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shinook mikelevy's article
Feb 7, 2019 at 18:30
Feb 7, 2019
5 Details About SRAM's Wireless AXS Components
@FisherFreerider: The point was that you could interfere with it and cause it to malfunction, which is what I was having a discussion on with @TheRaven. I'm not claiming anyone is going to die or trying to come up with reasons to hate it. The slipping was just an example of what it might feel like if the above happened, not exactly what would happen if it was messed with.
shinook mikelevy's article
Feb 7, 2019 at 17:59
Feb 7, 2019
5 Details About SRAM's Wireless AXS Components
@FisherFreerider: Have you ever been standing and pedaling, then had your drivetrain slip? It's not a pleasant experience and definitely could result in a pulled muscle or other injury. While not life threatening, in a XC race, in tight quarters with other riders, or on a technical section, it could have safety implications. While I doubt anyone is going to die, it could change the outcome of a race or cause someone to fall over unexpectedly onto other riders or trail features. It'd be more likely to have implications for the standings of an event, I could see someone meddling with it during an elite competition, but not much else.
shinook mikelevy's article
Feb 7, 2019 at 11:53
Feb 7, 2019
5 Details About SRAM's Wireless AXS Components
@TheRaven: Fair point and makes sense if you are just trying to disrupt it, for sure!
shinook mikelevy's article
Feb 7, 2019 at 11:43
Feb 7, 2019
5 Details About SRAM's Wireless AXS Components
@TheRaven: I doubt they are using 802.11, they claim the protocol is proprietary and it’s probably something closer to ZigBee than 802.11 or even Bluetooth.
shinook mikelevy's article
Feb 7, 2019 at 11:17
Feb 7, 2019
5 Details About SRAM's Wireless AXS Components
So, wait, for #3 it sounds like you are saying your phone has to be synced for the system to work. Is that true or is that just to adjust the function of the shifter keys and configure it? That also really doesn’t address someone that can send messages directly to the mech, they seem real focused on preventing someone from messing with this system via their phone over the Bluetooth interface but haven’t really talked at all about the security around the communications between the shifter and mech. The fact they are proprietary and encrypted doesn’t really mean much on it’s own.
shinook mikelevy's article
Feb 6, 2019 at 10:17
Feb 6, 2019
Video: SRAM's Wireless Eagle AXS Drivetrain Explained
@mobaar: The issue is less about reliability/functionality and more about someone with nefarious intent doing something outside of what the designers of the protocol or device expected. An example would be spoofing as the shifter and forcing gear shifts or trim changes to throw off the drivetrain or shift gears when the rider wasn't expecting. If you consider the level these drivetrains will be used in competition, that could be a big concern. I'm sure that they considered that with whatever association process they have between the two, but my experience is that most manufacturers of embedded devices like this develop the protocols and devices around functionality first and security is an afterthought, which often means there are ways of forcing the devices to do things that aren't intended, although it has to be done intentionally. An example would be pairing the shifters, they probably designed the protocol to ensure there was no accidental interference with other drivetrains, but not to prevent someone on the sidelines from intentionally forcing a gear change and spoofing someone else's shifter. Granted, it's a fair amount of work to get there, but I've heard a lot of device vendors claim their devices are 'secure' simply because they use encryption and proprietary protocols, but once you take a look at what they are doing, it's implemented incorrectly and doesn't solve the problems they think it does. If you consider these components will likely be used at high level competitions (e.g. Olympics), the implications of someone doing nefarious could have impacts on the competition, at best, and at worst, cause injury. As for your experiences, unless you were intentionally being targeted by someone or made an effort to reverse engineer the devices, protocol, and communications, then that's really not the issue. I have no doubt it's reliable, the question is what can someone do to it with a little RE work and with bad intentions.
shinook mikelevy's article
Feb 6, 2019 at 7:51
Feb 6, 2019
Video: SRAM's Wireless Eagle AXS Drivetrain Explained
source: I work with embedded manufacturers on devices just like this in other fields and have heard the same claims several dozen times, but when we started to reverse engineer and test the device, found a lot of problems in their implementation that allowed exactly what they didn't think was possible. ...but hey, some people do it right, although they are in the minority.
shinook mikelevy's article
Feb 6, 2019 at 7:33
Feb 6, 2019
Video: SRAM's Wireless Eagle AXS Drivetrain Explained
It isn't wearing a tinfoil hat when you worry about the security of an embedded device. By rolling their own protocols and claiming encryption is going to somehow prevent someone on the sideline from muddling with their device, they haven't exactly given me a lot of confidence that's the case.
shinook mikelevy's article
Feb 5, 2019 at 8:41
Feb 5, 2019
Video: Spengle's 3-Spoke Carbon Wheels
Imaging not crashing and having to be seen with those things on your bike.
shinook mikekazimer's article
Jan 28, 2019 at 8:37
Jan 28, 2019
Review: The Pole Machine Has a Serious Need For Speed
@sngltrkmnd: stainless and aluminum don't play well together, they'd corrode where they meet and be impossible to remove after a while without drilling them out.
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