Block user

Supported Regions

Whistler via WORCA

Recent

VorsprungSuspension seb-stott's article
Apr 9, 2021 at 23:28
Apr 9, 2021
Carbon Air Aims to Make Air Suspension More Like Coil - Pond Beaver 2021
@lefthandohvhater: without thorough investigation I can't say 100% for sure, but on cursory consideration this concept appears to be legit and more or less as-described (though I'm not yet completely sold on the reduction in velocity sensitivity, but haven't tested or calculated that so far, so willing to take their word for it for the moment). It basically lets you increase effective air volume without increasing actual air volume, in other words you could theoretically get say 100cc of actual air volume to behave as though it's 200cc of air. That alone doesn't just automatically solve every issue with air springs on its own, but it is a very cool idea that could definitely stand to open up new possibilities to improve things in forks in particular.
VorsprungSuspension seb-stott's article
Apr 9, 2021 at 20:42
Apr 9, 2021
Carbon Air Aims to Make Air Suspension More Like Coil - Pond Beaver 2021
@justwaki: It's less crazy than it sounds. The first part of the increase in the delta there comes from the fact that air springs have gotten significantly lighter than they used to be. Fox air springs for example used to have two negative coil springs in them, which weren't anywhere near as light as their current air negative systems, and some air springs back in the day had steel shafts. The second part of the change comes about from the fact that air sprung forks typically use shorter stanchions than equivalent travel coil sprung forks used to, which necessitates the use of a cartridge & longer spring. You can cram a spring into the short stanchion, but you're much more limited in the spring rates and travel which you can run before the spring takes a permanent set. To give a standard of comparison, a 29" Lyrik or 36 with Smashpot is around 2400-2500g for most spring rates. A 66RC2X was 3160g (https://www.bikeradar.com/reviews/components/forks/suspension-forks/marzocchi-66-rc2x-review/) in 26".
VorsprungSuspension seb-stott's article
Apr 9, 2021 at 15:40
Apr 9, 2021
Carbon Air Aims to Make Air Suspension More Like Coil - Pond Beaver 2021
@lefthandohvhater: Just a clarification - the Secus actually DOES work well for long travel singlecrown forks like the Zeb/38. It also reduces the amount of end stroke ramp the fork has, as compared to a Luftkappe which increases it. It was built specifically to get around the limitations that the Luftkappe faces there.
VorsprungSuspension seb-stott's article
Mar 29, 2021 at 22:34
Mar 29, 2021
Burning Question: What Causes Some Fork Crowns to Creak?
@PullMyBrakeLever: exactly - I don't have enough information to offer strong opinions on loctiting the press fit parts and how reliable or durable it is as a solution. From the guys I've talked to around the world who offer disassembling and repressing CSUs with loctite as a service, it seems to be capable of shutting up an existing creaky CSU, and if you're out of warranty and are willing to chance it, it's probably a decent option to try. It might even be a permanent fix, and I think most likely it's also totally safe. But as someone who used to test structural automotive parts in a lab for a living, I personally don't want to mess with interfaces like that without sufficient hard data, it's the most highly stressed part on the entire bike with the highest consequence for any failure. My main point was that loctite is extremely cheap and easy to add to an assembly process - every fork and shocks already has a number of loctited interfaces already, it's certainly not cost that prevents anyone doing that. I'm not privy to what Fox and Rockshox have or have not tested, but given the amount of money that warranty claims on creaking CSUs must be costing them, it seems extremely improbable to me that they haven't tried it already, since it's literally the cheapest, easiest possible solution they could hope for. It's easy to sit on the internet and say "well obviously the solution is ____" or write the entire bike industry off as a joke, but crowns and stanchions in particular are actually legitimately precise parts by almost any industry's standard, and it is no exaggeration to say fork structures (CSUs in particularly) are the most robustly lab-tested part of any mountain bike. I can't recall ever seeing anyone actually snap or bend a modern SC fork at the crown, which is quite incredible, because I've seen people break just about everything else. One piece crown/steerers might be a partial solution (X-Fusion, Ohlins and Fox have all tried this in the past and subsequently abandoned it), but they still don't solve any problems at the stanchion/crown interface, plus they're hard/expensive to make.
VorsprungSuspension seb-stott's article
Mar 29, 2021 at 22:15
Mar 29, 2021
Burning Question: What Causes Some Fork Crowns to Creak?
@justinc5716: strength to weight, SC forks win, because in order to cut down the weight of a DC fork to match an equivalent SC fork, the tubes get so thin that they're too easy to dent or fold - they need to maintain enough hoop stiffness as well as 2nd moment of area. Even the heaviest SC fork currently available (Fox 38 ) is 200-300g lighter than a Boxxer. When your criteria is "it needs to be ____ strong and as light and cheap as possible" then for the realistic strength standards demanded of a bicycle fork, the SC fork can usually be done lighter. Only Maverick's old DUC32 really competed with equivalent travel SC forks weight wise, and that had some other issues of its own, particularly alignment since the crown was welded to the upper tubes. Also, to be frank I think people are afraid of the looks. Bike companies don't really want prospective customers to think that their 150mm trailbike is as heavy as a DH bike based on looks alone.
VorsprungSuspension pinkbikeaudience's article
Mar 2, 2021 at 17:47
Mar 2, 2021
The 2020 Pinkbike Photo of the Year Winner is...
@rybrentd: Sorry if I missed an email from you! Not knowing who you are from your username though I can't go look it up, but if we didn't reply, please re-send your email. We do get a huge volume of emails daily though, and we were closed for a couple of weeks due to a staff Covid case around the start of Feb, so that may have been factor.
VorsprungSuspension pinkbikeaudience's article
Mar 1, 2021 at 22:38
Mar 1, 2021
The 2020 Pinkbike Photo of the Year Winner is...
The photo is from the very top of the descent from the Gornergratbahn. He’s like 10 metres from the train station, hasn’t had time to get muddy yet. It is a phenomenal descent.
VorsprungSuspension rfphotographics's article
Jan 23, 2021 at 17:05
Jan 23, 2021
Video: Sending Gaps & Railing Turns in Maydena
100%, Maydena is absolutely amazing. And I live in Whistler...
VorsprungSuspension dan-roberts's article
Dec 17, 2020 at 14:42
Dec 17, 2020
2020 Pinkbike Awards: Suspension Product of the Year Nominees
@leon-forfar: agreed re the RC2 damper, that's still a personal favourite (other than 7mm ID shims). First gen Grip2 could be run extremely firm (at maxed adjusters, it was way too firm at low to mid speeds), the second gen one went to extremes in the other direction - at almost all speeds there is more friction force than there is compression damping (yes we measured this, and this is with no binding load on the fork). The 38's air spring is a significant step forward from anything the two big brands have produced to date for sure, and it is the main reason why the 38s feel as good as they do. It very closely resembles the air spring system BOS were using in their forks 5 or 6 years ago.
VorsprungSuspension dan-roberts's article
Dec 16, 2020 at 22:59
Dec 16, 2020
2020 Pinkbike Awards: Suspension Product of the Year Nominees
@leon-forfar: (relating to this and your other post above) this kind of thing is actually where our criticism of the narrow compression range of the VVC Grip2 damper comes into play. When you're running ~20% higher than recommended spring rate AND more tokens, it's quite likely that you're one of the riders who actually would benefit from more compression damping than what's on offer, because clearly you're pushing the thing pretty hard. Our criticisms there definitely don't stem from a dyno speed issue, we've run these dampers to over 4m/s just to check, double check and triple check what we're on about.
Load more...
You must login to Pinkbike.
Don't have an account? Sign up

Join Pinkbike  Login
Copyright © 2000 - 2021. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv65 0.016993
Mobile Version of Website