phobospwns

An engineer, who frequently misses working in shops.

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phobospwns vernonfelton's article
Feb 16, 2018 at 9:45
Feb 16, 2018
Shimano Patent Filing Raises Electric Questions
I read the article, and also watched the vid at the end... First on the article, it could lead to something big... or, it could be a matter of "patent it just in case someone else goes down this path", and they may have decided not to, possibly. Either way, really neat little blub, I love stuff like this. Regarding the vid: I just wanna say, I love what KS is and has been doing as a company. They started out making cheap parts en mass quantities as recently as 1991... look at them now, only 27 years! They've been a great alternative at a nice price point for a while now, and they're rolling out with new stuff year in and year out- keeping up with the "big dogs". I have a lot of respect for them as a company. I hope they're able to grow their market share so they can keep coming out with nice stuff.
phobospwns RichardCunningham's article
Feb 16, 2018 at 9:01
Feb 16, 2018
Carbon vs Aluminum: Separating Environmental Fact From Fiction in the Frame Materials Debate
The article put a lot of facts out there, which is great. It went above and beyond so many other articles we get to see as consumers. However, it didn't present the facts in an even manner, in my opinion. It felt like a puff piece for carbon fiber when it was said and done. Sure there was lip service paid to "there's no wrong answer", but the pros and cons were such that the path to carbon was much more positively spun. This is a great example: "If your bicycle frame is made of carbon, that hole is 12 to 30 inches wide and oil comes out of it. If it is aluminum or steel, well, those holes can be seen from space." If you want to talk about a single instance of 1 "hole" itself, sure... but it's a vast understatement in regards to any actual oil extraction operation. Where's the picture of a huge plot of oil wells? https://themorningnews.org/gallery/oil https://cdn5.img.sputniknews.com/images/102937/43/1029374306.jpg A little more than just an innocuous little hole, isn't it? Yet, only actual imagery of a bauxite mine was shown. I just found that odd. There's other examples, but that was the most egregious one to me. In the end, I still like the article. Again, it contained a lot of really good information. I'd rather this than the alternative- an article based on hearsay and internet opinions. I just think it was a little skewed, I encourage people to do research beyond this article before they make any "real decisions", but this is a nice starting point.
phobospwns mikelevy's article
Feb 1, 2018 at 9:25
Feb 1, 2018
Failing the $2,000 Bike Challenge - Opinion
@bonfire: Yes, all of those things are new- but the technology associated with manufacturing them, that cost has not gone up. You think the tech to fabricate an 11 speed drive train is considerably more expensive than the tooling to create an 8 speed set up? Nope. Geo: Nope Suspension: Nope Derailleurs: Nope Brakes: Nope Wider tire extrusions: Nope The technology should be going down in price as companies become more adept at utilizing their tech. Yes, there's cost associated with R&D, and there's always going to be overhead- space related, maintenance, etc. We're not talking about small jumps in price, things have gone up considerably, more than what I think is justifiable. Seeing 10k bikes isn't unusual at all anymore. That's crazy.
phobospwns mikelevy's article
Jan 26, 2018 at 7:18
Jan 26, 2018
Failing the $2,000 Bike Challenge - Opinion
@bonfire: Failure prone I-Drive? I mean, I don't ride a GT anymore anyway, so whatever... but pretty sure that hasn't been too much of an issue with the last like 3 generations of the ID. Maybe I'm wrong though, I haven't kept expert track of it. The main point of that was comparing like vs. like. What's a 2010 Trance 2 vs. the new Trance 2 look like? But yes, the Giant is a nice value, for sure. There are good value bikes out there (especially with the emergence of direct to buyer brands who make great products)- I just bought one; but by in large, the cost relative to the value of bikes across the board haven't really improved from 8 years ago. To me, considering there haven't been any truly major advancements in tech (yes, 11 speed works better than 9 speed did; geo has gotten more rider friendly; and dropper seatposts are huge- probably the biggest thing; but a bike from 2010 could still be confused for a bike from 2018 ), the climb in price is not justified. I'll still buy things, because the only other option is quitting, which I'm not doing. But it's not all that often I feel like "hey, I just got fantastic value for my money, I feel great about this purchase." when I get something brand new. With my newest bike, I feel that way. Maybe that's why there was 8 years between new bike purchases for me (with several used bikes/frames along the way).
phobospwns mikelevy's article
Jan 25, 2018 at 12:55
Jan 25, 2018
Failing the $2,000 Bike Challenge - Opinion
Most people who are putting bikes together are doing it for closer to 1500, and can't have the luxury of buying new stuff. I like the article, though. I feel like you could have gotten that bad boy finished off for the 200 you had left, though. I just bought the most expensive bike I've ever purchased... $1900 for a 2017 Vitus Escarpe XT on CRC, new. Prior to that I'd purchased 2 bikes for $1500 (1 EP back when I was in the industry - GT Sensor 1.0 my only other new bike ever, and 1 used DH- Moorewood Izimu). I'm an engineer, in my 30s. So, I imagine I'm probably at or above the median of incomes for users on this site. Sure, I pay a mortgage, and I've got some school loans, but my car is paid for, so really, my monthly costs aren't crazy. This isn't to brag, it's just to set the scene. I don't think I could ever justify spending 4k to 5k on a bike. I don't know how enough people can to have it be the new normal for upper end bikes. It boggles my mind. The thing is- they aren't getting nicer! My GT was MSRP 3k (again, paid 1500). Full XT, full Fox, Richey/WTB bits, ALU frame. Now, 3.2k (chalk 200 up to inflation, which adds up) gets you the lowest possible spec Sensor. NX drivetrain, Deore brakes, RS Recon/Monarch. "GT" hubs with WTB/RF bits. So the same money now gets you downgraded drive train, brakes, wheels, and suspension. Still an Alu frame. What gives?
phobospwns mikekazimer's article
Jan 21, 2018 at 6:49
Jan 21, 2018
SRAM's New DUB Cranks and Bottom Brackets - First Look
Changes like this come around because a company feels like if they're doing nothing they're losing ground. Changing for the sake of it ensures that you don't have a repeatable product that you are truly perfecting. You get just far enough for the product to start working out the real kinks, then introduce a whole new host of them with the next product, because... "Progress". This is why I truly appreciate shimano's methodical approach. People who criticize them for being too slow to adopt change are missing the point.
phobospwns mikekazimer's article
Jan 17, 2018 at 12:06
Jan 17, 2018
phobospwns paulaston's article
Jan 17, 2018 at 12:01
Jan 17, 2018
Hope Cuts Price on Made-in-England Carbon Bike
The fact of the matter is, any bike that's listed over 3k could drop 1k+ off the price and still be easily profitable. Props to Hope for actually doing it.
phobospwns vernonfelton's article
Jan 10, 2018 at 13:27
Jan 10, 2018
We've Got Questions: Digging Deep at Enve
@thorsbane: I don't have a problem with the cost. I have a problem with the video repeatedly conveying the notion that it's the fact that they're manufactured in the US that's causing the disparity. It's causing *some* of that price gap, sure- but the vast majority of the mark-up is simply because people who can afford those prices will pay. We in the biking industry universally put some amount of stock into "reputation" of brands, it impacts how we spend money, no doubt. ENVE caters to those who put a larger stock in those items than others (and have the money to make those purchases accordingly). More power to them. I'd love to see a company who had the balls to admit it, or at least no pussy foot around it. "People buy ENVE despite the high cost, because not only do we make a great product, but because the brand commands respect within the industry." would be a much more badass answer. Own it, ya know?
phobospwns vernonfelton's article
Jan 10, 2018 at 11:53
Jan 10, 2018
We've Got Questions: Digging Deep at Enve
That's pretty rad. This is the kind of thing they should be talking about when asked why their wheels cost so much. "We provide lifetime support to our customers, which frankly, raises the initial cost. But, if you invest in our wheels, and you won't regret it, and we will show you the value of your purchase".
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