phobospwns

An engineer, former professional mechanic, who frequently misses working in shops.

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phobospwns jamessmurthwaite's article
May 28, 2021 at 6:36
May 28, 2021
Throwback Thursday: How Much Has Geometry Changed in the Past 10 Years?
My bike is a 2017. 27.5, 66.5 HA, 435 reach (I'm 5'10), and on my local trails, it's an absolute blast- so much better than 2010-ish bikes, yet it hasn't gone "too far". These trails came about when things tended to be a lot tighter and it's really 50% up 50% down (with zero fire roads), so when you get to a bike that's got a 63 HA, a 500mm reach number, and a 1200+ WB... people have started riding bikes like they're driving big rigs- I'm starting to see "pre turn" lines getting cut into turns, and the trails are starting to get wider and wider. On the climbs, guys are pushing these endro rigs, and despite their "steep seat tube angles", they are more and more averse to every little root, so again, widening trails. It's not making anyone a better rider in this particular terrain- I still blow by most of these guys. It is; however, turning the trails into highways. The longest and slackest just isn't the best all the time- but I can see why guys want these bikes, based on the general sentiment toward "old geometry". I hope things settle in soon... it wouldn't surprise me to see a slight "correction" back the other way, because it's starting to get a little crazy- everything is a park bike now. I sincerely wish I lived in a place where I needed the latest long & slack geometry to maximize my riding experience. I just... don't (womp womp). A lot of folks out there don't, though. I dunno. It's not that big of a deal, the "every bike must be more long and slack than the last" is just a little annoyance that I probably overstated here, heh.
phobospwns jamessmurthwaite's article
May 23, 2021 at 6:00
May 23, 2021
phobospwns jamessmurthwaite's article
May 23, 2021 at 5:40
May 23, 2021
SRAM Produces Generative Design Prototype Cranks in Partnership with Autodesk
This is awesome. Generative design is the eventual future of mountain biking (amongst many other things). The technology that went into designing this crank has been used in much more high-risk environments for some time now (such as high performance car parts). If anything, it's more advanced than the technology used to create whatever crank you're riding now, the amount of risk in the comments is quite overstated.
phobospwns henryquinney's article
May 23, 2021 at 5:28
May 23, 2021
Opinion: The Hot Chip Has Gone Cold - Flip Chips Don't Deliver
Alright, so flip chips don't give you what you want... But is their presence hindering anything performance wise? Are they adding substantial cost to bikes? I believe not, on both accounts. They may also add value in the minds of other riders. So should they certainly shouldn't stop using them, right? In this article it seems like you're actually asking for more flip chips, in fact!
phobospwns mikekazimer's article
May 19, 2021 at 5:51
May 19, 2021
SRAM Granted Patent for Drivetrain With a Direct Mount Derailleur
Holy... it was that long ago. I feel like I just picked up a discount saint hub & RD the other day as it never really caught on. Time flies, man.
phobospwns mikekazimer's article
May 19, 2021 at 5:44
May 19, 2021
SRAM Granted Patent for Drivetrain With a Direct Mount Derailleur
@Corinthian: Yup, I came here to say this myself!
phobospwns jamessmurthwaite's article
May 6, 2021 at 10:44
May 6, 2021
Only 8% of Downhill World Cup Riders Want Skinsuits to Return - Pinkbike's State of the Sport Survey
Finally the survey we 1. have all been looking forward to and 2. can all agree on! XD
phobospwns jamessmurthwaite's article
May 6, 2021 at 9:26
May 6, 2021
More Than 50% of Pro Riders Feel They Wouldn't be Adequately Financially Supported After Injury - State of the Sport Survey
The post I had all typed out was way too cynical... So I'll be short. The pay thing, this issue- to me, it's just life. There's never enough money, and the safety net is never big enough, it always takes too much work, and the reward is never sufficient. Make choices, live with the consequences. No one gets a free pass in anything, and it's unlikely anyone (government, corporation, industry, people, etc.) is going to save you when things to tits up. Stay safe out there, and try and have some fun along the way.
phobospwns jamessmurthwaite's article
May 5, 2021 at 6:02
May 5, 2021
How Much Do Professional Mountain Bikers Get Paid? - Pinkbike's State of the Sport Survey
@SJP: To be fair, they did include the graph about how much MTB contributes to their annual income- but I agree with you here. Really, the 50% who said MTB is 100% of their income are the real pros. I'd love to see that group broken out seperately, because I believe that would give the true feel for "how much do pros get paid". You could even include the "more than 50% comes from MTB" folks, I think. As it stands now, including the 35% of who make 50% or less of their income in MTB, makes it more like "how much do people who are exceptional at mountain biking get paid". Their results being included definitely skews the outcome. 21% of respondents "don't take a wage from mountain biking"... why are they included at all? That's the opposite of being a pro, heh. Still interesting, no doubt.
phobospwns jamessmurthwaite's article
May 5, 2021 at 5:52
May 5, 2021
How Much Do Professional Mountain Bikers Get Paid? - Pinkbike's State of the Sport Survey
I found the article interesting, for sure. I always wondered how much folks make in MTB, and this did a decent job of answering that question. I'm not surprised most don't make much... although I think it's a positive that you've got 30% of respondents making more than $40k. Good for the folks making top dollar, too! One thing that's come out the comments... I'm really struggling to wrap my head around people feeling like there should be some minimum floor that MTB athletes should be paid. The only way there's anything wrong with the pay, is if bike companies are banding together though back door channels and coming to agreements not to pay athletes more than x value (i.e. collusion against the riders by the industry). Otherwise, they're being paid what the market has deemed they are worth, in the industry they've decided to be in. If they continue on with that career, then they're agreeing to work for it, by choice, and choices carry consequences (both good and bad). Long ago, I was a bike mechanic, at my pinnacle including working on pro riders bikes (in their off seasons, to be fair). I absolutely loved it. I've always said I'd have done it forever if it paid the bills, but it really didn't- So, I made a choice to change careers. But, for those years I chose to be broke, and it was worth the joy of it all... of course I felt I deserved more, but it was that joy that kept me on board. I'm sure a lot of riders feel the same way. It's OK to accept low pay if you deem it worth it based on other value. For me, when it came down to it, I made the choice to go get more money so I could build a family, it cost changing careers. I surely don't love my job now like I did then. These individuals make their choice daily. The market pays what it pays- each individual can make the decision to keep at it, or not. I guess the answer to getting paid more is 1. be better, 2. unionize (which has its own costs & difficulties), or 3. go do something else. Sadly, loving a job doesn't qualify you for making whatever we on the internet deem as "fair".
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