Production Privee Shan Review

Nov 19, 2012
by Mike Kazimer  
 
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Production Privee
Shan

WORDS Mike Kazimer




Andorran steel
Production Privee is a young company, created in 2010 by two former members of Commencal's research and development team. Based in Andorra (home to Cedric Gracia, and host of stop number three on the 2013 UCI World Cup downhill calendar), the company has been making a name for themselves in Europe with their stems and handlebars, and now with their first steel hardtail frame, the Shan. The Shan was designed with aggressive riding in mind, and is intended for all-mountain or enduro use with 150 or 160mm travel fork. With a 66 degree head angle, 420mm chain stay length, 72.5 degree seat tube angle and a 300mm bottom bracket height, the Shan's numbers place it squarely in the all-mountain / enduro category.

Aesthetically, the Shan is eye-catching. From the head tube gusset to the curved seat tube brace, the frame has a refined, finished look to it. The welds are clean, and the paint is free of any blemishes. Production Privee had our frame custom painted red and white; the stock color is black and grey, with the limited edition bright blue and yellow Macaw version now sold out. Three new colors will be available for the upcoming December production run, with Production Privee promising to show something quite special.


Production Privee Shan details

• Intended use: All-mountain, enduro riding
• 4130 Japanese chromoly frame
• Tapered head tube
• ISCG 05 chain guide tabs
• Replaceable dropouts: 10x135, 12x135, singlespeed
• Sizes: S, M, L (tested ), XL
• Frame Weight: 5.7 pounds
• MSRP: $776 USD ($649 Euros )

  Check out that head tube (left). Interchangeable dropouts (right) make for an adaptable ride.


Frame details
The Shan is made in Taiwan from triple butted and heat treated Japanese 4130 seamless chromoly which goes through an electrodeposition treatment before painting to protect against corrosion. The Shan has a tapered head tube (with the company logo cut out of it) and takes an integrated Campy style headset. A section of wire mesh is taped behind the head tube cut out, likely to prevent larger trail debris from getting into the frame, although it also adds to the great looks as well. While the head tube cut out looks trick, for wet weather riding we'd recommend replacing the screen with something (a small piece of tube would work) to keep water from getting in and settling on the lower headset bearing.

The frame's dropouts are replaceable, held on with two chainring bolts on each side, and can be swapped out to make the Shan a singlespeed if that's how you want to run it. ISCG 05 tabs encircle the bottom bracket shell, which takes a BB92 press fit bottom bracket. In the ever-changing world of bike industry “standards” the BB92 is not as prevalent as the traditional threaded bottom bracket shell, or the increasingly common BB30 style, which could make finding replacement parts a little more difficult. The addition of bolt-on housing guides was a nice touch – we ran our frame set up as a 1x10, which freed up a spot to run the dropper post's housing. One feature which we were surprised to find missing was a place to mount a water bottle cage. Hydration packs are fine, but sometimes it's nice to go light and fast, or to have a place for a drink other than water on a long ride.

Shan geometry

• Head tube angle: 66°
• Seat tube angle: 72.5°
• Bottom bracket drop: - 30mm
• chain stay length: 420mm
• Wheelbase (sm, med, lrg, xlrg ): 1089, 1109, 1129, 1164mm
• Seat tube length: 400, 430, 470, 510mm
• Top tube length (horizontal ): 560, 580, 600, 635mm

Production Privee Shan
  Nice lines. The Shan's flowy tube shapes make for a visually appealing frame. Bolt on housing guides (left) make for easy cable routing, while the head tube gusset adds strength and stiffness to the front end.


Riding the Shan


Climbing
We built our Shan up with an eye towards durability and technical trail riding. With fat tires, wide bars, a short stem, 1 x 10 drivetrain and a 160mm travel fork, our bike weighed in right around 30 lbs - no lightweight, but acceptable given its intentions. The weight made seated pedalling on flat terrain feel a bit sluggish - the Shan is definitely not a cross-country race whip. However, we were pleasantly surprised by its climbing abilities. Once we got it up to speed, the Shan proved to be a capable climber, and felt surefooted on slippery, technical uphills. The wide bars gave us the leverage necessary to navigate the front end through jumbles of roots and rocks, and the weight distribution felt spot-on. We found it easy to keep our weight over the rear wheel for traction on steep uphills, even during out-of-the seat climbs. No, it doesn't have the additional traction that comes with rear suspension, but the Shan more than held its own in low-grip situations.

  When gravity takes over, the Shan shines. Rocky, root infested trails are its forte.

Descending
When the trail pointed downhill and speeds increased the Shan came to life. Any sluggishness felt on slower trails disappeared, replaced by a feeling of stability not often found in a hardtail. We're not sure whether to attribute it to the shaped rear tubing or the chromoly itself, but in any case the Shan has a decidedly less-harsh ride feel than other hardtails we've ridden. There was no visible lateral or vertical rear end flex, but the Shan did absorb vibrations remarkably well. This allowed us to carry good speed on sections of rough trail without feeling as if our teeth were being rattled out. Don't confuse this attribute with anything approaching actual rear suspension; the bike is still very much a hardtail, but it happens to be a forgiving hardtail. On steep, loamy trails the Shan was a blast to ride. It felt playful yet stable, letting us dive into bermed corners at full speed, then rocket out the other side without losing control.

We even took the Shan to the local dirt jump park to test its air-time capabilities. The bike doesn't have the geometry (or short travel fork) of a dedicated dirt jumper, but we came away impressed with its jumping performance. The sloping top tube made it easy to maneuver the bike, allowing us to toss in some style before getting realigned for landing. The Shan handled on-trail jumps and drops with aplomb - it was confidence-inspiring in the air, pushing us to hit jumps we normally reserve for full suspension bikes. There is no reason that a smooth rider couldn't do any of the average sized (or bigger) jumps on a trail so long as the transition was hit correctly.

  The Shan reopened our eyes as to just how much fun a hardtail can make a trail.

Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesSo who is the Shan for? Is there still a market for a 26'' hardtail? We think so. Aggressive riders looking for a hardtail that can handle rowdy terrain will find the Shan to be a worthy candidate. Set up as a singlespeed, the Shan would make an excellent, low maintenance foul weather bike. Water bottle mounts are on our wish list for future versions of the Shan, but as it is, the Shan is a well-executed all-mountain ripper. - Mike Kazimer


www.production-privee.com

170 Comments

  • + 153
 "is there still a market for a 26" hardtail".......hell yes there is!just come to England and find out!
  • + 29
 Well said!
  • + 20
 I have a '12 Ragley Troof, and there's no need to defend the 26" AM hardtail segment. Once you ride it, you're SOLD!
This is such a beautiful bike, as is the Ragley line, and several others...
The one true thing about hardtail builders like this is that in order to make their product perfect, they put attention to detail into EVERYTHING, and far surpass the fit, finish, and detail of the majority of the "big name" brands; bolt-on metal cable and hose guides, removable dropouts with interchangeable axle setups....
These are the things that make us love our AM hardtail rig more than our other bikes!
  • + 17
 Amen! But plug that hole in the head tube.
  • + 7
 Not only in England!
  • + 1
 Amen x2 Had my eyes on a Cotic BFe for this winter but am very tempted by this badger now. Looks very nice
  • + 4
 Instantly saw the perfection in this frame ! So simple and clean but jeez i love it !
  • + 51
 rt76

He he, ^^ he said 'butt plug'.
  • + 4
 charge blender anyone?
  • + 4
 I thought it was 776$ for the whole bike and I was like: Shut up and take my money!!!!!
  • + 4
 Well, I'm riding to Bagger 288, also buy Ragley. Never ever going back to a fully. Except for DH and FreeRide Razz
- I must say that I'm impressed of this Hardcore steel machine! Wink
  • + 1
 Charge blender is a bit too much 4x focused to be a great xc/am bike
  • + 2
 Don't have to be in the UK to love a good 26" HT... The whole WORLD needs them Wink This bike is DEAD SEXY!!!!!
  • + 2
 im planeing to build an hardtrail bike, best option everSmile
  • + 4
 I ride a 243 hardtail every week and all winter long................dont want to wear out the couch in nasty weather! and love it always. There nothing I won't do on my hardtail that i do on my squishy.
  • + 6
 For me. 26 steel HTs are my personal future. In Japan the local hills don't require a FS and after a few years of struggling to force myself through trails overbiked I am loving my Cotic BFe (www.cotic.co.uk/product/BFe) and Stanton Slackline (www.stantonbikes.com/bikes).

Of course it depends on the kind of riding you do (I am no freeriding hucker) but I now do almost everything except serious DH on them: trail rides, mates races, winter DH series and I am convinced of one thing....they have made me a better rider by putting me more in contact with what is happening at the tyre/ground interface. Definitely. And as a result I enjoy my riding time more. Thanks Cy at Cotic and Dan at Stanton.

The downside I can see with the Shan is only the price. The dealer here in Japan (www.bike-online.jp/SHOP/GJ-FRM-014.html) knocks them out at 73,000 yen a frame!!!!! Sorry, too much for me for a HT. There are so many more more affordable steel HTs out there that will put an equally big smile on your face.
  • + 23
 I think HT's are something ALL riders SHOULD have... I grew up racing/riding BMX and frankly some younger riders have grown WAY too acustom to having suspension to bail them out. a nice HT can help you with line choice and teach you how to use the biggest bit of suspension on your bike: YOUR BODY Wink Not to say HT's are only for "training", but they certainly can make a good rider even better. Try taking a HT to your favorite DH track and wrk on going as fast as you can on the HT and I think you;ll be REAL surprised at how much faster you are when you get back on the squishy bike aye. The Days of 20ft rock "dorps to falt" are nearly gone in most places, so with a good transition even shrt-travel fullys are more fun. Plus on a HT you'll be amazed at how you start to see every trail as a pump-track and you'll be popping off every root nd bump, you know the stuff your "squishy bike" just sucks up and floats over??? yeah that is some of my favorite stuff to hit on the HT. Are you gonna beat someone down a WCDH track on a HT??? No, but if you train on one I'll bet you get to be a LOT faster as you learn to pump for your speed and choose lines that keep you speeding along. There will always be need for good FS bikes, but HT's are just too much fun to write off. hell SOME of us older guys ONLY had HT's when we were inventing this whole sport and we're still alive to tell about it Wink
  • + 3
 Cheers mate... Wasn't trying to bag on younger riders (I see youre 15) as being 'soft" it's just a very different ball game these days in terms of the tech/equipment that's available and it can be a crutch to some and can lead to the "plow through without thinking ahead" mentality versus reading the trail and looking as far ahead as possible (something you HAVE to do on a HT most times aye). Keep on charging mate.
  • + 1
 I agree with you 100%. I ride a hardtail with 80mm and ride some burly trails, and I usually can keep up with my friends on AM or DH bikes. Although I'm doing more work, because Im picking lines around rocks, not through them. That said, I can't wait to ride a fully because I know if I take my skills and technique over to the full suspension I will fly. Just wont be as much fun, no pumping little dipsor bunnyhopping roots. Salute
  • + 2
 Yep... HTs are bang up fun all by themselves, but as a training tool they're unreal. I think that those little roots and wht not are my favorite part about riding sometmes, some little bump or root, on a HT, can be like a kicker on a "big bike" and you just launch to whatever natural tranny you can find or just as far down the trail as possible. Pus you can "play" on a HT a LOT easier on any given trail and even slow things down and do a bit of "trials-like" riding which is REAL good for developing your balance in all situations.
  • + 2
 the HT benies soap box...pretty much nailed it all medic, aye. !
  • + 1
 THanks Hammerschmidt Wink I'm nothing if not talkative aye hahahahahahaha.

I'm just really glad to hear tohers feel the same. The good old HT has lost some of it's following in the "all mountain/Trail/FR" crowd and been relegated to XC racing and street/slope riding in the minds of a lot I think, but bikes and reviews like this are reminding people that a good old "simple" HT can be a GREAT bit of fun and deserves to be drooled over as much as the newest DH/Enduro Race bike aye.... I'll always have a HT in the stable. Hell my "road bike" is a 2006 P3 Smile I can ride across town AND hit every jump and what not on the way plus I don't have to get stuck in the rain fixing flats like those poor guys with them skinny tires (saw some poor guy doing this today after he got forced to ride through some gravel)

Look I did it again... I need to work on SHUTTING UP more often hahahahahahaha.
[Reply]
  • + 11
 I love my steel hardtail so much. I bought it as a stop-gap before getting another full sus AM bike that wasn't out at the time. Now that it's out, I don't actually want it anymore, the steel beauty is putting a massive grin on my face. This production privee seems like just such a bike, with similar angles . So nice and clean looking too.
  • + 1
 There needs to be more Steel frames out on the market! With todays Steel technology they can easily surpass alloys or offer special fatigue/strength benefits over Aluminum at the cost of very very little weight.
  • + 0
 There are quite a few in the UK, given our relatively tame terrain and "alwaysfeckingmuddy" tracks, these type of bikes have become very popular.
  • + 3
 @spicy - even with the steel tech of 20 years ago, and todays aluminum, it would still have better fatigue/strength characteristics. steel will always be far far better with fatigue/strength benefits over aluminum. But people want light weight- and aluminum give you a better strength/"weight" ratio.
  • + 0
 ^ I agree, Aluminum has some inherent design problems, and it confuses me, we can make steel pretty much as light as an common 6061 alloy and stronger? Weight wise isn't too big of an issue since the weight will be just a little bit more than an alloy I think. Wouldn't that still make the strength to weight ratio better for steel?
  • + 1
 @spicy- Technically yes. But to make the same weight tubes you'd have to heavily butt the steel or make them with a smaller diameter. So maybe no. Depends on the test haha Where steel out shines (as mentioned above) it's more durable. Steel has a bit of flex you can give it without worry. Aluminum doesn't like to flex. You can manipulate steel tubes and add some torsional stiffness, gussets, etc. But you're still looking at about a 8-10oz weight penalty for the intended riding purpose. In reality though, a steel frame will usually out last an aluminum frame and be more compliant (smoother riding). There is a stainless steel tubset out there somewhere that's supossed to be as stiff as any hardened steel tubeset and is in the aluminum weight zone too. But it would fall into a high end carbon price point becasue that stuff ain't cheap to work with.
  • + 2
 Its called Renolds 953 tubing, and as yet its pretty much reserved for race only frames but the costs are very high, so you may as well buy a decent Titanium from the likes of Lynskey or Independent Fabrications for similar money. My Dialled Bikes Alpine HT is Renolds 853 and is a blast to ride and with steel its cheaper to fix if you break it too.
  • + 0
 That's what it is. Thanx.
  • + 1
 Ahhh kk. Thanks for the info.

Yeah the flex compliancy imo is one of the best features of Steel = more fatigue strength. Also, that's why you see decades old steel bikes and although Aluminum bikes are relatively new, you don't see them old, and even then doubt they would generally last that long. Thanks again, very interesting about the Renolds 853.
  • + 1
 @Spicy-Mike: Totaly agree (and what silly nint neg-proped you for your comment above???)... As a Medic I try to volunteer at local races here in Oregon and the NW in general and I've had a couple BAD cases involving patients who had catastrophic failures of their Aluminum frames. One sheared HT and a kid with a skate-lid helmet REALLY had me worried for a bit and I'm still not sure how he ended up after all was said and done, but his face was NOT happy after his front end just "disappeared" on a hard landing

I'm a HUGE lover of Steel HT's. I know that Alu. HT's have certain benefits in some applications, but the first time I got on my Alu HT I thought I was gonna die it's SO STIFF!!!! Light, yes, but my old as the hills Spec. Rockhopper (from 95 or so, and the bike I first made into a "big BMX bike with gears back in the brithing days of Freeride and Shore riding here in the NW) is still going strong after years of HEAVY abuse that it was never meant to take. Plus, when it get's into the rough stuff you can feel it giving you that little bit of "give" you want in a HT. It's now become my Fiance's trail bike and when I let her ride my P3 for steeper trails she automaticly says "this thing just feels 'rough' compared to my bike"... her bike has a bagged out STOCK 95 Spec. Elastomer "Future Shock" fork that has less then a 1/4" of travel and the P3 has a 110mm Marz Z1 on it so even with suspension the nearly RIGID Steel HT is just all arund "smoother" on any given trail. Steel HT's are and always will be my favorite type of HT fraes foor EVERY application I need them for. The Fiance is gettign the P3 next year as I build a Steel HT up, but I'm worried she's not gonna like it now that she's gotten to understand what she;s feeling in the ride quality of the Steel HT she's been learning on.
  • + 2
 @ The-Medic

Nice writeup! Props for doing volunteer work, I'm sure many unfortunate people have directly benefited because of you and your work! Also, my uncle is an anesthesiologist @ the ER and he's told me some stories of people not wearing adequate protection/safety...and it's bad. Like decapitated bad. Although an extreme case and probably a "Once in every year" statistic, people always need to wear proper protection. And apparently some come into the ER for bike failures as well. Cracks that develop without the rider's knowledge..scary stuff. Imo, stick with bikes that have a long production history with a clean title. Commencal, Lapierre, Intense FRO, etc...they don't make bikes like they use too. That's why I went old school (VP-Free), it's when they overbuilt things for maximum strength rather than playing the stupid "light-weight race game". Plus Santa Cruz bikes, not a single one, has had a rampant or known history of cracks which is really really awesome.

I was creeping on your profile, sorry, and I've noticed you wanted a Lapierre, those are renowned for cracks along seatpost (can tell by design), BB, and HT Wink careful with those!

And, yeah HT's are awesome. You can't beat them for utter simplicity and great efficiency of almost all terrain. Hah, idk that's a hard one to call about the Steel vs Alu bike. I think especially for HT's steel has that kind of ride quality that is much better for HT, since the rear triangle flex is actually beneficial! But then again, I guess only time will tell what she likes. Let me know what she thinks of the difference! it'll be interesting to see the difference in material.
  • + 1
 Cheers mate, yeah it's a tough job/line of work both mentaly AND physicaly, but it's worth it to help people when they're in need so... The biggst thing about my Fiance's current bkes is GEO... once I put her on a ore raked out bike she suddenly "got" the whole downhill thing and wasn't scared about going OTB anymore... I'm just ucky I found one who is so keen on learning to ride. I tok her to the premier of one of the NWD movies back when we started dating years ago and she sat there like a kid watching a fire-truck go by and kept saying "I don't know if I could do that, but I'd like to try..." She's not gonna be hitting the canyon gap at rampage anytime soon, but it's pretty awesome to have her tell me I had to build her a "mini ladder bridge" so she could learn to wheelie drop. Plus she was doign tri-athalons and her cnfidence on ANY bike has just shot through the roof so I'm a happy man aye Wink I think that the P3 will do her for awhieand then it's gonna be onto a nice Steel HT for her as well for average riding. The old Stinky is going to be her "big squishy" bike and she's already excited to "go faster and jump stuff" Smile
I'd not heard of lapierre's issues with cracking... The Spicy is just one of a myriad of Enduro bikes I'd love to have, right now the Spec Enduro or Stupy Evo or the Norco Range are toping the list in my dreams. My checkbook just went off and hid in the closet Wink

I've been staring at this Privee and I now think it's the sexiest "AM hard-Tail" I've ever seen...
I stupidly missed that it was a CroMo frame but now that I see its steel AND has the great standover I'm looking for I'm all Drool s and dreams. If onyl te Chain-stays were sub-16" but that's not a deal breaker. Te Rangley Pig looks sweet too. Gotta love a good HT aye.
[Reply]
  • + 8
 just got a Ragley Blue Pig... so much fun! Steel hardtails are the dogs dangles for winter time and the majority of the summer too! My full sus is now relegated to DH and Alps riding!
  • + 4
 Ha! "Dogs dangles." Beautiful. Furthermore I totally agree. I sometimes have a hard time deciding between the hard tail and the fully.
  • + 1
 This bike looks like sooo much fun!!!!!
[Reply]
  • + 4
 I'd love one of these - i have a Ragley Bagger though, not as pretty, but costs a lot less and sounds like it handles just like this review describes the Shan. Honest to god the best hardtail I've ever ridden. Every time I ride it, I fall a little bit more in love!
  • + 7
 Ragley RULES!
  • + 1
 I've got a rgley bagger too, real nice, a little heavy though but it's performance and fun on the downs make up for that!Smile
  • + 1
 aye it's not the lightest bike, but half of that is the build, it's not supposed to be a racing snake. I can get up most hills on it fine anyway. like you say, the fun you have on the descents makes up for it!
  • + 1
 @Sam264: HAHAHAHA I aways say "Elephants Danglies" and people look at me like I should be taking medication... They're not wrong, but it's a great saying all the same aye Wink I'm really intersted in trying a Rangley frame, but I never see them here in N. America and I wouldn't know where to get one (also haven't ever gotten to ride one and I tend to be picky about frame designs. Red: I like a LOT of standover even though I'm not short but a long enough TT to give me room to be comfy on long rides). I hate how "larger" frames tend to have much higher TT's (Id like to see re companies use a longer seat-tub with a TT that joins lower on the ST then has a brace UP to the top of the ST/post collar)... THat's why this bike (The Privee) really does it for me because while it doesnt look like thats a size small frame, it still has a LOT of standover height. I have very ong legs for my eight even (5'11) so I can stil FIT on more "traditionaly sized" frames, but I like to have a 'tighter" main triangle cause when you;re table toping or something, it's a pain to have to try to get your knee bent and your leg wrapped over the top-tube on larger bikes. Im gonna have to look at Rangley, but can any of you guys suggest a STEEL HT that has this type of frame that's NOT a dedicated DJ/Street bike??? I almost feel like I'd be better off with a LARGE womens frame for the longer TT but added standover, but I don't think such HT exists (nor one that'll live long under a 190-200+lb guy like me)...
  • + 1
 WOW... I just realized how absolutely STUID I am... SOMEHOW I missed that this was a Steel frame and.... GASP it's got the exact frame "standover" solution I was describing above... I wish I could neg prop myself... Now I think I NEED to buy one of these frames... pretty much EXACTLY what I'm looking for in a HT. ... WOW, I just can't belive what I tit I am ofr not noticing that...
[Reply]
  • + 5
 saw this a while back and fell for it big time and it still looks sweet, as for the market .. yes, i think you will find there is a renewed interest in steel tails - i love em, England loves em ..
  • + 1
 ENGLAND LOVES STEEL ........
  • + 1
 Should be coming to England very soon indeed...
[Reply]
  • + 2
 There are a fair few of us in the UK who prefer to steer clear of trail centres in favour of exactly what this kind of riding this HT was built for - www.youtube.com/watch?v=CY8l7HWOmUI

Sure, you'll never get the altitude but the tracks still bring the same smiles to your face as those overseas...and some of them (which are usually kept hidden well away) will more than happily hand you up your ass on a plate!

With the angles the PP is offering and with forks being as good as they are these days the only thing that's holding you back with this bike is, well, you!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I cant wait for a full-suss. The hardtail looks like a great bike to ride too. I come from Hamilton in Canada and we used to make steel - we actually still do and we need a boost to our economy as well as bikes you dont need to replace whenever they crash.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Personally just got the Transition Trans AM and it's just so much quicker than my aluminium framed Cinder Cone in the rough stuff. The back end is just so much more planted and the confidence the steel gives you really let's hammer the descents.
  • + 2
 Yes Trans AM ,pisssesss all over my old Pig
[Reply]
  • + 3
 Where I'm from shan means crap. As in:
Chava 1 - "Tha job centre made us go for a interview so a couldn't put me bet on."
Chava 2- "That's propa shan that like."
  • + 1
 Shan means "unfair" in scotish Wink
  • + 1
 Oddboo,move darn sarff son !
[Reply]
  • + 4
 love steel hardtails. have a slackline myself but ill be geting a privee soon Smile
[Reply]
  • + 1
 With all the chattr over wheel size, you think that would be what everyone is talking about. 2012 from my trail experience, was the return of the hardtail. They were everywhere. So many trails don't need squish out back - glad to see folks going back to basics. Today's lighter wheels and more reasonable tires really amp the fun factor on a steel frame. Their longevity is my only issue, I ain't 145 pounds, and combined with the drive for light weight, awesome steel frames never last more than two seasons for me, while I have at aluminum frames last 5+ years...may try this beauty out.
  • + 4
 You sir must have been buying some weird steel frames or had some strange accidents for an Ali frame to outlast a steel one.
  • + 2
 I'm near 15stone and steel always outlasts the Ali frames i've had, plus they feel more spritely in hard corners and don't feel like you are being kicked in the arse by a mule.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I hate when it puts all the comments in italics... if that bike has the commencal ride feel to it im in! although around here hardtails get tiresome rather quickly, wouldnt a 160mm fork with no travel out back feel unbalanced?
  • + 1
 Agreed. Pinkbike, get rid of the italics please! It's hard on the eyes to read.
  • + 1
 I ride a Cotic Bfe with 150mm. It only feels unbalanced if you get lazy and don't use your legs to soak up the rear. If the fork's a little low on air it get's weird too, 3 inches of fork bob while standing and pedalling. That really makes it feel unbalanced. We have one trail with a bumpy 25mph g-out, that makes it feel weird for sure. Those are the only examples I can think of where it felt that way. With the fork setup correctly, you lighten the rear and let the fork work, it goes through just about anything this side of football sized rocks. They work best with lockout forks, dropper posts and larger rear tires. I run a 2.35 Nevagal front and 2.1 Nevagal rear and have yet to pinch flat, but was thinking about going plus one on both. It will hold a 2.35 Nev with room to spare. It would smooth it out a bit more. The only time I wished I had a full sus was at the end of a 2.5 hour ride. Well...At the end of that ride, my friend had a pivot bearing let go and I reconsidered that thought....
  • + 1
 I'd prefer italics to it changing the colour font to the same as the background colour.
  • + 1
 I have an On-one 456 summer season with a 160mm Marz fork and it feels amazing. For the trails we have here in Ireland I really cant imagine anything more fun. Rode down a very fast and bumpy downhill trail yesterday and i was catching my friend on his DH bike. The bike feels very balanced over rough terrain and seems to handle well. Its hard to say exactly how it handles though as we have no decent trails with berms or fast corners here. But ill put it this way, i would be very surprised if it didnt handle well as it feels amazing for everything else so far. I need a dropper post soon though.
  • + 3
 lockout forks? nah
got 170mm lyriks on my ragley and it feels ace, doesn't feel unbalanced at all, as oldschool says, you just have to work on the back end a little harder with your legs. I find it gets me jumping and pumping over obstacles a lot more than a full sus. Only time it feels a bit sluggish is really persistently rocky trails where it's hard to carry speed without rear suspension. I 100% don't regret buying a hardtail after my full sus, it's so much fun and I don't find that the guys on full sus leave me behind!
  • + 1
 Yeah, I have my Ragley Troof set up with a Domain 160mm, and while that isn't a light fork (overweighs the rear), you ride it so your legs and lower back do the flexing and absorption, and the fork is only for initial impact... It's hard to describe, but I've been doing it since back when I was dropping stairs and running rooty trails in Central FL with my '03 Specialized Hardock. Ah, takes me back...
I agree with sam264 regarding the sluggishness in super-broken terrain, but that's manageable if you have some body strength down there.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Been riding an XL for 2 weeks now.
Awesome! This bike just wants to rip.
Feels realy dialled, and roomy for us tall boys.
Confidence inspiring for my so so skills and as the review stated, not a bad climber either.
Did I mention it looks absolutely mint?
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Seems like a pretty sweet ride. Wouldn't mind having one. A buddy of mine has a Kona 5-O built pretty similarly and it is a blast to ride. And I greatly prefer this red and white color scheme to the blue and yellow one..
  • + 3
 Kona Steely is pretty bad ass too. Purpose built and too much fun to ride.
[Reply]
  • + 0
 Where can I buy the Red/White one, on the website it shows only the Grey/black version and only in Large..

Love the simple design (Nice touch with the headtube cut-out) and the colours of the Red/White one are perfectly placed. I want one please..

Where and when can this be purchased?? at £480 its not cheap but its definitely cool different.
  • - 10
 You goofy f*ckers. It seems damn near every article has someone asking a question that is answered by referencing the article. According to the 2nd paragraph, it was custom painted for PB. So either email Production Privee and ask if they can replicate the paint scheme for you, or else take it to a powder coating place in your town and get it done for less than $100. Also, not to be a dick, but PLEASE READ AN ARTICLE BEFORE POSTING QUESTIONS ABOUT SAID ARTICLE!
  • + 12
 Well, there's no need to be so rude about it. Just skipped over that bit as the pictures were so good... Don't want to be rude but, I'll ask whatever I want...You could have just pointed out it was in the 2nd paragraph and I would have said thanks.
  • + 1
 Something about the white head tube and the BIG white fork looks so mmmmmmmm.

I love Red n White.

goofy f*uckers??

www.pinkbike.com/photo/8922624
  • + 5
 Sorry Transitionbandit, you're totally right. Will calm down on the douche-iness. Happy trails man
  • - 1
 Well really it is kinda ridiculous to ask a question that you can find the answer to so very easily. Its the same as people asking what a song is on a video when it says in the caption or in the video or something.. Was it rude? Yes. Was it ridiculous? Not really... Read the articles people.
  • + 3
 Thanks for the apology Six66, I've emailed them whether I can get the Red/White one for myself..

Gooldylocks,: Of course it wasn't very bright of me to ask that question but all the important stuff isn't in the first two paragraphs, just a bit of ramble about the company etc. I kindof read the rest...(Better read it all before I ask anything else though, save myself looking stoopid again)
[Reply]
  • + 0
 Because it's really fun Big Grin
It's a fair amount cheaper
A lot less maintenance so perfect for english weather/winter
It's steel so will out last an aluminum full sus frames
An aggressive hardtail will make you a better rider compared to skill compensating suspension haha
  • + 0
 Oops, was supposed to be a reply, but still stands why aggressive steel hardtails are here.

However there are cheaper frames out there with similar geometry and purpose however are made of much higher quality steel, Reynolds 853 rather than chromoly.
Look at the Cotic BFe if you're in England and that even has bottle cage mounts Wink
[Reply]
  • + 3
 really nice frame! (unfortunately too expensive Frown )
So i'll keep ma nsbikes surge Big Grin , hardtail is so fun Smile .
[Reply]
  • + 1
 How do steel frames fair for rusting?

Scratches through the paint from riding and slapping chain are inevitable, so how do they cope with that?

I just got an NS Suburban and I've never taken it out in the rain yet!
  • + 2
 it should be fine, I've had steel road bikes before that have lasted from the 70's and no doubt been ridden in the rain thousands of times with no rust
  • + 4
 Worrying about rusting with steel frames is like worrying about the next meteor that'll strike the earth and wipeout all life. Either one affecting you are about equally as likely.
  • + 10
 dont say that, the 2012 believers might chime in!
  • + 4
 Alot of these companies fill the frames with an anti-corrosive film. I have a black coating in mine. Other than soaking it in salt water or road salt, rust spots stay very small. Not like you should worry, we only have like 3 weeks left on earth anyway LOL
  • + 1
 Steel frames do rust, but they are much more likely to rust internally than externally. A liberal helping of Framesaver spray inside the seat tube and bottom bracket shell before you assemble the bike will help immensely.
  • + 1
 My On*One, Inbred gets used in rain, snow, mud, whatever. No rust issues yet. I'm not worried at all.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 I've got a steel charge blender and ride it all year round. No rust , just good times ( cheese)
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Good review! I like the look of this frame, especially the PB red and white. How many All Mtn hardtails are out on the market now? This one and the TransAM are so clean looking with the big forks up front.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Lovely - absolutely fantastic good looking bike, trust the French to design something so pretty!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I reckon serious 4X potential in the right size, it's steel so solid strength wise, but slim and refined enough that it's weight isn't unconceivable to race.
  • + 2
 Bit much travel no?
  • + 1
 maybe on a rough course... notice how i say maybe
  • + 1
 yeah too much travel as it is, I just think it's rare to see a slim and sleek steel frame, and given one in a 14" with a head angle geared for a 100-120mm fork, it could be a rare 4X raceable steel frame.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 $760? Thats complete, right? Pretty cheap if thats true. This bike would go good witha Sram xx1.
  • + 1
 Erm no. Try again.....And yes! yes it would.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Looks tops.
What do they mean needs water bottle mounts? PB in a hurry to leave some bottles on the trail?
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I Love a good steel HT, I got Two Smile On-one Inbred and Dialled Holeshot.
I might go all and get steel DH HT Next: www.btr-fabrications.com/index.php/products/belter
[Reply]
  • + 2
 I've seen pictures of this for months, been waiting for this review forever.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Nice bike. So good...you must do a 29er, guys. Receipt: Alfine 11, Rotor 3D+ Cranks and a bit more slooping to get aligned top tube with seatstay tubes.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 That is the one of the best looking hardtails I've seen!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 i like steel frames.i ride one myself on my dirtjumper and its lighter than some of the aluminium ones
[Reply]
  • + 1
 i used to have a Transition TransAm. Looks pretty similar. I loved my transam. Long live the steel hardtail.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Wow, this bike looks freaking solid. Does anyone know what kind of bash guard it has on there?
  • + 1
 nvm, it looks like an MRP skid
[Reply]
  • + 1
 que linda que esta esta cletica. la mejor que he visto en su clase. quiero una
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Is it Shan by name and shan by nature, that's what I want to know Razz
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Cool looking bike, but the name sounds like a portable outhouse for concerts or something....
[Reply]
  • + 2
 I own this bike and its the best bike I ever ridden! BUY IT
  • + 1
 Pics or it didn't happen.
  • + 1
 Derp, OK... we'll let you off... Nice Privee! Smile

www.pinkbike.com/photo/8423076
  • + 2
 Nice bike you got! Have you riden any other all mountain hardtails? I'd love to know how it compares to them. I curently ride a 456 Summer Season and it's a nice bike but I naven't riden many other hardcore hardtails.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Cleanets looking frame i've seen in a looooooooong time! very nice!
[Reply]
  • + 3
 love this frame ... !!!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Great job. Steel is such a good material for bike frames. Like the idea of oversized steel tubing or a slender Dh-steelbike.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I still like my Chameleon. Not the flex of steel, but I love the versatility.
  • + 2
 I don't know. I still ride my Chameleon with a 140mm fork. I also have a Cotic steel frame with a 140mm fork. The BB is every bit as stiff. The TT has an oval bend that keeps the front stiff. The Chameleon is just the smallest bit stiffer as a whole. But the Cotic takes some of the "sting" out of the ride. It's a smoother overall ride. Steel does have some compliance, I would say this frame has some vertical compliance, especially when seated. There is no flex when standing and pedalling. If you ever get a chance to ride one, you'd be surprised, I was.
[Reply]
  • + 0
 i like the geometry of the frame would make a sick street frame if it was made of cromoly and had a short seatpost
  • + 1
 it IS made of cro-mo
[Reply]
  • + 1
 who supplies these in the uk ?
  • + 1
 Buy direct from PP
  • + 2
 oh ok cool looks like such a good frame
[Reply]
  • + 0
 am i the only person who thinks this bike is a huge rip off? you guys are crazy if you pay $776 USD for this frame.
  • + 1
 i din't mean that its bad. but its seems way overpriced.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Where can I find a cheap 26" hardtail frame!?!?!?!
  • + 2
 In the the US try On-One. My brother has the last version of the 456 (not the EVO) and he likes it alot. And at $299 for the EVO, you can't go wrong. The EVO has geometry close to this bike, but a slightly higher BB. It's worth a look. shop.titusti.com/category-s/1517.htm
  • + 2
 Don't cheap out. I ordered a privee for the gf. I myself have a Stanton slackline and love it.
  • + 1
 I second the 456, i have the summer season and i love it. Dirt cheap too and quality is just as good as more expensive frames.
  • + 1
 On the buy/sell part of this site.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 It's sucha a ripping bike
[Reply]
  • + 0
 I'm buying this bike simply because the chainstay is 420mm. because that what stoners do. Right?
[Reply]
  • + 0
 Would you make me one of these frames that could put a sealed drive on?
www.pinkbike.com/video/218538
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I want this bike so much. Hardtails are so much fun.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Do they make a drop out for 275?
[Reply]
  • + 1
 nvm never read it was cromo
  • + 1
 have a look juste underneath the 1st picture "4130 Japanese chromoly frame"
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I love my EVIL Sovereign! It's a little heavy, but so am I!
[Reply]
  • - 3
 Looks like a s-works
[Reply]
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