Bontrager Release New TLR Flash Charger Pump

Jun 4, 2020
by Daniel Sapp  

Bontraver have released their new TLR (Tubeless Ready) Flash Charger floor pump. The pump is designed to help aid setting up and inflating tubeless tires easy by expelling large volumes of air quickly to set the bead without having to use an air compressor.

The pump has a dual-chamber design with a large charging chamber and then a standard pump chamber. The pump inflates the charging chamber but can be selected so that it also functions as a normal floor pump to inflate tires. The auto-select head on the pump is compatible with both Presta and Schrader valves and includes pool toy/yoga ball and sports ball needles in a nifty stash in the handle.

There are two separate levers, one to charge and release the large chamber and another to select whether you're inflating the chamber or using the pump as a standard floor pump.

The accessories in the handle are nicely integrated and good to have as it seems needles for inflating sports balls are rarely where you left them.

The pump has a large digital gauge that accurately reads tire pressures as well as showing how much pressure is in the charger, depending on which mode is selected. There's also a bleed valve on the pump. The maximum pressure the pump is designed to operate at and the maximum pressure the gauge will read is 160-psi.


The TLR Flash Charger is has a two-year warranty and sells for $129.99 USD.



I've been using the pump for a couple of months now and have no complaints. It works well for seating tires, the gauge is accurate, and the hose of the pump is plenty long, allowing for use with a bike on a repair stand and I would recommend it for anyone looking for a one-pump solution for a variety of inflation scenarios.

For more information, visit trekbikes.com


94 Comments

  • 67 4
 Pro Tip:

For $9.99, get yourself an HDX pump sprayer from Home Depot. Take the spray tip off so that it's just a "hose" ending. Make a tiny cut in each side of the circular ending of the hose/wand (so that it can expand just a little bit to fit better around the valve stem) and presto, you've got yourself a tubeless inflator. Pump it up, take your valve core out, push the pump hose on to the valve stem, activate the sprayer wand, and you've got a seated tire. All for $9.99. You're welcome.

1 gallon sprayers work just fine, but if you want extra pressure/volume, get a 2 gallon one I suppose.

(If you've seen the Skills with Phil video on this, you don't even have to go through the hassle of changing the hoses on the pump. Just take the sprayer tip off, make a couple tiny cuts in the end of it, and you're good).
  • 5 21
flag pargolf8 (Jun 4, 2020 at 8:07) (Below Threshold)
 My god just get a two gallon compressor and a ratchet strap and soapy water. I bet I can setup tubeless blind with those
  • 3 0
 Holy crap. This is incredible. I thought I was smart for using a threaded CO2 inflator - I don't change tires often so It is still cheaper than a dedicated pump or taking it to the shop. But I'm definitely going to pick up another pump sprayer hose during my next HD trip....so later today.
  • 38 0
 Extra bonus if you have a little residual Round-Up to help seat the bead.
  • 5 0
 @pinkbike , more of these kind of tips in articles!
  • 3 0
 I have this setup (2gal), it works sometimes. Depends on the wheel tire combo. In general I find it easier to seat my MTB tires than my skinnier gravel tires.
  • 1 0
 @smoothmoose: yeah, it works pretty well, but sometimes needs soapy water and helping the bead get seated beforehand with a tire lever. But in those same situations, I've had difficulty with a large air compressor too. Those situations for me are usually a previously used XC tire I'm remounting - at least with Maxxis they seem to have looser beads than burly tires, or maybe they stretch? I dunno.

So yes, not perfect, but works pretty well for me, comparable to a compressor.
  • 5 0
 I use a 2 litre coke bottle, 5mm internal tubeless my from eBay and 2 valves from old tubes. Cost about $3 and works a charm

Videos on you tube.
  • 9 6
 All you are a bunch of cheapskates. I take my tires to the bike shop and pay the minimum $45/hour charge. Works perfectly every time and I don't break a nail. Support your local bike shop!!!
  • 5 0
 Ain’t no shame in saving a few bucks and doing your own repairs. Unless your afraid of breaking a nail and getting your hands dirty. @hangdogr:
  • 4 0
 @hangdogr: Or better yet, buy your own compressor and seat your own tires.
  • 1 0
 You can repurpose a scuba tank to accomplish the same. More costly than a garden sprayer after you purchase the fittings but probably more robust. Smile
  • 5 0
 @hangdogr: learn how to work on your bike, take pride in it, do a proper job, you're done in 5 min. I like to maximize my time on bike not wait around.
  • 4 0
 @sngltrkmnd: it's absolutely ridiculous if you're going to purchase a scuba tank, purchase fittings, and then manually pump it up. Just purchase an air compressor. I got a 3 gallon for about $40 including tax...
  • 1 0
 @hangdogr: I already spend a HELL of an amount supporting my local bike shop. Plus it's annoying to have to bring my bike there, as it'd be more convenient to do it at home. Plus my LBS is super busy right now
  • 1 0
 @pargolf8: $9.99 is a lot cheaper than a 2 gallon compressor. Still, at $129 for this contraption you can find a compressor for a lot less. And you don’t need a ratchet strap or soapy water.
  • 5 1
 Yes, you can buy a compressor for less than $130 bucks. But also with a digital gauge? And all the parts to make said compressor work for a bike? And if you want to take it on a trip or to the trails is the compressor easily transportable, battery operated, and silent (hello unhappy campers nearby)?

The Flashcharger is great. I love mine. I use it nearly every day.
  • 1 0
 @iamamodel: Why do I need a compressor or that contraption on a camping trip? If I get a flat, I’ll stick one of my spare tubes in. I’m sure there is a market for an overpriced, high volume pump, I’m just not that market.
  • 1 0
 @blkmrktrider156: Let's take it easy on the hyperbole, friend. The benefit of the scuba tank - my friend got one for free - is that it doesn't require any electricity to fill tires, it's operation is nearly silent, and it has a massive capacity with a very high flow rate. Just another way to skin a cat.
  • 1 0
 I have used coke bottles, a modified co2 fire extinguisher and now I have a second hand compressor off facebook marketplace that cost £30.
I can do the car tyres, motorbike tyres, tubeless set up and even better, I have discovered the utter joy of an air gun for cleaning!! Bye bye water, mud and the leafs from my garageSmile
Oh and you don't need a digital gauge because when setting up, just crank it up to 60psi or whatever to seat the bead. Then use a little topeak later.
  • 1 0
 @gnarlysipes: I spent $19.99 on my compressor. And $50 on my track pump.
  • 1 0
 @iamamodel: You don't get a digital gauge. Most compressors come with an adapter for pumping up tyres (even the cheaper ones), but personally I take the valve core out, and just hold the regular "air blow" attachment to the valve. This gets a bit more air in faster. I've had tyres that didn't want to seat with the valve core in, and seated immediately with this method.
This thing is great if you want something portable, but if you want something for home use, i'd suggest a compressor as well. The beauty of the compressor is that you can use it for a bunch of other things as well, bike and non bike related.
  • 1 0
 That is Bro not Pro
  • 1 0
 lol - I've done the same. And as an add bonus they work great for watering/packing jumps when their not close to a water supply
  • 21 0
 Honestly the last like 4 or 5 tires I've seated have gone on without any qualms with just a track pump and I didn't need to pull out the charger bottle. I think tires are getting better/easier to mount and these types of things are not going to be needed as much.

Although haven't tried any tubeless on the road/gravel side of things. Not sure if smaller volume makes a difference.
  • 5 1
 You are correct. Mounting any tire from 2.0 to 4.0 is super easy with a track pump, but man... seating CX or gravel is super hard. Probably buying just the canister for your track pump is the way to go if you have a nice pump already.
  • 5 0
 I have only used Maxxis tires for the last few years and I have the same experience. Regular floor pump is all I need for mountain tires.


Road/gravel/cx is a whole different animal. It greatly depends on the tire/rim combo and I'm like 50/50 on if I need a compressor to seat a tires or not.
  • 1 0
 @Paddock22: Yes, and usually if you are using tape on the rim gets harder (I rather use rim strip), and usually, all my bonty's rims seat easier than other brands.
  • 1 0
 @HopeFbn: the only issue with the Bontrager setup is at higher pressures. On my previous road tubeless setup using Bontrager rims, after about 6mos of use the Plastic liner starts to dimple at the spoke holes. Since they're usualy offset, when you attempt to inflate the air escapes around all dimples and won't allow the tire to bead. That's when you need the big dog bead setter to get enough volume to push the tire past the dimples.
  • 1 0
 @HopeFbn: ugh it took myself an hour to friggin' seat,inflate and get rolling on my cx tires, there Maxxis all terrane 33c. Hardest time was getting the bead to seat against the rim flange, all I had was floor pump and a few CO2 cartridges
  • 2 1
 @HopeFbn: another good reason not to ride a “gravel” bike...
  • 10 0
 Love my v1 Flash Charger pump, with the analogue gauge. Compressors are neat, no doubt, but personally I prefer not being tied to a power source, This thing is sturdy and does the job.
  • 2 0
 I too have had outstanding performance from my Flash Charger pump. Really nice piece of equipment.
  • 12 0
 Can of butane n a pack of matches is the real flash charger
  • 2 0
 Hahaha Tractor stuff.
  • 5 0
 I've had mixed results with my V1 charger. It really comes down to the brand/model tire. Bontrager, Specialized, Maxxis, and Vittoria have all seated nicely. Kenda and tubeless road/cx/gravel tires are a pain the the butt. the smaller volume makes it harder to seat the bead. I find i have to lubricate the bead or even use a C02 to get those to go.
  • 2 3
 Kenda tires suck lol. That’s why
  • 7 0
 LOL at all the ding dongs in the comment section talking like they would drag an air compressor all over their country/state/province/continent.
  • 1 0
 No, but I'm not seating tires all over the continent either. If you cant seat it with a track pump just use a tube until you get to civilization.
That being said I have no problem with these type of track pumps existing, and I have no issue with you spending whatever amount you want on it. It is just definitely not something I'm spending more that $60 on.
  • 2 0
 Air compressor is part of my mandatory camping gear now
  • 1 0
 @BreezerXCer: nice choice. Big big or go home as they say.
  • 4 0
 I've had the original version of this for about 5 years. Works great. I did break the 90 degree connector from the flash charger to the rubber hose once. A Trek dealer got me sorted in minutes.
  • 2 0
 I've had the first version since it came out. One of the best MTB products I've had in 30 years. Gauge wasn't perfectly accurate but, in conjunction with a digital gauge, I've learned where I need the needle to be. If it is accurate, the addition of a digital gauge is great. This is not the same as buying a compressor as it is silent, doesn't need juice, and you can chuck it in the car. Essential at a race. Long hose is great.
  • 2 0
 I bought a TLR flash charger back in 2016 and the thing is still going strong. It's nice to have it on bike trips, in case things can go wrong. My buddies have had some parking lot mishaps that required setting a tire and it saved the ride for them. Personally, I think these pumps are great and worth every penny.
  • 5 1
 Hmmm. I bought a 2 gallon compressor for half the price. 12 years later and it still works flawlessly.
  • 1 0
 Same, though I can see these being useful for people without a garage or living in an apartment...unless the spouse is okay with an air compressor under the sink.
  • 4 0
 Dope you bring that with you to the trails too?
  • 1 0
 @freeridejerk888: I believe the comment was more in regards to the price than the convenience.
  • 1 0
 @freeridejerk888: yes I do actually. It's come in handy a few times for me and my friends. I'm able to run it off my truck.
  • 1 0
 @SvenNorske: good point. Too noisy for a condo or apartment
  • 2 0
 mini portable air compressors are cheaper than that . There is no substitute for speed and ease of use as with an air compressor . The real innovations in tire inflation need to be in the field , not at home .
  • 2 0
 I love my original version of this pump and it still works like a charm. I would never have a digital pump gauge tho cause it seems the batteries run out faster than the air off the charger can.
  • 6 2
 Pretty charged up for this, seems smart and easy to use.
  • 1 0
 You'll get those tires setup in a flash.
  • 3 1
 Cool product, but I'm not gonna invest $130 in a floor pump that doubles as a tubeless booster when I can seat a tubeless tire with a regular floor pump already.
  • 6 1
 I frequently am dealing with DH tires. Different ballgame there. This type of pump or a compressor is where it's at.
  • 2 0
 Or, depending on your situation, you can put that $130 into a Harbor Freight Ultra Quiet compressor and not only seat tubeless, but also pump up car tires, use an air-nailer, maybe even an impact. Of course, that doesn't do much when you need to reseat a tire at the trailhead, but usually in those cases the day is done anyhow.
  • 2 0
 @onlybirdman Just get the USB recharging batteries and plug it into your Ebike. Charge it while you ride. BAM, problem solved. Mike drop and I'm done internetting...
  • 1 0
 For this amount of cash you can get Einhell or Parkside (lidl) battery powered compressor that you can carry anywhere and use it for more than just inflating bike tires plus a set of new tires.
  • 1 0
 Never had an issue seating a tubeless tire with just a floor pump until I tried a 40c on a 22mm rim. For some reason lower volume tires are more difficult to set up.
  • 3 0
 It depends a lot on tyre fit and rim profile. I have a few loose tyres and need my modified fire extinguisher (nsmb.com/articles/build-your-own-tubeless-inflator) to get them seated. I put on an Assegai the other day and it pumped up fine with the track pump.
  • 1 0
 Why don’t people just use a compressor? It’s the correct tool for the job and they cost less than a bike pump and they give you an excuse to get some air tools!
  • 1 0
 I have the original and it works awesome, has seated everything from 650x47 gravel tires to 29x3.0 plus sized balloons. would recommend!
  • 1 0
 Cool, but I don’t see what you wouldn’t just have a small portal (ie 110/12V) compressor.
  • 9 0
 It's about volume of air, not pressure. Those small 12VDC pumps are designed to create pressure.
At our shop I've delt with tire/rim combos that won't seat without a significant amount of initial puff. Especially when it comes to older tires or gettho tubeless setups. I made a 3/4" airline on a 6' hose directly off the tank and before the regulator to allow me to get sufficient initial volume to inflate really stubborn tires. I've also used the Flashcharger occasionally, which works nearly as well as my tubeless bead setter. At home I just use my shop compressor. My experience with those 12vdc pumps has been pretty miserable.
  • 3 1
 This has me pumped to get riding again.

Big Grin
  • 3 1
 This innovation blows
  • 1 0
 Did they have to make it digital? That's the only thing stopping me from buying it.
  • 2 0
 I have the first/analogue version and I rely on a digital gauge because the dial isn't accurate enough. The digital gauge is a step in the right direction.
  • 1 0
 Mine is *wildly* out. +/- 10psi sometimes....
  • 1 0
 Is it Moogawa-Oomgawa compatible?
  • 4 3
 Hmmm... or you could buy an electric pancake compressor for less $.
  • 24 0
 I love carrying my compressor to the trail or camping.
  • 4 1
 You certainly can, but this stays in our truck for mtb trips and has seated a many tubeless tire. Works awesome.
  • 2 4
 @txclg: dude once the tires has been beaded you literally never need the compressor again. Just use a shit pump to top off pressure. So you and 15 others are smurt
  • 3 1
 @pargolf8: So you have never had to change a tire while away from your garage? Tore side walls, changing weather conditions, etc all might be a reason to need to seat a new tire on a rim away from your home compressor.

And I do have a large compressor for home us, but it just doesn't have the portability.
  • 2 1
 @pargolf8: sounds like you've never been on a trip and had to replace a tubeless tire in a campsite.
  • 1 0
 @Superboost: Nothing a floor pump can't handle with some dish washing liquid mixed with water.

Use something to wipe the soapy water nicely round the beads and pump away till you hear the pops - what's the issue?

This flash floor charger = not necessary.
  • 1 0
 @gnarterrorist: doesn't work for every tire and rim combo.
  • 2 1
 So I now gotta change the battery on my bike pump?
  • 2 0
 I'm 100% over any tire related products that need a battery, like the Schwalbe Airmax gauge. Batteries are constantly going out right when you need it, and expensive to replace.
  • 1 0
 @SvenNorske: give me analog any day of the week.
  • 1 0
 Don't see it anywhere on the Trek website.
  • 3 1
 more useless shtuff
  • 1 0
 Not sure, how do you pronounce this brand?
  • 1 0
 We are here to pump you up!!
  • 2 1
 Know what else does that? A $50 air compressor.
  • 2 0
 FK THESE PRICES
  • 2 3
 Bwahahahahahahhahahahahahaha. You can buy yourself a freaking compressor for this price. Piss off, Bontrager.
  • 3 0
 Meh a good pump is $40-100 USD. If you need a track pump and a compressor you'll be lucky to spend less than $150 to own both. Granted the compressor has a lot more utility than this, but if you lived in a small apartment/house or spent a lot of time on the road $130 is not much cheese to spend on something you'll likely use almost daily. Plus, if it's half as durable as my Bontrager Super Charger it'll last forever. Plus they stand behind their products and offer spare parts, if you were ever to need them.
My Bontrager pump is 8 years old, and hasn't needed a damn thing. I don't think that's uncommon for a track pump, but still. If it lasts a decade than what has it cost you... $13 a year? Go to any bike shop and ask them to set up a tubeless tire for you, it's probably around $15 plus sealant. I think we charge $25 including up to 4oz of Orange Seal.
Plus what does that Silca pump cost, like $200? And its just a fancy pump.
  • 1 0
 @BikesBoatsNJeeps: yep. My Flashcharger comes to all the rides and races. It's also handy just to keep about 60 psi in to top up tyres just by pulling the lever and letting a little air in.
  • 1 0
 @iamamodel: as opposed to pushing and pulling the handle for 15 seconds? Yeah that does sound easier/better for seals...............

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