First Ride: BMC Trailfox TF01

Aug 13, 2013
by Mike Kazimer  
BMC's Trailfox TF01: Ready to Race

BMC's new Trailfox TF01 is the Swiss company's flagship enduro race bike, intended to excel on the rough courses found on the Enduro World Series circuit. Prototypes had been spotted under BMC Trailcrew team riders Aaron Bradford and Tobias Woggon at previous stops on the EWS tour, with Bradford piloting his to a fourth place finish in Winter Park, Colorado. The Trailfox series was first introduced in 2007 in the form of an aluminum framed bike with carbon seatstays and 120mm of travel. Since then, the travel has increased, bumping up to 140mm of travel in 2008, and now, for 2014 the Trailfox TF01 is available with a full carbon frame featuring 150mm of travel and 29” wheels. BMC will also be offering the Trailfox TF01 with a carbon front triangle and aluminum rear swingarm, along with a full aluminum version. All of the frames share the same geometry and suspension configuration.
Details
• 150mm travel
• 29" wheels
• 67 degree head angle
• 435mm chainstay length
• 142x12mm thru-axle
• Internal cable routing
• Weight (claimed): 27.1 lbs
• MSRP as shown (without pedals): $8999 USD
• Full aluminum version with full Shimano SLX: $3999 USD
Geometry and Frame Design

Going into this project, BMC's product designers and engineers had the goal of increasing the capabilities of the Trailfox, taking it past its trail bike origins and into the realm of a true all-mountain or enduro race bike. After extensive testing of various wheel size and geometry configurations, BMC decided that short, 435mm chainstays, a 67 degree head angle, and a relatively long top tube in conjunction with 29 inch wheels would give them the ride characteristics they were searching for.

The TF01 uses BMC's APS
suspension design.

Once the geometry numbers were settled upon, there were still frame design challenges to overcome, including where to mount a front derailleur. Front derailleurs have long been the bane of 29ers, as the position of the rear wheel, particularly on a bike with short chainstays, makes it difficult to find clearance to fit the derailleur without it rubbing on the rear tire. To avoid this, BMC moved the lower portion of the seat tube forward and mounted the derailleur directly to the rear swingarm. Riders going sans front derailleur can remove the direct mount and replace it with a clean looking cap that bolts to the swingarm.

Other standout frame features include the internal cable routing, an item that has become increasingly common, but BMC's execution is particularly well though out. The cable entrance and exit ports are large enough to make cable changing easy, and the cap design ensures that the cables will stay in place without any rattling on the frame. An integrated downtube protector shields the carbon frame from rock impacts, and ISCG mounts allow riders the option of running a chainguide. BMC has also developed their own chain device that can be mounted onto the chainstay protector. In keeping with the race-oriented design, a full size water bottle will fit on the medium and large size frames, and a smaller bottle can be mounted on the size small. Even though the new bike uses bigger wheels, the frame weight of the full carbon version comes in at a claimed 2490 grams, 40 grams less than last year's 26" version.

The TF01 uses BMC's APS (Advanced Pivot System) suspension design which uses two short links to attach the rear swingarm to the front triangle. The design is intended to use chain tension to prevent the suspension from compressing due to pedalling forces, while at the same time being able to remain active and absorb impacts from trail obstacles. Sag indicators are printed on the upper link to simplify shock set up – simply adjust the sag until the white lines are aligned and head out for a ride.

  BMC's attention to detail is evident throughout the TF01, from the internal cable routing to the integrated downtube bash guard. The cover for the direct mount front derailleur is also well executed.

Ride Impressions

We were able to put in three solid days of riding on the Trailfox TF01 in Whistler, British Columbia, which included racing in round five of the Enduro World Series. There aren't many places in the world better suited for bike testing than Whistler, a location with no shortage of properly rowdy terrain to take the Trailfox on. Our lime green XX1 Trailcrew edition of the TF01 came specc'd ready to race – SRAM's XX1 drivetrain handled shifting duties on one side of the handlebars, while a remote for the stealth routed 150mm RockShox Reverb dropper post managed seat height on the other. Fox takes care of the suspension on the Trailcrew edition, with the new Float X air shock on the rear and a 34 Float CTD up front. Shifting was crisp and snappy, with no mis-shifts or dropped chains at any point during our time aboard the bike. The Float X shock performed admirably as well, working tirelessly to absorb the thousands of rocks and roots we rode over and through. We did experience an odd top out a few times with the 34 Float, which was noticeable after preloading and then popping off a jump, but it occurred sporadically and we didn't have time to investigate it fully.

Stability at speed is the standout trait of the TF01 – even when rocketing down fireroads strewn with softball sized rocks the TF01 didn't flinch, charging along without any discernible frame flex or speed wobbles. This stiffness does mean that increased trail feedback reaches the rider, despite the bike's 150mm of travel. To compensate for this we ended up running the bike on the softer side of the recommended settings, but the bike still had a ride feel that wasn't as plush as we would have expected. For racers, this isn't going to be a detriment, as responsiveness takes precedence over having a super-plush ride, but riders looking for a bike that can make rocky trails seem like they've been flattened and covered in shag carpet may find it difficult to achieve that feeling with the TF01.

Steep corners were where the long top tube / short stem combination truly came into play, making it possible to keep weight over the front wheel without feeling too far in front of the axle. This combination was also helpful on sections where the trail followed the path of least resistance and went straight down the fall line, with the extra top tube length making it easy to find a balanced position without hanging too far off the back end of the bike.

  The trails around Whistler offered plenty of opportunities to put the TF01 through its paces.

Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesThe TF01 is a worthy successor to the previous bikes in BMC's Trailfox line, a stouter, more robust offering capable of competing at top level enduro races. A take-charge riding style is necessary to truly eke out every bit of potential, but that's a reasonable characteristic given the bike's intended purpose. We fully realize that the price of the TF01 puts it out of reach for many riders, which is why the fact that a well equipped full aluminum version is available for half the price is appreciated, giving privateer racers a chance to have the same geometry and suspension design as those with deeper pockets. The aluminum version still doesn't fall into what we'd consider 'budget' pricing, but it is on the more attainable side of the spectrum. - Mike Kazimer

www.bmc-racing.com

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134 Comments

  • + 70
 does Switzerland offer anything that's cheap?? even money laundering is expensive there Smile )
  • + 36
 oh nice Sir, you use a stereotype. Then you Poles are all car thiefs and drunk addicts. you're welcome Wink
stop crying about the price of the bike superstars. no one is forced to buy a bike for $8000. no pain no gain.
...oh wait.....of course we swiss people can buy them becuase we're rich enough. life's good Big Grin
  • + 44
 ^ DRUNK ADDICTS.... maaaaan you're killing me right now.
  • + 16
 you definitely have more strong sides: chcolate, watches, dj bobo...oh no that's is a weak side of yours))
really love the bike - it would fit me perfectly
any swiss bank offering bike loans?Smile cheers
  • + 58
 motowhip your a tool
  • - 50
flag BikeNERD007 (Aug 13, 2013 at 3:37) (Below Threshold)
 @mataja, nope the jews moved in and sucked thats place clean... there is a crisis actually.. #broke
  • + 1
 ha ha! last time i walked out my door i honestly thought i was in turkey and i certainly dont see them laying down 8 grand with the amount of stolen bikes for sale all over the place!
  • - 17
flag motowhip (Aug 13, 2013 at 4:10) (Below Threshold)
 @propermuntered: dräi mer nid grad düre. isch nume ironisch gmeint gsi. der pol het der witz verstande Wink nume ke stress!
  • + 19
 i don't know, i'm laundering money right now and it only costs a few bucks for detergent and power. that's not too bad for three suitcases fitting in one washing machine, eh?
  • + 29
 Switzerland may have good chocolate, watches, banks and dj bobos, but when I look at Polish girls, I'd still rather stay here.
  • - 1
 150mm, fox ctd, so i guess it is meant for enduro!

don't you think that 67ha is quite steep??
  • + 12
 @fr33riding, the head angle is not the equivelant of a 67HA on a 26" wheeled bike as the 29" wheels increase the trail measurement. As a result it's going to be closer in feel to a 65.0 or 65.5HA on 26".
  • + 2
 @cloverleaf that is a very useful info for clients facing their forced revolution of wheels sizes. What would it be then on the "perfectly magical" 27.5 inch?
  • + 2
 you are correct!!!! thank you Smile
  • + 1
 i just don't think the motorwhil is a swiss first of all.
  • + 7
 jedreza: You are so right!!! Few and far between.

Bicycle Manufacturing Company does exactly not manufacture bikes. Cheap chinese ware at a premium.

Wouldn`t touch that overpriced crap with a pole...
  • + 1
 >Wouldn`t touch that overpriced crap with a pole...
Do You have Your own Pole for touching things?
  • + 2
 Borrow yours?
  • + 3
 Last I saw a BMC, it got skewered alive and roasted by MBA for terrible geo and a questionable spec in something... I wanna say wheels...
So unless they reinvented it for the 29" market (and by looks it copies *some* of the stance of the 26" TF), that'll be a big 'ol glass of NOPE.
  • + 1
 Come on, 9K$ is still less than most of S-Works bikes, even Cube has something more expensive, as well as Giant. It's just price for the top shelf bike. And expect good quality from Swiss, as well as solid warranty cover.
  • + 0
 It looks like they tried to do a revolution with 29inch wheels, and it did not win with 26inch wheels on a scale they planned, so now they are trying to introduce "at least" 27,5. Anything guys, at least 1,5 more. We want to make more money. The world's in crisis. Companies like Intense, Fox, Marzocchi already got back to the drawing boards to redesign their products, but the problem is if I were to build a new bike now, it is not so easy task, as 26inch technology may sadly expire in a short while and there aren't enough products to build a proper 27,5 full suspension bike yet, so in fact money making stopped by the revolution. Everybody's waiting, or not giving a glimpse of interest at this situation and ride on.

I like the approach of Marzocchi. They introduced new 888 that fits both 26 and 27,5 sizes and kiss the bottom with this revolution. Whatever.

I really have to recalculate what is the difference between diameters of 27.5 inch wheel with a 2.3inch wide tire and 26inch wheel with at least 2.5 or 2.7inch tire. A wider tire means also higher tire, and the weight could be comparable. Maybe I already have a 27,5 wheels on my bike and I'm sitting here unconscious and hopeless.
  • + 8
 did some homework on this.

and the results are:

1. to find the head angle feel of the 27.5 bike in a 26 bike, subtract 1.20° from the 27.5's bike head angle.

2. to find the head angle feel of the 29 bike in a 26 bike, subtract 2.35° from the 29's bike head angle.

proof of that: oi43.tinypic.com/2j3ff44.jpg

example: the bmc's 29 feel is as a 26's with a 64.65° head angle.

Smile
  • + 0
 Thanks so much. This looks like CAD. Funny since I also use it to check bike dimensions.
  • + 3
 There is no reason for mortals and unsponsored riders to buy a bike over 5k ,but if people buy an iphone that is built in china for +600$ (++++1000$ in Israel ) and pose like they have some kind of a super phone (they are convinced that it is built in the US ) there will always be those who are willing to pay ridiculous amounts of money on plastic bikes, at least its not hideous as the Redlap bike Wink . for 9k i would rather have a 3k mtb ,5k moto and 1k for spares&premix.
  • + 3
 I was with the Swiss guy... right up to the point in which he said they are all rich...
  • + 2
 I could really go for a Costco polish dog right now.
  • + 2
 Come on, who buys at MSRP prices in nowadays? Big Grin
  • + 1
 Wheels are like condoms, they all come in different sizes, and at the end they all have the same purpose which is RIDING. Some ride better with smaller ones, while others enjoy riding with bigger ones.....
  • + 0
 A 67degree head angle, 29" wheels, and 17" stays. How does this thing not handle like a truck? And 67degrees is not steep, even on a 26" bike. If you need something slacker to ride the technical bits, learn to ride. You want training wheels too?
  • + 3
 how come my above scientific post have only +4, and other bullshit here have more???

you should learn damnit!!! hahaha

Razz Smile
  • + 2
 ok, fr33riding, I'll give you +1 Big Grin

...

Done!
  • + 1
 hahaha Razz Smile

kidding btw...keep riding!
  • + 3
 For those who want to compare 26 vs 27.5 diameters:

Schwalbe Muddy Mary 2.5x26 =690mm =27.2in
Duro Wildlife leopard 3.0x26 =702mm =27.6in
Maxxis Highroller II 2.4x27.5 =706mm = 27.8in

Comparing the feel between them the 27.5/650b wheel feels stiffer. This is due to the lower profile tire i.e. the schwalbe 2.5 is taller than the Maxxis 2.4 thus more rim. Obviously there is an even bigger difference with the Duro because it is MASSIVE! You do notice the increase in diameter (even though that is obviously less when comparing a 26x2.5 to a Maxxis 2.4x27.5) at both low speed (slower handling) and going over rocks/roots (better).

By the way:
26in rims are 559mm=22in
27.5in rims are 584mm=23in

So 27.5/650b are only 25mm/1inch bigger in diameter than 26in rims NOT 1.5in!
  • + 1
 I am collecting data to compare dimensions and weights of the same products of tires and rims offered in the two sizes. It is obvious that different companies produce different sizes which they all claim to be e.g. 2.5. For example Minion dhf 2.7 eguals more likely 2.5 of Schwalbe. That is why I think we should compare products of the same company like 2.35 or 2.5 minion dhf and 2.7 dhf. We should compare weights (remebering that the more weight outside the wheel the worse), the tire prints area (for the traction) and the diameters (for the ability to roll over small obsacles).

Anyway thank You very much for Your work.
  • + 1
 I am also collecting the same kinda data but only for DH specific tires. What I have found out is that 650b is only 25mm bigger than 26in and that 650b with DH tires is closer to 28in rather than 27.5. Also Schwalbe size tires are the size they claim to be whereas Maxxis lie. A Maxxis 2.5 is 2.3 and their 2.7 is 2.5. I also hope that Schwalbe will come out with a 2.5 for 650b. By my calculations that should comeout to 715mm/28.1in. Also most MX wheels comeout around 28in front and about 27in for the rear which I find interesting and might just suggest that 650b is the ideal MTB wheel as well (at least for the front).
As for weigh difference 27.5 seem to be ~100g heavier, though the new Schwalbe supergravity casing will offset that.
  • + 2
 @bmar I'm going to Costco tonight, I'll get one for ya!
  • + 23
 For BMC team racers and rich mid-life-crisis men everywhere.
  • + 3
 rich mid life crisis men prefer to ride project one treks with "real fire"
  • + 21
 For 9k I can get "decent" EN and DH rig, not just one overpriced 29ner...
  • - 7
flag richierocket (Aug 13, 2013 at 5:35) (Below Threshold)
 "Full aluminum version with full Shimano SLX: $3999 USD". No thanks, its still a 29ner.
  • + 1
 $9k?!? Bro, does anyone in your company even ride? What happened to mountain biking?
  • + 14
 Had a crack in my 2011 speed fox frame after about 300 mi. BMC customer service is terrible, looking for any excuse not to cover the bike under warranty. There final excuse, I'm too heavy for an XL frame, I'm 6,3 and 220lbs. If your XL frame can't handle that, get out of the bike business. I told their customer service I would shout from the roof tops how bad their bikes are, so here it goes. BMC makes terrible frames!
  • + 2
 I think it looks like poo, I assume ( without knowing ) that it will ride like one and for that price I could get a reputiblle frame with many many good reviews instead of tossing away 4 G ( aluminum ) for a questionable frame that only a few have ridden..
  • + 16
 BMC go home your drunk ......
  • + 10
 Hey MTB manufacturers... listen up. NO ONE WANTS TO PAY $9k FOR A FREAKIN MOUNTAIN BIKE. Goodness folks... stop buying this over priced crap and they won't be able to charge this much in the future. Seriously... $3k for an "average bike" these days... come one... what's wrong with the world?
  • + 6
 APS,DW-link, Maestro are all co-rotating 4 bars. Does patent laws still exist? Or all you need is lots of money and good lawyer.
  • + 2
 Not in Switzerland I think.
  • + 2
 Warphen, mentioned patent rights works only in USA, not in Europe. Thats why a lot of excellent european frames with horst-link (for example - made by Cube or Nicolai) cannot be sell in the USA - because of the Specialized's FSR patent.
  • + 3
 didn't that expire?
  • + 1
 This bike review in aimed more on North American consumers since $ was used. I cant find any Swiss technology here since the suspension is obviously Weagle's DW-link. Most consumers now buy bikes based on its suspension platform.If they use Dave Weagle's patent rights then they might have a share of buyers among Ibis,pivot and Iron Horse fan. Or else i might be reading future internet headlines "Weagle sues BMC"!
  • + 1
 I also thought FSR patent expired. .... No?
  • + 2
 Yes, Lapierre went FSR now for free. They renamed as OST suspension.

www.pinkbike.com/news/Lapierre-2014-Mid-Sized-Wheels-for-Spicy-and-Zesty-and-a-Wicked-.html
  • + 8
 $8999................................f*ck!
  • + 16
 hey now.... at least they're generous and get to save you one dollar
  • + 0
 And they don't even include pedals!!!!!
  • + 14
 wouldn't you be pissed if you had to pay for crankbros candy 11s on a bike when you wanted to use xtr pedals?
  • + 6
 damn', 2 dollars more and you could use that button... so close!
www.instantsfun.es/over-9000
  • + 1
 ^hahaha...
  • + 2
 Most bikes don't include pedals, unless you shop at Wal Mart LOL.
  • + 4
 No thank you... Tallboy LTc like CG!!! Waiting for the highly anticipated 28.25 Pilsner LTc. More nimble than my Tallboy but rolls better than the Bronson. 153mm of travel... Perfect for a pissing contest!
  • + 2
 Dont' give anybody ideas Wink
  • + 5
 Gotta pay the best to have the best! I'll never love a bike as much as I loved my trailfox. They are truly amazing bikes.
  • + 6
 9000!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
  • + 13
 and you still don't get ride it until you buy the pedals so.....9,100!? more?
  • - 23
flag BikeNERD007 (Aug 13, 2013 at 3:21) (Below Threshold)
 no, pedals aren't $9,100 more, they are around $100 more... equaling a total of $9,100.00 didn't we learn to count as children...?
  • + 17
 He said 9100!? (read: maybe the total will rise to 9100!?) more? (read: maybe more than $9100 since some pedals cost more).

u W0t M8
  • + 3
 Bahhh who cares its a freakin 29er! Check the buy/sell there are tons of them for sale!
  • + 6
 dbaser: thank you, that's the correct interpretation.

BikeNERD007: to answer your question, yes I did learned how to count. Did you learned how to read?
  • + 18
 Yeah if I had $9000 to blow on a bike it would be on a KTM... with an engine.
  • + 0
 Ummmm.... Did you guys not read there are more affordable models? NO ONE HAS TO BUY THE TOP OF THE LINE!!!!!!
  • + 5
 That's a lot of waffles and syrup... sign me up!
  • - 1
 BikeNERD007,,,,, Wow, your an Ass hat.
  • + 2
 Bigbossman you got the right idea. Mmmmmmm waffles and yz450 and new AM bike.
  • + 4
 and 9K is not the top. There is still an XTR Version for $11999 Wink Well swiss was always expensive
  • + 12
 I built my bikes and its always cheaper,almost half the price, Example,Closeout Carbine carbon frame,1600$ ,XTR Groupset 1400$, Fox Kashima 800$ ,wheelset 500$ everything else add 200$. Total 4500$ for a brand new XTR equipped Carbine. And its a US of A company.
  • + 4
 Designed in US, made in Taiwan.
  • + 5
 I had read in the past that BMC are made in Taiwan too from Easton company.
  • + 2
 Warphen, spend all that and only get a $500 wheelset? Your wheelset makes as much difference to the ride as your fork!
  • + 1
 Joeof,I can buy a take off or Brand new Roval wheelset for 500$ and abuse as much as i can than a 1500$ Enve. I saw the run of Bryceland in MSA and the wheels gave up.
  • + 2
 The spikes have up. Big time! But Minaar's was fine.
  • + 2
 Yes but the carbon wheels will handle better. Same reason you chose XTR over SLX, but different component.
  • + 1
 Its essentially an iron horse! Not a bad thing mind,great bikes and copied by so many company's,giant glory,summum,pivot and plenty more. Save your money and buy a Sunday or 6 point.
  • + 2
 Pinkbike doods, can you review/test a less expensive model. Everyone just complains about the price rather than talk about the actual bike.
  • + 1
 Switzerland, the biggest problem lies in the fact that it is illegal to ride a mountain bike almost anywhere where it would be fun everywhere are limitations, so many stereotypes about many nations it is just stupid
  • + 1
 ...not really - your ride everywhere you like.. But some stereotypes about Swiss are true - every nation has some serious pricks.
  • + 1
 Not really digging the look of this frame, I especially hate the Seat tube, My eyes look there right away for some reason and I think it looks Weak.

...not trying to be a hater, just my 2c
Salute
  • + 4
 And again,Test a yt or canyon
  • + 4
 What he said^, would like to see a review on the torque
  • + 2
 He says it but doesnt do it,plus He just says it so no One hates on him
  • + 0
 go find a review somewhere else or test ride.... :mindblown:
  • + 0
 Why should i
  • + 1
 because why would pinkbike write a review of a bike you'll almost never see in canada?
  • + 2
 All this tendency of carbon 29er enduros is making a 3 year old custom build Intense Tracer look like a cheap wallmart bike...
  • + 0
 Sounds good(but when does a PB review of a top line bike ever sound anything but?) I don't like the look of the bike - that bent seat tube and angeld forward shock mount make it look a little retarded. If I was going for a 29er trail bike it would be the Enduro - actually no, would buy a sixer, it'd be the Enduro evo.
  • + 1
 $9000 for a brand new 29'er trailbike? Must have missed memo about 27.5. Can't wait till someone gives a stellar write up on a 36er. Haha..
  • + 2
 I'm not convinced to switch to 29er yet and the 9k price tag is not motivating me to get rid of my bike.....
  • + 0
 Now, I see everybody complaining about $9k...if anybody noticed, at the bottom, there is one for $4k as well...I actually am interested in this bike because I personally like 29ers and fox suspension...
  • + 3
 If I ever get a 29er I'll go with the enduro 29er
  • + 2
 you have to be f*cking insane to spend $9000 on a bike. absolutely unreasonable
  • + 3
 All I know is the 26er version is a solid bike
  • + 3
 Tired of the 27.5er and 29er reviews. Bring back the 26ers.
  • + 4
 You didn't buy enough new 26er bikes to keep the manufacturers making them.
  • + 2
 @Willie1,
It's not really as simple as consumer driven supply and demand. Companies have been known to manipulate markets to gain a profit advantage.
BP routinely buys oil wells and then turns them off to lower supply and increase demand.

Its also possible that the bike companies are victims of their own success: they built a too good bike in 26", so people don't need to replace their bikes as often as they did in the past. But maybe they need to "upgrade " to a heavier and slower steering bike.
  • + 1
 ?There is that possibility, but don't forget the consumer has been asking for heavier and slower steering bikes for the past 10 years. Travel has increased from 100-120mm, to 140-160mm, tire volume has gone up, and the HTA continues to slacken. You will get the same ride, but more efficiently with a slightly larger wheel, better weight balance, 20mm less travel, and more reasonable HTA.

The conspiracy theory works too. The manufacturers bought up all of the 650b products produced in the past 5 years, creating a false hysteria and are now releasing the product for the created market against the consumer's demand.

I know which one seems more believable Smile .
  • + 1
 Well played. +1 for the first paragraph.

What I was referring to was by eliminating supply of 26", it would increase demand for the next closest thing that is being mass brought to market at the exact same time.

Companies are free to do what they want legally. BP can do what ever they want to with an oil well once they own it.

ButI don't agree that it's always on the consumer.
  • + 1
 Willie1: only one man, I can only afford a new bike every now and again, haha, can't keep the whole market afloat on my own! Honestly the 27.5/29er thing doesn't bother me a ton. I think there is some merit in exploration of different wheel sizes. Having said that, I probably won't buy a larger size wheeled bike until forced to by lack of availability of 26ers.

What does bother me more are some of the other new "standards." E.g., 15mm front axle size, 142mm rear axle size, BB30, etc., etc. The 142 is the worst offender to me. 8mm away from a full 150mm DH size spacing, a little more than a quarter inch makes enough of a difference to make a whole new hub size/rear wheel frame spacing standard? Give me a break. And 5mm difference going from 15mm to 20mm for a whole new front hub size and all new fork axle standard? Come on, folks.

Edit: One more rant, haha, the so called "new" 2x drivetrains. The fact that they are making them from the factory doesn't bother me; it's that manufacturers and writers claim that this is such a great "new" innovation (particularly guilty is Mountain Bike Action, "20 innovations that changed mountain biking forever" article). Old school freeride guys like me have been riding and enjoying the benefits of 2x's for many, many years.

Anyway, done ranting, and MBA is a joke anyway.
  • + 3
 That kind of money is better spent elsewhere - on a BMC? no thank you.
  • - 1
 How many grams does that carbon front triangle save you? Doesn't seem cost effective to blow that kind of money on a part of the bike when only large weight changes have a significant effect on bike handling.
It is in cases like i feel carbon is more fashion than function. Carbon wheels sure, maybe even the rear triangle, but the front? The effective weight is you plus that triangle so does one lb make a difference worth 4g's?
Not for me. Never.
  • + 2
 The least important part of the weight of the bicycle is the front triangle (even though most triangles with bicycles are impressionist art versions of triangles.) Ststic weight is ALMOST unimportant. Rotational and unsprung weight is where the differences are felt.
  • + 2
 Lighter weight is only one benefit- being stiffer, stronger, and providing a damper ride are the other factors that make a carbon bike (when done properly) a better ride than aluminum.
  • + 1
 This is true as well. A steel front triangle has more in common with carbon than an aluminum triangle, in terms of ride.
  • + 1
 Building on ka-brap's comment, using carbon allows designers to build features and contortions that would be difficult or impossible to do in metal, even with complex hydroforming and gusseting. Maybe the carbon is 10mm thick in complex areas but it works.

And being that mountain bikes are essentially commodities at this point (plethora of very similar things at similar price points) carbon allows for a branded design approach that reinforces the rest of the line and what the company stands for. In this case, rich Swiss company.
  • + 1
 So it adds more rigid ride characteristics. Hmm, yeah, shill not worth 4 grand. I'd sooner fin something with a cabron rear triangle, or just get the best alu frame on the market. And when it comes to 29er I might go ti.
  • + 1
 206's comment reminds me of the explanation for why companies make f1 cars. Another something I don't want.
  • + 3
 9k! Off your head!
  • + 1
 I had a Superstroke for awhile. I really liked it but too bad some butthole broke into my garage and stole it
  • + 3
 Funkin butthole! You need to find him and tear a new one!
  • + 2
 I was in kill mode for the longest time. Its long gone now but lm looking...always looking
  • + 1
 29er though..amma right or amma right?
  • + 1
 $8999 "without" pedals? C'mon now guys throw us a 'friggen bone here...
  • + 1
 i love bmc frame,but it's really expensive。。。
  • + 2
 Looks like a stereo
  • + 1
 Now for me, it's a bike! Brutal!
  • + 1
 I think I will stick with my Goblin...
  • + 1
 for 9k i can get a good ...motocross
  • + 1
 ive always wanted to buy a BMC but dammit lower your prices!
  • + 0
 9000 bhahahahahah....BMC bhahahahahaha....., i'd buy a CCM before that piece of Swiss cheese.
  • + 0
 Could we have an article of top fulface helmets comparison with a questionary?
I think this could be appreciated by many.
  • + 1
 love it
  • - 2
 uhm... is kind of funny how all the new models from BMC, Felt and even Intense are starting to look like Specialized older or newer models (stumpy/enduro). I wonder why...
  • + 1
 Great looking bike.
  • + 1
 ...schwing...!
  • - 1
 Finally there is an article without promoting 650Bs!!!!! Hoooorrrraaayyy!

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