Spank Oozy Trail Flat Pedal - Review

Oct 23, 2014
by Mike Kazimer  
Spank Oozy Trail pedal review

Spank Oozy Trail Pedal

When Spank's Spike flat pedal was introduced in 2011, it was an instant hit with the downhill and freeride crowd, who were won over by the pedal's thin and wide platform. Now, almost four years later, Spank has launched their Oozy Trail pedal, which shares many of the design principles of the Spike, but in a lighter package aimed at trail and all-mountain riders. Thanks to a new forging mold and extensive CNC machining, Spank was able to get the Oozy's total weight down 362 grams, a number that can be lowered all the way to 300 grams by riders who don't mind shelling out an additional $75 for a titanium axle upgrade kit. The pedal's aluminum body measures 111 x 111 x 12mm, with the usable portion measuring in at 100 x 100mm, numbers that translate into a platform with plenty of real estate underfoot.

The Oozy Trail pedal rotates on a sealed cartridge bearing that's housed in the bulge directly next to the crankarm, and at the other end of the spindle is an IGUS bushing that's protected from the elements by a rubber o-ring and a stainless steel cap. For 2014, Spank has upgraded the seals that are used on both the Spike and Oozy pedals to better keep out contaminants, and now use Finish Line brand Teflon lubricant to keep things spinning smoothly. Traction is provided by 9 pins on each side of the pedal, seven of which have machined tips for additional grip, as well as a smidgen of weight savings. Those seven pins thread in from the opposite side of the pedal for easy replacement, while the center two are actually set screws that thread through the entire body. As is typical with pedals that use some version of the oversize bearing design, it is necessary to use pedal washers to prevent the aluminum body from bottoming out on the crankarm, which would prevent them from turning. Colors: Emerald Green / Silver / Black / Blue / Red. MSRP: $149 USD. www.spank-ind.com


Spank Oozy Trail pedal review

Due to a new forging mold and additional CNC machining, the Oozy Trail weighs 60 grams less than Spank's more DH oriented Spike pedal.



Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesThe Oozy Trail pedals have held up to a summer's worth of use and abuse, shrugging off a number of direct impacts that had me expecting the worse. A few pins did need to be replaced, but that comes with the territory when smashing through rock gardens aboard a bike with an extremely low bottom bracket height. Like the Spike pedals, the Oozy Trails do have a slight bit of resistance built in to prevent them from spinning wildly should your foot slip off, but this resistance wasn't noticeable at all while pedaling, and the bushings and bearings are still spinning smoothly. The grip provided by the Oozy's wide platform is excellent, with plenty of traction on tap no matter what kind of nastiness I was riding through. I typically prefer pedals with a concave body as opposed to the pancake flat design that the Oozy Trails use, but Spank's use of shorter center pins works well to mimic the feeling of a concave platform, and I have no gripes about how they feel underfoot. When it comes down to it, the Oozy is a worthy addition to Spank's flat pedal lineup, a slightly refined version of the Spike that meets all the criteria for a well-executed flat pedal: thin, light, and above all, reliable. - Mike Kazimer


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Mentions: @spank-bikes




105 Comments

  • + 78
 I just saved 60 grams and it only cost me $150 Big Grin
  • + 16
 what a deal
  • + 17
 Only $150?!?! wow!
  • + 43
 60 grams? Does it really matter 60 grams? I understand a 1000g or 2000g but 60g. Leave you underwear at home and it will be more than 60g saved for free.
  • + 129
 Take a dump before a ride and save $150 bucks.
  • + 2
 Thanks. I have just learned I am not a rider.
  • + 12
 I hate people who get on their high horse about parts that save weight. Do you ride naked? It takes people to buy these things for technologies to be trickled down into lower specced parts. I personally wouldn't spend $150 on a pair of pedals, but other people will (and obviously do from other comments on here). Go Away.
  • + 7
 @mikeybean. You are right. Once I told a bike seller that I am not interested in weight of parts at all, he could not find other arguments to convince me. Unless you are a pro fighting for seconds, couple more grams won't change anything. Just practice and grow stronger. It will always be too heavy, because this is not your body.
  • + 13
 That said when you combine all the expensive weight savings into a bike that weighs a couple of kg less it's amazing. If you have the money and you get a warm fuzzy feeling every time you look at your near 10 grand rig then it's pretty sick. Kinda have to have the $$$ though.
  • + 6
 love the feel of my spikes but the bushings don't last and axles aren't that strong anyone would be better off buying something like nukeproofs for less then half the price
  • - 7
flag jedrzeja (Oct 24, 2014 at 0:52) (Below Threshold)
 @medievalbiking Have you ever met a rider who claimed that his bike was to light? You feel a difference when you change a heavy bike into a lighter one, but the feeling disappears after using the bike for some time. Then the new bike becomes heavy in comparison to the more expensive one in a bike store. What does it mean? There is a chance that you're becoming weaker, isn't it? I don't remember any of my previous bikes to be too light. All bikes, even 5kg road bikes are heavy when you are tired, or at least familiar with a bike. I prefer the option of maintaining strenght and stamina to feel that I can do more with the same, still heavy bike. Mine weighs about 21kg and I don't care. The "pretty sick" feeling you have is just a trap in your mind. You think that more expensive means better, and it still you that powers it. It won't move without your muscles. I stopped thinking like you when I saw a guy smoking me at 10 times cheaper bike.
  • + 11
 1) Your suggestion that I am getting weaker because I now have a lighter bike is laughable. I am still working my muscles as hard as I can but now my energy is going towards speed(fun) instead of trying to just move the bike. 2) Your argument that you still have to power a bike even if it is lighter, therefore lighter means nothing, doesn't make sense because if the bike is lighter surely it is easier to power - by your logic a 100kg bike would be fine because "it still you that powers it. It won't move without your muscles." 3) The feeling does not disappear after a period of time. I've had my bike for most of a season and I'm still amazed at how well it does everything, no way am I going back to the kona coilair I bought years ago, and no way I could've hit a 40 foot jump on that. 4) Just because a better rider can beat you on a worse bike does not make yours worth nothing. If this rider supposedly had a bike 10x cheaper you must've been on an 8k bike while he rode an $800 xc bike. Try taking a ride on that and see how it feels. 5) Your point that paying more for something makes something feel more valuable by default is true, and an obvious part of human nature. That said, if you pay more for a bike, it is also in actuality a better bike, unless you're an idiot who pays 5 grand for a 2 grand bike.
  • + 5
 I have infact met several riders who have claimed their bike was too light, mostly dh bikes under 32lbs, at which point it didnt hold a line well and the suspension felt awful because there wasn't enoughass for it to work against if you get what I mean. To me whos used to 34 - 40lb am/fr bikes, having a go on my mates 26lb carbon trail bike felt too light.
  • + 3
 Wut? 26Lbs for a trail bike isnt too light! My agro hard tail feels heavy at 28Lbs.

I have a set of the Spike DH pedals, and once the pins wear down a little bit, I feel the low amount of flat surface area leaves my foot not as secure as I would like. DMR Vault's pins seem sturdier and they have more flat pedal to stand on, while still being very open for mud clearance, plus being concave.

Also, the Spank pedals develop play quite easily around the bushing. Not really noticable when riding, but still nicer to have something that stays solid.
  • - 5
flag inked-up-metalhead (Oct 24, 2014 at 2:17) (Below Threshold)
 Are you stupid? I said compared to the nearly 40lb bikes that im used to a 26lb bike feels too light for me. Not that it is too light, just its too light for me and my riding style.
  • - 4
flag jedrzeja (Oct 24, 2014 at 2:24) (Below Threshold)
 You are exaggerating about the weights. There is no bike that weighs 100kg. Bikes weigh between 10 and 20kg and it is still about 15 to 20% of your body weight, provided that you are not a super skinny, or super fat person. Naturally one day you feel stronger, another day weaker and this means more than some grams or even kg less in the bike.
You are still working your muscles but not as hard, Lighter bike makes you move faster, but only if you are training on a heavier one. Getting used to a light bike, does not always mean you are going faster everywhere. Some sections or corners just won't let you go faster enough, and after some time of riding irregularly you can acknowledge that the speed is ok, forgetting that you were doing the same speed on your heavier bike 2 years ago. This is so much about human nature and it is called laziness. You just don't use / train the power always if you don't have to while moving a lighter bike.
The cona collar was not only heavier, but possibly performed worse.
I was smoked by an excellent dh rider on his very old and cheap xc bike. I was trying to chase him on my first dh bike and I was a beginner. My bike was approx 10 times more expensive than his. Had suspension and saint brakes. He had a completely rigid bike with one Vbrake.
More expensive bike in some cases can occur worse than less expensive bike. It also depends on trail, rider etc., but no always a more expensive bike is better. For example it may consist in the fact that the most expensive bikes often present some innovations that become history after some time, because they occur useless.
  • + 0
 @inked-up-metalhead This is the first time ever I witness a story of a too light bike, but donwhill does not mean moving bike with muscles only. The gravity usually helps.
  • + 4
 All youve done is repeat your ill informed comments and then admit you dont know that much. He was using the 100kg bike as an example, I.e. You were being silly when you said bike weight doesnt matter. It does. Every human can move their own weight. Anything you add onto that suddenly feels heavy. Hence why carrying 2 5kg shopping bags 2 miles kills your arms, because its an extra 5kg of mass your joints and muscles aren't used to. So a lighter bike over the same trail will be easier to ride. You cant argue with that, its a fact. Yes the training on a heavier bike would enable you to ride the lighter bike more easily, but itd also get you used to a heavier bike that carries momentum differently and perhaps jumps and handles differently. This may in turn make you slower (or quicker). The guy who smoked you on a full rigid was quite clearly a better rider than you, which goes to prove your 10x more expensive bike was a waste if you havent got the skills to ride it, regardless of weight. The fact is with these pedals, yes there's cheaper, but they're probably heavier or less grippy or less durable. Theres lots of pedals in the same price bracket as these, and all of them are good performers, unlike the bracket below where its a bit hit n miss. Your in a performance and consumer driven sport here, if you dont like the prices go take up something else like amateur racing or golf or oh wait they all cost the same or more than mtbing.
  • - 8
flag jedrzeja (Oct 24, 2014 at 3:08) (Below Threshold)
 @inked-up-metalhead Don't be rude. 100kg bike was an unreal and wrong example. Not every human can move their own weight. There is extreme obesity existing in world and this fat would be the extra weight. This way people can't even stand, walk, run or power slightly heavier bikes, depending on size of the problem. Yes a lighter bike is easier to ride, this way less demanding. The momentum difference is not so much noticeable if you consider a change of 1 or 2 % in weight of the whole set of bike and rider. It is body of rider that carries the most of momentum. It is a fact, that getting used to a bike helps in being faster but this is just a different aspect that we are not considerring right now. More expensive bike wasn't a waste, becasue I don't race and still want to have a dh bike for dh riding and keep the play safe.
  • + 6
 He was using that as an extreme example of what you were saying. Yeah it was silly but you started it. And i meant that as every healthy human being. And your still not getting the point. Its not the rider and bike combined, its the extra weight of the bike. How easily you can lift the bike, turn it, get it going in the first place is all down to bike weight not yours. Yes, most of the overall momentum is the rider, but swap tyres from xc weight to dh weight and youll notice the bike carries more momentum. Its not like these things arent well documented...
  • - 1
 Now that you have specified all your previous arguments, or added some different, I can agree with you, but my earler comment also states true. So maybe we are discussing who is more true about the same arguments? The difference between our points of view exists only in the fact that I am considering some proper pedalling to train muscles and you are talking about facing some technical section with a lot of jumping, cornering etc. I just wanted to say that there are lighter and heavier bikes and the differences are heavily exaggerated by riders. Especially when they are searching for saving something around 50g or so. Yes I can feel 2kg more or less on a bike (not even always), but I don't see difference of 0.5kg. Having in mind that I would have to build a completely new bike for 3 times the money to save something around 3kg I don't care at all. I prefer to keep the weight stable and see my progress more clearly, provided that it works well. Others prefer to spend their money, buy lighter bikes and feel sick about it. In the end I am observing a trend of new bikes becoming lighter and lighter. They are carving everything, thinking of parts to get rid of. What would be the weight of the bike in next ten years? There is a limit somewhere and the sick feeling may only be a matter of next 20grams saved in a totally new bike.
  • + 4
 Confused - its only $75 for the 62-gram-saving titanium axle kit.....!? not $150.
  • + 1
 hey biker3335, you mentioned nuke proof at half the cost. i have spikes on one bike and crappy pedals on another. I was thinking about picking up a pair of race face atlas, or the $40 nuke proof plastic pedals. i love my spikes. have you ridden on the nuke proof? how do they compare? I notice a difference between my spikes and three other pedals i have tried.
  • + 1
 I know an upstart who is deeply prejudiced. He thinks that people whining on pointlessness of weight savings are frustrated because they can't afford high end products. I Myself, on the other hand, think that Titanium is such a luxurious and rare material that it should be used only for elements that can give justice to it's beauty: frame, eventually bars and seatpost. I refuse to discuss it's price. It would be refreshing though to see sameone notice the minimal thickness of the pedal which among similar offerings is a game changer in how we ride flat pedals.
  • + 3
 Waki, how about titanium body armor? for the game of thrones mtb look. i would cop that.
  • + 3
 FWIW: After riding ~43lb DH bikes for about ten years, when I got a ~31lb AM bike, I noticed immediately that it couldn't hold a line like the heavier bikes did(& one of my DH bikes was a bottlerocket, which has similar travel & geo to my lighter AM bike.) Had to ride the bike in a completely different way. You could argue that the heavier bike was better, because it was nimble, but stayed where you put it, whereas with the AM bike, I can put it where I want it, but when I hit an obstacle, it might deflect over to a completely different line.

I know which one I want to pedal back up to the top of a trail though.
  • + 2
 truedat groghunter, i just jumped from a 29lb AM bike to a 40lb dh bike and man the thing tracks. i love it. point and shoot.
  • + 0
 The only valid argument against a bike being light is money. If money didn't matter, you'd all have your bikes as light as possible.
  • + 2
 I disagree smike. I think if money were not an issue i would prolly ride a 34 to 38 pounder. my dh rig at 40 seems a little heavy but i can ride it much harder than my 29lber. on my lighter bike i have to be uber aware of washing. on my big bike i play around with where i put my upper body weight. it almost rides like its on rails. I feel weight has a lot to do with it. the geo between the two rides is almost the same.
  • + 2
 Bike can be too light but most of gravity bikes will never get there. I rode a sub 9kg XC 29er, I put my own cockpit on it to make it more "civilized". That thing was a bloody hemoroid and you really didn't need to use brakes because every root was stopping you down as hell. When your wheels including tyres are sub 2 kg, sht starts to surface...
  • - 1
 You're not comparing apples to apples though. Of course a 29lb trail bike is not going to handle DH like a 38lb DH bike. If you keep everything the same (travel and geo), you would go as light as you could. It's not the weight that makes the lighter bikes sketchy - it's the geometry, the stiffness and the amount of travel.
  • + 2
 No it isnt. Various people have said once you go under 34lbs with a dh bike it feels too light. So how (on a v10C or session 9.9) is it not the weight that makes it feel sketchy? Like, the exact same frame but theyve dropped a few pounds (easily done)
  • + 2
 but the two bikes are the same. the only real difference is 2 less inches of travel on my am bike and a lower bb on my am bike. the travel doesnt change the way it tracks and if anything the lower bb should make the am bike track better and not worse
  • + 0
 Actually, a lot of dh bikes ability to hold a line is the suspension, its the amount of negative travel they have (once sagged back up to full extension). Its why vpp is a very effective dh suspension platform, because they typically run a little extra sag by design.
  • + 2
 Actualy looking ahead or not looking ahead is going to make more difference than switching from 50lbs Bighit with Supermonster and 30lbs Session 9.9 with BoxxerWC and 400g rims... I am too a perfect rider, skilled and fit, my choice of components is flawless and the only variable making night and day is the latest thing marketed to me or the current argument in the discussion. Whenever I fail to qualify to a final in local race I say: you can't alwasy get what you want - it's racing Big Grin
  • + 0
 Yeah but presuming the rider is actually competent, more riders would be able to ride the big hit faster than the session without killing the rims if nothing else
  • + 0
 Hahahahaha best comment ever!!!!!
  • + 2
 $150 bucks to save the weight of 5 paper clips...
  • + 1
 thuff - people were hung for less get over it.
  • + 1
 @inked-up-metalhead While what you say about suspension soaking up hits is true, & is further supplemented by head angle(in that the slacker the angle, the more rearward your front wheel's path is as suspension compresses) deflecting because of less suspension feels different to me than deflection because of the bike having less mass. Keep in mind, too, I'm talking about a bike with 170mm of travel at ~32lbs vs a bike with ~175mm of travel at 43lbs, & they have similar head angles. you're unlikely to be able to feel a significant difference in what the suspension absorbs between those two, but the bikes move over aggressive terrain in completely different manners.
  • + 1
 I dont understand what your saying? Are you agreeing with me or disagreeing? And just for reference, 2 suspension platforms can feel completely differently due to kinematics, meaning similar travel amounts feel completely different or ride completely differently over rough terrain.
  • + 3
 Didn't expect my reply to provoke this....

The original point is that people complain/ moan/ like to find a problem with parts that save weight (which inevitably cost more than heavy parts), just because they like to. There is obviously a market/ purpose for the high end stuff and anyone who says its pointless or says stuff like 'take a dump before you go riding', is quite frankly narrow minded and miss-informed about how marketing and product design works.
  • + 1
 @inked-up-metalhead If you're saying that the weight makes no difference, then I'm disagreeing. both bikes had the same 175mm fork on them for a while, but rode completely differently. It's not just suspension.
  • + 1
 No, im the one who's been saying the weight does make the biggest difference all along?!?
  • + 1
 I was replying to your comment "Actually, a lot of dh bikes ability to hold a line is the suspension, its the amount of negative travel they have (once sagged back up to full extension). Its why vpp is a very effective dh suspension platform, because they typically run a little extra sag by design."

I assumed you were implying that I wasn't feeling the difference between weights, but between a DH bike & an AM bike.
  • + 1
 Dont assume anything over the Internet. If youd read all my previous comments, youll see that ive been saying weight makes a big difference to how it rides, but so does geometry and suspension layout. It all adds up though. The only bikes you can truly compare weight wise are 2 exactly the same frame and suspension set ups with 10lb difference in weight. Untill then it could be any manner of things making it feel different. My new bike is either 150 or 165mm rear travel, with the same 160 fork that was on old bike with 160mm rear travel, and the new one even with 10mm less travel handles rocks and roots far better, because its a better suspension design. Your two bikes could have different intended uses, it could be a long travel am bike vs a short travel dh bike, which would feel completely different even if they weighed exactly the same
  • + 3
 Have a claim and be a dick about it.
  • + 0
 Light bikes suck on windy days when catching air. I usually ride no hands when riding on the road to save my back, neck and palms. When I had a litespeed road bike it would get blown around by the slightest side wind. I imagine it is worse for those aero shapes. I don't see 3-5mm thinner pedals having less rock strikes and doubt the increased pedalling efficiency is very noticeable. Pedals cost what they do because of materials and CNC work done on small batches. I'll keep my free kerbside pick up Felt pedals with $6 custom angled grub screws for when I'm not riding clipless.
  • + 1
 I look at weight from both sides now, from up & down, and still somehow it's weight illusions that I recall, I really don't know weight...at all.
  • + 1
 - owns a 32 lb v-10. Set personal speed records with it one day one with it. Just saying
  • + 2
 I think it's a lot harder to go too light with DH bikes than it is with xc bikes. DH bikes no matter what you aren't gonna get them (much) under 30 lb, whereas I'm sure you could probably get a carbon fibre hard tail xc bike that weighs half that, which would probably handle like all the worst parts of a feather.
  • + 1
 @medievalbiking It makes much sense to me, but I will still have my individual claim that it is more about thinking than weighing. After I built my present dh bike I could feel and compare to guess it was between 18 and 19 kg. Then after some time, I actually weighed it with some precise scale of my friend's and found out it is actually 21,5 kg. It was the moment when my bike started to feel much, much heavier. I've read all of the comments once again and there is a true point in most of them, but I think riders are too much under the influence of commercials and fuss exaggerating the influence of weight. There are two ways of keeping the weight low. Having lighter parts or having fewer parts. Considerring the existing raw materials which bikes are made of, there is not much to do more to decrease the weight dramatically. The progress is slowing down and costing more. Afterall bikes are not only to cope with riding loads, but all the nasty transportation situations, maintanance abuse etc. From my point of view a bike should stay a reliable tool of safety and survival in many cases. It has to weigh something to be strong enough rather than demand super careful treating just for the sake of some fractions of seconds. I remember when I changed handlebars into 25% lighter and it was stiff only under foreseen by the designer loads. Riding specificly, I sometimes introduced to it loads of different directions and it does not feel so stable as the previous, heavier one.
  • + 4
 Opinions opinions opinions, most of which are completely fine, because even if they are wrong, they are subjective opinions. The opinions which are not fine are those that poorly criticize others for their choices. The reoccurring and disappointing type of comment I have consistently read is that someone doesn't deserve to ride a 10k bike because they aren't skilled enough to use it to its limits. There are many things wrong with those statements, but I'll leave it to 2 main points:

Who are you to say that said rider isn't skilled enough for the bike? Hypothetically speaking, and purely as an example, I wouldn't sponsor anyone, no matter how many wins on the WC circuit, who openly says that a rider of any skill doesn't deserve to ride the most expensive technology if they can afford it... (Think back to the Rock Shox Vivid Air advertisement).

Who are you to judge whether someone deserves something or not if you don't know them, and even if you did know them, and you're 100% right, what sort of person does that make you?

Just ride your bike.
  • + 1
 Very liberal words coming from ZeGermans.
  • + 1
 There are a lot of intelligent people in Australia, seems to me.
  • + 1
 @inked-up-metalhead "don't assume anything over the internet" ah, i see were taking jabs at each other now. i used the word assume instead of typing out: "you replied to my comment contradicting my assertion, so i used the words you typed as a basis for a rebuttal" because i thought we were having a civilized conversation, & i could use vernacular, since in this case, i'm not really making an assumption. However, it turns out you've decided that even though i agreed with you, i somehow did so wrong, & you're going to prove me wrong using any method possible.

actually on topic: your statement that you can only compare 2 systems that are identical except for the tested variable is false. You absolutely can compare 2 different systems, & gain valuable, even scientific data from doing so, as long as you account for any skewing of your results due to the dissimilarities. In this case, i've accounted for the variables you stated, & am confident that I was still able to discern a difference: therefore my conclusion that bike weight has an impact on tracking, specifically in the case of the two bikes i'm comparing.
  • + 2
 This thread has provided me with hours of entertainment. It's like a mountainbiking sitcom.
  • + 10
 Whinge, moan, my pedals work, blah, blah fucking blah. I love my Spikes. At the end of the day there are cheaper options but for those of us willing to shell out for the bling aspect these are then look no further. Fully serviceable axle and with that beveled side profile, get your lean on boys and girlz!
  • + 4
 spikes are the truth. I'm fairly picky about my pedals and they're the best I've ever owned
  • + 1
 riding spikes right now(when I ride flats), and I like them, but compared to the ht-aeo1 pedals they replaced they don't grip at all. Only reason I went away is because the ht aren't durable whatsoever(as far as axle and bearings go)
  • + 3
 IMO, if you are at all serious about riding, and to spend this kind of $ on pedals you would have to be, then riding in any other shoe than a 5-10 is silly. Your pedals will only grip as well as what your shoe allows. For me the pins on the HT's are a bit long and unnecessary.
  • + 3
 Wouldn't being really, truly serious about riding exclude the possibility to write sht loads on the internet? The truth is, people who deserve such stuff like Ti axles get it for free as sponsorship deal, then if a lightweight component, normally invisible, hidden inside other part, (like airspring in DH fork) fails riders expectations, he rides a normal Steel axle or Coil spring but pretends it isn't...
  • + 1
 @wheelieking81 I agree about the pins, those things marred my skins a bit, but they sure dug in!(To flesh or rubber..)
(Edit: both pedals were with 510 freeriders)
  • + 8
 Oh I always love the comment section on Pinkbike. Its like no other. Basically like a bunch of teanage girls arguing about which boy is more dreamy. Get a life and quite analyzing and bitching about every little issue you can with bike parts.
  • + 13
 Love my Spikes.
  • + 3
 Ditto! Excellent bit of kit.
  • + 6
 $150 average price for a good quality THIN pedal. You can get great pedals for $80 like Kona wah wahs or Spesh Bennies, but they are both pretty thick.

Weight does make a difference. A lighter bike is quicker acceleration, easier to climb, more huck and whip able. Not to mention you will not be as worn out at the end of a day of riding.

Back to the Spikes...60g is not a good reason to go and swap out your Spikes for the oozy's. But for those of us in need of new pedals, a 60g lighter pedal is pretty attractive.
  • + 2
 Deity....
  • + 4
 I'm on my 4th set of spike pedals. I love the platform shape and mud shedding design. However they don't last long. The bushing and bearing are destroyed within just 2 or 3 months. I bought replacement parts but a blind bearing puller is necessary to do the work. My local bike shops don't even have the right tools. Put simply, the pedals would be awesome but they are fragile and don't last long.
  • + 2
 my spikes are lasting just fine. something is up if you go through a pair every 2-3 months
  • + 2
 I hear ya. The bushings have a ridiculously short lifespan and they're like $15/pair. So now I'm just riding mine all rattly until they're completely done. Too bad because they're great pedals otherwise.
  • + 2
 I'm riding them on a single speed. Mashing up steep hills puts extreme pressure on the drive train at that gearing. Not everyone exerts that much force on their pedals but it isn't really that unusual either. These same people go through bottom brackets frequently too. While the spike pedals are fine for some riders. Many riders will discover that the bushings and bearings cannot withstand their type of riding.
  • + 2
 Totally agree. Love the way spanks feel, but the bearings suck. I've never had a pedal repeatedly fail so quickly. I need a good similarly priced replacement, any reccs? Been considering point ones or just getting a set of saints. Haven't seen much in between I'm willing to trust after my experience with spank.
  • + 1
 Why review $150 pedals when for that price they should do everything great. Why not more budget oriented offerings that are not just "the product is great, after months of thrashing no problems" but also offer similar performance?
  • + 1
 Because Spank likely is a paid advertiser, while lower-budget brands are not. That's just the state of capitalism. It's why you won't see scathing reports on prescription drug effects when after the news program cuts to commercial an advertisement for Prozac comes on. You don't review "other" brands if they don't give you advertising dollars.
  • + 4
 How many pedal reviews does pb do in a week?
I got pedals like four years ago. They still work.
  • + 6
 I love my spikes
  • + 2
 You guys are missing all the puns.. pins! These pedals are flat-out oozing style. Igus you'd all rather argue the cost, instead of bearing down and poking fun.
  • + 1
 They're just a little cranky.
  • + 0
 I have a pair of Deity's Decoy flats, and they are worrisomely durable! I bought them on CRC in 2012, and they are still rock solid! No issues at all. They do look like sh*t by now, since they get abused a lot, but no rolling issues, no bent axles, no nothing! If they ever fail I am buying a pair again! Also, they are on CRC for 83 bucks! BUT they do weight 425g for the pair, no big deal for me, but some may not like it.

www.chainreactioncycles.com/br/pt/deity-components-decoy-pedals-2014/rp-prod94874
  • + 1
 Man this is a conversation. The biggest and best part of it, at the end of the day I can say Wakidesignes and I participated in a forum. I feel good, I feel better than James Brown...
  • + 2
 Had spank spike pedals 110euros. Killed bearings in 2 months. Will never buy spank pedals again.
  • + 1
 Yes everything should be cheap enough so that every company goes bankrupt and there is no more mountain bike parts this makes sense.
  • + 1
 I've run Xpedos on my trail bike for three seasons, super happy with them ... and especially for $70.
  • + 1
 That weight is actually quite surprising, considering that the Point One pedals are 280g with steel spindles.
  • + 2
 I'm oozing over those pedals!!!
  • + 2
 I'd buy 'em if I were flat broke.
  • + 2
 Lots of pedalphiles here!
  • + 0
 my rebuttal to every comment for and against these pedals... Deity Components.
  • + 0
 Only £150, thats pretty cheep when I think how much my Vault TI Mag pedals cost
  • - 1
 Just get three pairs of diety compounds for the same price, love mine been abusing them for two years now still solid
  • + 1
 Love my Spikes!!
  • + 0
 Steeeeeeeeez!
  • + 0
 I love my wellgo Mg1s
  • + 1
 they're not perfect but lotta bang for your buck.
  • + 0
 Ugly.
  • - 3
 9 pins only?
  • - 1
 No purple Fail
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