2013 Diamondback Scapegoat Review

Aug 20, 2012
by Brad Walton  
TESTED
DIAMONDBACK
SCAPEGOAT
BY BRAD WALTON

Fully Loaded Freeride Fiend

With a range of Knuckle Box-equipped bikes sporting top-end parts spec, Diamondback is back in the ring, ready to compete with the big boys. Along with the mature attitude comes some very grown-up price tags. While impressive adornments are hardly considered a bargain for $6k, a review of the Scapegoat's firm foundation solidifies the deal. Frame details such as a butted and reinforced downtube, 142x12mm rear axle, and non-driveside, oversized pivot hardware prove that Diamondback has been paying attention. Add in a versatile gearing spec and a full-length seat-tube, coupled with the efficient Knuckle Box suspension platform, and the 'Goat becomes a shuttle-free rally machine.

Scapegoat Details

• Purpose: freeride / bike park
• Hydroformed 6061 aluminum frame
• Butted & reinforced down tube
• Rear wheel travel: 160mm
• Tapered head tube
• 142x12mm rear axle
• Single-sided hardware
• FOX 36 Float RC2 Fit 180mm fork w/ Kashima
• FOX DHX Air 5.0 rear shock, w/ Kashima
• Shimano XTR and Saint componentry
• Easton Havoc wheels and parts
• Weight: 32.2 pounds (w/o pedals )
• Sizes: small, medium, large (tested )
• MSRP: $5,999 USD




Integration is a running theme with the Aurum.  Fork bump stops, clean hardware, and seat post binder show the forethought Norco has put into their new DH sled.
The bike's brawny front end employs a thicker walled down tube than its little brother, the Mission.

Built Like A Goat

The Scapegoat chassis is based around Diamondback's all-mountain platform, the Mission. A hydroformed 6061 aluminum tubeset maintains a traditional look while reinforcing critical stress points, and a tapered head tube joins up to a reinforced down tube. All other details are the same between both frames, including the 142x12mm rear axle, clean downtube cable routing, cable stops under down tube to support routing for a dropper seat post (not included in the stock build), a full-length seat tube, ISCG-05 tabs, and of course the Knuckle Box suspension design.

 While there's nothing exotic about the Scapegoat's frame, its details are simple and purposeful.
While there's nothing exotic about the Scapegoat's frame, its details are simple and purposeful.

The Knuckle Box

Diamondback has been utilizing the Knuckle Box suspension linkage for several years now, and for good reason. A derivative of the linkage-driven single-pivot, Knuckle Box's bell crank link is regarded for providing efficient pedalling and supple small-bump compliance. Besides its acclaimed pedalling characteristics, the linkage is positioned just above the crankset to keep the bike's center of gravity low for neutralized handling. The low-leverage single-pivot reduces load on the frame, bearings, and linkage. A FOX DHX Air 5.0 shock, complete with Kashima coating to match the bike's 36 Float RC2 Fit 180mm fork, offers great tunability, along with a lockout for sustained uphill efforts.

 The Knuckle Box utilizes large sealed bearings and clevis mounts for a stiff rear end.
The Knuckle Box utilizes large sealed bearings and clevis mounts for a stiff rear end.

Scapegoat Component Check

For riders that enjoy a custom build spec but don't want to take the time to build up a bike one piece at a time, the Scapegoat is ready straight off the showroom floor with an out-of-the-box, ready to rip, top-notch spec. Diamondback has clearly hand selected every component for it's strength to weight ratio. With a 180mm travel 36 Float RC2 Fit fork, Easton Havoc wheels and parts kit, and Shimano Saint brakes, it should be obvious what the bike is intended to do. However, in an effort to shave grams, Diamondback chose Shimano's XTR for shifting duty, a Gravity Light crankset, and single-ply Kenda Nevegal 2.5 tires. This spec puts the Scapegoat somewhere between capable climber and fully functional descender, with a definite emphasis on the latter.

 Diamondback is back. The type of parts you'd expect to find on a pro rider's bike are the base spec of the Scapegoat.
Diamondback is back. The type of parts you'd expect to find on a pro rider's bike are the base spec of the Scapegoat.



Specifications
Release Date 2013
Price $5999
Travel 152mm
Rear Shock Fox DHX Air 5.0 w/ Kashima
Fork FOX 36 Float RC2 FIT w/ Kashima
Headset FSA
Cassette Shimano HG980 XTR 10spd Cassette, 11-34t
Crankarms Gravity Light Mega Exo DH single 34t alloy ring
Chainguide Gravity RACE chainguide w/integrated bash
Bottom Bracket Mega Exo BB
Pedals DB Sound Alloy w/ replaceable traction pins
Chain Shimano HG94 10spd
Rear Derailleur Shimano XTR Short Cage Shadow Plus 10spd
Shifter Pods Shimano XTR 10spd
Handlebar Easton HAVOC 750mm width LowRise
Stem Easton HAVOC
Grips DB4L "Lock on" 135mm Kraton
Brakes Shimano Saint w/ 203mm front, 185mm rear rotors
Wheelset Easton HAVOC
Tires Kenda Nevegal 2.5, w/STICK-E rubber compound, Folding
Seat WTB Silverado
Seatpost Easton Havoc Double bolt clamp 30.9mm



Riding the Scapegoat


Downhill

Gravity riders will feel right at home around names like Saint, Havoc, and... Gravity. It's nearly a given that the Scapegoat's parts kit assures confidence on the downhill. And with burly, reinforced aluminum frameset, we feel comfortable throwing the Scapegoat into every situation we encounter. Robust and stiff, the bike tracks impressively well for a 160mm travel air shock equipped frame. Pointed in a straight line down a mountain, the bike feels quite balanced, more like 170/170mm rather than 180/160mm, and the 17.3" chain stays keep Scapegoat feeling stable at speed. The 180mm fork makes for somewhat upright geometry that offers a comfortable body position that, while not feeling overly aggressive, is intuitive. Riders will want to prepare early for tight corners, as the tall fork may leave some with that off-the-back feeling. For park-like settings with high-speed berms, the Scapegoat attacks corners with confidence, just as intended.

 Scapegoat's geometry feels relaxed and comfortable on the steeps.
The Scapegoat's geometry feels relaxed and comfortable on the steeps.

When it comes to outright downhilling on serious terrain, the bike feels a bit under-gunned. The chassis feels stiff and strong, but the bike feels inherently light. While the World Cup DH scene struggles to figure out how to shave 100 grams, regular Joes like us feel more comfortable pinning it through rock chunder aboard a sturdier steed, especially in the tire department. Though the stiff frame compliments Scapegoat's limited travel in responding to square-edge hits, we pinch flatted the rear Nevegal single-ply tire numerous times.

A short-travel downhill bike isn't such a bad idea given the right circumstances, and that's where the bike really shines. Trails with big compressions and terrain dips are devoured by the Scapegoat without that sinking sensation felt in bigger bikes. When precision maneuvers are required, it rises to the occasion with nimble and agile responsiveness. As Diamondback's pro slopestyle rider Kelly McGarry will attest, the Scapegoat lends especially well to jumping. The stiff 160mm rear end easily makes the most of any lip, and all but the flattest of drops are landed smoothly thanks to the progressive nature of the Knuckle Box and the DHX air shock. If we had to pick a single word to sum up the Scapegoat, 'playful' would be most fitting.

 Jumps, drops, and general bike park type settings are where the Scapegoat really comes to life.
Jumps, drops, and general bike park type settings are where the Scapegoat really comes to life.


A Free Ride

The Scapegoat is clearly intended for rugged terrain, but what excites us most about the 'Goat is a spec suitable for remote access. Many of mountain biking's best kept secrets are kept that way because shuttling isn't an option. Weighing in at 32lb, a relatively svelte figure for a bike of the Scapegoat's intentions, it moderates the sufferfest that deters traffic in favor of those willing to earn their turns. Aside from the weight, the bike has a full-length seat tube, as well as fairly capable 34 x 11-34 gearing range. Those who live where the climbs point straight up may want to swap to either a smaller, 32 tooth ring or a larger spread, 11-36 tooth cassette, though.

Even with a fleet of condition-specific test rigs, we're big fans of versatility. We can't help but wonder what happened to all those 'freeride' bikes from a few years ago. It seems as though nearly every company had a 7" bike with a full-length seat tube and capable gearing for trail accessibility. Perhaps even with the basic necessities, riders couldn't stand to pedal those abominations uphill, so just like the cumbersome Laserdiscs of the 1990's, they phased out. Fortunately for Diamondback, the Scapegoat's Knuckle Box suspension is efficient enough to tame the often unruly pedalling characteristics of longer travel bikes, and when that isn't enough, the DHX Air shock offers a lockout lever. At the flip of a switch, the bike rejects rider input entirely. It's sure is a treat when the trail awaits atop a seven mile gravel climb.

Realistically this isn't the bike you'd choose for enduro racing, or if you plan to be first to the top. What the Scapegoat affords the rider is the capability to get to the top. With versatility comes compromise. Although the blue bike climbs efficiently and offers most of the amenities of a typical all-mountain steed, the tall fork tends to wander the uphills, and especially through tight switchbacks. On the steepest climbs, standing negates most of this effect, which is likely the position Scapegoat riders will be in anyways due to the 1:1 minimum stock gear ratio.


The Scapegoat feels stable when it's time to air out the laundry.
The Scapegoat feels stable when it's time to air out the laundry.

Component Selection

Seeing as how our shuttle opportunities are minimal, yet burly trails are abundant, we thrive on the practical parts spec Diamondback has equipped us with on the Scapegoat. 1x10 gearing consisting of a 34t ring and 11-34 cassette allows for manageable climbs, although we see no detriment from a 11-36t cassette and were surprised it wasn't the stock setup. Easton's Havoc parts are an ideal match for the Scapegoat's playful demeanor while keeping the weight down. Shimano's Saint stoppers offer the best in control when the going gets rough, while the XTR drivetrain is nearly silent thanks to the clutch-equipped rear derailleur and the Gravity chain guide. Overall, the Scapegoat's spec is likened to what you would find a pro slopestyle rider or freeride film performer using, and suits the intent of versatility with both durability and light weight in mind. The one change that we can see some 'Goat owners making is the addition of a dropper post. Yes, the bike is intended as a park and freeride rig, but a dropper post would go a long ways to adding even more versatility to the bike's performance.


Thanks to a full-length seat tube, the 'Goat conquers mountains, uphill and down.
Thanks to a full-length seat tube, the 'Goat conquers mountains, uphill and down.

Technical report

• Kenda's folding Nevegal tire is a good choice for all-mountain pursuits, but we were plagued with rear pinch flats on the Scapegoat. Consider upgrading to a meatier sidewall in the rear for aggressive riding.
• Shimano's XTR rear derailleur with clutch makes for a stealthy all terrain vehicle. This is one quiet bike.
• Although the suspension feels surprisingly balanced on this 180/160mm bike, the front end tended to wander on steep climbs and was slow to respond in tight corners. Installing a 10mm FOX travel spacer in the 36 Float to reduce it to 170mm would likely correct the tall-feeling front end without affecting downhill prowess.
• Saint brakes have always been a top choice for optimal braking control, with excellent power and modulation. Being a 2013 bike, we were surprised to not find the new Saint's spec'ed.
• Bonus points for cable routing for a height-adjust seat post. Many riders will immediately recognize the opportunity to enhance the bike's trail efficiency, as mentioned above.



Pinkbike's take:
Diamondback has invested heavily in the philosophy of 'you get what you pay for'. Such is the case with the 2013 Scapegoat and its lush component offering. While many will struggle to find the 'value' in a six thousand dollar bike, a certain few will see Scapegoat's spec as the perfect blend of uphill capability and downhill shredability. The Scapegoat answers the call for what most riders in the 7" freeride or park environment are asking for: an efficient, supple suspension system and a stiff, sturdy frame with climbing credibility lay foundation to one of the most brilliant parts packages found on a production bike. When 'the man' locks the gate on your favorite shuttle hill, the Scapegoat becomes the key. -Brad Walton



www.diamondback.com

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120 Comments

  • + 41
 Diamondback really seems to be putting in an effort to be comparable to the big rigs. It's quite apparant cause I really am liking their new line up of bikes! That knuckle-box technology is sweet, Good job Diamondback!!
  • - 1
 yeah, the new Scapegoat looks to be as a sweriously capable "freeride oreinted bike", its like a burly all-mountain build thats capable of true FR and hucking around the gnar gnar, i wanna see this thing as a SlopeStyle bike format too. could be a sick whip as its freeride format is set at 32.2 lbs!
  • + 4
 Would be nice to see a scapegoat II, at the 3500-4000 price range with the Zee/ XT group. Also where is the dropper post, If it is meant for AM/ Enduro (Albeit the burly side) It should have a dropper post. Maybe the DOSS to keep it all Fox/ Shimano.
  • + 2
 This was my favorite bike at Interbike last year. I was amazed! Great things coming from DB these days!
  • + 2
 @c25porter i think its meant more as a freeride bike that u can peddle uphill
  • + 19
 Can't remember the last time I saw a review of a big bike actually doing gnarly stuff in pics. The credibility of the review, due to the pics of actual steep terrain and big bike playground type trails, is certainly more than adequate. The overall quality of the pics is significantly better than many of the well known pubs (even BikeRadar)! This is the kind of review I like to see!
  • + 5
 this was from the cove STD tested article, pretty gnarly,

www.pinkbike.com/photo/7602041
  • + 6
 I was hoping there'd be a self shot video. Brad's reviews are tops.
  • + 1
 I can assure you the location they did all the long travel AM rigs testing here on pinkbike is gnarly too.
  • + 2
 Yeah, and they wonder why they were getting flats... Wink
  • + 3
 Vid of the cove STD drop.

www.pinkbike.com/video/1895
  • + 1
 HOLY SH*T! Haha, yep definitely puts a whole lot more perspective on things. Burly!
  • + 1
 Holy shit @ that drop!

In that vid, his approach kind of sounds like a fighter jet's approach!
  • + 8
 looks like diamondback is doing things right
  • + 4
 For everyone complaining about prices....Yes $6k is a lot of cash. I have seen lots of people saying " I can buy a CRF 450, YZ 450, etc," for the price of a World Cup DH rig. However lets, look at it from this angle: Downhill bikes, top of the line with the same parts Aaron Gwin (top of his sport) rides and same frame $9,000-$10,000...again. He has a custome tuned shock and such, but same bike and parts. Yes, a ton of cash. Same price as a STOCK CR,YZ, etc..true but.....

Now look at the same bike James Stewart &/or Viloppoto ride, not the stock motorcycles. $40,000+ I would imagine since everthing one it is custom/high end (think XTR, SAINT, XX, XO). Yes, all of it is a ton of money, but not many racing sports you can pretty much buy off the shelf what the pros at the top run.
  • + 0
 The works suspension in moto is 50k per bike. The motors are 60k. Wheels are 3k and single wall aluminum. MTB high end components are a bargain. The technology in a stock moto fork is about the same as a Domain DC. or the old Manitou Stance. You can buy a bike with the same technology level as a stock moto for 2k. Is there really 7k worth of metal in a moto engine? I see engines on ebay for $150.00. Moto is ripping you off. You can buy a 2k bike, a 150.00 engine and have a moto for 2150.00!!!!!!
  • - 1
 This post got a neg prop???? WTF???????
  • + 2
 "While the World Cup DH scene struggles to figure out how to shave 100 grams, regular Joes like us feel more comfortable pinning it through rock chunder aboard a sturdier steed,". On the self-deprecation point Brad saying that he's a "regular Joe" is somewhat like saying that a Maserati is just another Italian car.

Nice pictures. If they're all self-filmed the one with the caption "Jumps, drops, and general bike park type settings are where the Scapegoat really comes to life." is particularly remarkable - a technically difficult self-filmed capture
  • + 3
 None of this set is self-shot. I served as a director, with my own gear, but my wife and a friend shot the 3 action photos. I wish I could do pan-blur on my own, I really love that effect. As for the heavier bike, it does take more power to move it around, but for DH aside from racing, most riders will ride more confidently on a well-planted bike, IMO.
  • + 1
 Great review Brad. Good to see you still shredding
  • + 2
 Hm. Not really impressed for the price tag. I have a Blindside w/a Boxxer WC (09 and still kickin ass) RC4 (steel spring) and Outlaws w/dual ply Minions and it's just a shade over 37 lbs. It pedals anywhere I want it to and shreds all the same terrain where the DB was tested. Plus I shuttle the bike with guys who ride Cove or Devinci dh bikes and nobody ever has to wait very long for me. It's superlative in the air, rips turns and pounds rock gardens. All for about 2/3 the price new. I think DB has offered a great build but at $6,000 w/o a gravity dropper I think their marketing dept. missed the mark. I definitely don't see these bikes flying off the showroom floor. It's just not a great value when compared to Norco, Kona, or Giant. And that's the group that DB is at the bottom of as far as name recognition goes in the high end mtb market. Wait a year and I'm sure you'll see these bikes on showroom floors steeply discounted to make room for next years models. (Hopefully the OEM parts won't have been stripped.)
  • + 1
 DB's OEM spec far exceeds that of a Blindside. And your Blindside is 5 pounds heavier. That's why some people pay more. Whatever works for you is the best choice, for you.
  • + 1
 Your point is certainly valid, but by putting on single ply Nevegals it would put the weight difference closer to 2-2 1/2 lbs. If I were willing to go further and put on an air can in the back, they would be comparable to the point of making the difference negligible. (at the cost of a coils suppleness) I think it's a fair assessment to say that it is an apples to apples comparison. The Blindside is billed as a long travel trail bike which is obviously the niche DB is trying to fill with the Scapegoat. My point isn't that DB made an inferior bike or that my Blindside is better, my point is that I believe they missed the mark being known as a value oriented bike company.
  • + 4
 Given the spec of this bike in particular, their emphasis is less on value and more on performance. It's not really fair to call it an apples to apples comparison since the Blindside is only available with a mix of X7 and in-house parts spec. The bike itself is marketed as a budget bike, whereas the Scapegoat is offered as the high-end model with one of the best build kits of any bike available.
  • + 1
 I can't argue with that. The build-up is well thought out and very performance oriented for sure. To do the same thing from a frame up build at retail would put the price much higher.
  • + 2
 Seems like a lot of discussion about price. Has anyone ever done an analysis of mountain bike price trends? Possibly trying to control for relative quality of parts available?. 6K for a non race bike does seems a bit munch considering there are so quality bikes out there now for around 3K.
  • + 1
 I can't believe a Diamond Back is $6000 grand. Does have top sheft parts though.

Here is the breakdown from a 2012 Honda CRF250r motorcycle, as there is reference to it. Subtract motor, radiators and shrouds, gas tank, computer-harness, you have a grand total of about $3000. Has an aluminum frame (made in taiwan, or maybe japan) and 12 inches of travel, with rebound, high speed and low speed compression damping.

I think bicycles are a bit out of control. Considering tubing and rockers for the DB probably cost $350... Don't look up the price of tubing btw, you won't like how much a set of tubes cost in relation to the price you pay....
  • + 1
 You guys are killing me, there are and have been bikes in the $6000 range for some time. This bike is only $100 more than last years model and has some pretty significant upgrades. I also compared this to a recent Trek FR from their choices on PB’s compare chart (there were a few to choose from but I felt this was a close comparison on these bikes in retrospective of intended use and component build and price - EVEN DESPITE THE TRAVEL DIFFERENCE).

www.pinkbike.com/product/compare/?items=2322,374,1546

On that note stellar review, awesome pics.
  • + 1
 Yeah,sure it would be to have a 6k$ rig in a country with average monthly saraly 500$. "since when MTB become sport for the reach ?" > it has always been and it depends on where you lived...because 12 months of hard work for a bike,think over it Frown After all almost every manufacturer produces frames in Taiwan,can you imagine the cost of a single frame. Stop bullshiting.
So it would be very interesting how to find a way to make 6000$ less significant for my finances...
  • + 2
 The mass production part is cheap, but the design phase is not. DB's highend guys have to justify their existence to raleigh america in order to keep the ball rolling and that means the big bucks. You can buy their cheaper stuff still but I do wish they had done a specked down version of the goat. A domain instead of a fox. A coil vanilla rear shock. cheaper stuff all around on a budget version would have probably cost $3000.
  • - 1
 You are talking about some rather large economic issues Stafref that I don't think a bike company is going to solve for you. Feel free to have a complain if it makes you feel better, but I promise you DBR and Pinkbike users aren't going to be able to solve that issue for you.
  • + 1
 Nice rig, but $6000? Bike companies like DB, GT, Mongoose got back on the map by selling bikes $1000-$2000 less than it's boutique competitors that where equipped with the same specs. The problem is still the same, the specs hold up in value, but the frames still don't live up to the demand and resale value of their competitor's. A comparable analogy is the resale/trade-in on a Hyundai compared to a Honda.
  • + 2
 just looked on line for $6000 can buy a brand new Honda CRF 450 motor x bike and have $1000 left to spend on kit that's beyond a joke. boycot the system and stop buying bikes they will have to bring the price down.
  • + 2
 actually the price would get larger becuase the overall production cost gets divided between fewer bikes, the more of something they make the cheaper it becomes to make
  • + 1
 they keep the prices low get a tred started wait for it to explode then start bumping prices up then once the market cools down again they will drop prices to try and keep an interest in the sport it's common practice in business.
  • + 1
 6 grand for a diamond back??
i supose it will be cheap in the sales by mid 2013

that canyon with a better spec for half the price really shows it up

and not even a dropper post, for six grand id expect diamondback to provide me with a trained monkey to chase me along the trail and raise and lower my seatpost for me
  • - 5
flag dh433 (Aug 20, 2012 at 14:26) (Below Threshold)
 its a fr ride bike, why would you put a dropper on it?
  • + 1
 R u serious 6000$ ??? didnt know i have to sell my house to buy a bike
since when MTB become sport for the reach ?

gas prices all over the world r going up i think bike companies need to understand that and make bikes WE the riders can get without selling my damn house

and yes it a nice bike but THANK ill stick with my 2009 pitch comp
  • + 5
 What top notch bike isn't at least matching or exceeding a $6000 price tag now a days?
  • + 5
 this is just the point we gat used to pay thousands of dollars this should stop! and im not even talking bout the other stuff like forks tyres bars stems etc
  • + 2
 Actually you bring up an interesting point. What are you talking about?
  • - 2
 you know what bashment? you can send a complaint in yourself, hell they might even respond if your lucky Wink
  • + 5
 10 years ago, a top of the range bike would have been around the £3000 mark (or US$4500 at the then current exchange rate). UK inflation over the last 10 years would bring that up to about £4000, or US$6000 at today's exchange rates (not exactly but close enough, and US inflation is comparable). Top spec bikes are always going to be expensive, but the fact that the real cost to the consumer has hardly changed at all is pretty impressive given the changing cost of materials, transport, labour, R&D, tooling, tax, duty etc etc... I bet the profit margins have decreased. So, less moaning about the price tag, and more thinking about how you go about making the price tag less significant to your finances Smile
  • + 7
 While inflation may have almost doubled the prices of things in the last ten years I can garuntee you inflation has not doubled most people's incomes in that same time period.
  • + 1
 A fair point. Sadly I doubt this figures highly in DB's pricing strategy. Figures very highly in my buying strategy! Razz

Still, for those who entered the competition to win this, you have a 25% discount code to use before 31 August Wink
  • + 7
 You don't need to spend 6 G s to get a nice bike. I have always built nice bikes up for around 3 G s with some lightly used oe last years model parts/ frame.
  • + 3
 @rickyretardo totally, I ride bikes that are probably 1-2 years old and they're total bargains. Also, thats why there's so many brands, many to choose from. I personally ride Norco because they're well priced, and well spec'd. Sure, Aaron Gwin isn't winning World Cups on a Norco, but I'm not Aaron Gwin! People just need to accept that they can't afford a brand new bike, but instead a bike maybe a year or 2 old. Get over your ego and just make the best of it. I won't let money stop me from riding, instead I find ways to ride good quality bikes without making life difficult.

And as for the 3,000 dollar build, it's easy if you get your ego out of the cost! It's unreal what you'll find for prices on 1 year old stock.
  • + 1
 I ride just as well on a quality well maintained used bike as i do on a new dream machine. Thanks for the props
  • + 2
 brings up a point, if you can afford to buy a dream machine you most likely cant push the bike to its limits
  • + 1
 Must be a pretty cheap house to have to sell it to buy this bike.
  • + 1
 its a tree house man
  • + 4
 For $6000 I would have 2 bikes!
  • + 1
 Exactly! Must be an adults only bike, I don't see alot of kids affording something like that.
  • + 1
 I have a 2010 and love it. I run a 160 fork and it is my do it all bike and I even take it to our dh trails from time to time and it doesn't disappoint. Review seems very accurate.
  • + 2
 I know it's out there and other bikes are using it... I was just saying I like it in general.
  • + 1
 a w polsce sie kłucą ża dartmoor wish i ns soda ma tą samą rame Smile )))
  • + 0
 @Maxxd - take a closer look next time you feel suggesting stuff, these are sort of different designs.

There are very few possibilities to conveniently connect the rear wheel to the front triangle - unfortunately some pricks decide to call it a patent so others must go bananas with designs not to get sued. I wonder when someone will patent the single pivot - it's the matter of money, not who did it first.
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns - you can call me a self-denying person but I can`t point out more bikes than Commencal Meta (till 2011) with that kind solution. BTW this DB from article above is really nice but in my opinion only as Meta 6 2011 replica Wink
  • + 1
 They are similar but these are slightly different suspension systems, whatever dood'e
  • + 1
 The suspension designs are different. They share a slight linkage in common that's it.

How do you not realize this?
  • + 4
 every thing is perfect except the price :/
  • + 1
 Muhaha 6000 $ where it has titties? My similarly equipped beast costs a half Smile ) www.agang.eu/en/2012/ninja/specification.htm
  • + 1
 X9 is 2 rungs down from Saint and XTR. You would need to compare to an XO DH build. The difference in X9 builds to XO builds is usually 2500-3000. This bike is also a lot lighter.
  • + 1
 Really odd spec for a park bike. I would prefer to see a Saint short cage out back and an XT cassette instead of XTR to save a little money off the overall price.
  • + 2
 32lbs is impressive but 6g too much. 180x160 a bit weird but diamondback is doing their thing. Keep em coming
  • + 1
 How much would a potential world class motocross motorcycle cost if it had pedals but no motor - think of that when rationalizing cost - not far eh?
  • + 1
 When I read $6000, the cola I was drinking at the time blew out of my nose during my knee-jerk reaction to that...and it burned.
  • + 3
 Sweeeeet! But $6000.00..... arg...
  • + 1
 shove your dimondback up your ass $6000 your taking the piss these company's are if the prices carry on rising I will be switching to motox bloody cheaper
  • + 1
 Damm, Thats one sexy bike, Good Job Diamond, You Gained my respect again after seeing all those Dimondbacks at sport check Big Grin
  • + 1
 6 Grand?! Are they for real? A price tag like that should help to turn new riders off the sport..
  • + 1
 Sweet bike set up exactly how my Nomad is. I just wish I could get a black Float 180 instead of the aftermarket white.
  • + 2
 bike sounds pretty swank if i do say so myself
  • + 0
 Am i the only one who thinks that saint brakes are too much for this bike. They belonged on dh race bike not on a 32 lbs ''trailbike''
  • + 2
 Not to buy diamondback* to be more exact
  • + 1
 $6000 for a Diamondback ? Hahaha! There is no reason to pay $6000 for any bike!
  • + 3
 demo,carbon session,carbon devinci all good reasons to pay 6000 for a bike
  • + 2
 You go ahead and overspend on a bike
  • + 1
 Can't afford it then you can always just walk.
  • + 2
 @THE-GUNT, overspend. id say thats a prety fair price for what level of engineering goes into these bikes. the best suspension designs and geometry you could ask for. so be happy on your cheap frame thats goin to snap soon.
  • + 0
 You boys are silly.
Im not saying it's a bad bike. I'm saying you can build that same bike for less than $6k and if you want to over spend then go right ahead.
@hillatoppa you have no clue what you are talking about!
  • + 1
 Not with those components, can you replicate this bike for under $6000….
  • + 2
 I'd buy the frameset.
  • + 2
 @THE-GUNT "There is no reason to spend 6000 for any bike"....
Yes, there are plenty of reasons to spend that amount of cash on a bike.
  • + 1
 What the next bike in line for testing, is this the 5 bike review thing that you guys did for the all mountain series?
  • + 2
 Diamondback: A truly polished turd.
  • + 0
 6 Gs for a non carbon framed bike? And it says Diamonback on the frame? Hmmm...
  • + 1
 hope the frame doesnt crack like the 2011
  • + 1
 i prefer my specialized big hit.
  • + 1
 I guess you guys don't know the right people
  • + 1
 Was the winner announced? Dayum, that bike looks so good Big Grin
  • + 1
 Very trick....like that thing!!
  • + 0
 Lmfaoooo I'm super cereal watched this south park the other week, so so funny.
  • + 2
 Chainstays are too long!
  • + 1
 There's a stigma not to buy these. But this looks so sweet.
  • + 1
 who won this bike? or was that a smart viral marketing ploy?
  • + 1
 Who else didn't win it?
  • + 0
 Looks similar to the Commencal Meta bikes..
  • + 1
 Thats funny, I always thought that the Commencal linkage looked like the one on the Giant VT from 2003.
www.gearreview.com/giant_vt.php
  • + 1
 I am so glad every company that comes out doesn't have to make a new linkage to make their own customized bike. The specialized big hit a couple years ago had the same style linkage as a kona, but no one is going to claim they are the same. Also I've seen the commencal link in person right next to my DB mission. The link isn't as pretty or beefy. DB does it well so respect that.
  • + 3
 that's because they're not the same at all, spesh uses an FSR linkage which is nothing like a faux bar single pivot design that kona use.
  • + 2
 Dude, you really should check your cycle history Kona use a 4 bar faux linkage while Specialized use a Horst linkage which the have used since the 90s, the new p-slope is one of the few bikes they have made NOT using a Horst linkage.
  • + 1
 sorry, the wheel is on a different bar isn't it. Ellsworth then. What I am really saying is a bike company would have to make an honest effort to make a knock off of someone else's bike.
The Kona operator got a lot of love that the stinky didn't. The frames were similar but the dialing was distinct. The result was a new type of ride. So why should DB be compared to commencal?
  • + 2
 Yeah I know what you mean, moving a pivot a few mm, or a few subtle geometry changes makes a frame totally different. That's why the new orange 322 is a totally different beast to the old 222, despite them both being basic single pivot designs.
  • + 1
 Guys I was just saying, from an average joes point of view they loo similar...
  • + 2
 because that really needed pointing out to the rest of us?
  • + 0
 the frame looks like my focus buster
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