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DavidGuerra seb-stott's article
Sep 22, 2021 at 6:57
2 days
Orange Introduces The Switch 6 Team
@threehats: You need to think of the seatstays on a four bar design as a floating brake mount (in the cases where the caliper does attach there), and the shock link as the rod on these floating brake contraptions (albeit much shorter). The float it provides is not as effective, only about 50% (unless it's one of those designs in which the "shock link" extends way back), but it seems to be good enough for most. These analogies might be tricky to get, I'll keep my fingers crossed!
DavidGuerra seb-stott's article
Sep 22, 2021 at 6:29
2 days
Orange Introduces The Switch 6 Team
@threehats: To address your confusion: The different braking behaviour I'm speaking of with some single pivot four bar designs has nothing to do with the interaction of the extra linkages with the shock, or with any interaction with the shock. It only relates to the path of the caliper itself as the suspension is compressed. What Danny Hart's floating brake adaptor does, in that link I shared, is partially accomplished by a four bar design in which the caliper is mounted on the seatstays, which is why no four bar designs of that kind (that I know of) ever used a similar floating brake adaptor contraption.
DavidGuerra seb-stott's article
Sep 22, 2021 at 6:09
2 days
Orange Introduces The Switch 6 Team
@threehats: Yes you are completely clueless, but haven't gotten your head out of your ass enough to realize it. I'll go back to your original statement: "Adding a linkage to drive the shock doesn’t change the braking behaviour" Who's talking about a linkage to drive the shock???
DavidGuerra seb-stott's article
Sep 21, 2021 at 17:36
3 days
Orange Introduces The Switch 6 Team
@threehats: You're totally clueless dude. That has nothing to do with the principles I mentioned. You are mixing everything up. I refer you to the link iiman posted, which speaks of the ways manufacturers tried to address this issue throughout time, until they figured out it just wasn't worth the trouble. https://www.vitalmtb.com/features/BRAKE-JACK-DOESNT-EXIST-Advice-with-Team-Robot-March-2021,3044
DavidGuerra seb-stott's article
Sep 21, 2021 at 11:47
Sep 21, 2021
Orange Introduces The Switch 6 Team
@iiman: What do you not get? Like when you press the fork, you get extra degrees of head angle. Get it now? Jeez...
DavidGuerra seb-stott's article
Sep 21, 2021 at 9:49
Sep 21, 2021
Orange Introduces The Switch 6 Team
It's also amazing how in almost every comment that I make in this platform, five smartasses come along to "correct" me because they didn't understand what I wrote, sidestepping and ignoring my actual comment and taking it to another direction.
DavidGuerra seb-stott's article
Sep 21, 2021 at 9:00
Sep 21, 2021
Orange Introduces The Switch 6 Team
@iiman: I think saw some Konas in the past with a floating disc setup though. It's a rod that extends from the main frame into a "floating" part where the caliper is attached to, just like those on the link you posted.
DavidGuerra seb-stott's article
Sep 21, 2021 at 8:57
Sep 21, 2021
Orange Introduces The Switch 6 Team
@iiman: No. You are not getting it, and you are bringing in concepts that have nothing to do with what I and chrismac were referring to. The linkage on a Kona, since the caliper is not attached to it, does not affect braking. Braking is just like on a non-linkage single pivot. We were referring to the effects of the caliper being attached to the chainstays, or to whatever part is directly connected to the main pivot, versus other systems that allow some "float" of the caliper in relation to the movement of the main swingarm.
DavidGuerra seb-stott's article
Sep 21, 2021 at 7:44
Sep 21, 2021
Orange Introduces The Switch 6 Team
@mountainsofsussex: Oh, ok, yes, I forgot about those types, I was assuming that every four-bar bike has the caliper on the seat stays, but with four-bar single pivots where the rear pivot is not concentric with the axle there often isn't much room to mount the caliper on the seatstays. That's an advantage for concentric axles on four-bar single pivots and for non-single pivot four bar designs.
DavidGuerra seb-stott's article
Sep 21, 2021 at 6:37
Sep 21, 2021
Orange Introduces The Switch 6 Team
@threehats: One correction though, the effect chrismac mentions does happen in all bikes in which the "bar" (the line from one pivot to the next) in which the caliper is mounted is not parallel the the movement of the wheel during compression. On true single pivots, this bar is exactly perpendicular. On most four-bar bikes, single pivot or otherwise, it makes a sort of 45 degree angle. VPP bikes are the ones most likely to offer the least interference of braking with the suspension.
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