want to rail the corners and set new personal best times on your local track? You can have that setting too.

  Beveled aluminum washers around the suspension hardware keeps everything looking neat and tidy. At first glance the TR250's clean cable routing has you wondering if they are routed internally.

Transition TR250. Photo by Ian Hylands
  The black oval is the ''chip'' (left), allowing for geometry adjustments by simply swapping it out or rotating it. The rear shift line is run internally through the swingarm, protected from the chain and the grime. The TR250 uses a tapered head tube (right) which will accept a zero stack headset to maximize compatibility.

Park ready build: The TR250 is available as a complete bike that uses the same build as out test model, or can be had as frame and rear shock for you to put together how you see fit. Suspension is taken care of by a 180mm travel Fox 36 Van RC2 in the front and a Fox DHX RC4 coil in the rear. The drivetrain uses SRAM's X9 derailleur and shifter, 9 speed instead of 10, powered by Truvativ's Descendent cranks. Slowing the bike is a set of Avid Elixir CR brakes, complete with 8" rotors. Transition has used some of their own parts, beginning with the burly Revolution 32 wheelset. The stem, pedals and seat are all Transition as well. The handle bar, a Kore Torsion Race, comes in at a knuckle-busting 31.5” (800mm) wide, with 1.3” (35mm) of rise. Using bar caps brought this width to over 32”(812mm), which may be good for handling, but will have you caught up in some tight trails.

  The stock build is sturdy and park friendly, complete with proper tires, platform pedals and a chainguide.

Specifications
Release Date 2011
Price $4699
Travel 160mm/180mm
Rear Shock Fox Racing Shox DHX RC4
Fork Fox Racing Shox 36 Van 180 RC2 FIT
Headset Full Speed Ahead Gravity DX Pro
Cassette SRAM PG950 11-26
Crankarms Truvativ Descendent 1.1 165mm
Chainguide e.thirteen SRS+
Bottom Bracket Truvativ Howitzer Team 83mm
Pedals Transition Stepdown
Chain KMC X9.93
Rear Derailleur SRAM X9 9 speed
Shifter Pods SRAM X9 9 speed
Handlebar Kore Torsion Race 800mm x 35mm
Stem Transition Temple Lite
Grips ODI Ruffian Lock-on
Brakes Avid Elixir CR 8"
Wheelset TBC Revolution 32 150
Tires Maxxis Minion DHF 26x2.5 3C
Seat Traitor Diamond Stitch
Seatpost Thompson Elite





Riding the TR250: Given the bike's intentions as a freeride friendly downhill machine, we took it to our favorite zone for such riding. This isn't an area to feel uncomfortable on a bike, but the TR250 was quickly being thrown off of the step downs, drops and jumps at our local haunt. The bike also spent time in the Whistler Bike Park, chasing down longer legged DH machines in the Garbanzo zone and spending copious amounts of time in the air on the local jump trails.

Derek Smith on the Transition 250
  The TR250 loved to play and find places to leave the ground, and even the smallest of rollers could get the bike aloft.

Supple suspension: As the bike takes much of its design from a DH bike, one might expect it to handle and feel like one. The is very true is some ways, but in others it is totally opposite. The TR250's suspension has a "big bike" feel to it, even when set to the shorter 6" position. The initial suppleness helped to tame chatter, making for a smoother ride than you would expect from a 6" or 7" travel steed when compared to a full-on DH sled. The rear suspension starts its stroke very active and soft to accommodate small bumps, but stays at the top of the stroke for when the travel is needed. When subjected to big drops and hard landings however, I found that my setup lacked enough bottom out resistance, and as a result the landings weren't always as smooth as I would have liked. Turning up the high speed compression a few clicks and adding air to the shock helped out in this situation, but adding air took away some of the initial suppleness of the stroke, even in the 7" travel setting. We're not saying that the TR250 can't be setup for both, but it does force you to choose one or the other. This won't be an issue for a lot of riders, especially those who are buying the bike as a pure freeride machine and will be setting it up accordingly, but racers looking for a short travel race bike should take note.

Derek Smith on the Transition 250
  The TR250 doesn't need much speed to get airborne and has plenty of pop to it.

Corner worker: While most would expect a bike such as the TR250 to be designed to send booters, with cornering being a ways down on the wishlist, the blue bike loved to get its lean on. Unlike a plus sized downhill rig, the TR250 took to corners with little effort, no matter what the speed. Slower bends could easily be pumped through, coming out the other end faster than you entered, and fast turns, even in the rough, were effortlessly railed. In fact, we don't doubt that the TR250 can get around the bends quicker than most downhill bikes, but it's how it does it that has us so impressed: there is no need to ride the front or back of the bike in such situations, it is just plain easy to ride fast. This is likely down to how stiff the bike is as a package, along with its low slung shock position and well sorted geometry.

The short wheelbase made it easy to lift the front end over obstacles and carry speed through tight corners. Sometimes, a short wheelbase tends to make a bike harder to control over rough terrain, but I found the TR250 was light enough to lift off the ground and skip over obstacles all together. The ease of lifting the front end combined with the playful suspension, made for a very fun bike to ride.

Derek Smith on the Transition 250
  One of the many trail features hidden amongst the mountains and trees.

A few things to note about the TR250:
• The rebound adjustment is only accessible by a set of small fingers (really small), or by partially removing the suspension linkage. This is a big pain in the ass.

• Although the bars seemed overly wide at first, I decided to give them a shot. The extra wide bars caused me to stop at tight spots more than a few times. With some nearly broken fingers and sore shoulders, I decided to cut the bars down. But it is much better than Transition spec'ing a bar that is far too skinny.

• The Revolution wheels may not be the flashiest option out there, but they are quite tough. They are still near perfect to this day, after a full Summer season of shredding.

• The SRAM drivetrain and Avid brakes have been nearly invisible during our time on the bike. No troubles and no adjustments needed.

Transition TR250. Photo by Jordan Holmes
  Keeping the wheels on the ground wasn't a problem, but the bike begged to be airborne.

Pinkbike's take:
bigquotesWhile we never quite got the bike's rear suspension where we wanted it, there is no doubting that the TR250 is a capable freeride machine. It loves to session the local booters, but it also can rail corners with the best downhill bikes out there. Unlike a lot of builds, the stock spec from Transition is also fully ready to shred, with nothing needing to be swapped out before hitting the trails.

Check out the Transition website to see their entire lineup.



Have you ridden the TR250? Agree with our thoughts? Put those words down below!





137 Comments

  • 112 2
 All i can say is:


I want it...
  • 62 2
 All I can say is. I have it. And love it for that matter
  • 8 0
 www.pinkbike.com/photo/7093877

There's a picture of mine I freakin love it, I swear its the best bike ive ever owned.
  • 1 0
 yeah i would drop my bike for this it so sick i love how they fell and you can do all the same stuff as you can on a 450!
  • 4 3
 nicest bike on the planet
  • 1 0
 I got to ride my buddies at whistler for a day and it felt pretty awesome. But the springs were way too soft for me so I had to baby it a lil Razz . Hopefully this season I can get one myself and put it through its paces
  • 3 0
 i looooooooooooooooooooooovveeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee my tr250!!!!
  • 3 2
 i love how no one has any reason not to love this bike!
  • 2 1
 if i have 5k.....
  • 1 1
 I have a 450 and they are right about the rebound being a pian in the ass... its almost impossible to get to
  • 1 0
 Hey I'm thinking about buying one but I was wondering if the components are a few years old-the brakes, fork, possibly derailleur look like older models i think the fork should have the kashima coat if it is 2011-2012 and the brakes don't look like they have the new hs1 rotors or do you think I should just do a custom build (order frameset) Plz tell me what you think it would be really helpful
  • 1 0
 kashima isnt the be-all end-all of cycling... just get the used one
  • 1 0
 I know that but I was kinda thinking about a custom setup anyways and if most of the components are a little dated it makes a bit more sense to do that I think. Also there is quite a few components i would probably end up swapping out anyways (2500 gram wheelset)
  • 1 10
flag subaig (Jul 11, 2012 at 12:19) (Below Threshold)
 NOrco truax is better
  • 7 1
 HAHAHHAHHAHHAAHHHAHAHHAHHHAHAHHAHHAHAHHAH...........................................funny one buddy...
  • 19 1
 I don't like the fact that after "an entire summer season of shredding" they still didn't have the rear suspension where they wanted it. This is a good looking bike. Very simple and clean, but the fact that they didn't have it dialed doesn't really give the review any credibility. Send an e-mail to Transition or even drop them a phone call and I'm sure they could have helped with the suspension setup. I am willing to bet it rips, but this review is goofy.
  • 8 1
 Why not just turn up the bottom out a couple turns on the rear shock to fix your landing problem? Of course turning up the high speed took away the initial suppleness of the shock. With as much adjustment as is on the RC4, you should be able to get the bike to feel just like you want. Maybe you were just having too much fun to try harder.
  • 4 0
 Its always hard to get suspension just right. In this case I think the solution would have been to turn in the bottom out adjust to make the chamber smaller then set the pressure to same as it was with the the previous, more open, chamber position that had nice small bump/beginning-stroke compliance. Reasoning for this is that if you have the same air pressure but a smaller chamber your more likely to maintain the initial stroke feel but have a firmer and faster ramp up at the end of the stroke. Not claiming to solve there problem with setting it up completely but if your trying to improve end stroke without having negative effects on the beginning stroke feel its a good place to start. I would personally disagree with increasing high speed compression and adding more air to the shock. those 2 setting changes target both the beginning and ending instead of targeting the problem directly. I would add though you may have ultimately needed to add air pressure depending how easily you were bottoming out.

However the simplest way to address the problem on the trail would have been to add a click or 2 of low speed compression. From the problem described the high speed compression should have been a last resort choice for addressing the problem.
  • 3 0
 I cant describe with words how much i love this bike although.......if your a DH racer, get a 450, if you need a DJ bike, get a double, but if you want a bike that can shred anything from smooth singletrack, bike parks, jump trails, and DH courses, this bike is for you. I feel like the majority of "freeriders" (people hating on freeriding just be quiet) would fit perfectly on a 250
  • 2 0
 Got to spend weekend shredding one of these this spring and loved it through and through. I took it on the full spectrum of trails, from flowy jumps to long ride up logging roads to the nastiest of dh rides and except for feeling a little nervous on the steepest rootiest sections because I was getting used to the bike I loved it through everything. One of the more versatile bikes I've ridden. And definitely seemed to want to be off the ground more than on it. But in a really really fun way. This bike begs to fly. One of these days it'll be in my quiver.
  • 3 0
 Definitely the ultimate Whistler bike! Light, jumpy, colourful and with just enough suspension!
  • 2 0
 I absolutely love my TR250. I'm able to ride smooth local trails, rail the corners and pop the jumps, but then fly over to the Alps and rail Morzine and Chatel etc without adjusting a thing. Rear end is super plush and I've not yet bottomed out harshly with near standard settings (I'm 75kg with a 450lbs spring). I would agree with the review that the single most annoying feature is the hidden rebound adjustment. I've found that thin flatblade screwdriver is often handy to have to make small changes on the trail. That's my only gripe. I would also recommend running Marzocchi 66 RC3 Ti forks, they complement the rear perfectly! Only issue I had was my Deemax hub spindles were too thin for the frame design and started eating the swingarm so had to pop a washer between the hub and the frame to protect it. Seems fine with all other hubs though... Bike feels amazing, inspires confidence and is THE most fun I've ever had biking!
  • 1 0
 The way I adjust my rebound is to just spin the preload spring all the way out. Then you can partially compress the suspension, and have full access to the rebound know. It's very quick and easy.
  • 1 0
 @tetonlarry Good tip, thanks!
  • 2 0
 Ive had my tr250 for about a month now. And I absolutly love it. Its such a playful bike to ride and the review is 100% true about its love to get in the air. This thing flies. The rebound really is a bitch to get too, but with a couple more adjustments rear end will be perfect just need to save for some 66 ti's!
If your looking for a super fun plush playful park bike. Look no furtheer!
  • 2 0
 Best bike ever. It easily keeps up with full DH bikes on all but the gnarliest of courses. It looooves to corner and fly like nothing I've ever ridden. The stock build with the 20 lbs wheelset and those useless brakes sucks though. The RC4 needs to be custom tuned for the 250 to function properly or swapped for CCDB or BOS altogether. The paintjob and the bearings are also pretty bad. These are all manageable flaws though. I'm still stoked every time I swing my leg over it.....
  • 1 0
 @Alex223 I understand the Transition guys did try the CCDB with the TR250, with the view to offering it as an option with the frame. However they found no real advantage to it over the DHX i.e it increased the cost rather than the performance. I guess a custom tuned DHX would work better, though really a custom tuned shock should work better for the intended rider on many bikes....since its customised for the person on it!!

I've not altered mine beyond setting it up within the scope of adjustment offered by the RC4 (seems to work for me anyway!)

Completely agree with your comment about being stoked to ride it, great bike from a great company!
  • 2 0
 I had two transition bikes before. One think, bought felt incredible in air and balance was so good. I am really sure TR 250 is another good bike from Transition. Also costumer service is more like good; they can help you with anything, just call. Good job Transition.
  • 5 0
 Mummy, you know how much i love you....
  • 1 0
 Don't we all ? Wink
  • 1 0
 took pictures of a guy at a trail once on one,and all i can say is once he got it he got way better then with the bike he had before(umf freddy1)i shouldnt say bad things about the umf because i have one haha the tr250 is SLICK
  • 4 3
 i was going to buy this ride but they took forever bringing it in so i just upgraded my Transition Bottlerocket : Hope Hubs / 721 rims / Race Face Crank & Bars / Formula The One Brakes / Titanium Nitride Chain w/ XO Derailleur / Shifter / Straitline Chain Guide and with Maxxis DH EXO tires taking a full 1.5 lbs off the bikes weight, i am now running a ride that is as the TR 250 : Light, Lively, and with 7" travel Totems and 5" rear i can drop anything the 250 can...still, i love the lines of the 250 and it is a whole level above my BR for its purpose, but, spent an extra 2 large on my BR and saved another 3 by not buying the 250...just put a positive spin on my situation in not getting the 250 and LOVE my BR more than ever now !
  • 10 1
 Cool story bro
  • 1 1
 thanks. i guess when you get to be 68 and still shredding you will have some cool stories too eh :-)
  • 1 0
 No probs, I guess getting to that ripe old age earns you the right to ramble on about a completely irrelvant topic.

eg: Topic: TR250
Discussion: Bottlerocket! Big Grin

Sorry, only messin/trolling a bit, no harm meant.
  • 1 1
 no worries...i wondered at the time if my comment would be mistaken that i was saying you didn't have any cool stories or that i was somehow blowing hot...your original comment was appreciated and i was only trying to show that - anyway, i suppose i can see how 90% of it was irrelevant in regards to the topic - but somehow thought it might be a way to show how a few upgrades can substitute someones dream bike when they can't get it...all in all since both bikes are made by Transition maybe a comparison is relevant....whoops, think i'm rambling again; better go take my ginsing :-)
  • 1 0
 ps. relevant comment would be: that although Tranny parts are good, i would prefer a few 'very' good 'not stock' parts on an obviously sick ride - ie : King or Hope Hubs / Straitline chain guide and bash guard - incredibly light and in my opinion THE best guide out there / Race Face Crank set / Straitline Amp flats and a few other goodies to lighten her up especially if you are a smaller and lighter rider like me...even the new Maxxis 3c EXOs are amazing single side wall pinch resistant DH tires - both tires shave off a full 1.5 lbs off your rig - i have run them for 4 months and had 1 pinch @ Whistler and 2 local, all because i forgot to check air pressure and was running about 24 lbs instead of my usual 30 -32 - wouldn't recommend them though for anyone DHing over 160 lbs
Hmmmmm - think i may be talking myself into looking at the TR 250 next year :-)
  • 1 0
 I do race, but not seriously by any stretch of the imagination. More of a free-rider if forced to pick a style, so I think this bike might be just what I'm looking for! Not to mention, I know of Transition's customer-service reputation thru several friends - that makes a huge difference in making a decision like this. Time to start saving some pennies, methinks.
  • 3 0
 Recently got a 250, really can't rate it highly enough. Nearly got a 450, this bike felt quite quite a bit more poppy and playful and since I don't race...!
  • 1 0
 Couldn't agree with you more mate, I've had my TR250 for about 4 months or so, love it to bits. It's insane, without doubt my riding's improved a million miles on the 250, it's a great package with so much adjustability. Awesome bikes!
  • 1 0
 Been on one for about 6 weeks and have my only complaint is that i'm not a better rider to really take advantage of this thing. It is such a fun bike! I have no issues with end of stroke action and haven't bottomed it harshly at all despite my best efforts on Crabapple Hits at Whistler last weekend. I'm in love with this thing.
  • 1 0
 My problem is the seat post doesn't look like it will go high enough. We have to pedal up to get to the fun downhill stuff around here. This would be the bike for me if I could get around that problem.
  • 2 0
 maybe you can put a droper seatpost?
  • 1 0
 Move to Whistler - never have to pedal again :-)
  • 1 0
 hotrodmarlin, I too live in an area where climbing to the trail heads is a must so I just purchased my 2012 TR250 with a Hammerschmidt crank setup and am contemplating a dropper post as well. I own a Rock Shox Reverb but after all of two months got the hydraulic line snagged on a branch thereby breaking it. And as much as I like having the control on the bar, I am considering a post that has the control located under the seat to minimize cable snags in the future. The jury is out on that one.
  • 3 0
 like the bike, the company, and the 250, 450 moto names, but this one coulda been named 350 or WhistlerBooty
  • 1 0
 ok got the WhistlerBooty, but 350 ???
  • 1 0
 The rear suspension feels so plush when you push down but stiff enough to crank it before a jump, all around good freeride bike. I want one of my own so bad. Good work guys.
  • 1 0
 its really nice. i just sold my commencal supreme and i wasnt going to buy another DH bike, but i might just have changed my mind!!!!!
  • 1 0
 Really nice work. The covering of all the linkage hardware with alloy caps ???? Totally Sano !!!! Wish more with do element proofing !
  • 1 0
 That a real nice frame, i wondering how it would look with a boxxer on it. As usual transition at the heavy end on this frame, should be 8 lbs with shock.
  • 1 0
 I've got a boxxer. Keep the front end low & light. I love it. Been riding whistler all year long, lots of other local fun stuff too. Best overall bike I can think of for this area. Whistler demands a stiff bike, whistler also tells you to just have some fun on a bike and pop a little more than if you were in a world cup race. I have a ti spring and it did take a few rides to get the shock setup right, but all the best bikes I've had do. Best bike I've ever had. You can setup a shock any way you want if you know how to take it apart and understand what each piece does. TRANSITION will help, if you are not happy, call them. And NO, I don't work for them.
  • 2 0
 That bike looks amazingly fun
  • 1 0
 Great review..! it definitely covered a lot of areas that i didn't fully understand about this bike...
  • 2 0
 If I were to buy a new bike next year this would be it
  • 2 0
 seraph, that would be such a waste of such a capable and sick bike
  • 1 0
 Your right with that! Maybe a superlight build, air shock etc. Its pedalable yes but not xc bike pedalable. Youll see when you ride mine Wink
  • 1 0
 That thing looks epic. I imagine should you wish too it could also be set up as an Enduro machine...
  • 1 0
 Looks awesome... I'm considering this, Canfield the ONE and 2012 Uzzi.... Hmmm....which one? Arrrgh
  • 1 0
 I rode Chris Cancields "the one a week ago... Wow... Just wow!!!

However I would still go with the 250 on the subject....
  • 1 0
 like the bike, the company, and the 250, 450 moto names, but this one coulda been named 350 or WhistlerBooty
  • 1 0
 im not diggin the lack of pivots on the drop outs but other wise..........well just YES
  • 1 0
 I want these babe badly, my saving is halfway already.
Can the 250 be setup with a double crown fork?
  • 1 0
 of course...
  • 1 0
 I've got a boxxer, see my reply above
  • 1 0
 my dream bike, all thats left is to make 5k in one night, and then you will be mine
  • 1 0
 looks like a cool bike... if you put a totem on it could be a boss for whistler
  • 1 0
 I have it and love it :-). This bike is Amazing. Every time i ride it, it puts a huge smile on my face!! Great Bike
  • 1 0
 it reminds me of a older compacted sx. the rebound adjust must be a pain in the ass to adjust, otherwise looks pretty cool
  • 1 0
 m.pinkbike.com/photo/7525770
This is mine, absolutely love it, mega bike.
  • 1 0
 thats a good place to wear your goggles...
  • 1 0
 i wanna sell my bike for one of those!!!! any buyers?
  • 1 0
 that top tube looks so small!
  • 1 0
 TR 250 or Cove STD??? Anyone?
  • 4 0
 250 everytime
  • 2 0
 std
  • 2 0
 Linkage > Singlepivot everytime- std
  • 2 1
 If all you ride is bike park or shuttle trails, they are somewhat comparable. While suspension theory is arguable, one of these bikes has a full-length seat tube and front derailleur compatibility, which makes it much more versatile. Depends on your needs, so I guess one isn't necessarily 'better' than the other.
  • 1 0
 yeah both bad ass rides no doubt.. but like you said, for my personal needs I'd go with the 250. I just want a light bike to toss off of park jumps.
  • 1 0
 STD because the 'Dual Link' has such a good feel but this looks pretty good and the weights look very similar. Both these frames look on par as far as performance goes I guess it comes down to personal preference.
  • 1 0
 I was under the impression that the STD was significantly heavier. If that is not the case, then I can't participate in this discussion as I have not ridden either.
  • 2 0
 These frames compared side by side stripped of all parts and without shocks would be nearly identical in weight.
  • 1 0
 then I retract my previous statements and will wear my ignorance with pride.
  • 1 0
 if light is what you want, the Trek Session is 7.3 lbs WITH rear shock! Now that is significantly lighter.
  • 1 0
 I do love my session.
  • 1 0
 whats the head angle please ?
  • 1 0
 64, 64.5, 65. Adjustable chips in the linkage.
  • 1 0
 Do we get to name this one..jk haha
  • 1 0
 Def my next bike. fo sho!
  • 1 0
 too many versions out there....not enough knee pads...!
  • 1 0
 Sorry love, they won't have that ring till next fall..
  • 1 0
 How would this compare to an Intense SS2 ?
  • 1 0
 Bloody beatiful ...I just felt in love =D
  • 1 0
 looks like it would be a perfect AM! I like it!!!
  • 1 0
 Sooo I got a 2010 p1... Anyone wanna trade for a tr250 Razz
  • 1 0
 Where can I buy a frame for one of these sexy beasts?
  • 1 2
 it looks like a good bike overall i think that slopestyle on this bike would be fun to try or post canyon if you put a domain on it you could ride downhill haha
  • 1 0
 Lush bike, not gonna lie...
  • 1 0
 mejores bicicletas del planeta
  • 1 0
 can you fit 200mm travel at the front?
  • 1 0
 Nice bike!
  • 1 0
 My Next freeride Bike
  • 1 0
 Time to start saving....
  • 1 0
 AHHhH
  • 1 0
 I'm in love
  • 2 1
 Looks like a TR450.
  • 1 0
 Does anyone know if the rear triangle is swappable with a TR450? I've got a 2010 450 and would love to have the 250's adjustable rear drop out (which is shorter overall) and the upgraded axle clamp (which was updated on the 2011 TR450 I believe).
  • 1 0
 The 2012 Tr450 will have the chainstay length adjusters and is backward compatible. Look no further and order it today Big Grin
  • 1 0
 @zorba.... Thats the Point. Similar geometry for lower racer style linkage on a free ride bike. Both bikes are sick.. I actually prefer my 250 over my 450 for most riding...
  • 1 0
 ..sorry dude, I was just trying to be a smart ass.
  • 1 0
 My dream Smile
  • 1 0
 sweet.
  • 1 0
 that is my next bike
  • 1 0
 Dear Santa...
  • 1 0
 I love this color!!!!
  • 1 0
 once again...
  • 1 0
 sick bike
  • 1 0
 looks ok
  • 4 0
 YOU'LL PAY HALF?!?!?!?!?!!!!!!!
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