Point One Racing Podium Pedals Review

Jun 15, 2010 at 0:07
Jun 15, 2010
by Leo Kokkonen  
 
You must login to Pinkbike.
Don't have an account? Sign up

Join Pinkbike  Login

They advertise the pedal as a racing pedal and I tested how it works for downhill racing.

Point One Racing has one of the most unique looking pedals on the market and I wanted to see just how much abuse they could take from a racing standpoint.

Review inside,


Durability
I bought the pedals from CRC just over a month ago and I've managed to abuse these puppies a lot since. They have been hit on rocks while riding, but nothing has broke them yet. I have not done any maintenance to the pedals because there has been no need to. I've ridden them in the muddiest courses at +9celsius to the hottest and dustiest at +28celsius.




Engineering
The pedal has a machined aluminum frame and a special steel axle. The weight is what they are advertised at, 359g. The frame is really open so the mud goes through the pedal easily. I might even go as far as to say that this pedal is more grippy in wet and muddy weather than in dry. I ride in the Five Ten Impact Karver shoes so the grip is quite good. The pedal's rotation is stiff and the pedal won't rotate too much if you do come off them in really rough conditions. The outer chamfers and angled shapes work as advertised: "Overlooking no detail, the outside profile of the body has been designed to deflect rock impacts and keep you moving in the same direction, at the same speed. The outside edge is chamfered in high probability impact areas to improve deflection and reduce wear." I've hit rocks at fast speed without bending the cranks or losing control of the bike.

Here are some video clips of me using the pedals. I'm riding the custom painted Orange 224:

Views: 6,659    Faves: 9    Comments: 2


Views: 3,880    Faves: 10    Comments: 5



Grip
Although the grip is good I've lost the pedals couple of times. First in the timing run and then in the race run. The second one cost me the podium. Last weekend I reached the podium with a three second gap. I suggest that Point One makes another version which has more pins. I marked the spots where I'd put them (Photo above). The pins would give extra grip for some conditions fe. Straitline has pins at the center of the pedal which gives a really good grip. If someone from Point One is reading this, please make room for more pins and you will have a perfect pedal on the market.



*Editor's Note: We read this and passed it along to the crew at Point One Racing and here is what they had to say...

"It’s great to see our products being raced on and enjoyed. As for feedback. The grip thing is actually a fine line, some people like more and some people like a little less.

But starting in about a month or so, we will be offering a longer stud option in addition to our current ones. Our pro riders have been testing them for a while now and love them! We’ve actually found our riders only replacing the 8 studs closest to the crank arm with the longer ones and leaving the outside ones stock. This gives you a lot more grip, but also keeps your ground clearance low on the outside of the pedal, since the outside studs take the most abuse.

There’re about double the length of our current stud and if you want to feel like you clipped in, then these will do it!" - Point One Racing
Must Read This Week









68 Comments

  • + 20
 dude they are not even a month old. Honestly... if a set of pedals wears out in less than 6 months... they suck effin butt.

Come back and do a review after a year of riding. Then we shall see how the bearings and cage hold up... Because honestly, how often do you guys replace pedals. (IE there is a point to replaceable pins etc).

Not to bash the product, or the article tho... just stating that it's only a month. Kinda short lived for a test type article.


btw, good job on the pic of the pin placement suggestion to the OP of the article. Hopefully they will take note... and something says they will...

btw, hope your not racing in those pumas. No wonder you'd be slipping. Channels would allow pins to slide with force. Skate shoes ftmfw!
  • + 1
 All pedals suck then as i've not found a set to last more than 6 months, it just depends how much you ride and how hard.
  • + 0
 uhhh...


Dude I've been on the same set of Primo pedals for over 5 years. There is only a few pins left, the cage is cracked... and they still spin and work flawlessly, and grip just as good as a flat pedal. Put over a 1k of miles on these pedals... and I beat the livin snot outa em.

Same on my street bmx bikes. One set lasted me the duration I had each bike (which was more than a few years a piece). this included pedal grinds etc. I don't hear about any crupi, BMW, or crank bro's pedals breaking or wearing out in 6 months. In fact... is absolutely obsurd to think something would only last 6 months. Especially when there are products that will last many years. (wellgo pedals surprisingly last years if the bearings stay intact) To add... this is the reason I said he should review these again in a year if he is still running them... or at the point he replaces them.
  • + 4
 i have heard of quite a few crank bro's breaking very quickly...
but other than that, if your pedals aren't even lasting 6 months, what kind of crap are you buying?
i have had my dmr v12's for over 6 years now, dh and jumping on them and they are still near perfect.
and my odyssey trailmix's are still perfect after about two years of hard riding on them
  • + 5
 Re-read the article - he uses 5 10 shoes.
  • + 4
 pedals definitely have to last longer than 1 year if you ask me... my Holzfellers got about 2 years of age before this happend

www.pinkbike.com/photo/4052834
  • + 2
 holy shit you absolutely obliterated that pedal Eek but im sure if you didnt hit it on a rock, like you said they would be keep going (direted at hoshi)
  • + 1
 Well, my v12's lasted 6 months - bent axles and bushings fell to bits, gusset pedals lasted 2 months before the bushings went, and again bent axles, crank bros fell to bits after 2 months. To "rffr" - 5 years and over 1k miles? My point exactly, I do more than 1k in a year, it all depends on how much you ride, and if you are hitting rocks, roots and jumps all day they take a pounding. I'm just stating my experience and it's not like I buy cheap.
  • + 5
 Pumas might be in the picture, but the article says he wears 5.10's, so, the shoe isn't the problem. Having said that, I am very surprised the author had some issues with grip. Yes, I know that every pedal is different, but, when wearing 5.10 shoes, the typical problem is too much grip, regardless of the pedal. If the author still having grip issues even while wearing 5.10's, it might be time to switch to clipless pedals.
  • - 1
 5.10s do make clipless/normal shoes
  • + 3
 Who said they were worn out? Aside from a few scratches because the reviewer smashes rocks like it's his job, he states that he "hasn't done any maintenance because there hasn't been a need to."
  • + 2
 Correct. He did not say they were worn out. However, he should not comment on durability after a month of testing. Should at least be a season.

That being said, all these new lightweight pedals are bound to have durability issues, just think about it guys, smaller bearings (if any, alot use bushings which I hate), lighter weight body's......Its the price you pay. You want bulletproof pedals??

Azonic A-Frames, been using the same set since 2006......they still have all but one pin, still grippy, still spin smooth. But you wont get your DH rig under 35 lbs with 'em.
  • + 1
 Ive had a set for almost 12 months and ridden them all over the west coast, the bearing is still perfect and i havent lost a pin yet. They are great, solid pedals.
  • + 1
 rock on braap, thanks for the input. ANyone else?
  • + 1
 You can ask me after this season how did the PORPP:s do.
  • + 1
 what good are wellgos if the bearing stays in taket but you snap the spindle its on?
  • + 1
 uhhh welgo spindles don't have any more of a chance of snapping than any other pedal.

You do realize that welgo still makes the majority of mass produced pedals right?
[Reply]
  • + 10
 double length studs... now they would really make a mess of your shin / calf.
[Reply]
  • + 5
 These pedals look sweet!, BUT its one of them! you cant review pedals or any other gear for matter in under a year. ive had shimano dx"s, azonic"s, Clip ins, all in the 2 year ive been riding. And to tell you the truth ITS about horses for courses. The man states that he prefers the pedals in wet and muddy conditions, and crap in the dry! Shouldnt a pair of pedals be good in every situation!! As for grip on pedals, if i had any issues i would be tempted to maybe drill the areas where there is insufficient grip, tap the hole, go to a engineering workshop and pick up some grub screws and fabricate a pedal that suits me. Its all good telling manufacturers to do this that and the other, but its not YOURE opinion that goes into design and development, you all know that when your belting down were ever, that last thing you think about is SH*t my pedals let me down! Its the fact you hit a section to hard that puts you off line. I have never done a race im not the best rider within my riding posse i just think there is to many products out there nowadays that offer you what you want to here. I think you have just got to be logical for your own riding style! What works for one doesnt work for another. Just my Personal opinion!! Peace DeanO!!
  • + 1
 Ha Ha HAAAAAAA!!!! i aint bothered about neg props im just keeping it REAL!!!!!!!! Pedals are FRIKIN pedals and if they get you to the bottom of where you wanna go without Fu*kin up then there good for me!! We aint all hardcore racers, some of us want somert that works and lasts cause were on a budget Blah Blah Blah. Man some people need a serious mental overhaul these days!
[Reply]
  • + 5
 "They advertise the pedal as a racing pedal and I tested how it works for downhill racing." -First line of the article...

"Racing means Replacing" was a motto in the team van where I raced, folks. If you aren't prepared to replace a part fast, and at a cost that gets you a quality product, don't bother.
Light weight and speed are king in DH, and this seems to be a case where you pay a high price to keep it light and tight on a race course. Oh, and also, I've swapped parts between courses on my old DH racer too. Not uncommon.
Comparing this pedal to a BMX, street, or FR pedal is ludicrous and shows the style-specific product knowledge (or lack thereof) of certain folks, don't you think?
[Reply]
  • + 5
 All pedals suck then as i've not found a set to last more than 6 months, it just depends how much you ride and how hard.

you need to find some better pedals then?

I've run the same set of Syncros Mental Alloy pedals on my FR bike for 3 years, and have just replaced one bearing and an "o" ring on each pedal - these pedals have been ridden very hard in wet / snow / mud, trips to Wales and Scotland in the UK, and Vancouver North Shore and Whistler Bike Park in Canada

regarding the article : 1 months means nothing in terms of bearing durability - like another poster said, come back in 6 months and let us know how they are holding up

those pedals look mangled considering they are just 1 month old??


the lack of grip (the tester reported slipping pedals even with 5-10 shoes!!)and the 359gm weight seem disappointing considering the boutique price?

I am currently using the classic Wellgo MG-1 pedal on my all-mountain bike, stupidly high grip with 5-10 shoes, only £40 and 380gm weight = big win
  • + 2
 the only problem with the mg-1 is that I've cracked two sets. magnesium seems to be pretty prone to cracks in my experience.
  • + 1
 It's not that he need's to find better pedals, he needs to ride smoother. If you are riding properly you should very rarely hit your pedal, hitting your pedal slows you down and can cause you to crash. If learn to read the trail better hitting pedals is a rare occurence.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 Thanks for your comments. I assure you that I do not ride the Pumas, they were just for the photo Wink I use 5 10 shoes for racing. I'll try the longer studs though. I think they will do the trick. I remind you guys that there are different kind of riders and different kind of pedals for different kind of riding styles. You just need to focus on what you want to achieve and choose the gear for that reason. Pedals, grips, gloves and shoes are the only things connecting you to your bike. I would pay attention when choosing these components and test different options as well. Cheers! -Leo
[Reply]
  • + 7
 point one baby! the pedals and stems are soooooo sick
  • + 5
 I wouldnt be surprised, if he's racing in those pumas, that his feet are slipping. Get some 5.10's!
  • + 19
 @ amadeusg

Under the Engineering paragraph: "I ride in the Five Ten Impact Karver shoes so the grip is quite good."
  • + 4
 i'm agreeing with amadeusg, 5.10s would solve any grip issues
  • + 2
 thanks so much for this review, i was tinking about buying a set of these pedals but now i willl wait until a more pinned model comes about
  • + 9
 we have got a negative propper...
  • + 3
 if anyone actually read the full article you guys would have noted that he was wearing 5.10s for racing...
  • + 1
 Gotta agree, I like a bit of "float" and there is no way pins can be placed where the writer suggested because that is the "strength" of the chassis.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 I have the same set of pedals and have nothing but praise. How he is slipping in 5/10 shoes is beyond me. I have been in some muddy shit at platty especially this weekend and had no slipping issues. I have the silver pedals, which don’t look, are beat up because of the lack of color. Colored pedals look nice when you put them on but after that they should look beat up. These pedals are made to race and are focused on the being light and durable, but focused on the light. I do not except these pedals to hold up as well as my syncros metal pedals as steel can take more of a beating. I love these pedals they are light, shed mud and grip very well. I love mine.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 One thing to note with these pedals is that because of the large diameter where the thread is (closest to the crank) they are a pain in the ass if you use a crank holder shuttle rack or if where you race use them...

Apart from that they are very well engineered pedals, well thought through.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 "the only problem with the mg-1 is that I've cracked two sets. magnesium seems to be pretty prone to cracks in my experience."


thanks for the info - my MG-1 are very new and I have not hit any rocks...yet!

I would be the first to admit that my Syncros Mental Magnesium pedals were ruined by a nasty rock on Winterberg's DH trail in germany, this rock strike tore a pin out of the pedal body, the pedals still grip fine with a missing pin, but have developed play in the axle / bearing interface which is a contrast to the long service life on my Syncros Mental Alloy pedals!

I have also owned DMR V-12 Magnesiums in the past, and also found these prone to premature death from the soft Mag. metal alloy developing play where the axle bushing sits inboard of the body - what engineers call "flogging out" where a bushing socket (in the body) becomes enlarged for the bushing itself

Magnesium alloy is lighter, but softer...pay your money, take your choice Wink
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Nice review, but a month is nowhere near long enough to gauge durability. I think Ive greased my Atomlabs once in 3 years and thy will need new bushes soon, theres a test for durability. Apart from that I like the look of these, theyre thin which is how pedals should be.
  • + 1
 i completely agree. i will not take a pedal review seriously unless it has been at least a year. ALL bike parts should work properly for at least the first few months (unless they are not used for their intended purpose)

and

"I might even go as far as to say that this pedal is more grippy in wet and muddy weather than in dry."

Oh give me a f*cking break. That is retarded. This statement especially makes me question the validity of this review.
  • + 1
 How many uplifts does your "one year" include? Does the "one year" include winter training periods or competition like this: www.pinkbike.com/video/128915

If you could detail your "serious review" requirements it would help me to do other reviews.
  • + 1
 By stating one year of riding, I was assuming there would be a good number of hours on the pedals. This usually implies at least 1 or 2 rides a week in all types of riding conditions and riding types. This includes crashes, because most riders crash if they are pushing themselves, and therefore want performance parts like this pedal. Besides, it is the crappy riding conditions and crashes that really test a pedal. I could get away with riding xc clips if I never crashed. But since I do crash on occasion (usually wayyyy too hard) I cannot use such pedals, and have to use parts that can withstand it. Here in Washington, we ride in the mud for 9 months out of the year, so that really tests bearings. I would never recommend a part unless I had some decent time on it because I do not want me or my friends to have to replace multiple parts every other month because they fail so soon.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I've been riding these pedals for about six months and absolutely love them. I wear 5 10s and have to say that I almost think they have too much grip. If anything, I would consider running shorter pins. I like them so much that I bought a set for my other bike. Mine have really held up but I probably ride less rocky trails.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Good review. Dissagree about that pin thing. just put in straitline pins. Did that to my CB 5050XX and they rock. Middle pins prevent the shoe sole from bending towards the pedal axle and practically disables the outer pins. Just take a look at hill's 5050. few but long pins. or ride clickies. cheers
[Reply]
  • + 2
 These pedals are so expensive your heart misses a bit everything you clip a rock.
  • + 1
 What wouldn't you pay for this sport? Maybe students or kids who dont go to work and so cannot afford the very best, would look for different option.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Little skate tape in those spots, and call it good. 2x length pins seem a bit much
[Reply]
  • - 1
 "Although the grip is good I've lost the pedals couple of times. First in the timing run and then in the race run. The second one cost me the podium."

That's extremely ironic, considering the name of the pedals.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 if your lacking grip(and style) those puma shoes might be the problem! try some vans or 510s
  • + 2
 I was going to say that exactly...
Maybe it´s your shoes fault, not your pedals
  • + 12
 He rides 5 10 shoes, it says in the article.
  • - 5
 yeah and you can see in the video that hes wearing 5 10s, i wasnt being entirely serious. there is no excuse for those pumas even in the pits.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 my friend rides for them, and he raves about this pedal. most defiantly a good one.
  • + 3
 rather than blame the grip on the pedals just buy a proper pair of shoes?!
  • + 10
 Read. The. Article. 5 10.
  • + 7
 If you read it you would realise he rides in Five Ten's, those Pumas are just there to act as a contrast between the pedal and the ground so you can see it better...
  • + 2
 I have been riding/racing on these pedals for over 4 months now. You can't really compare the feel of these pedals to anything else on the market. It feels as if your bottom bracket is lower while cornering, yet you have more clearance between the pedal and ground. The best word to describe the feel under foot is "planted". Definitely one of the best flat pedal products on the market (along with 5.10 shoes). With the longer pins the traction is even better, but I've never seen the need to replace the stock pins myself. Huge props to Point One for taking flat pedal performance to another level. What's next boys?...
  • + 1
 Point one is severely under-rated. Not enough people know about how amazing these products are.
  • + 6
 Point One is also severely overpriced.
  • + 1
 mikeyridesbikes: Please define overpriced.
  • + 1
 When a product is sold to the consumer for a large, unreasonable cost.

To be fair, all bike parts are overpriced, how much can it really cost to machine some metal? Chainreaction, for example, still turn a profit selling products at heavy discounts from retail value, and companies would not sell their products to the distributor for anything near to the cost that they make their product at. Any company could lower their prices significantly and still turn a more than reasonable profit, but they sell for the maximum price consumers will pay.

Personally, I would rather buy a product that does the same job as these pedals for a fraction of the price. Not trying to hate on them, they look very nice, and I'm sure they're very good quality, but I will not be buying them anytime soon, and neither will most people.
  • + 0
 "When a product is sold to the consumer for a large, unreasonable cost."
If the product is sold to a customer and he have selected the product among the other similar products it is not overpricing. Buying pedals at this cost may be unreasonable to you but not for those who are willing to pay the amount to get this product. Overpricing is when someone is selling the very same product far more higher price than the others do.

"To be fair, all bike parts are overpriced, how much can it really cost to machine some metal?" Maybe this clears your head a bit: Production costs aren't just machining some metal. There are peoples wages, design costs, marketing costs, branding costs, storage costs etc. Also there are currency changes when you import the products and of course the costs managing a store where you sell the product. Get it?

And here is an another poit of view which you should learn before you make a statement: www.youtube.com/watch?v=MvgN5gCuLac#t=2m11s
[Reply]
  • + 0
 Canfield Crampon pedals are sightly thinner (lower profile) with roughly twice as many studs. They make most other pedals feel like a joke.
  • + 1
 The Crampon pedals from Canfield Brothers are amazing so far been running them for a couple months but i am really interested in trying out the Podium pedals to compare because i have heard rave reviews about both.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 i hope you didint pay to enter that 50 second race
[Reply]
  • + 1
 very unique pedal design, looks sick
[Reply]
  • + 0
 So cool Big Grin but strange XD
[Reply]
  • + 0
 How can you want more grip,when you are wearing puma shoes.
  • + 1
 Read the story and you will learn something new.
[Reply]

Post a Comment



Copyright © 2000 - 2014. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv14 0.044335
Mobile Version of Website