Canyon Now Offering Home Delivery by Velofix

Nov 2, 2017 at 8:51
by Pinkbike Staff  
Press Release

Canyon USA, the American division of Germany’s Canyon Bicycles GmbH, has today announced the addition of an extended delivery option for sales in the United States. Canyon currently offers direct-to-consumer delivery at home or workplace around the globe, using the exclusive Canyon Bike Guard to deliver award-winning bicycles with all tools included for simple assembly in a matter of minutes. This new Canyon USA Delivery Service by velofix is an additional delivery option exclusively for the United States, and will provide another choice for consumers who choose to have personal assistance from a professional mechanic.

Canyon USA Delivery Service by velofix is available to all Canyon USA customers immediately for an additional charge of $95. “Canyon ́s groundbreaking direct-to-consumer distribution has demonstrated for years around the globe that our riders can expect the highest level of service and quality when purchasing online, and be ready to ride within minutes of receiving their Canyon at home or office,” said Canyon USA President Blair Clark. “The simple setup process has satisfied hundreds of thousands of customers and is one of Canyon’s many unique benefits. By offering the Canyon USA Delivery Service by velofix we will have another option to serve the customer who desires additional personal assistance from a professional certified mechanic.”


Canyon Sender - Pinkbike First Look. Photo credit Markus Greber
With the new service, Canyon's US customers can have their bike delivered, assembled, and set up just for them by a professional mechanic.


“We are proud to partner with Canyon USA and to offer their customers this additional premium delivery option, bike build, and bike fit by a professional certified mechanic,” said velofix CEO and co-founder Chris Guillemet. “With close to 100 mobile bike shops across the United States, we are perfectly positioned to offer this concierge delivery option to those Canyon customers who are interested.”

Canyon customers who chose this Canyon USA Delivery Service option will have their bicycle shipped to their local velofix mobile bike shop. velofix will assemble the bike, arrange a delivery time, and assist in a first fitting for the Canyon customer. For more information on this option, please visitwww.canyon.com/en-us/service-support/canyon-service-by-velofix

Inside Canyon

About Canyon Bicycles

Canyon started life as Radsport Arnold back in 1985. What began as a business run out of founder Roman Arnold’s garage has evolved into one of the bike industry’s leading innovators. Following the success of the first ever Canyon bikes developed in the late 90s, the company changed its name to Canyon Bicycles GmbH in 2002. For years, talented engineers and designers have been drawn to Koblenz, Germany, for the development of an ever-expanding range of road, mountain, triathlon, fitness and urban bikes. Canyon’s technology-first approach focusses on applying the most cutting-edge materials, working together with the world’s best riders and ensuring everything produced delivers the finest quality and performance. Canyon products are available exclusively via direct sales.

For more information, go to www.canyon.com.


83 Comments

  • + 28
 Pretty smart move. My biggest challenge with these online brands have more to deal with warranty claims on components. My shop for example, will just pull something from inventory, swap it, and deal with the warranty. They represent me to SRAM, Fox etc. and get me on the trail within a day or so. If Velofix could offer that same level of service they could make Canyon more competitive.
  • + 5
 I wouldn't let that stop you. My LBS will handle warranty claims for parts I didn't purchase there. I've also had really good luck with some companies directly; WTB, Santa Cruz Bikes, and Cane Creek for example.
  • + 5
 I can't agree more...I bought a YT and had issues with the BOS suspension...YT suspended their relationship with BOS so it was a complete pain getting the custom eye-eye length shock replaced and BOS wouldn't deal with it either...5 months later I got a replacement Fox through YT and they were super cool about it, but not having your shop involved makes it alot harder...
  • + 16
 Maybe this will go to show how hard it is as a shop employee to get the warranty handled for a customer. We bust our butts so customers don't have to, and we often get the shorthanded with minimal labor to compensate time if sitting on the phone, endless emails, lazy reps, etc. Getting yelled at that it wasn't fast enough but an understandably upset customer. it's frustrating at times, but it's the job.
  • + 1
 @kubikeman: They will as long as they stay in business Smile
  • + 6
 @PaulLehr: the true downside to busting ass for customers who don't support the brick and mortar until they want something replaced for free.
  • + 1
 As a heads up, SRAM/Rockshox/Truvativ will take warranty claims from any shop, regardless if you bought it from them or not. I think its the same for Shimano but I'm not sure since I've never had to file a warranty claim with their amazing components.
  • + 2
 @scott-townes: you are correct, Shimano will as well. Most companies will, many will require a receipt though.
  • + 1
 @PaulLehr: I hear you. I feel guilty taking a part to the shop to have them deal with warranty. Raceface won't speak to me though. Several others are the same way. I want to pay for it but my shop won't charge me since I install everything myself.
  • + 1
 @kubikeman: agreed, those bike companies are great to work with.
  • + 4
 @PsychoT: beer and pizza are always welcome in any shop I believe!
  • + 4
 @PaulLehr: Had a customer the other get upset when we told him we would handle his warranty, but there would be a labor charge to install the part... It was a bike he purchased online.. If he had purchased the bike from us, no charge.

Keep in mind, shops rarely get a labor credit for warranty work... That's why one shop I worked at charged a warranty processing fee for any item not purchased from us... It takes time, making phone calls, sending pictures and emails, and sometimes having to box up parts to ship back... It all takes time out of our day and we don't get paid for it...
  • + 1
 @PsychoT: offer them a few bucks for handling it for you... It will at least make the owner happy...
  • + 1
 @lumpy873: my last shop had a warranty processing fee, which we would discuss before doing anything further even talking about the warranty process. was never an issue really, just have to explain in a way that you don't anger anyone. I also talk about any possible labor charges ahead of time... you need a new lever replaced, that's a bleed, occasionally companies send a product to compensate labor, but I still have to create SKUs and price and inventory that, then sit on it who knows how long before selling it at a discount to compete with online buying. it's tough, i'm not complaining, but it's more work that it needs to be all around for everyone involved.
  • + 1
 @PaulLehr: one way or another, shops should be compensated for their time... SRAM is the only company that has given me parts as compensation... Usually, it's a chain or 2, so I already have a SKU and they usually turn fast...
  • + 1
 I don't know if I would actually have the heart or guts to walk into a shop, get something warranted that I bought on line and expect it for free. I would want to pay a fee for them helping me out. Something to be said about building a relationship with a shop. I think it would be great if someone would come to my house and warranty a part for me, but I'm also not that lazy or too busy in life to not go in.
  • + 0
 @lumpy873: I really hate those customers who expect something for no reason at all. Uhhh yeah you weren't charged for the replacement part but what makes you think we will also install it for free? At that point, I'd just give them the part and tell the person to do it him/herself if they want it done for free.
  • + 0
 @scott-townes: can we not bash customers on the internet? I get the need to vent, but lots of people read this stuff, It's not helping shops at all. Customer service is our friend, use it, gain a customer that used to go to the internet, there are plenty of ways, just be professional about it
  • + 3
 @PaulLehr: I don't work at a LBS so I have the freedom to bring up past interactions. However when I did work at a LBS, customers like those who come in expecting work for free, this and that for free, and then complain when they don't get it, are the sort of customers we turned away and didn't want back in the shop. You hook up the genuinely nice people who will spread the good word about the shop. You don't give in to unreasonable demands to bad customers because at the end of the day, you will lose money on them and they will still bad mouth the shop or in best case scenarios, tell others you can get free stuff if you demand it.

Customer service is a thickle business but you have to remember the customer is not always right and its not worth losing money just to appease someone with a chip on their shoulder.
  • + 1
 @scott-townes: no, you're up front about charges before they get a chance to complain, and if they need to, they can seek else where. prices first, no arguments later. Customer service is not about bending over and spreading your cheeks, it's about detail oriented and concise notes to inform customer, calling them before they call you, and showing the value of what they've received for they money.
  • + 3
 @scott-townes: also, dont hook up anyone, ever. friends who support you are your friends, friends who need their support bought with a discount, are not your friends.
  • + 1
 @PaulLehr: Its not always that cut and dry and perfect every time. Also even if it is, I've run into instances where after explaining it, they purposely try to get a different answer out of another employee that may be newer or simply didn't perfectly explain everything up front and then hang that over your head. Personally the bike industry has a lot of a*shole, entitled customers, more so than in other industries.. Some of them are straight up horrible people and those are the last people you want as a customer or someone representing your shop in any fashion. I can guarantee if they're that horrible to a shop, they're that horrible to people around them.

Once again, the customer is not always right, and there's no way to absolutely prevent an a*shole from being an a*shole.
  • + 1
 @PaulLehr: You're looking at it wrong. You're hooking people up who will spread the good word. Essentially its a cheap form of guerrilla marketing... on top of helping out a chill person. Of course you run into the risk of people assuming they'll get a discount or hookup automatically every time, but that's rare and its just like explaining to a child why they don't get a cookie every time they clean up their room.
  • + 1
 @PaulLehr: I am not a fan of hooking people up to get their business, but I don't mind giving someone who comes in almost daily a little discount as a thank you to them... They appreciate it. Most of them have even told me they would come in without a discount...

On the other hand, I have one parent of a high school team racer and pretty much the first words out of her mouth when she comes in "Hello, we get our team discount, right?" Not a fan of that type of behavior...
  • + 1
 @scott-townes: People who are stoked will always spread the good word, regardless of the price they paid. I let my work speak for itself.
  • + 1
 @PaulLehr: Discounts are not given out to make up for shotty work... you're missing the point completely.
  • + 1
 @PaulLehr: many many riders appreciate folks like you! thanks to you and LBS folks that take the pain out of warranties. i empathize and realize time is not free.
  • + 1
 @scott-townes: I never said, that, you inferred it somehow, my friend. I get the point, you're missing mine. Never devalue yourself or what your hands and mind are capable of, is all I'm saying.

People make goff and my price, next time they'll go elsewhere, get slower work at a lower quality than I can provide, then they come back to me, and appreciate all the value I put into their bike each and every time I touch it.
  • + 7
 I still don't understand how LBSs haven't all gone to a concierge model of picking up/dropping off customers' bikes for them. Just about every shop has a vehicle of some sort. Yep, you'll have a bit of extra labor cost to get someone to drive around - but given that they already have a shop and the whole mobile part of the business would just increase utilization for them, they should be able to eat Velofix's lunch any day.
  • + 7
 My local bike chain, Mikes Bikes, has begun doing just that. And they do it for free. Pretty smart, as you say.
  • + 2
 @zachinblack: We've got one store here in town that has started doing it; they've always been a sort of family/neighborhood store with consignment stuff, a commuter focus, and a big emphasis on repairs, so it makes sense. We've got another store that operates out of a van built out sort of like a rolling tiny home - usually parked right at the trail head. They went the other route, started with repairs (at the trailhead, at the brew pub, and then with pickup/delivery) and have branched out into sales/rentals/demos. But the main bike stores haven't gone there - I'm shaking my head about that. I talked to a (former) bike store owner about that, and he said he wanted people to come into the store so they could get all excited about accessories, or maybe even new bikes. Fair enough - but you still get to build a relationship, probably more so than requiring them to come in during working hours.
  • + 0
 As someone who works far a business with the drivers. I can say that unfortunately the liability insurance a business is required to carry for a company vehicle and employed driver is pretty costly. Plus professional maintenance on the vehicle. Plus vehicle cost and insurance itself. Its a great idea but many small shops could likely never handle the financial undertaking to do so.
  • + 1
 @cthorpe: Yea but running a small business in the US isn't even the American dream or anything. Big companies only, please. Their products and customer service are always way better anyway especially after they outsource it to other economies.
  • + 6
 Bike delivery ?!! I cant get my Lbs true a wheel, change a headeset or anything like that in under 5 days. 5 DAYS. And you gotta make an appointment .
  • + 2
 @cthorpe: it's not overly expensive
  • + 1
 @scary1: and that is why I started doing my own wrenching! Now I just laugh at how long it takes some of these shops now that I've learned the ways..
  • + 1
 @bohns1: yeah, i just have a 1000 other things to do. Time to shop around i guess.
  • + 1
 @g-42: besides additional expenses that were already listed, a lot of small shops like where I work don't have an extra body to send out driving during the day...
  • + 1
 @lumpy873: You don't send an extra body you just happen to have around - you hire a couple college kids who are into mountain biking and are trying to figure out a way to work with/around bikes rather than pushing carts at the grocery store or cleaning toilets at McDonald's. And then you scale up your service business - get an extra stand in the workshop, hire an additional mechanic, and use the additional service business to pay for your building overhead - and to build relationships with people who might actually come in and buy stuff if you deliver good service.
  • + 1
 @g-42: That's a great idea, but they should be careful with that. Most municipalities, and parks (both county, state, and fed) usually have ordinances, regulations, licenses, or straight up prohibitions associated with parking a mobile business and setting up shop for the day. Best to look into it first than have them shut you down. Makes getting the license/etc. almost impossible to get.
  • + 1
 @g-42: Depending on where you are, that's not always an option... We recently had to replace a mechanic...Finding someone with even an inkling of bike experience was tough... And if you have a service department already on a 5 day backlog, you probably don't have time to train someone... My boss is fond of bringing in some of the high school team racers to "help" me on the floor... It usually means everything takes longer because I have to either stop what I'm doing to work with them or spend time later fixing stuff....

Bringing in an extra body doesn't guarantee more revenue to pay for that body...
  • + 1
 Our shop (Epic BMX) offer free local pick up/dropping off for years but for some reason, not a lot of the customers take advantage of it.
  • + 1
 @scary1: That's what I'm seeing too. Equal parts "Bike shops are dying" and, "Yeah we can change your tube, just come pick it up in January."
  • + 1
 @BadgerBacker: Good old local ordinances, make sure you suck some city councilman's dick for 6 months before you set up a bike stand near a trail. Because if you don;t have special permission and a license to turn a wrench, EVERYTHING WILL BURN!!!
  • + 10
 All I want is a Stitched 720. Is that too much to ask?
  • + 1
 Seriously. That bike is on my very short list for a new ride and not available.
  • + 5
 Ditto on the stitched 720! I've contacted Canyon USA twice about this and their response was:

1st: "We do not have this bike scheduled for this year but hope to get some in stock in 2018 as this has been a very popular request."

So naturally I asked "When?"

2nd: "We do not know if or when we will have any of the Stitched series unfortunately"

WTF!

Canyon, if you're listening the market is here. Bring the bike before I take my $$ elsewhere.
  • + 1
 @ClarkRonald: I've asked the same a few days ago and got the exact same response. I'm already considering other options (ask a friend from europe)
  • + 1
 I'm guessing that even though it a sweet bike, it's probably not even a big mover in Europe, so the U.S. office is hesitant to bring it in....
  • + 1
 @cucupebicicleta: Don't think they're in stock in Europe either. They probably aren't a big priority. Enduro is everything these days I guess, lame.
  • + 1
 @lumpy873: It's not enduro enough, so who cares right?
  • + 1
 @chrisfirth: To many "yo... I can do a backflip, you should sponsor me, bro" emails...
  • + 4
 Good idea for most. Me, I'm pretty much sold on getting a Transition. They are just a bit up the road from home and a good excuse to head into Bellingham. Obviously not everyone can take a drive to the manufacturer for spares, but if I can, I will!
  • + 2
 Johnny, we're neighbors. I was recently at the Poulsbo Pump Track grand opening last weekend. Great day for riding. Bit I too am so close to driving up north to B'ham to put my money on the Triple. The last I checked on their web-site was that it was on sale. Now their site only shows the 2018 lineup which doesn't include the Triple. Not sure what's going on there...
  • + 2
 @ClarkRonald: They're no longer making it.
  • + 6
 @ClarkRonald: Hey guys, I just saw this comment and wanted to let you know that we do have Triples in stock (both colors) and on our site in the webstore. The Triple is not technically a "2018" model which is why we haven't gotten it loaded up on our Bike Model pages yet. You can find full support info for the Triple in our support section and you can purchase them from our online store or from one of our fine dealers.

-Kyle
Transition Bikes
  • + 1
 @TransitionBikeCompany: #riderownedforlife
  • + 8
 Diamondback offers this same option through Beeline, but FREE!
  • + 1
 I just moved to a new area, and decided to do some online bike buying instead of hitting the local shop. So far so good, but I felt incredibly guilty on not going to my LBS who sells the bike that I wanted. The price difference was just too much and the shop's unwillingness to work with me on price was the tipping point. I'm not sure if it will come back to bite me in my butt but so far it hasn't.
  • + 2
 If people buy a canyon they usually know what they want and they also want to save money..I don't know how many will fork out another 100 for the bike to tighten bolts and set stem and seatpost height..
  • + 2
 Yeah, I don't see canyon and YT destroying the market anytime soon. LBS' make their money on local whales and people who have the money to pay someone to change their tubes for them. Which in my eyes is GREAT. Guys like me don't keep the lights on, I roll in every so often for a valve core or some sealant, that doesn't pay mechanics or put on local races. Dentists pay for cycling to exist, and I applaud them for that.
  • + 5
 I will only be happy when I can buy a stitched 360
  • + 4
 Agreed! I just want a Stitched 720!
  • + 2
 This doesn't help at all if they only sell a couple models in the US. I want the stitched 720 frameset and they've told me that maybe they'll import a few next year. Thanks a lot...
  • + 1
 They told me no plans to sell that in the US. So maybe things are getting better
  • + 1
 complete bike for almost the same cost as a ticket s frame.... yeah buddy!
  • + 0
 This is worse than e-bikes... All the macho, bike jock shred dorks that get all butt hurt about the mere mention or photo of an ebike and insist that people "man up" and quit "being pussies and pedal your bike", are the first ones to sit in their moms basement, borrow her credit card, order a bike off the internet, wait for some guy to come to their door, assemble it for them, test ride it for them, make sure it works... talk about lazy... :/ I see too many kooks that all ride the same bike, wear the same shit kit, talk the same shit, yet can't adjust the tension on the cable when their shifting on the fancy 12spd falcon gets wonky. The homogenization of mountain biking is killing me...

Get off your ass, go buy a frame, go buy parts, new or used, buy some tools, put the damn thing together, figure out it works, what does what doesn't... That's half the fun.
  • + 2
 Now I want someone in the middle of North Dakota to prefer a new Canyon, with delivery and assembly by Velofix.
  • + 2
 Damn that's a big rack. I wonder what kind of equipment gets the boxes from the top shelf?
  • + 1
 Heavy load sky lift I'm guessing.
  • + 16
 Catapults
  • + 1
 They use guide by wire Raymond forklifts most likely.
forkliftworld.org/wp-content/uploads/raymond-forklift-1.jpg
  • + 3
 when can i buy a damn sender????????????????????
  • + 1
 I wonder if they offer this service with their lower end bikes? With advanced diagnostics?
  • + 2
 why no al strives in US??
  • + 1
 This just makes sense . Like pizza delivery. Extra sag, hold the anchovies.
  • + 1
 If they had bikes to deliver...
  • + 1
 I’ll wait until I can get it delivered by a drone.
  • + 0
 YEAH NICE BUT HOW MUCH ! TURENR HAS THAT FOR A COST OF AN ARM!
  • + 1
 Turner bikes will do it for free.
  • + 0
 The new normal
  • - 1
 Yeah, I think these mobile bike shops will take over. Hopefully they will enable more demos too.

I'm currently thinking about either a new shock or custom tuning my existing shock, and how the hell am I supposed to chose between 10 different options without actually trying any? Shocks are so dependent on the suspension, a given model could be great for one frame, and horrible on another. Would love it if I could demo some shocks.

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