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vinay dan-roberts's article
Jun 5, 2020 at 14:42
8 hours
Pinkbike Poll: What's Your Favorite MTB Suspension Design?
Voted that too. I like that hardtails behave pretty predictable. No sudden geometry changes, no rebound to fine tune etc. It just always works as advertised. You just never get that with a full suspension design.
vinay dan-roberts's article
Jun 5, 2020 at 14:39
8 hours
Pinkbike Poll: What's Your Favorite MTB Suspension Design?
Their original 303 had two of those. Indeed if you draw a short part of a circle around a midpoint very far away, it is pretty much a straight line. It doesn't take much more to just make that section perfectly straight and consider the midpoint (pivot) infinitely far away.
vinay brianpark's article
Jun 5, 2020 at 14:30
8 hours
Race & Accessibility in the Mountain Bike Community
As a PB visitor "of color", let me drop some words here too. First of all, I always thought the words "white" and "black" have always been a bit, well, black and white. And considering how Muslims and Chinese (who, by skin tone are typically right in the middle) have been subject to discrimination too over the course of the past decades. In the comment section of this website too. Possibly more so than people with darker skin. Sure I get that in the greatest country on earth, land of the free etc, some groups (including some of those who are to serve and protect) tend to abuse and kill those with African roots. If something like that happens, even bringing those officers to justice seems like a poor act of covering things up as the root lies much deeper. "Justice" doesn't solve that. Find where the hatred stems from and solve that. Therapy, group sessions, illegal hippie shit, whatever it takes. But sending officers to jail for pushing things too far, based on a hatred they may have been raised with doesn't solve anything. It merely sends the signal that expressing that hatred is being frowned upon, but it doesn't solve the hatred. But back to the cycling world, to be honest I see no harm in the way it has developed. It wasn't intended to be a white male dominated scene. It just turned out this way. It takes a good bit of money to get into the sport. Especially for a kid who doesn't just break stuff, but also outgrows it. This isn't exclusive to cycling, but also to other sports and also to arts (like playing musical instruments). But it isn't intentional. Those big brands we have now have all been small, excited to see their business and the scene grow. They weren't in the position to do charity back then. Back in the days as I kid I would have loved a BMX too but these just were too expensive. Later as a teen I was spending half the money I made (delivering newspapers) on keeping my own bike rolling. No way I would have been able to afford a BMX or MTB (and ride it in the way it was intended). Only much later as a student I bought my first MTB, joined a group and got hooked. So sure, if the money was there I would have started earlier. But as it wasn't, I just started later. But I never blamed this on anything or anyone. The money just wasn't there. That's no blaming matter. As things are now, I think BMX and MTB are getting more accessible to more people. More trails mean you don't need a car to get to some trails to ride. And more good pumptracks in urban areas make the latest drivetrain and suspension nonsense obsolete, just basic skills for everyone to learn who has got access to a half decent set of wheels. So if there is one company making riding more inclusive, I'd give that award to Velosolutions. As for role models, I get that these can be inspirations. But if you're looking for similarities to yourself, you're looking at the wrong aspects. Why? Did these actual role models have that too? Which white male would Wade Simmons have been looking up to? Was he even? Or was he just shredding it for the love of it. Pick your role models based on what they do, not who they are on the outside. I've been rooting for Anneke Beerten ever since she was riding for BeOne. Because she's been working so hard following her own path and performing great doing so. I love both Matt Hunter as well as Hannah Barnes for so clearly loving what they do. Ryan Leech for being so skilled, friendly, positive and constructive. Picking role models and inspirations merely for being the same color and/or same sex as you is so limited. You'll be missing out on so many opportunities of being inspired, why should you? I'm a death metal (music) fan ever since I was 13 or so. Good luck extracting "black" role models from that scene. Chuck Schuldiner has always been my greatest inspiration. Sure he doesn't have the same skin color but when I listen to his music it is exactly how I feel. Surely that matters more than skin tone. So on one side I'm not necessarily against the way the cycling scene as it is as it hasn't evolved into this because of bad intentions. And (as a "black" guy) have never felt unwelcome. But I get that just as us blokes feel a company feels more fun as it becomes more diverse (that is, when more ladies join, clearly enjoy riding and take ownership over their own development as riders), "white" people may also feel better when people from different cultures (or at least with different colors) join. Not sure if that's the case as I haven't been on that side of the fence obviously. But if that's the goal the sure, go for it. But don't feel bad for it being as it is. Again, I think the best thing that could make riding bikes properly more accessible would be to have more public Velosolution tracks everywhere. They're inclusive as can be. Kids can develop proper skills on whatever gear they own and if they really love it, they'll get their own mountainbike eventually.
vinay dan-roberts's article
Jun 5, 2020 at 2:14
21 hours
Behind the Numbers: Ibis Ripmo V2
Understanding suspension design isn't necessarily the same as analyzing and reverse engineering an existing bike. The scanning stuff was only done to do the measurements. Once you have the dimensions, it is all back to 2D. LEGO technic is quite limiting actually as you're have to stick to discrete distances. Unless you actually use the black (+ shaped cross sectioned) beams for links. Then you can have the pivots wherever you want them to be, though the grey connectors are hard to keep exactly in position (that is, that they don't slide). If you want to build your own linkage, just make it out of cardboard with pins for pivots/connectors. Or maybe plywood if you need to make something stiffer (to integrate drivetrain and brake effects in there). Either way, with Lego you often end up working around its limitations rather than focus on what you really want to focus on. Your user name makes me assume you're into rally car racing where yes I'd agree Lego would come handy because it is more of a 3D affair (with anti-roll bars etc) but as bicycle suspension design is typically a 2D affair, I think you can get away with 2D materials and these usually are more convenient (and cheaper) to work with. That said, I'd love to see more articles on the 3D effects of bicycle dynamics. Cornering, throwing whips... Straightline suspension action is only a tiny fraction of what makes bicycle dynamics interesting. The PB audience has already been quite vocal about this: wheelsize, head angle... People want to talk about cornering dynamics. As for suspension design, we only need to know whether it remotely resembles a Session (where even a 9.9 doesn't round up to a 10, though idler pulleys are getting hot again).
vinay dan-roberts's article
Jun 5, 2020 at 1:54
21 hours
Behind the Numbers: Ibis Ripmo V2
@RonSauce: I only trust Vergier on suspension noises. He's the professional after all.
vinay jamessmurthwaite's article
Jun 4, 2020 at 23:06
24 hours
Throwback: The Best Tech From the Fort William DH World Cups
@Ron-C: Then again SC geometry has always been a bit behind the curve, hasn't it? Orange was way closer to what we have now. Also, Sam Hill's 2007 Sunday had a 62.7deg HA though fair enough the production model was much steeper. Orange was 64 in 2001, 62.5 in 2005. The PB audience may still have been lamenting the lack of pivots at the time though ;).
vinay danielsapp's article
Jun 4, 2020 at 22:10
1 days
Video: Forbidden Bike Co. Announce Complete Druid Builds & 3 New Frame Colors
@commental: Oops, seems like I ended up in a conversation between native English speakers. Sorry for the confusion.
vinay danielsapp's article
Jun 3, 2020 at 11:54
2 days
Video: Forbidden Bike Co. Announce Complete Druid Builds & 3 New Frame Colors
@RowdyAirTime: No drugs? Never tried smoking an eggplant though...
vinay danielsapp's article
Jun 3, 2020 at 10:41
3 days
Video: Forbidden Bike Co. Announce Complete Druid Builds & 3 New Frame Colors
Mr Brownstone, that's heroine innit? Indeed forbidden in most places afaik. Makes me wonder what cosmic eggplant and blue steel stand for ;).
vinay dan-roberts's article
Jun 2, 2020 at 3:40
Jun 2, 2020
Behind the Numbers: Unno Dash
@DhDWills: I'm not necessarily against aluminum. Also, my initial post actually was about "we" (as in, the what I read in the PB comment section). As mentioned, CNC production is getting a lot of love around here and it is typically aluminum being machined that way. As for my frame being made out of steel, I agree it is partly an emotional decision. The mountainbike frames I had been riding in in the fifteen years before I got this one were steel too (Voodoo, DMR and also a Specialized P1 dirtjumper). But back in the days I also worked in a shop where we built steel frames (typically road and trekking) to order. People came from all over the country with their dreams, whishes and stories about what they wanted, what they have done and what they wanted to do. Some older customers came for something more comfortable. Some others came for something super durable and have traveled the Himalaya on our bikes. Titanium frames we had built by Litespeed but steel frames we built ourselves. I thought it was cool. So I decided one day I wanted one of these too. A frame built exactly the way I wanted it. Now I have it and it rides exactly the way I envisioned it. Happy the way it turned out. As for steel being heavier. It has higher density so where helps to add volume (for tubes loaded under compression, bending or torsion), using lower density material (that is, aluminium for instance) does indeed make for a lighter frame. Members subject to tensile loading won't really benefit from the lower density material. As for the same weight, steel is typically stronger and stiffer when loaded in tension so when looking at a complete frame, both options (aluminum vs steel) save their weight in different places. If you head to the "geek section" of the Cotic website, you can read more about their decisions. Sure I thing when looking for superlight and not too heavily loaded (CX, road, XC etc) the weight savings are considerable (and maybe more sensible considering the effort put into saving weight in other components too). But when weight saving takes a back seat against durability/maintainability and strength, steel becomes more interesting again. I personally don't feel the weight of the frame is such a big deal. It is situated nice and low/central, sprung (in case of a full suspension design) and easy to control at both ends (feet close to the bb, hands near the head tube). So yeah, it is more a conscious choice for steel than so much a decision against aluminum. I obviously have enough aluminum components on my bike. I'd be surprised to see someone riding a mountainbike without any aluminum (or steel) anywhere on the bike!
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