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vinay danielsapp's article
Jun 17, 2019 at 14:09
7 mins
Made in USA: Inside Zipp's Carbon Wheel Testing and Production Facility
@laksboy: I'm actually considering Tannus. Seems really convenient to use. Only downside I see compared to ProCore is that there is no way to make the tire "chamber" softer or harder. Not sure how much being able to play with the tube pressure makes up for that. And I don't know whether and how quickly the foam wears (cracks, stiffens etc). As there is no sealant it doesn't seal punctures in the tire but then again when something penetrates deep enough to puncture the tube, you can always swap out the tube and patch it at home. Just like I used to. But I want to build a spare wheelset and install it in there. At least there is no sealant to age. The neighbor I helped install his tubeless tires the other day actually has some pool noodle variation in there. Not sure how different all those are, this one is from Barbierri. Fifteen pounds for a pair including valves. No reason not to give it a shot. He seems happy with it.
vinay nr22's article
Jun 17, 2019 at 11:15
3 hours
First Ride: Orbea's 2020 Occam Trail Bike is Light, Fast & Fun
@motard5: Occam H30 (the cheapest build) is still 12 speed with SLX rear mech.
vinay nr22's article
Jun 17, 2019 at 10:13
4 hours
First Ride: Orbea's 2020 Occam Trail Bike is Light, Fast & Fun
@rh00p: I don't know. The official story was that Dave Weagle came to Trek to discuss his design to find out that they were already working on something similar. So they decided to go their own way. I get that. After all, it isn't all that different to a floating brake we already saw on bikes from Kona and Santa Cruz among others. Just less adjustable (on a floating brake like D.O.P.E. you could shift the link along the seattube to get different brake feedback on the suspension) and now with ABP they also have the shock driven by that linkage. But from the brake point of view (which is what it is all about after all) it is just a floating brake caliper. So sometimes different companies come up with a similar idea. Syntace and Schwalbe also developed ProCore independently. Then found out they were working on the same thing and then decided to continue together.
vinay danielsapp's article
Jun 17, 2019 at 9:50
4 hours
Made in USA: Inside Zipp's Carbon Wheel Testing and Production Facility
@WAKIdesigns: Yeah, actually that's what I do too though don't go over 3bar initially. I do this to make sure that the tube is completely inside the blue tire and not somewhere still under the bead (so that it could blow). So maybe that's what helped me. Though the W35 is slightly wider than the EX471 so maybe the center channel is already wider too. If I'd buy new rims, I'd probably get something from Spank though. They have two center channels so that makes it a bit less cramped, even around the valves. I've got no experience with their rims but I expect them to be fine. They're affordable, available in 26" and they even do pretty colors. I may even get them foam filled (Vibrocore) just to be up to date with the latest tech too for once. Jay! @danielsapp : Thanks for figuring that out for us!
vinay nr22's article
Jun 17, 2019 at 9:38
5 hours
First Ride: Orbea's 2020 Occam Trail Bike is Light, Fast & Fun
The question is, have they bought the design from Weagle or from Trek?
vinay nr22's article
Jun 17, 2019 at 9:36
5 hours
First Ride: Orbea's 2020 Occam Trail Bike is Light, Fast & Fun
@cuban-b: I think Truvativ stuff is quite decent.
vinay danielsapp's article
Jun 17, 2019 at 9:26
5 hours
Made in USA: Inside Zipp's Carbon Wheel Testing and Production Facility
@WAKIdesigns: Installing ProCore never got me trouble. Before you inflate the tire, inflate the tube to 3bar. Only then inflate the tire. It seals instantly (unless the tire is already punctured, obviously). I helped my neighbor install regular tubeless, which was a first for me. It wasn't an endless nightmare by any means, but it takes a minute of pumping or so before both beads pop and it actually holds air. Until then it spills sealant so eventually you don't really know how much is actually in there. The only thing that bothered me is the expensive tube with the complex valve. I much prefer my current setup with two valves. For people who already have their rim tape, sealant, tire levers and all that, it is probably even much cheaper to just get the ProCore blue tire and airguide and just get a regular 1" wide tube and Pepi/CushCore/whateverinsertishotnow valve and use this setup. You just need to drill a second valve hole which may only be an issue with some carbon rims. Now I'm curious whether these Syntace W35 are actually Ryde Trace rims. The complete wheelset does use Sapim spokes and Sapim owns Ryde so I wouldn't be surprised if it is the same thing. I think Syntace did have a vision about what a rim was supposed to be like but needed a supplier to make that happen. They don't produce their own stuff as far as I know. I don't question your sources nor your proficiency on installing tires. You may have noticed my tires have much thinner sidewalls than what you are using, so obviously that helps. That said, I also never met someone who had trouble removing a cassette using a chain whip. The a year ago I read a review here about an alternative for a chain whip (a catalog product like Decathlon has been offering for a good while before that) which was great because the PB reviewer always ended up with bloody knuckles when taking off a cassette. And I don't question their experience in taking cassettes on and off either. Sometimes stuff is hard. I won't judge.
vinay danielsapp's article
Jun 17, 2019 at 5:58
8 hours
Made in USA: Inside Zipp's Carbon Wheel Testing and Production Facility
@WAKIdesigns: Syntace and Schwalbe developed ProCore independently, then later realized they were onto the same thing and then moved on together. The first experiments were with two valves, they only later developed that single nightmare valve. So I think the ProCore ready label only meant that they already drilled the second hole and that it is up to the pressure. It may not be a Ryde rim but the profile of the Syntace W35 looks very similar to that of the Ryde Trace. No experience with those though. I've only used their rims for commuter use. Aluminium Ryde and Rigida rims and steel Van Schothorst rims. So many names for that same brand! They've all held up fine though of course it wasn't mountainbike use. As for how hard it is to put on tires, I'm baffled by how poor tire installation technique some people have. Push the tire bead into the center channel, drag all "play" towards the valve and lift that end over the flange. Though I do admit I've started to use tire levers now too for the blue inner tire. When covered in sealant, it is hard to grip and drag it over the flange. But no reason to blame that on the rim. That said, being from The Netherlands I'm getting away with running the tires that you despise because they won't hold up where you're riding. Currently running Nobby Nic 26x2.35 in the rear and Conti Trail King 26x2.4 in the front.
vinay danielsapp's article
Jun 17, 2019 at 5:13
9 hours
Made in USA: Inside Zipp's Carbon Wheel Testing and Production Facility
@WAKIdesigns: I've got Syntace W35 wheels. Rims look like Ryde Trace 29 (29mm internal) rims, not sure if they're exactly the same though. They came with a label that said "ProCore ready" (ProCore is from Schwalbe and Syntace) so that's what I installed. I typically inflate the tube up to 6bar (why not) and it holds up just fine. @cravks: Yeah the regular 20 euro tube has some complex valve that when it clogs up is impossible to clean out. That is, I don't have a clue how to do that. So now I'm using a Pepi valve for the tyre and use a 1" tube with its own valve. The Pepi valve is tall enough to hold the air guide in place. First ghetto approach was to drill holes in the sides of a regular tubeless valve (through the rubber bit near the end) but it sealed soon enough so I soon enough went with the Pepi valve instead. As my rims are ProCore ready they already had the second valve hole drilled (4 spokes away from the first valve, covered with a black sticker) but as far as I know, all aluminium rims can have a second valve hole. I'd stick with the four spoke step and not more as you don't want to extend the area where you can't push the tire bead into the center channel. That would make tire installation/removal more difficult and would require the use of tire levers etc. Right now I'm only using two valves in the front wheel. The rear wheel still has the ProCore tube with a single valve. If it clogs up, I'll install a Pepi valve and a regular tube there too.
vinay RichardCunningham's article
Jun 17, 2019 at 5:02
9 hours
Check Out: Fenders, Flat Pedal Shoes, a Protective Pack & More - June 2019
@korev: Yeah, obviously be careful how you pack your pack. As mentioned, my backpack has a back protector so if it protects against a root, rock or anything alike then it would protect against my pump too. That said, the one he seemed to have been using has a horrible shape. I'm using a regular cylindrical shaped tire pump (something from Leyzine, forgot what it was) and a shock pump (Topeak Microshock), both without pressure gauge. I carry the Topeak Shuttle Gauge which can be connected between pump and tire or fork valve so I enjoy one accurate gauge for two pumps/purposes. The Topeak Microshock may be least likely to cause injury out of all shock pumps, but the workshop type tool that poor riders was using was probably the worst shape to carry on your back. The average shock pump again wouldn't be more likely to cause injury than a branch, root or rock lying there in the wrong spot. That said, not having your back covered leaves it exposed to whatever you crash onto. Safest would be full back protection without any tools or hard stuff in there, I'd say worst would be the hip pack. Without having seen any test, my guess is that it would subject the lower back to some odd loads if you land on a full hip pack with bottles, tools etc.
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