RC's Random Walk Through Interbike 2012

Sep 25, 2012 at 13:19
by Richard Cunningham  

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Niner R.I.P. 9 RDO

Niner has been working overtime to capture the mid-travel trailbike market for 29ers and this time they have built a bike that PB riders can get excited about. The R.I.P. 9 RDO (Race Day Optimized) is a carbon trailbike with 125 millimeters of rear-wheel travel. Boosted by its 29 inch wheels, the carbon R.I.P. 9 should be able to run with 140 or 150-millimeter-travel 26ers. The R.I.P. 9 RDO has an ISCG 05 chainguide mount and a bash guard beneath its lower link. The bike looks positively stunning and it should be an equally good performer.

Niner s Carbon framed R.I.P. RDO

Three years in the making and extensively tested, Niner's carbon AM/trail 29er is warranted for five years. The CVA rear suspension is a proven performer and is also designed to guide big wheels away from the seat tube as the suspension compresses to full travel. Niner keeps the stand-over height of its long-travel designs quite low and a full range of sizes are available.



Niner s Carbon framed R.I.P. RDO details

Internal cables keep the R.I.P. 9 RDO looking clean, with the head badge doubling as a handy housing stop. The upper link is carbon and the angular-contact bearings found at both upper and lower rocker links are said to be as large as those in some sealed-bearing headsets.



RIP 9 RDO geometry


Niner bills the R.I.P. 9 RDO as tough enough to handle anything - at a bike park or on an epic trail ride. Front travel is set at 120 to 140 millimeters, the frame accepts tires up to 2.4 inches and there is a 142/12-millimeter through-axle in the rear. First items are said to be shipping next Spring, with a limited amount of complete bikes offered with their top-level build kits. Frames with Fox CTD Kashima shocks will run $2899, and in 'Rally Blue' with a matching RockShox Revelation RT3 fork, $3550. Complete build prices TBD.
Niner Bikes



T.H.E. Helmets

T.H.E. has been refocusing on its core customers with a solid helmet lineup, beginning with the Thirty 3 full face. The Thirty 3 is offered in carbon for $399 or in figerglass at $275 - both quite reasonable for full-featured lids. The name comes from the classic '33 deuce coupe and its forward vent is styled to look like its radiator grille. The paint and graphic schemes are also more on the classic side of the design curve. T.H.E. decided to build to the more rigorous DOT standard for its Thirty 3 helmets, so its vents must be designed to handle the penetration phase of testing. The vents must be molded so there are no vertical openings in the upper part of the shell. Internal venting channels air from the front, across the head and out through dedicated exhaust vents in the rear. Two size shells fit six different head sizes via snap-out padding, and all Thirty 3 helmets are'Eject' ready.

T.H.E. fiberglass full face helmet

T.H.E. put a lot of work into its less-expensive Thirty 3 fiberglass helmet. The graphics look great. The goggle strap is guided with a grooved side plate and a molded relief around the rear. The large visor helps force feed cooling air into the upper vents.



T.H.E. full face helmet details

(Clockwise)The Thirty 3 gets its name from the stylish grille in the face guard vent. Frog-eye vents under the visor are made to channel ram air into passages molded in the helmet's EPS foam liner.Snaps ensure that the removable pads can be serviced or removed easily in an emergency. A look at the molded goggle strap relief in the rear of the shell.



T.H.E. carbon full face helmet

The Thirty 3 Carbon shares the same technology as the fiberglass model, but it weighs significantly less - and looks pretty sharp as well.



T.H.E skate-style helmets

T.H.E. joins the rest of the helmet makers on the planet with a take on the classic skate lid. The Stamp and Postal Stamp helmet liners are in-molded into the shell to keep them as thin as protection will allow. The $59 Stamp is the basic model with the $79 Postal Stamp getting an adjustable head band as well as a distinctive two-tone paint scheme. The name came from Freestyler Andrew Taylor who helped design the helmets. His words were: 'Put it on before you send it.'

T.H.E. Industries



Hey, Nice Ink

Lots of ink at Interbike. This girl won the contest.

The cycling industry is a showcase for tattoo and piercing - which helps to make Interbike one of the best people-watching opportunities in the world of bike. Saw this woman at the Broken Bones booth. Couldn't get a word out of her.




One Industries - Name the Riders

Four different bike brands racing for One Industries. Guess the names of the Racers there s a 4 on the GT Fury s number-plate

One industries sponsors some famous racers on the DH circuit - each with a different bike brand. Can you name the owners of each rig in this picture? The GT Fury carries the number four plate.

Find the answers here at One Industries



Osmo Nutrition

Ben Capron is a massively talented rider with a long resume developing products for one of the sport s most influential bike brands. Ben has thrown his future with Osmo nutrition

Ben Capron is a massively talented rider with a long resume' developing products for one of the sport's most influential bike brands. Ben has thrown his future with Osmo nutrition - a new take on preparation, restoration and recovery supplements that is based upon the body's natural balance of osmosis - the function that allows fluids and solids to pass from one organ to another, or through the cell's membranes.

Osmo Nutrition



Zoic Cycling Apparel

Zoic was on the vanguard of the anti-spandex revolution, and it continues to preach comfort and a relaxed style without sacrificing the performance of modern fabrics with movement-oriented cuts and design elements. We showcased a few pieces for both male and female riders from Zoic's fall collection.

Zoic mens riding shorts

(From left) Antidote plaid short, 14-inch inseam, includes RPL Essential liner. Ether Premium short - lots of pockets, zipped air vents and taped seams. Stretch, water-repellent fabric with a 12-inch inseam and RPL premium liner. Torsion short with a higher back and a long, 15-inch inseam is more DH oriented with room for knee pads and mesh lining inside. Stretch panels in the back and vented sides for range of motion. Includes a RPL premium liner. Prices from $79 to $129.



Zoic mens casual and technical riding jerseys

Zoic's long-sleeve Woodsman flannel (left) is outfitted with disguised pockets in the rear and front and vented in back for a hydration pack. The V-neck DNA short-sleeve jersey (right) and long-sleeve Guru are Zoic's more technical styles designed for aggressive riders Prices range from $54 to $80.



Zoic female riding jerseys

Zoic's Women's lineup is more extensive than its men's. The Collins Plaid is made from a quick drying fabric with ventilation panels in the back and hidden side pockets. The front snaps closed, and the bottom seams are taped so the garment holds its shape. $60

Zoic



TRP Quadiem Four-Piston Disc Brake

TRP has been quietly gaining popularity as a value-priced, high performance brake maker. Some may claim that those four words cannot share the same sentence, but TRP has proved many naysayers wrong. This show, TRP debuted a sweet looking DH/AM disc brake that features a four-piston caliper that weighs a reported 340 grams per wheel (no rotors) and could be an alternative to the typical XC brake with a big rotor that pops up so often on mid-priced AM and gravity machines.

RP four-piston DH freeride brake

(Clockwise) TRP's Quadiem lever nests perfectly with Shimano shifters and shares similar archetecture. The simple four-piston caliper is a two-piece arrangement which uses through-bolts to hold tension. A closeup look at the lever's reach adjuster and its tactile O-ring. The post-mount caliper is configured for larger, 180 to 203-millimeter rotors.



The Quadiem brake is a straight-forward design powered by mineral oil and armed by a familiar-looking shorty lever. Adjustment at the lever is only for reach, and the red-anodized dial is easy to manipulate. The caliper pistons are of similar diameter, and the brake pads are sintered metallic material. TRP offers only 180 and 203-millimeter rotors - attesting that the Quadiem brake is specifically designed for gravity use. Price is $200 per side, which is qjuite reasonable if the Quadiem performs as promised.
TRP Brakes



Lizard Skins Celebrity Grips

Steve Peat and Darren Berrecloth have both designed their favorite lock-on grips under the Lizard Skin brand. Peaty's grip is a mid-diameter, 30.5 -millimeter design with moto-inspired rectangular gripping blocks. The Claw's grip is one of Lizard Skins' thinnest at 29.5 millimeters, and he prefers a diamond pattern. The two newest grips, the Moab and Northshore are celebrities in themselves, however, because some of your purchase price goes to the Moab Trails Alliance, or to the North Shore Mountain Bike Association (NSMBA). MSRP is $24.99 USD.

Lizard Skins Peaty Moab Northshore and Bearclaw grips
Lizard Skins Peat Moab Northshore and Bearclaw grips up close and personal.

The Moab grip is 130 millimeters long and a relatively thin, 31.25 millimeters in diameter with a grippy rounded tread pattern modeled after the stone archway that looks over the valley in Arches National Monument. The Northshore grip is one of the larger diameter grips that Lizard Skins makes, at 33 millimeters and its tread pattern is a widely spaced checkerboard that is very moto inspired. Four great reasons to make Lizard Skins your next grip purchase.
Lizard Skins



Chrome Bags

Chrome Bags brought its factory to Interbike. Workers were stitching bags together for al to see. The silk Screen press right was also cranking out garments.

Chrome makes its edgy stylized bags and gear in the USA and to underscore its we can-make-it-here pride, Chrome brought part of its factory to Interbike, where its craftspeople were sewing messenger bags and silk-screening clothing for all to see. Impressive.

Chrome



Cycle Dogs

Cycle Dog makes collars and accessories for your best friend from recycled innertubes and other rubber cycling products The top line collars have a seatbelt type release and a man s best friend bottle opener sewn in. Cycle Dog just released their Retread ball made from 50-percent ground recycled rubber molded with a popular tread pattern .

Cycle Dog makes collars and accessories for your best friend from recycled innertubes and other rubber cycling products, The top line collars have a seatbelt type release and a 'man's best friend' bottle opener sewn in. Cycle Dog just released their 'Retread' ball made from 50-percent ground recycled rubber, molded with a popular tread pattern. The Metal latching collar shown runs about $25 USD.

Cycle Dog



A'ME Heated Grips

A'ME grips has perfected its heated grip system just in time for winter. The waterproof system is powered by a lightweight lithium ion polymer battery. The connectors are waterproof and the heat can be turned off or set to one of six temperature settings with a remote button and LED indicator on the grip. Runtime is about two hours and temperature settings range from body temperature to about 150 degrees F. Price for the kit, including battery, charger and grips is a tough sell at $350. If you have a good lighting system battery, A'ME sells pigtail adapters to the top brands' batterys, and that will save you a bundle (the kit without the battery is about $125), as the lithium polymer battery is the most costly item in the kit.

Ame grips has perfected its heated grip system just in time for winter. The waterproof system is powered by a lightweight lithium polymer battery.

If you live where the temps meet or exceed freezing, you will find A'ME's heated grips well worth their price. The kit weighs less than a pound. Many riders who laughed at the concept have been converted to owners after a single winter's ride. A'ME makes a full linep for OHV use too and Moto and snowmobile riders in the know, won't ride without them during the peak winter months.
A'ME Heated Grips



Foes Racing F275

Foes Racing F275 was one of the heavy hitters in the mid-size wheel category. With 650b being the buzz among mid-sized bike brands, Brent Foe's entry into the balloning trailbike class was anticipated. That said, the new bike is placed squarely in the center of the market, with a beautifully crafted aluminum chassis that features progressive geometry, hydro-formed and CNC-machined components, and plenty of rear wheel travel with which to take full advantage of faster-rolling wheels shod with meaty knobbies. Frame sizes are small, medium or large and prices run $2399 for the frame and Fox Float CTD Kashima shock, or $2649 with the Cane Creek Double Barrel Air shock.

Foes Racing F275 was one of the heavy hitters in the mid-size wheel category

Foes Racing F275 trailbike details

Foes designed its 650b trailbike for aggressive terrain and a high-volume riding style. The F275 sports the new Fox 34-millimeter stanchion Float CTD fork and had the optional Cane Creek Doubel Barrel air-sprung shock. The smooth leverage rate control afforded by Foes' two-stage linkage supersedes any limitations of a single-pivot swingarm suspension - imagined or real. Foes interlocks the CNC-machined nut for the 142/12-millimeter through-axle in the swingarm.



The F 275 has Foes' race-proven single-pivot scissor-linkage with adjustable travel from 5.5 inches to 6 inches. The low-leverage, 2.3:1 suspension get the most out of its Fox CTD Kashima shock. Those who want further adjustability can opt for the Cane Creek Double Barrel Air damper. The F275s head angle is 67 degrees, and its seat angle is a trail-ready, 73 degrees. The magic of the mid-sized wheel, however, is that its 13.1-inch-high bottom bracket is still .65 inches lower than the axles, which is a significant boost over any dual-suspension 26er in both cornering and especially for covering rough terrain efficiently.
Foes Racing



Club Ride Apparel

Club Ride was founded by riders who wanted to distance themselves as far as possible from cycling's horde of spandex prancers. Club Ride's styles surf the edge, but the company's secret weapon is a designer named Patty Davidson. Davidson recently came on board and she has the ability to make cloth fit the human form with a minimum of cuts and seams, and has a second sight for style.

Clubride s casual take on riding gear is remarkably technical in its construction

Hers: Queen Bee jersey: $74.99, Cross Wind Jacket: $84.99. His: Bolt Jersey: $89.99.



Club Ride s men s jersey and stretch denim pants.

Men's technical stretch-denim Ray Jean: $129.99. Go Long long-sleeve jersey $89.99. And a selection of colors for the Bolt and Go Long jerseys.



A look at some of Club Ride s easy-to-wear female riding gear.

Women's Queen Bee jersey, details of the Wheel Cute jersey: $74.99 and Freedom mid-length short: $79.99.



Club Ride's clothing is styled to look the casual part, but is constructed with up to the moment fabrics and fittings that give the garments breatheablity and freedom of movement that matches the more utilitarian-looking technical gear worn by most of us. Unless you party with other riders, it is a rare garment that can be trusted on the trail and still look good should your cycling kit be the only clean clothes you own when you need to fulfill a dinner date.
Club Ride



Calfee Africa Bike

Calfee is a name synonymous with alternative materials and construction methods. The latest project is Africa Bike - a bamboo frame joined with fibers harvested from ficus tree bark relatives of figs . The raw fibers are mixed with epoxy resin and wrapped around the bamboo and various metal bits to join the frame.

Craig Calfee is a name synonymous with alternative materials and construction methods. His latest project is Africa Bike - a bamboo frame joined with fibers harvested from ficus tree bark (relatives of figs). The raw fibers are mixed with epoxy resin and wrapped around the bamboo and various metal bits to join the frame, which is then sanded smooth and painted with a clear coat.



The construction methods for the burden-bearing Africa BIke says Calfee can be replicated in developing countries with a minimum of tools and investment. The Africa Bike used the Nuvinci 360 variable-speed hub transmission.

The construction methods for the burden-bearing Africa BIke, says Calfee, can be replicated in developing countries with a minimum of tools and investment. The Africa Bike used the Nuvinci 360 variable-speed hub transmission.

Calfee Design



Nuvinci Constantly Variable Hub Transmission

Nuvinci's 360 CVT transmission is unusual because its planetary reduction system contains no gears. Four steel balls are tilted on their axis, causing the transmission to seamlessly increase or decrease the hub's rate of speed. A special fluid acts like lubricating oil until it is compressed at high pressure, when it actually reverses its nature and provides traction so that the balls will not slip under load. Watch the Video.

Nuvinci s CVT Constantly Variable Transmission hub was featured on the Calfee Africa bike as well as a this belt-driven 9 Zero 7 big-tire expedition bike. Four steel balls are tilted on their axis to create a variable speed reduction..

Nuvinci's CVT (Constantly Variable Transmission) hub was featured on the Calfee Africa bike as well as a this belt-driven 9:Zero:7 big-tire expedition bike. There are no gears inside - four steel balls are tilted on their axis to create a planetary, variable-speed reduction.



Nuvinci s 360 CVT hub is disc brake compatible and can be driven by chains or belts. The twist shifter left can be operated when the vehicle is stopped. The shift indicator graphic is quite original.

Nuvinci's 360 CVT hub is disc brake compatible, and can be driven by chains or belts. The twist shifter (upper right) can be operated when the vehicle is stopped. The shift indicator graphic is quite original - the gradient of the hill steepens as the transmission eases into a lower gear.

Nuvinci



Yeti Clothing

Yeti was not completely satisfied with the clothing options it had, so it set out to make its own lineup. To be successful in technical apparel, one must consort with dieties, so Yeti hired a top designer from Patagonia.The tag line is: 'Rider Driven, for mountain bikers, by mountain bikers.' Their short range is a system with three liners available: an unpadded technical boxer, a mid-weight padded liner and an epic-ride-weight padded liner. The choice is up to the customer: padding , no padding or commando - it's about rider comfort and preference. The female lineup is completely different than the men's offering in look and cut, but sensible in every respect and that's probably long in coming.

Yeti 02 Downhill jersey under 01 Smuggler hoody jacket. Padroni DH pants. right Como padded liner above Morley lightweight padded liner.

Yeti 02 Downhill jersey under 01 Smuggler Performance Hoody: $120. Padroni DH Short: $105. (Right) Como padded liner: $60 above Morley lightweight padded liner: $60.



Yeti female riding shorts Lightweight Caddoa XC left and Norrie DH right . Padded liner not shown.

Yeti female riding shorts: Lightweight Caddoa XC short: $75 (left) and Norrie DH short: $89 (right). Padded Ruby liner: $60 not shown.



Yeti Padroni dh Freeland trail and Teller lightweight XC shorts

Men's riding shorts:Yeti Padroni DH, Freeland trail: $89, and Teller lightweight XC short: $75.



Yeti's pricing is pretty fair considering that the garments are well constructed with just-right stretch panels and ventilation, glide strips on the underside of the leg openings and pockets only where one may carry items without the frustrating pendulum effect that (as a side note) pisses me off and makes me wonder if baggy designers EVER rode a bike on trail with their phone in a cargo side-pocket? Yeti gets it.
Yeti Cycles



Madness at Surly

The Surly crew built a crude set of log rollers and offered up a big-tire bike to challenge all comers. It looks easier than it is. It took me a few tries to get going.

The Surly crew built a crude set of log rollers and offered up a big-tire bike to challenge all comers. Some left defeated, those who triumphed made it to facebook. It looks easier than it is. It took me a few tries to get going.

Surly Bikes



Paul Components GoPro Mount

Paul Components builds a stem-cap mount for the GoPro camera. The machining is beautiful as usual. Turn the camera on yourself or set it an any angle to catch another rider in action.

Paul Components builds a stem-cap mount for the GoPro camera. The machining is beautiful as usual. Turn the camera on yourself or set it an any angle to catch another rider in action. Email for prices.

Paul Components



Kali Protectives

Kali Protectives figured out how to co-mold an EPS foam shell into an ABS plastic shell.Why is that important First because the helmet dissipates energy better when the shell is part of the foam Second because the color is in the plastic so the helmet can take a pounding and not look like the paint is scratched off on the first weekend of use.

Kali Protectives figured out how to in-mold an EPS foam liner into an ABS plastic shell.Why is that important? First, because the helmet dissipates energy better when the shell is part of the foam. Second, the color is in the plastic, so the helmet can take a pounding and not look like the paint is scratched off on the first weekend of use.

Kali Protectives



Elastic Interface Pads

My psychologist showed me these pictures and asked me to look closely for any imagery that came to mind. Well I said. That green feller is an MTB Carbonium Chamois pad for men and that little red guy I think he s a road racer. Elastic Interface makes em - they are the best.

My psychologist showed me these pictures and asked me to speak about any imagery that came to mind. 'Well' I said. 'That green feller is an MTB Carbonium Chamois pad for men. And that little red guy? I think he's a road racer.' Elastic Interface makes em' - they can be found in the world's best riding shorts.

Elastic Interface



GravityDropper - It Lives!

Wayne Sicz co-in vented the GravityDropper and eventually changed the face of trail riding. The latest version of the Turbo uses a low-profile actuator that allows users to insert the post another centimeter lower. The original dropper post still uses a simple spring to extend it and a pin that indexes into a series of holes in the sliding element. 299 USD.

Wayne Sicz co-invented the GravityDropper and eventually changed the face of trail riding. The latest version of the 'Turbo' uses a low-profile actuator that allows users to insert the post another centimeter lower. The original dropper post still uses a simple spring to extend it and a pin that indexes into a series of holes in the sliding element. Order yours with drops from two to five inches and a number of indexing positions in between for $299 USD.

GravityDropper



Ortlieb Bags

Ortlieb packs are made in Germany to a standard that is out of reach of most bag makers. When Ortlieb says waterproof it means you can put your laptop inside and go diving. With the popularity of multi-day back-country trail excursions on the rise Ortlieb should be on your radar.

Ortlieb packs are made in Germany to a standard that is out of reach of most bag makers. When Ortlieb says 'waterproof' it means you can probably put your laptop inside and go diving. With the popularity of multi-day back-country trail excursions on the rise, Ortlieb should be on your radar.

Ortlieb Bags



Fi'z:ik XC Shoes

My friend Steve Delacruz has been spending most of his life lately in Italy designing Fizik s new shoe range. Steve has done enough laps on the dirt to earn the cred and Fizik s new M5 left and top-drawer M1 reflect it. M1 details clockwise replacable dual-compound heel block carbon fiber sole tipped by a molded nylon flex member for walking replaceable cleat bed carbon fiber reinforced sailcloth on instep straps armored toe box to fend off rock strikes. The ratcheting buckle not pictured has a one-click tension release.

My friend Steve Delacruz has been spending most of his life lately in Italy designing Fizik's new shoe range. Steve has done enough laps on the dirt to earn the cred' and Fizik's new M5 (left) and top-drawer M1 reflect it. M1 details (clockwise): replacable dual-compound heel block; carbon fiber sole tipped by a molded nylon flex member for walking; replaceable cleat bed; carbon fiber reinforced sailcloth on the instep straps; armored toe box to fend off rock strikes. The ratcheting buckle (not pictured) has a one-click tension release.

Fizik



Syntace X-Fix Through-Axle

Syntace X-Fix is a three-head Allen Key driver that snaps into a modified collar that retrofits all Syntace X-12 through axles. X-Fix can also be ordered with the Torx 25 head that fits may SRAM components. Syntace says that the X-Fix axle system is ligher in total than a conventional quick release type. 18 Euros including the conversion parts USD TBD .

Syntace X-Fix is a three-head Allen Key driver that snaps into a modified collar that retrofits all Syntace X-12 through axles. X-Fix can also be ordered with the Torx 25 head that fits may SRAM components. Syntace says that the X-Fix axle system is lighter in total than a conventional quick release type axle. MSRP is 18 Euros including the conversion parts (USD TBD).

Syntace



Good Bye For Now

Guess where these guys live. Well it s bye bye to Las Vegas until the next Interbike. Can t say I ll miss the town all that much.

Guess where these guys live? (hint: T.H.E.) Well it's bye bye to Las Vegas until the next Interbike. Can't say I'll miss the town all that much, but the bike part of it was entertaining!. Peace out - RC



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104 Comments

  • + 17
 That Nuvinci hub has very smooth, infinitely adjustable shifting, and has a very good range. But before you all go frothing at the mouth, it is heavy beyond belief. For cruising along the beachfront only. Concept is awesome though.
  • + 5
 It would be awesome to be able to ride one of these on a XC or even on a DH bike...
Hope they will get it lighter...

[EDIT]
It has 2450g...
  • + 6
 there is probably many ways to reduce weight. It would be good if zerode guys could take a look at it!
  • + 9
 I don't like the infinite adjustable feeling. I want to be able to reliably hit the same ratio and know exactly what I'm jumpin to when I'm cOming up on he pedally section.
  • + 1
 I'm using one in my XC/All MTN hardtail and it's brilliant. Doesn't take long to know how much to shift, and no indicators is a blessing not a curse. Meant to be as reliable as a Rohloff too. Ultimate simplicity with no mucking about for years. Win win.
  • + 2
 I remember I drew up a design similar to this thinking I was onto something and show my friend. Turns out it was already implemented in some small motorized platforms..But now to see it on a bike, that's awesome. This may be the new way of the future. If so, companies will catch on and it'll be getting weight reductions as each one races to take over the market as usual. And CF is overrated. It's all about the Bamboo now.
  • + 1
 my buddy does BOO Bicycles and i am forever telling him to show an AM Hard Tail at NAHBS... now that they are doing Bamboo/Alu they can do rear suspensions... those frames ride so nice...
  • + 1
 Spicy-Mike, That's nice you drew up a concept - only problem is you are nearly 500 years behind the time! It's scary how similar they were able to copy Devinci's original design and have a solid performer!
  • + 1
 what does it mean
  • + 1
 Hahaha, @ mobilechernobyl, I have no doubt I'm that far behind. I remember sitting in one of my classes back in highschool and showed my friend, all excited,.when he told me I was wayy behind... I was literally depressed.
  • + 1
 My wife's scooter has CVT and it gives you a lot of extra time to concentrate on what you're doing, not what gear you're in. Having said that, I agree with someone who already posted saying they like to know exactly what gear they're in time and time again - that's useful if you want to hit a jump and need to know you're going fast enough
  • + 1
 YETI Jocks !!! BOOYAH !!!
  • + 1
 Correct me if I'm wrong, but I think Leonardo DeVinci drew up the basic design for an infinitely adjustable system like this
[Reply]
  • + 13
 They have good drugs at Surly.
[Reply]
  • + 11
 The Syntace thru-axle just stole a piece of my heart.
[Reply]
  • + 9
 I really want to try one of those bamboo bikes!!
  • + 2
 I really want to try a surly!
[Reply]
  • + 8
 Heated grips?! What the f*ck!
  • + 3
 actually, i wouldn't mind having a set. We ride until there is to much snow for us to practice. At the very end of the season, we can barely move our hands on the grips. motorcycle and snowmobile already have them.
  • + 2
 truth. For me, winter riding gets cut short not only by the lack of light, but by how frickin' cold your hands are!! [Edit]: I started to get frostbite once...
  • + 2
 My only question is what happens when the rubber on the grips get worn down? Those grips cant be cheap to replace, unless they had some sort of replacement rubbers.
  • + 2
 Well, when it's -30C out, and you're riding into a 50 km/h headwind, sometimes the pogies just aren't enough by themselves...
  • + 1
 Yes, but the cheapest AME set is around $200, I saw some for closer to 400.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 that grill isnt very stylish in my opinion, steve* not stevel for the ame heated grips and I can only see that gopro mount being used for road, simply too shaky for mountain bike all that aside I'd love to try the grips and that osmo stuff, ODI TLD grips have been a staple on my bike for ages and gotta try out the new options at some point
[Reply]
  • + 3
 You can publish something like "for $399 or in figerglass at $275 - both quite reasonable for full-featured lids," as many times as you like--it won't make it so.
  • - 1
 How much is your head worth?
  • + 6
 That is such a tired argument. Show me the test data that say the market's $400 darling helmets which meet ASTM1952 are any safer than, for example, a Fox Rampage that costs $120 and meets ASTM1952. If price and protection are perfectly positively correlated, then why stop at the $400 TLD D3? Why not wear the $500 Shoei VFX-W or the $600 Arai VX-Pro III? Be honest w/ yourself. There are interesting and complicated reasons for the D3 and roughly $400 to stand out as benchmarks in many riders' minds. It's just a mistake to think it has anything to do with safety.
  • + 1
 The Fox Rampage is a solid lid for the price, but the TLD meets many more certification standards and features. The t.h.e. adds to that DOT certification (are they the first in 'bicycle' helmets?) and Eject compatibility for a slightly lower price tag. The Shoei and Arai are actual motocross helmets, so they are in a different league than 'bicycle' full face helmets. Of course they have DOT certification, but are also about 500-600 grams heavier and bulkier than top carbon helmets. If t.h.e. managed to keep the weight on the carbon version on par with other carbon helmets, sell it at the same price AND get it DOT certified, that's actually pretty impressive. Not sure about that 'grille' though. I thought the $100 Point 5 they had was actually better looking, even if it didn't have all the bells and whistles.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Ah Gravity Dropper. The originators of the telescoping height adjustable seat post as we know it today. I'm rather surprised that they haven't changed their design or image in the last few years, considering how companies like Rock Shox and KS have essentially usurped them in the dropper market. They even still use a plastic bottom piece on their remote lever clamp... I wonder if they'll still look like a 90s throwback in another 20 years.
  • + 12
 It's just the boot, get rid of the boot!
  • + 3
 The plastic bottom piece is designed to break off in a crash - you are supposed to carry a spare - which is an easy trail fix
  • + 4
 I'm fairly certain that my Reverb button wouldn't get damaged if I crashed.

Oh and something I forgot to mention about the Gravity Dropper is how insanely strong its return spring is. Seriously we have sent tire levers flying across the store with a Gravity Dropper post.
  • + 8
 I would have to disagree with your comment. Yes RS and KS have 'newer' designs than GD. How about reliability? My GD post is going on 4 years with next to no maintenance apart from cleaning and a bit of grease. Did I mention they are completely USER serviceable and rebuildable? How about 27.2mm sizing? Where is that from RS? (KS has one) It also has the cable at the base of the post, which only NOW does KS have an answer for (I am looking forward to trying a KS Lev). The cable loop is one of the biggest drawbacks to all seat mounted actuation posts.
So while the GD may look 'old school', they are still ahead of the curve in terms of functionality,durability and serviceabilty in my opinion.
  • + 1
 Until GD makes a post with more than 4" of drop (and loses the boot) they will never compete with RS or KS.

Oh and I have noticed that the Gravity Dropper has a high percentage chance of appealing to older riders than these newfangled hydraulic posts. Darn kids.
  • + 3
 GD is not the original, Joe Breeze is the original inventor of a dropper post.
  • + 3
 GD makes a 3", 4" and 5" drop. I guess the boot isnt THE ideal esthetically, but who sees that when they are riding? It in no way effects how the bike rides, but if you are more about the looks than the function of your bike, I guess the GD loses points.
  • + 1
 Notice how I said "...as we know it today"? The Hite Rite does not operate on the same principle as a modern dropper post. Also the Hite Rite was not a seat post, it was a spring attached to the seat collar and a separate clamp that attached to the post.
  • + 2
 I took out the boot. It still works as it should. It has been 2 yrs, without the boot. Looks a lot better.
  • + 2
 I don't think a spring attached to the QR bolt and seatpost counts, or else we'd all have one ;-)
  • - 3
 I completely agree that RockShox and KindShox are some of the leaders in the dropper post market (and GD is ancient history), yet what about Crank Brothers and Fox? Fox recently came out with a new seatpost to work with their shocks and forks as part of their CTD line. Apparently it's pretty good. So is the CrankBros Kronolog.
  • + 3
 Are you kidding? The Kronolog has gotten terrible reviews, and the Joplin was horrible.
  • + 1
 i remember thinking "no friggin way" about the height rite when i was racing xc in juniors when that was around... ha... i am partial to the X Fusion Hilo now days...
  • + 1
 xc madneess !!! so much talking
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Man. I really like the T.H.E. 33 helmet, it's such a clean looking design. Totally digging the front grill design especially, being a big '33 Deuce coupe fan.
[Reply]
  • + 4
 Hell ya, bottle opener for mans best friend!!!
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Gravity Dropper: best seat dropper on the market by far! I dont care about the fancy looks of the other posts, Gravity dropper is to simple to fail.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 The stem mount for the GoPro looks good
  • + 11
 Until your chest hits the bars...
[Reply]
  • + 3
 Way to cover the goods RC! Props on the DOT helmet!
[Reply]
  • - 1
 just saying, on the last comment left by the author, if you aren't missing the city of Las Vegas that much except for the bikes, you need to go ride something else for a while..bikes are cool but Vegas offers so much more to where bikes aren't even on the brain..hope that was just a comment for how cool interbike was and not a serious remark
  • + 2
 IMO Las Vegas is horrid. It's a brightly decorated shell with no substance inside.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Looks like i'll be getting a T.H.E fullface lid soon... and a Kali dirtjump lid!
[Reply]
  • + 3
 I'm diggin the Thirty 3 carbon helmet.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 That Go-Pro top-cap mount is a neat idea, but I would put a breakaway component on it, to protect both the camera and the rider. Footage could be very shaky.
  • + 1
 gopro has the anti shake thing built into the camera
  • + 2
 Eh since when? I've never realized it had it, to me it always looked shaky no matter what.

And the Stem-Cap has been around for a long time, there was a guy who CNC'ed out of some good material and high frequency shake was cut down almost to nothing.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I can't wait to see the first hospital report for the GoPro stem mount removal from the body...
[Reply]
  • + 2
 So much good stuff to look into!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Go yeti your clothes this year gonna be great!
And surly,i'm saving money for you Smile !
[Reply]
  • + 0
 Mmmmmmm confused here why have FOES got this bike called the F275 ? I have the 2012 foes trail shaver and its the same as the pic . Please someone say what im missing here .
  • + 4
 You're missing that this Foes has 27,5" (650B) wheels, hence the name 'F275', while your Shaver has, the now outdated, 26" wheels :o)
  • + 3
 If you bothered to read the words that were near the photo of the bike, you would discover that the F275 is a 27.5" (650b) model that is new to their lineup. Get it? F{oes}27{.}5!
  • + 0
 Arrrrrr ok i just had no idear that they are now doing funny sized wheels Big Grin
[Reply]
  • + 2
 One of the most decent coverages of Interbike this year so far! Thanks RC!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Worst ever POV from Paul Components stem cap.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 yew, bamboos the new carbon!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Great review RC, simple and to the point Smile
[Reply]
  • + 1
 TRP is making 80mm rotors. Sweet.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Stevel Pete ???????????????????????????????
  • + 1
 Got it fixed, thanks. RC
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Gee atherton,Arron chase,Jared graves,Cody warren
[Reply]
  • + 1
 This Foes looks nice. First model that I like !
  • + 2
 Never ridden one so I don't know how they ride but Foes frames look to me like they are stuck in the early 2000's.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 wow the niner looks sick
[Reply]
  • - 1
 Foes have never made 'pretty' bikes, but that one is a new low. Holy shit, that is fugly.
  • + 2
 foes hydro is good looking.
  • + 0
 The rear shock makes it look ugly for me!
  • + 3
 im sorry, youre wrong
  • + 0
 What is the matter with you haters? That Foes looks bad-ass.
  • + 2
 I'm not a hater, I'm just blessed with the gift of sight.
  • + 0
 not a fan of that color, but the frame looks just right for me. looks tough, and like an absolute ripper.
  • - 1
 Even the color is pretty good. None of that neon, daiglo, rainbow vomit. It's dark, bold, and understated. It doesn't scream, "Hey, look at me", because it doesn't have to, because you already are looking.
  • + 1
 The shapes of the Foes bikes aren't bad, it's the paint and graphics (mostly the graphics) that kill it. Never ridden one, but heard nothing but things.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 give me the yeti pants!
[Reply]
  • + 0
 What word? Sorry meant to reply to something, can't edit.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Into those gopro mounts
[Reply]
  • - 2
 Hated grips for people with 6 fingered hands that don't fit gloves.
  • + 13
 Hello, my name is Inigo Montoya...
  • + 2
 That's good macross87. Although you killed my father.
  • + 7
 You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means.
  • + 3
 Inconceivable!!
  • + 2
 ^^This guy gets it!
  • + 3
 Greatest film ever made.
  • + 1
 Among my top 10 for sure, secure in the top 3 even.
[Reply]
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