ProVisions #2 - On a Crash Course?

Feb 18, 2013
by Ryan Leech  
At last count, there were 8,389 crash videos uploaded to Pinkbike. YouTube surfing always leads to a crash video. Spectators gather in great numbers at events in part because of the allure of danger. Heck, the success of my own career as a pro trials rider arose because of my ability to flirt with the potential of a crash. Clearly people ‘like’ watching crashes, so what’s with our cultural crash fascination?

Views: 28,286    Faves: 13    Comments: 1

Here's one of many failed attempts of the chainride video from CRUX I shared last month

Are we evolving into more intelligent creatures or is our entertainment culture dumbing us down? That’s the question posed in the Mike Judge movie “Idiocracy”, where he humorously explores what would happen if dumb people mindlessly reproduced and smart people chose not to because they don’t trust the future. In the movie, a doctor reports about one of the ‘dumb’ people: “Clevon is lucky to be alive, he attempted to jump a jet ski from a lake into a swimming pool and impaled his crotch on an iron gate, but thanks to recent advances in stem-cell research and the fine work of Dr. Krenski and Altschuller, Clevon should regain full reproductive function.” Clevon in the background is heard saying to the doctor, “Get your hands off my junk.” Funny movie, but the thing is, the plot is eerily believable.

The Three Stooges performed slapstick physical humour to elicit a humorous emotional release for viewers, that was intentional. America’s Funniest Home Videos provides a similar laughable experience for viewers largely from unintentional and stupid accidents. The Jackass folks intentionally perform risky physical acts to bring about an emotional response. Red Bull Stratos was a life or death risk for Felix Baumgartner, one which captivated some 8 million live-stream viewers. These spectacles provide spectators an acceptable way to release their emotions.

Views: 17,693    Faves: 19    Comments: 4

From my old film Manifesto showing a relatively low risk sequence with the crashes necessary to complete the line.

Historically speaking, the evidence shows we are growing ever more sophisticated in what we accept as entertainment. Gladiators were armed entertainers in the Roman Empire who fought other gladiators and wild animals. Entering the arena by choice, they risked their lives for admiration and were celebrated widely. Sound familiar? We do praise those who take risks for our entertainment, and the crash is an inevitable part of the show. The difference between then and now is that it is no longer socially acceptable to kill another human or creature for entertainment purposes, but, it is still socially acceptable to risk our own lives; the evidence comes from healthily rewarding those who do risk everything in hopes that they’ll do it again.

Location Ryans K6 Trail Gibson s BC Athlete Ryan Leech
A mixed emotion film shoot for Kranked 6.

While I have great admiration for the highly developed talents of the riders in Crankworx, I find it uncomfortable to watch, I shudder when I empathize with the feeling of a rider at the start gate ‘entering the arena’ exposing himself to danger. While I maintain they're not crazy, as discussed in my last article, they gotta do what they gotta do, and to do so I’ve even heard of riders chugging a beer before a run to numb out the fear. In Warren Farrell’s book ‘The Myth of Male Power’, he says. “When I see how our cheers encourage boys to swallow their fears and repress their tears, we realize it is time to repress our cheers so our boys can express their fears.” The spectator is morally implicated in the rider's performance. Where do you sit in this relationship? It’s nice to be able to sit back and point fingers when things go wrong, but we need to own our part, and take responsibility for the risks we encourage our friends and our sport heroes to take.

Mike Montgomery at the point of no return.

Upon witnessing a crash, we have an emotional response. It can come out as laughter or a gasp - even watching someone seriously injure themselves can be met with strange emotional expressions, but that might be just a sign of our (perhaps limited) emotional intelligence. As a kid, I remember it being more socially acceptable to laugh at the geek being tormented rather than having a more accurate heart-breaking response. As a rider, there comes a time when submitting to the cheers by ‘manning up’ is actually a cowardly act, and if something goes wrong it’s just not cool.

Taking a hard look at myself transformed how I approached my career as a pro trials rider. I needed moral and emotional development to untangled my true-self from the cheers to go bigger. Doing this personal work provided me with conscious choice, and I used it to guide my influence as a pro in ways that aligned with my deepest values. In videos I began choosing lines that were more technical and closer to the ground - train tracks and chains instead of roof beams. I began to notice my ego’s need for external validation during trials shows and replaced it with a more personal and interactive approach. As I reduce the risks I take on my bike the hero spotlight fades, but I find my enjoyment of riding and ability to contribute in meaningful ways rising.

Ride On!


Ryan Leech is widely considered to be one of the most progressive and technically skilled mountain bikers in the world. Intimate with the benefits of yoga for a thriving pro career, he got certified to teach and thus began injecting a new generation of cyclists with the body mind intelligence necessary for long term optimal performance.

As a Professional Integral Coach™, he works privately with people, such as pro athletes, during transition to help them discover what’s next more quickly and with less suffering.



84 Comments

  • + 92
 Thinking about your actions and emotions, in regards to what you consider your passion in life. Not Gay. More Ryan Leech on Pinkbike please: there are people who appreciate this insight more than they appreciate some dude talking about how rad stoked they are to be riding brand-x this season.
  • + 16
 What if my passion is being Gay? (with capital G).
  • + 16
 then theres a forum for that!

dirt.mpora.com

Wink Big Grin
  • + 12
 Ryan: most people in the first world lead relatively dull and uninteresting lives. This is the first time in history where a person can live a totally sheltered, secure, insured, safety-handrail life... for their whole life. But the only things that give the average masses a feeling of being "alive" is watching someone else that they can relate to, perform something "crazy".

I've been riding long enough and have had enough bad crashes, that I hate watching crash videos. Maybe if the average person crawled out of their safety bubble, took some risks and failed, they might realize how devastating the results of crash videos can actually be. A 5-second Redbull clip can be a lifetime in a wheelchair for an actual person. Get out there and live your lives people, experience the world.
  • + 3
 Great article! I am split on the issue, however. Personally, if I wreck really bad, I hope to god someone got it on film. Just a personal thing, I usualy look back at myself and laugh... and then send the video to a bunch of friends. I do have a bit of trouble watching others crash though. It's not that I'm squeemish, but I just don't like watching other people get hurt. Again, just my opinion. Great article though.
  • - 3
 I disagree mr g123.
  • + 3
 I think this article has a great point, I find that its so terrible that those who watch us in action laugh when they think a serious crash is funny, because it may look hilarious to see a guy fall from 50 feet into the air onto nothing but dirt, but they have no clue how much balls it took to even drop in to that, much less face serious injury, the end of your career, or even death-Cedric Garcia almost died while riding. And it took 100 times more balls to try again, but it doesn't have to be that way. It would be easier to come back from a crash if it is simply seen as a part of the process of nailing it, instead of a funny conclusion. Sports is technically the field of entertainment, but watching the rider nail it is the entertainment, not the crash before its perfected.
  • + 24
 Idiocracy is a GREAT movie! Everybody has to watch that movie at least once!
  • + 8
 or 20
  • + 8
 SHUT UP... im baiting
  • + 6
 It's what your body craves!!
  • + 4
 what do ya say we go family style on her?
  • + 5
 plenty of 'tards living kickass lives - my first wife, was 'tarded.. she's a pilot now
  • + 5
 Today I step into the shoes of a great man, a man by the name of Dwayne Elizondo Mountain Dew Herbert Camacho.
  • + 3
 welcome to pinkbike i love you...
  • + 4
 I cant believe you like money too. We should hang out
  • + 5
 Why come you dont have a tatoo?
  • + 15
 This is a very interesting read. It really makes you think... And I can identify with Ryan on his feelings toward Crankworx, or any high-risk event for that matter. I get nervous for the riders. All in all though, I really watch for the riding and not so much the crashes. Once again, great article. Thanks Ryan.
  • + 0
 No body is forcing anyone to ride at these events!
  • + 4
 I personally hate the crashes when I watch high risk events like this or X-games etc. I watch because of the thrill that I might see someone pull something truly mind blowing, and see the excitement on that athletes face when they do so, knowing how much hard work they put in. But at the same time we have to accept that crashes will happen, but that doesn't make it an enjoyable part of being a fan of these sports, and it doesn't mean I don't cringe and get nervous every time a rider drops in.
  • + 14
 " As I reduce the risks I take on my bike the hero spotlight fades, but I find my enjoyment of riding and ability to contribute in meaningful ways rising. "

This right here is the meaning of life in one sentence. It takes acceptance of our vulnerabilities to be a true hero, because true courage can't exist without vulnerability. There is nothing heroic about recklessly flirting with a future spent in a wheel chair, flushing down the toilet the gift of being able to walk or feed ourselves, just for a moment of cheer in the spotlight.
  • + 2
 Amen, brother.
  • - 2
 hey ampa,
thanks for your view..........
myself and evel knievel would argue to the death that you are 100% wrong,... but ya, thanks for YOUR view.

who cares if ya can walk when you have the talent and desire to fly...?...
not i.
  • + 0
 evel droppin the knowledge...........

www.youtube.com/watch?v=llzIVDbvSAc

amen brother.
  • + 1
 Thanks for the thoughts Stacy! Ride on, or should I say, fly on ? Wink

But also take care. I'm sure there are a lot of people around you whose lives are made better when they see in good cheer and good health.
  • + 2
 its a balance. we need the ultra conservative, we need the big time risk takers. having both makes all of us stronger. its been like that since the dawn of man. a sure sign of an unhealthy ecosystem is a monoculture. dig on diversity. embrace it all.
  • + 0
 and thats were we differ ............... you think evel and bender are jokes, people not to be taken serious... i , and many others take them as serious as a heart attack. we see them as pioneers and almost spiritual leaders. people are all wired differently.
  • + 1
 agreed...bender cannot be taken seriously. the likelihood of him (or anyone) landing any of his huge drops is slim to none, but bender always sides with the slight chance that he could land them
  • + 7
 Great article Ryan.. I think what makes your point a little more poignant is that it is only with time (or injury) that we tend to be able to take that step back and re-evealuate our situation and our responses to them...
Another point is that our sport is young, not just in terms of it being a sport, but in the median age that it tends to attract. At least with the dirt jumping and downhilling.. Which tends to lead to a fair amount of recklessness and testosterone. Which seems to lead to daredevil attempts that we normally wouldn't try...
It will be interesting to see how all of these concussed and brain injured riders make out in the long run... Just think of the crashes at Red-Bull Rampage, Crankworx, and all the dirt jumps and downhill courses... It adds up.. and adds up... and adds up... Checkout a movie/documentary called (I think it's called) MindGames... About head injuries in sports.. It'll rattle your nerves. Having suffered a head injury myself, every time a rider goes down and hits their head I just cringe knowing how it feels and what it feels like for months after... and how it can change their lives completely.
I guess my question to myself and to you Ryan is this. How do we encourage our sport to grow without others taking the inherent risks needed to push it further? But perhaps that is the problem... We are by nature drawn to the train wrecks around us.. it just seems like we can't turn away...
  • + 6
 The short answer to your question is, we really can't. What we CAN do though is really push the idea of slowly pushing your limits, instead of going balls to the wall with little to no skill already developed. Couple that with much more promotion of safety equipment like helmets and kneepads/elbowpads, I think it'd be the best we can do. Everytime I see anybody without a helmet on any bike, in really any situation, I just have to give a slight sigh to myself and make a note to encourage it more to anybody who wants to get into biking.

Other than that, just like other physical sports, dangers are involved. Most riders know there are risks involved, and eventually it will bite you. I raced motocross for 13 years before making the switch which gave me the understanding to respect my limits and work on them slowly. Crash videos give anybody new to the sport the sort of reality check of what CAN happen if you push too hard or just make a simple mistake. Yeah, watching a heavily edited video with awesome runs and no crashes may look way sweeter in the long run, but it can jade the watcher over time.

Rant over, and I'm blaming this rant on having a few drinks. Party on and let the discussion flow over this awesome article.
  • + 2
 Great point, "SLOWLY pushing your limits, instead of going balls to the wall". Everyone should take note of this. You can't jump on a bike and expect to be Cam McCaul.(though it would be cool if you could)
Sometimes it takes finding out the hard way before this sinks in..did for me anyway!
  • + 3
 Fully agree. As I age, I find myself less willing to try the new huck but rather ease my way into it. The more you become a grown up, the longer it seems to take to recover from even minor injuries. It's this time away from shredding due to injuries that actually acts to slow me from doing the riskier stuff. Not a bad thing. As good as watching PinkBike videos from my hurt bed is, it ain't as good as railing berms and popping booters on Vancouver Island.
  • + 1
 yoda has it right when he said "there is no try, there is only do" if you arnt sure you can do it, you cant. i've been rebuilt by science and surgeons a few times and it sucks. mobility is something that should not be taken for granted.
  • + 7
 Great article Ryan. As I age and my responsibilities to others exceed those to myself, I also find a greatly lessened desire to do the more advanced (dangerous) moves I used to enjoy doing. How often (if ever) do you find yourself longing for the higher risk stuff you used to do? And when you do find yourself longing for the ego stoke of the bigger moves, do you do it?
  • + 2
 For example, the metal mountains sculpture by the seabus terminal (north side) still baffles me to this day how you owned that! And the consequences!!!
  • + 4
 My challenge as I grow older is to decide where the glory seeking stops and the skill seeking starts. I have a lot to lose. No health insurance, growing family, important schooling I can't afford to miss. All the same, I kick myself for not hitting the big drop when I left the park last time. That isn't about skill, it is about glory. But then, how far do my current skills reach? How much do I limit myself because of fear?
A foam pit shows me I can't do a back flip on a mountain bike and a 360 is still a little beyond my reach but why should I fear the ten foot drop? A fail could land me in the hospital (and years of debt), but not doing it puts a cap on what I can do.
I guess we all need to be smart about it. There are other areas to grow. I can get faster, become a better climber.
That is part of the excitement about enduro for me. It requires skills I haven't finished growing, but are less likely to end me. It gives me a new area to grow.
Still, even as I get better I worry that I'll find a new limit of what I can do safely. What do I do when I find going any faster on an enduro run is likely to lead to a bad crash? Move on to xc?
I'd like to think that with enduro I've found a niche I can stick with. My skills will balance out my glory seeking and I will be faster and faster without risking control.
  • + 3
 I think the worst day riding is watching your mate get hurt. I never push my mates to do anything that might result in injury. If I don't think they are ready to attempt the bigger jump or drop I'll encourage them to leave it for another day. I'll also encourage them to work on basic skills that will make "going bigger" safer. I cringe every time a mate attempts something that may end in disaster. I love the feeling when you successfully nail that huge jump or drop however, I won't attempt it until I'm content with myself that I can do it safely. Well as safe as humanely possible. I always encourage my mates and other riders to wear their protection, no matter how easy the trail is. It's often the "easy" trail where riders make mistakes because they get complacent. A small crash can break your body just the same. All it takes is to land wrong or hit a root or rock. It takes more balls to ignore peer pressure and armour up than it does to wear no protection to satisfy some wreckless idiot that thinks helmets and armour is gay. Personally I think redbull and other events need to adopt the policy: no armour, no entry. Too many kids get hurt because they try to be like their heroes and wear no armour. It's a dangerous sport and wearing armour is a small inconvenience to keep you safe so you can ride another day.
Come on elite riders, lead by example and encourage young riders and fans to experience their thrill by appropriately protecting themselves whilst seeking the rush of going big!
  • + 2
 Excellent article... and I couldn't agree more about the bit of discomfort watching riders at some events. Cedric's crash or some of the crashes at Crankworx & Rampage this year were incredible, mostly just for the fact that the riders walked away... but it's getting to the point where some stunts are so big that it's almost just a matter of time till someone goes down double backflipping some huge gap or double or whatever and doesn't get up and walk away.
  • + 2
 UFC... Boxing... (arguably) Nascar... These are just some of the pro sports that come to mind that people watch to the specific end of seeing someone get messed up in some way or another. As with the high stakes varieties of riding though the fascination with injury is usually only a starting point. As the viewer matures as a viewer (s)he comes to appreciate the finer aspects of the given sport. The finesse in the combo of punches, the skillful block that anticipates an opening, the split second longer on the straightaway...

I agree that most people are natural thrill seekers and that if they don't have the nerve to do it themselves they seek role-models to do it for them. I disagree with the conclusion that as we become dulled to the role-model's excesses we inevitably drive the role-model to ever greater excess.
  • + 2
 He's absolutely right to question those who enjoy watching others crash and/or injure themselves. There's also a related flip side to this. When I go riding trails I'm unfamiliar with or when I just want to push my boundaries a bit, I suit up. That is, I put on Body Armour, padded shorts, knee pads and full face. The reasons for this are that A) I'm 37 and no longer bounce, B) If I injure myself to a point where I cannot work, then I cannot provide for my family and C) There should be no sympathy from non Mountain Bikers who are effected by your actions because they are NOT accidental. You did not go out and accidentally hurtle down a trail as fast as possible whilst trying to huck at every opportunity.
What I fail to understand is the mocking from within our own community this brings with it. Yes, I'll sweat like a b*tch on the climbs. Yes, a full face helmet is daft unless your coming down but once your into the descents, it all makes perfect sense. Apparently it's not ok to make sure you can enjoy the sport you love by staying injury free and not becoming an injured burden to your family. Apparently it much cooler to wear as little protection as possible and go much slower to therefore avoid crashing and have no need for any kind of protection in the first place.I suspect that the ones who mock those who wear spine protectors are the very same who "enjoy a good, bone crunching crash video".
My question is..Why is it so many Pinkbike users raise questions about the intelligence of a BMX rider who chooses to jump 8ft onto concrete without a helmet , yet think it's "way cool Bro" for somebody to compete at Rampage/Crankworx whilst wearing a helmet and a tank top?
  • + 2
 Try roadracing motorcycles, even beginners can reach speeds of 160mph around corners dragging body parts on the ground. Its all in the name of FUN. Sometimes bad things happen and when caught on camera can be used as a learning tool. this article sure does put a weird twist on things! Have you ever crashed and said "DID YOU GET THAT ON CAMERA?" !!!
  • + 2
 Again, awesome article Ryan. I really appreciate the insight you've been sharing. It's made me question my motives for flinging myself off of things, and ultimately realize it's because I love the feeling of accomplishment more than gaining the "respect" of others.
  • + 2
 Thanks to all who commented for sharing the rich variety of opinions and personal experiences; it's great to read how we each describe and see things differently and ultimately how the love of riding bikes holds us all together for the best possible outcomes...yes there are crashes along the way, but it's all part of the evolution of ourselves and our sport. Seeya on the trail...
  • + 2
 I think Aggy is super inspiring and fits the bill... he goes so big and crashes so hard but doesn't seem to do it for the cheers or prize purses at the end, I think it's just how he's wired -- internal motivation rather than external reward (or pressure). I'm of a mixed mind. Contests are such an insane high pressure environment and the pros feed off the atmosphere but could it be true that we as fans are force-feeding them courage/pressure or is it, again, just how certain people are wired? I think it's tough to compare the mtb world with the rest of the world too (fail videos on the internet... eurgh...)
At Joyride this weekend I was pushing myself and doing bigger jumps than I had thought possible 3 years ago (the first time I went). Many injuries later (including my 1st concussion and the associated 5 months of post-concussion syndrome) the sky has become the limit for me and I can now see myself conquering the biggest jump line there eventually! I know it's high consequence but I believe it's possible and I want it! Not for the high 5s or being one of few girls who can do it but because *I* want to be able to do it! It's a fine line... poignant article, I like when attention is drawn to these sorts of things.
  • + 5
 I'd rather not watch crash & burn vids, makes me question myself. So I just ride.
  • + 4
 i like to watch them sometimes just 'cus i catch mistakes that i myself make when riding,and usually the next time im out i think about that mistake and how to improve upon it
  • + 1
 cant believe I put up.. hahaha
  • + 1
 But... Brawndo's got what mountain bikers need. I used to drink lotsa Brawndo, but i am trying to be more critical about my recreation choices. An unexamined life is not worth living, know thyself and etc... Enjoyed the article, good advice, hope somebody who needs to hear it does!
  • + 1
 Great post! i benefit a lot from Ryan's video 'Mastering The Art Of Trials' in the past year, but also got my ankle and wrist seriously injured in crashes. The pain left in my ankle still remind me of how awful the consequence of reckless riding could be. wish i could have read this post a year earlier.
  • + 1
 Great article, like a lot of our customers...everyone has something they have to do the next day, week or so. $, Families, Work....sadly play a factor! As long as YOU the grinder are having fun in whatever "skill" your perfecting, is all that matters! Have fun, know your limits, but always improve them too...
  • + 1
 Why do posts in these articles never go in order of when they were posted? Or is it just my phone browser? Cause it would be easier to read and make sense if it went in order of time posted except of course replies to individual comments.
  • + 1
 The sport will continue to progress. I know my place in the world and fully respect those that give us these moments that amaze all of us. My progression as a rider has its limits,and as a 19 year professional (U.S. ARMY) pushing the envelope to impress anyone is simply out of the question. What I do execute came at the cost of many injuries and were not fun. I spent all of last season down due to one crash, which terrified most of my buddies who watched it happen. We watched it one time just so I could see how lucky I was and determine whether it was a rider in over his head or a needed mod to a trail.
  • + 1
 In terms of deaths, its not as dangerous as road racing, and at least the stunt riders wear full faced helmets most of the time. But more than a few have died in DH, Jake Watson and Dave Moffitt RIP. Another died in a Big Bear crash and also one from Mammoth. Whistler Blacomb had someone die in a DH race in the mid 90's. I think someone died in a North Carolina race also. DH is definitely the risky sport in terms of deaths. Ending up in a wheel chair is tragic, but not the end of all your relationships as with death. We can't stop these guys from pushing the limits but some of the jumps are designed recklessly, such as the tiny radius jump over the huge canyon at Rampage last year. But I think the drops are actually safer, I can't recall any slow or medium speed drop where someone ended up in a wheelchair. But overall I think it's a great sport where the reward is worth the risk.
  • + 1
 It's a curious perspective for those of us who are both spectators and riders. Give me a crash montage for anything else and as long as the carnage is below my acceptable threshold, I'm entertained. Show me CG's crash, or Cole's Rampage Canyon Gap crash and I have the worst feeling in the pit of my stomach; anything that may permanently take away ones riding capacity (or ones passion) does not entertain me.

I think there's a fine line between spectators being entertained and having a morbid curiousity about death and crashes. My own crash shattered my hand and took my riding away from me for a couple months yet the girlfriend still doesn't fully understand how I was utterly fascinated with my injury rather than be concerned or worried. I don't either. Unless someone gets caught up in some kind of bloodlust mass mentality, seeing riders successfully perform high risk feats is far more entertaining (huge adrenalin rush) than seeing their crashes. Although I do pay way more attention when crashes do occur out of curious fascination.

There will always be new riders pushing limits, and big crowds demanding more. I appreciate all the work riders do to push limits, but I especially respect those who maintain the ride to ride philosophy and don't just ride for the spectators.
  • + 1
 Great article and I generally agree. However, I think crashes should definitely be shown if it is done in the proper way. Rather than making fun or light of how bad the crash is, I like to see it done in a way that shows how hard the line is and the risks that are involved. I think the crashes on Where the Trail Ends did this very well. I think its really important to show people how much risk and danger is involved in these sports, and not necessarily in a glamourous way.
  • + 2
 I got the 'dumbass of the week' award at my hospital.... Maybe pinkbike should do one? Or am I just digging myself a hole saying that??? Wink
  • + 0
 I 100% refuse to watch crash vids as I've been a few majors that have been very painful and still effect me to this day. It's bad to get pleasure from others pain. I'm not sure if karma is real or not but I heard it can be a b$tch. Rubber side up!
  • + 7
 You mean down, ya?
  • + 7
 I think that's why he crashed...
  • + 1
 I found much greater enjoyment when our riding went from pushing each other into doing dumb things to encouraging everyone to do their best and using their head.
  • + 4
 well then....
  • + 2
 I dont see the attraction of crash vids. Just remind me of mine and others pain
  • + 1
 To be fair to PB they seem to vet the Fails for your Friday videos to not include anything with serious injury.

I like comedy crash videos best, and I like people to walk away. Some are so stupid you have to laugh, but these tend to be low risk (as much as the sport allows). Anything where they don't doesn't really sit comfortably - Rampage is just scary as discussed.

The only thing I would add is that without crashing people wouldn't realise how skilled people actually are. The way the stunts get progressively bigger you need something to hold you back. The crashes show us where the limit of the sport is... Rampage is Rampage because of the risk for example.
  • + 2
 It's good to know what not to do. It is good to know how many crashes it took to nail a trick to make you fully understand the danger. It is good to learn how to crash well. Watch the pros crash and see how they avoid injury while attempting amazing things. Ideocracy is the future. I find I wish for less crashes from riders I have been following for longer. I like how Andreu Lacondeguy will sometimes just not ride if it doesn't feel right where he just used to go balls out and crash a lot. He still has huge balls they are just tempered with experience these days.
  • + 1
 I would also add I watched 'Home' for the first time yesterday - it's a film about Scottish mountain biking. One of the segments was race footage from an NPS race - the fact that a couple of crashes occurred kept me on the edge of my seat! Some of the crashes looked a bit nasty, so it wasn't what I would call a pleasant watch, but it was certainly gripping and, without it, I'd not have had half a clue JUST how dangerous it was...
  • + 3
 Very cool Ryan! Great write up and hey....ride on brother.
  • + 4
 Ryan = legend!
  • + 3
 If your just watching Vids to see crashes and get a chuckle your wrong.
  • + 2
 ARE YOU NOT ENTERTAINED?!?!
  • - 2
 Sorry Ryan, I have no sympathy for any rider who gets hurt. There's an inherent danger in all these adrenaline sports and it's the person performing the sport that takes all the responsibility for their actions. If I'm back country skiing on a high avalanche day with a group of my friends I don't allow them to talk me into doing something that could get me killed. Oh, as for watching the videos for "crashes". No, I don't do that. I do watch videos for skill. Anyway, good article.
  • + 2
 It's a bit harsh to not feel sympathy for anyone. Don't get me wrong - we do a dangerous sport and injury is inevitable, and we should all take responsibility for ourselves and the injuries we sustain, but accidents do occur. I feel sympathy for any injured rider because they can't participate in the sport they love. If they injured themselves recklessly, the level of sympathy does plummet though!
  • + 1
 i always tought the future of humanity would be like Mad Max or Blade Runner....But im sure will be more like Idiocracy.....
  • + 2
 I didn't read any of the text but that first photo... Holy shit.
  • + 1
 Second photo... Oh shit.
  • + 1
 It`s your choice.. I have read it and then I read no.1 aswell because I had missed it when it was published. It was well written, just like this one.
Bottom line is: "Don`t be risking your life or health for someone elses cheap thrill."
I also only ride and stuff that give me 99 % confidence to ride it out.. and i still have the time of my life everytime ride my bike. And crashes aren`t excluded althou those 99%.

Because flow happens when/where your skills intersect with challenge.
  • + 1
 im not a very good rider and i crash alot but i always get up
  • - 1
 not me im brilliant
  • + 1
 that wasent me im brilliant
  • + 1
 Liking the irony of "healthily rewarding those who risk everything"
  • + 2
 im not down with crashes
  • + 1
 But crashes are down
  • + 1
 sketchy!
  • + 1
 agree with u
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