A Little Paradise: Queenstown

May 9, 2013
by Matt Wragg  
 
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A little paradise:
Queenstown
WORDS MATT WRAGG
PHOTOS LUKE SERGENT
"The Indians are embalming the drugs you absorb from the television in the coffee." She was obviously agitated, someone had emptied the coffee can and it upset the fragile balance of the universe. We were in the path of her of her storm. "What do you mean ‘excuse me’? You understand me perfectly well, they steal the drugs from you when you’re sleeping and embalm them in the coffee." Queenstown attracts screamers, the kind of people who went too far out into life and now spend their days angry with the sky. Most of the time you can avoid them, they lock themselves away in their badly-painted camper vans and, well god knows what they actually do in there, some questions are better left unasked... She’d escaped hers though and booked herself into the hostel. We were confronted by this tiny, seething woman, beanie pulled down hard over her skull to keep the worst of the madness in. What spilled out into the kitchen was bad enough.

Something draws them in, an almost magnetic attraction to this spot. Yet even if you don’t visit a crystal healer before your doctor, or feel the need to rant to a hostel full of people about your "true spirit love," it’s hard to deny there’s an energy here in Queenstown. Call it a vibe, a feeling, or whatever new-age horse shit you buy into, there’s something in the air that it’s hard to put your finger on at first. After weeks of struggling with the idea, ex-pat and mechanic at R&R Sport, Pete Weir, put it into words almost too easily: "People are happy to be here." Sure, it sounds like a small, simple thing, but how many times do you find yourself in a place full of people who genuinely want to be there? That changes a place. Coming from the UK it can be an unnerving thing to be around. We tend to be conditioned to accept everyone around us plotting to run for the nearest airport if they ever find the balls or the imagination.

Photo Luke Sergent The view out over the lake.
Photo Luke Sergent The Earnslaw.
Photo Luke Sergent The beach.

You have no doubt how special this place is from the moment you step out onto the tiny airport runway. Towering over you are The Remarkables, one of only two mountain lines in the world that run north-south. It’s not the geological quirk that takes your breath away though - it’s that they are the fantasy mountains from a Disney film, fleshed out to over 1,200m above the valley floor. Giant, jagged, grey colossuses peppered with snow at their tips. Unlike the surrounding mountains these came from Somewhere Else, some great seismic event forced them violently up towards the sky. You wouldn’t be surprised if they had simply appeared one morning. From the airport it’s 5km into town along the banks of Lake Wakatipu. Maoris believe that an ancient monster lives in its depths and that the monster breathing causes the waters to rise and fall each day. Looking out over its cold, crystal blue expanse you wouldn’t bet on them being wrong. The beauty of that all-too-short first drive stays imprinted in the memory of everyone who comes here.

Heading into the heart of Queenstown you start to see signs of a healthy riding community. Bumper stickers, fork-style racks hanging off cars, tyre tracks on the gravel path. Although it’s more subtle than other riding towns here, sure there are expensive rigs chained up along the side of the road and far too many bike shops for a town this size, but it ain’t Morzine or Whistler. You’re not likely to see big groups of guys on DH rigs with full body armour tearing down Shotover Street. Here you’re more likely to see groups of hungover gap year students killing time before they head out to bungee jump, or back to their sticky hostel rooms to exercise their hormones. Shoals of shiny Japanese tourists float by, pointing their cameras at nothing and everything, chubby Indian men parade their implausibly beautiful, sylph-like girlfriends by. For a small town there’s a real bustle to the centre, with people of all ages from across the world passing through. There’s life here and bikes are just another part of this vibrant former mining outpost, the self-styled Outdoor Capital of the World.

Photo Luke Sergent Main street by day .
Photo Luke Sergent Queenstown by night.

Before you can enjoy the finer points of the town there’s usually the small issue of jetlag to deal with. The thirty or so hours up in the air to get here takes its toll on your mind and body. There’s nothing better to start the healing than the meat and grease of a Fergburger. From a shack in a back street this local institution has grown to international fame, and rightly so – anyone who can make pineapple taste good on a burger is worth your time and money. Of course there’s then the dilemma of whether to chase your burger with booze or strong coffee (the only two proper options for a time like that). You’re spoilt for choice - the Kiwis take their coffee very seriously, so there are great little coffee shops all over town. As for the booze, well you can have a good night out any day of the week, and you can almost certainly find chlamydia just as easily if you venture into the Altitude bar.

Queenstown Lakes District Council’s Paul Wilson needs few words to sum up how he sees mountain biking here. Quite simply, "It’s important." How many people in the UK would kill to hear that from their local council? Talking to him we got around to the inevitable, at least for us Brits, talk of health and safety. He explains that "Here in New Zealand we’ve always had a culture of adventure and we don’t want to lose that because of health and safety rules. We have some pretty extreme trails around here and people have been seriously hurt. Those people got hurt because they got out of their depth." He doesn’t stop there either, as the council he sees their responsibility as making sure the trails are well-built and maintained, the fact that the transition and landing might be 50ft apart for some of the jumps doesn’t worry him. “If you’re walking down the pavement and it isn’t well-maintained, that’s our responsibility. If you just fall over, well that’s not because of us.” Yes, you really did just read that people are actually expected to take responsibility for their own actions here... Around town you’ll find riding of every kind supported by the council, from the pleasant, gravel roll around Lake Wakatipu to World Cup-level downhill tracks on Bob’s Peak and the put-hairs-on-your-chest-sized jumps of the Dream Track.

Where the council do draw the line is at getting involved in building the trails, he leaves that to the "experts," mountain bikers. More specifically, Queenstown Mountain Bike Club. Run entirely by volunteers they are what president, Tom Hey, describes as "the voice of mountain bikers here. We build most of the (legal) trails around town, maintain trails, run weekly rides and hold events like Seven Hours of Seven Mile." It’s not always as simple as just organising a group of people to go and throw some spades about either, there’s the council to work with, the Department of Conservation (DOC), local landowners, archaeologists and so on. Looking at the amount of work Tom has sitting on his hard drive it’s hard to believe that this is just something he does in his spare time. He only took over last year and already has reams of maps, applications and proposals piling up on that disc.

The top of the Fernhill Loop.
Fernhill Loop.

To get an idea of what the club are capable of you need to head down to Seven Mile, which sits (yep, you guessed it) seven miles out of town along the lake. It’s one of the best uses of space anywhere in the world. They weren’t given much land to work with, one small hill bound by private land on one side and the lake on the other. What they’ve cut into the woods is a trail network that riders of all levels can get hours of fun from. Running off from the main climb there are easily a dozen sweet, well-built and maintained descents in this small tuft of a trail centre. What’s more, you don’t really see the other runs as you’re riding, it’s only when you see the spaghetti-like mass of the trail map you appreciate how much they’ve fitted into here. On something like the oddly-named Kachoong your first run down seems like a fast rollercoaster, but on your second you start seeing where you can use the trail shape to double up, or the triple black line sneaking off to the left... They’ve also been very clever with how they use the gradient, nearly all the runs are surprisingly long, but you never get that nagging doubt that a section has been built just to save those precious vertical metres.

Tom’s big mission for the club is to open up the back country around Queenstown. It’s a huge project in every sense – he’s mapped out a couple of hundred kilometres of trail that either needs building or for access granting to ride. “The XC here isn’t as good as Whistler” is his blunt assessment of the current situation. “They’ve got the best cross country riding anywhere in the world and we’re nowhere near that right now, but we have the potential for amazing loops.” Out of everyone, Tom should know. Before he moved to Queenstown a few years ago he was a long-term Whistler resident and one of the guys responsible for building the courses for Crankworx and other big freeride events. “Part of the reason it’s so good in Canada is because people would just go out into the woods with chainsaws to build trails. Here it’s much more complicated to get a trail built.” Bureaucracy isn’t going to stop him though, his quiet determination and energy leave a sense of inevitability to his plans and you cannot doubt the amount of work both he and the club are pouring into this. It looks like sooner rather than later there’s going to be an incredible trail network here.

Coronet panorama.
Coronet singletrack. Photo by Luke Sergent.
Coronet corners.

You can get a glimpse of that future if you head out to the Moonlight Trail. Pedalling up past the perfectly-manicured dirt jumps on Gorge Road, the trailhead is maybe twenty minutes ride out of town. One brief, lung-bursting stint up from the road and you’re onto singletrack. Thirty minutes from central Queenstown and you’re skirting the side of Ben Lomond with the Shotover River far below. Suddenly you’re in real backcountry. These aren’t purposely-designed mountain bike trails, as you climb away from the last few houses you’ll find your bike and shoulder getting well-acquainted. What’s overwhelming is how quickly you feel a long way out from the rest of the world. There’s that sense of rawness, at times you’re riding along the tops of cliffs. Even when it’s slightly less vertical, if you go off the trail, there isn’t a lot to stop you before you reach the gorge below.

At the top of the first climb you can look back to where you’ve come from and still see signs of civilisation. Looking ahead along the valley you see the potential of this area. Aside from being stunning, to the point of needing to catch your breath, there’s so much terrain to play with, all of it in easy reach of town. You can see why Tom is so passionate about developing the region. With some work, well... Stu, my riding partner for the day and for the last two seasons a guide in Whistler, half-whispered: “You could have the best backcountry riding in the world here.” There was nobody for miles to hear him say that, but you don’t want to take chances if you’re making such big statements. Maybe a butterfly fell from the skies, stone-dead, in Whistler as the words passed his lips.

Coronet sunset.

If we had any doubts about Stu’s big claim, they melted away as we descended further into the valley. The same kind of features we’d hiked our bikes up on the climb became fun, challenging hits to play with. With planned trails you can never find that same feeling of being alert and alive, waiting for nature to throw something ugly and unrideable at you. All the while that big exposure stays there to your right, almost inviting you to fall. To describe the trail as slow, awkward and technical doesn’t sound as much fun now on paper, but the word on our lips as we ducked and weaved through the rocks was “perfect.”

When you drop back onto the road at the end of the loop you realise the challenge of building such a big network. Finishing way out past Wilson’s Bay there are eight miles or so of road between you and town – there’s the nut. It’s not just building the trails, but the connections to link them together. Fortunately Seven Mile is between the end of the trail and town, it’d be rude not to grab a few more descents as you pass, right?

Throughout Queenstown you can see signs that mountain biking is gaining traction with local businesses. Several local bars even run nights for riders (you can make your own logjam joke). The biggest, most important sign is the company who run the gondola going up from town to Bob’s Peak. You’d think opening it to bikes in a town full of riders would be a no brainer, but it wasn’t that simple. The story goes that the previous general manager hated mountain bikers because one day his partner was out walking on the hill and was hit by one. Since then he’d done everything he could to keep bikers out (there’s probably a less fun corporate version of why they’ve only opened recently involving target markets and revenue streams, but we prefer this one). For a few years the lift up on Coronet Peak had filled that gap, but when the plug was pulled there, riders were left staring longingly at the Skyline lift. In 2010 the company finally caved in to common sense and opened it to bikes.

Skyline skids.
Skyline climbing and descending.
Skyline panning.
More Skyline skids.

Don’t be put off by the words 'bike park,' it’s not just for big, heavy downhill bikes - a lot of people who head up there are outright novices. Tracks like Hammy’s have been designed with tourists in mind, the kind of folk who want to try mountain biking for a day. Like with Seven Mile, they’ve found that balance between something cool for beginners, but still fun for experienced riders. Of course there is some pretty full-on stuff up on the hill too - the flatout, near vertical chutes of Ant’s Track, the huge, hilarious rooty fadeaway on Grundy and the start-to-finish man-eater that is World Cup/Hobbit. But the trail police won’t drag you off the hill if you just fancy getting some fun, chilled laps in. It’s a perfect chance to go fast for a few hours, maybe you wouldn’t want to ride an open motorway-style trail every day, but once in a while it’s about as much fun as you can have with your clothes on. For $45 NZD for a half day it’s not bad value, you should be able to get about ten runs in with time to spare, plenty to leave you sore, battered and grinning.

With a bike park open the talk among riders inevitably ends with comparisons to Whistler and the other handful of seasonaire towns. A lot of people doing summers here are Whistler refugees, flitting between the two to avoid the snow and cold. Year-on-year there are more riders in town, it’s a rapidly growing sport here. Unlike other riders’ towns, people stay here though. People who have travelled the world with bikes, ridden everywhere you can think of, and plenty of places you hadn’t, choose to settle in Queenstown. But why?

Luke s truck.
Fergburger and one trashed tyre.
Post-ride relaxation at Wilsons Bay.

There’s no debate that the riding here is worth travelling halfway round the world for, there are some of the best trails you’ll ever ride in these hills. Yet there are a handful of other places that can make the same kind of claim, even make serious claims to be better, but people don’t settle in those places in the same way. Tom Hey is a good example, sure he’ll tell you that the backcountry is better in Whistler, but it’s here in Queenstown he’s decided to live. Finally Paul ‘Pang’ Angus, part owner of local shop Vertigo Bikes and ex-World Cup racer, nailed what it is that keeps them here. “People love bikes, love riding bikes, but it’s not the be-all and end-all here. People love to use the lake, use the mountains; they love to go climbing, fishing, motorbiking, wakeboarding, all that sort of stuff. There’s way more to do here than just riding. I think that’s where places like Whistler suffer, if you’re not riding there’s not much else to do. Whereas with Queenstown if you don’t want to ride today there are a million things you can do. That’s what is so unique about this place.” It’s almost ironic - the thing that makes this the best riding town in the world isn’t bikes at all. It’s everything else.

83 Comments

  • + 61
 The aussie guy who runs Queenstown Bike Taxis told me "he came to Queenstown for a one month mountain bike holiday.." that was 9 years ago ha
  • + 9
 Went for a 2 week holiday and spent nearly 8 years there. The place certainly has a way of taking a hold on you. I have only just moved up to Nelson after spending nearly 2 years away. This story has just made me miss it that little bit more. Thanks Matt.
  • + 4
 Yeah I have spent the last few years saving to move there. I look forward to it every day! so if anyone needs a share house buddy in Queenstown that's be sweet Smile
  • + 2
 Can't explain how much I want to quit my job in Christchurch and move to Queenstown, Such a sick town, great vibe, amazing bike park and trails. roll on summer 2013 for more good times.
  • + 2
 I'm hopefully going to get a few days in when I visit there this fall. Hopefully I don't spend the semester there...
  • + 1
 What does it take to be able to work in New Zealand? I would move there in a min!
  • + 1
 A ticket, a computer to fill out visa info(it's a free visa for Americans), no felonies. That's all it takes to be able to go and work for a year.
  • + 1
 I went to Queenstown from England for my brothers wedding, ended up staying for 16months and met my wife there... it truly is the most beautiful place but damn hard to find a reliable well paying job - you get used to being frugal!
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  • + 12
 Holy shit - one of the best writeups I've ever read, if not the best... and it's all about my favourite place on earth. And the fact that I can relate to everything in the article made it so enjoyable to read. Well done Matt, and thanks!
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  • + 12
 No... no bike,n there. Views are terrible. Weathers terrible. People terrible. Oh and that Ferg burger...
No dont go there ;-)
  • - 1
 Said no one but this guy.
  • + 2
 Sarcasm dude...
  • + 2
 Now now Thunderbiker, we all have to share... Razz
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  • + 10
 Now if I could only land a solid Machinist job there, i'd move there and mountain bike, skydive, basejump, surf, etc etc etc until the day I stopped breathing.
  • + 4
 You're life is all planned out haha, best life ever...
  • + 5
 Don't worry about work, just do it mate!
  • - 2
 I'm a CNC machinist in BC. Smile
  • + 3
 In same boat as you bro, Any aircraft engineer jobs going in Queenstown.. nope!!!
  • + 2
 Kelly McGarry says his bicycle is an aircraft on account of how much time he spends in the air. Plenty of work to do in NZ!
  • + 1
 哈哈,心动不如行动~
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  • + 5
 This article makes me even more stoked for my school trip down there in 4 days time. Pity the bike park's closed. My mate and I were seriously considering renting some DH rigs and having an awesome time on the trails.
  • + 2
 Bugger you missed out bro.
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  • + 6
 Cannot rate this place enough. I'm going back there with some mates in January and i'm not even 18 yet.
  • + 3
 going there in jan aswell. going to be sweet
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  • + 5
 Not much else to do in whistler??? Seems that bc is an adventure paradise. That's an odd statement??
  • + 2
 I can't think of a place with more top caliber outdoor opportunities.
  • + 3
 "There’s way more to do here than just riding. I think that’s where places like Whistler suffer, if you’re not riding there’s not much else to do. Whereas with Queenstown if you don’t want to ride today there are a million things you can do. That’s what is so unique about this place.” It’s almost ironic - the thing that makes this the best riding town in the world isn’t bikes at all. It’s everything else."
Are you kidding me!!? I'm disappointed Matt, if you've actually been to Whistler, you'd know you can do everything here you could possibly want to do besides ride some of the best trails in the world! Name one activity you can't do in this valley that you can do there! All of the ones you have mentioned so far are quite popular here!
You shouldn't need to slag one place to make another place sound good, it should stand on its own merrits if its as good as you claim!
  • + 1
 I think he was talking more about all the adventure sports that you can do in QT, including things like Fly By Wire that you can't do anywhere else in the world. At least, that's how I read it - and that's all well and good, but those activities are spendy. I always joke when I get to Queenstown that if you listen hard, you can hear your money evaporating. You can have a lot of fun in either place, but in both cases you have to be prepared to bring your wallet.
  • + 1
 Its a good article but that reference was oddly uninformed and out of place. There's no need to always compare a beautiful place in the world (Queenstown) to another beautiful place in the world (Whistler)

---- A resident of Whistler who one day would like to see Queenstown ----
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  • + 2
 Epic write up, nice work. Qt is amazing, i was here riding 3 times last year, and moved here in january. Endless options with dirt jumps at gorge rd, gondola accessed downhill, massive trail network, and a club thats committed and has council backing. Great place to be
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  • + 1
 I'm quite excited to read this article because in September I of Portugal on honeymoon to Australia and New Zealand. I've done business with my future wife a day off (our honeymoon) to be able to feel the flow of any of these tracks. Someone can tell me how can I get to the track where the Gee Arterthon and Stive Smith made ​​a very famous video. I completely surrendered to Queenstown and I can not wait to get to September. Shine or rain or even snow do, I will feel the flow of the tracks. Take this opportunity to launch a challenge to conehcerm another paradise for MTB world, the Isle of Madeira. Search the net for Freeride Madeira Island and rave with my company MTB here in Madeira. See the enduro event that we organize the end-of-week.

www.pinkbike.com/u/freeridemadeira/blog/Enduro-Challenge-Madeira.html
  • + 2
 Contact Queenstown Bike Taxis - you will be shown my friend!
  • + 2
 Ask anyone with a bike, everyone is so helpful and accepting over here.
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  • + 1
 We just finished a Teva trip and started in Queenstown and stayed for a while. That place it incredible. Amazing dirt jumps, great trails and free ride spots. I'd recommend it to anyone looking for a vacation that has a lot to do rather than sit around on vacation.
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  • + 1
 Heading home to NZ next March. I've spent a bunch of time (and a bunch of money, ha!) in Queenstown over the years, and I was going to limit my time there this trip. I think I just changed my mind. Those tracks look way too epic to pass up.
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  • + 1
 A couple of old fart friends and I just spent eight days in Queenstown and Wanaka. It is MTB heaven. From man made flow down trails, the gondola tracks, jumps to die on (if you are game), local XC cruise rides: it is all there and more besides. I really loved the backcountry riding; the scope and scale is enormous. If anyone is interested I posted a pic under XC riding, Wanaka at

www.pinkbike.com/photo/9566205

We did about 800m of climbing in shortish hard sections, and then a fabulous 1200m descent, ending at a pub. Good timesSmile
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  • + 5
 That 60 Series Landcruiser is nuts!
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  • + 1
 Amazing place and brilliant article. In SA we have a similar place - Knysna - forest, mountains (lower), a huge estuary, beaches and a busy holiday and logging town. It even has trails but nothing quite as special as Queenstown's tracks...
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  • + 1
 Q.T is the nuts for a week or two of riding but wouldn't want to live there. Nelson (my hometown) has a network of great trails, just as much back country potential as Q.T, the possibility a gondola coming in the future, a council who are aware of what such a thing would do for local people and businesses and a big MTB club with a long term plan! Watch this space......
  • + 1
 Hey mate. I signed up for this site to ask you why you wouldn't live there if I may. I have a job offer there and trying to decide if a hefty cut on my Auckland salary is a fair price to pay for life there. My primary love in life is snowboarding, and I'm bored out of my brains in the city I was born in. The biggest thing I've heard and seen for myself is it's expensive. As much as Auckland.
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  • + 1
 Just a heads up that 'Maori' isn't pluralised with an 's', it's just left at 'Maori' (given some of NZ's history it can come off as a bit racist to some people) Nice write up, and sick photos!
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  • + 1
 I just spent two months in Queenstown. It's a cyclist's paradise. Dh trails, massive dirt jumps, awesome single track and xc, a lake for swimming, trampoline park, good food, and super friendly people. Ten outta ten
  • + 1
 Hey there, I am planning on heading there early next year for a month or two. Quick question, would you recommend a full-on downhill rig, or would a bike like my Intense Tracer 2, pics in profile, work well enough for most stuff?
  • + 1
 I was in NZ last year to do some riding and we didn't bother to take DH rigs, just our all mtn bikes. You'll be far happier with a 5 or 6" bike if you like to explore. I'd say you can still ride the bike park on a Tracer 2 but you can always rent a DH bike for the day instead. Sooo much trail to find in that area - you'll LOVE it!
  • + 1
 Sweet! Thanks man!
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  • + 1
 I spent a mere 9 days there, but felt like a local (and still do) by the end. No other place has formed such a strong connection with me in such a short time - there be something in that water!
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  • + 3
 probably one of the most beautiful citys in the world. and it never gets boring there...
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  • + 1
 Absolutely stunning. Been to Queenstown and much of the NZ S. Island, had hiking boots on for a couple weeks- but no bike. Hopefully going back with my bike is in my future.
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  • + 2
 NICE。。。。。。。。。。。。。。。。。。。。。。。。。
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  • + 1
 Wonderful scenery, beautiful pictures and a brilliant write-up. This has been a very enjoyable read. One of the best articles I have ever read.
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  • + 2
 A paradise indeed. I want to go back now!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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  • + 2
 so stoked to be reading this article as i'm currently waiting on a visa to go here .... cant wait!!
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  • + 1
 Like those moments when you want to have money (without being selfish) and +18 Drool
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  • + 1
 How does Queenstown compare to Nelson (NZ)? ........for biking and in general.
  • + 0
 Nelson NZ is awesome man, I grew up there. If you like your trail / enduro riding it's one of the best places in NZ, lots of friendly people and local bike shops will point you in the right direction of the good trails, I recommend the coppermine loop.
Downhill is amazing in Nelson only problem is most of the good trails are hidden in locked forestry plantations, so you need a friend who knows a friend who has a access key, then you need a 4x4 to shuttle the roads, if the stars align and you get the key & a 4x4 you are in for a treat, lots of loamy steep pine forest.
Comparing Queenstown to Nelson, they both cool places and have good riding, Queenstown is tourist central and had a real buzzy vibe you can't beat its go go go, Nelson is the opposite really chilled out and a quiet town.
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  • + 1
 Wow, nice coverage Matt and Luke! NZ is such a nice country to ride, thanks for bringing us back.
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  • + 1
 Hoofing place, need to go back some day but will probably not come back its just too awesome.
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  • + 0
 Great writeup, sums NZ so well! Its has so much good things but nothing truly great =)
That's why we all here ride in Whistler, snowboard in Hokkaido and surf at Bali..
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  • + 2
 Queenstown is quite literally heaven on earth to me....love the place.
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  • + 1
 I can't believe I was there and didn't ride a bike, feeling a bit of a prick now Frown
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  • + 2
 I love NZ, Wish I was still living there.
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  • + 1
 Not having bears is a plus!
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  • + 1
 I do love living in Queenstown
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  • + 1
 Spent 3 weeks there 1.5 years ago... Goin back soon! Cert!
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  • - 1
 Queenstown is great, until you want to cross the road. Such a shame that for a tourist city, the roads are crazy busy with cars.
  • + 2
 ya what mate??
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  • + 1
 Great article. I am booking a ticket right now!
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  • + 1
 furgberger is the dopest place ever.
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  • + 0
 whoops, let the neg props begin haha
  • + 1
 It's all good haha, I read it like that first too...
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  • + 1
 awesome place
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I need to be there
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  • - 1
 I am pretty sure Queenstown is in the Southern Hemisphere
  • + 5
 'Queenstown is one of the best places to escape the Northern Hemisphere winter. We explore this little paradise hidden away on the bottom of the world.' IS ONE OF THE BEST PLACES TO ESCAPE THE NORTHERN HEMISPHERE. You read it wrong haha...
  • + 8
 Props for paying attention to geography class, neg props for skipping out on English classes.
  • + 1
 What do you mean skipping out on English classes? Nothing is spelt incorrect?
  • + 3
 'Incorrectly' - sorry mate
  • + 3
 UnknownDHRider - not you dipsh!t Smile
The guy you were responding to, has working knowledge of Geography, but his reading comprehension isn't on par Smile
  • + 1
 Ahaha oh okay then.
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