Video: The Creation of the GT RTS - 'Full Travel' Ep.1

Apr 30, 2020
by Ed Spratt  

bigquotesChapter 1: The birth of the RTS and a major upset at the 1992 World Championships

Travel back to the beginning of full-suspension mountain bikes with some legendary personalities! 'Full Travel' is a documentary by Pipeline Digital Media which takes a look back at GT's history of pushing the progression of the sport!
GT Bicycles


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38 Comments

  • 9 0
 GT, back in the day was the bike brand everyone wanted! Everyone wanted an RTS or an LTS! By the time I saved enough money, I ended up buying an i-Drive.
  • 2 0
 Yeah, sad that everyone who mattered back then obviously dropped out of the brand in 1999. RIP Richard Long.
  • 1 0
 The LTS was my first bouncy bike and it was great when it wasn't broken (about half the time I had it). And don't mention the bushings.... (great idea in Socal but not in the NZ mud)
  • 9 0
 I loved the RTS . It was the first full Susser that actually was better than a hard tail.
  • 1 0
 Yep. Fond memories of that bike. Original quiver killer.
  • 2 6
flag softsteel (Apr 30, 2020 at 12:01) (Below Threshold)
 Being better than a hardtail at this period was probably not that difficult.
  • 2 0
 first lts was wet dream material
  • 2 0
 Uhhhh....pedaling and braking locked it out. Don't know how this was better.
  • 2 0
 If only they had put an idler on it.... The design is pretty damn similar to the high pivot bikes we have now.
  • 1 0
 @softsteel: You wer emaybe not riding at this period, there was a bunch of bad bikes. Having a correct hardtail was fine, having a fully which actually provides a benefit was easy to count.
  • 1 0
 @smartfartbart: in 1992 I was 18yo!!! so I was riding for quite a while... but I didn`t have a MTB, I had a rubbish BMX to do absolutely everything... till I broke it in two. Then I stuck to BMX with a PK Ripper...
Anyway, when I look at the MTB`s they did at this period, I just think that I probably didn`t miss that much, and I`m really glad to enjoy the modern MTB`s we have now.
In 92 I was mainly looking at moto-cross, even if I couldn`t afford any, and when I see the recent MTB`s, I just think that they`re actually so close to moto-cross design and geometry; so it took about 30 years to understand that a good MTB is a lighter copy-paste of a MX without engine, more or less Wink
First MTB`s were just normal bicycles with bigger knobbed tyres ridden by reckless hippies smoking weed / Klunkerz related
  • 4 0
 I remember when these came out, the shop guys said RTS stood for really terrible suspension. The thing was, it was way better than the URT designs like the Ibis Szabo, which bucked you off when you pointed downhill. The MTB bikes were more into XC smoothing and not gnar riding, which is where the RTS shined. I few weeks ago a saved a perfect RTS example from a neighbor's dumpster, and promptly gave it to a local GT collector. His smile looked like Deadhead on a double dose.
  • 3 0
 When the RTS was released there were not many other options for full suspension. It's competition was the Trek 9500 pogo stick, Cannondale EST, Boulder Defiant, etc. All high pivots, and the GT was the better of the bunch. The URT bikes did not come out until a few years later.
  • 5 1
 AMP already had the Horst link. You want to see a bike that showed the future of bike design it was the AMP B5, not this POS.
  • 1 0
 @peleton7: The Amp B5 was several years later, it came out after GT moved on to the LTS. The Amp B2 would have been available around the same time as the RTS, a good riding bike but flexy and fragile.
  • 3 0
 Phops, instant results in geometry were hampered by trails being much more tame, brake tech way behind, and heavy influence from road and xc biking. In addition talented riders were winning because they overcame those issues. It was the dark ages. When guys started ripping serious downhills and giving feed back in the pits and setting their own stuff up with heavy rearward bias, engineers took notice. A stiff monster t that was several centimeters taller created slack where there was none before and it worked. Until motocross guys started getting involved things just were not apparent. They just did not know long wheelbase, slack head angle wide bars and short stems worked. They were doing their best. Lts linkage was badass in its day. Fsr based on amp was a vast improvement over truly poor designs. Motocross guys took one ride and just said wtf are you trying to ride?!!! Then geo came in. Arguably adjustable seatpost made most of what you see possible now. Mho.
  • 3 1
 This bike was garbage. Pedaling and braking forces stiffened the suspension, so you'd stand up and get hammered. The AMP B5 is the bike that showed the way to the future. Low standover, disc brakes and.......ooooh yeah; Horst Leitner had already designed the Horst link.
  • 1 0
 still find it crazy what bikes are at now, from what they were. I always wonder if you take a average biker with the bikes today, and race a pro back then, what the out come would be.
  • 2 0
 put an idler on an RTS and it isn't that different from the high pivot bikes that are around today. The biggie for me is geo and bigger wheels. I would still rather ride my rigid 29 with decent geo over an RTS.
  • 1 0
 Furtado and Lopes would still kick our asses ! lol.
  • 2 0
 Like the classic car races, it would be cool to see classic mountain bike races.
  • 3 1
 Heh, no one would insure it.....soon enough MIPS will be mandatory for getting out of bed if you so much as own a bike.
  • 1 0
 I had a 97 LTS3 which was my first real mtb. The suspension worked on fire roads. I remember the first time I took it to a ski resort. That was an eye opener. Lol
  • 1 0
 There goes any chance of grabbing one to restore prices be thru the roof by the weekend
  • 4 2
 Dick Long
  • 1 0
 had one worked great for the time!
  • 1 0
 Man that thing musta had pedal kickback like WHOA.
  • 1 0
 High Pivot, before it was cool...
  • 1 0
 Fond memories of watching Jason McRoy race Mammoth on an RTS....
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