How-to: Hip Flexion - Video

Jul 19, 2012
by Diamondback Bicycles  
Views: 35,914    Faves: 232    Comments: 10


Diamondback DF5 Rider and Fluidride Professional Cycling Coach Simon Lawton works through the process of hip flexion and how that translates to better and more precise cornering. You can learn more and reach Simon for questions and/or to schedule classes at www.fluidride.com.

www.diamondback.com

Posted In:
Diamondback



58 Comments

  • 56 2
 What you need is a laser penis
  • 57 0
 pew pew pew
  • 9 4
 apple working on it, should be available in time for next Christmas.
  • 12 0
 iPenis
  • 1 0
 I think this is super helpful because while I can't ride due to injurie or broken down bikes, I can still learn Smile
  • 23 0
 I bet shakira's good at this. Also why would I buy their dvd's when i have PB?!
  • 6 1
 Sad technical point: What does hip "flexion" have to do with this technique? Sure there is a small amount of extra hip flexion (sagittal plane motion) as you open up the inside knee but the technique is more about a rotation of the hips and torso in the transverse plane (which is not flexion!). That is all Smile
  • 10 0
 Flexion is a cool word
  • 1 0
 Nailed it, Robotra.
  • 2 0
 This video is a little misleading, calling it 'hip flexion' doesn't add anything because you aren't flexing them, you are twisting into the corner to counter the force and increase stability, the uncoiling of this twist works as pump when the rider returns to their normal trail position.
  • 2 0
 I was playn around with this technique yesterday on a long steep fireroad in between some fun single track. I tried keeping evergthing super straight except my hips. My bike turned every time. I was surprised how much I turned. I know I do this instinctively but increasing the flex does help. I never get tired of these vids. Thanks guys.
  • 5 0
 Mmmm, sweet double berms... where are these trails?
  • 5 0
 Duthies Hill, 30 minute drive from Seattle.
  • 3 0
 Ok thanks, I'll be right over.
  • 5 0
 it sounds like a sex manoeuvre...
  • 4 3
 guys, just look at this pic of Greg Minnar, a guy who doesn`t know how to ride Big Grin
pic is here : www.3minutegaps.com/assets/riders/greg_minnaar.jpg

Elbry, you`re right. Upper body should remain static and not leaned inwards,if so the bike will skid out.
The correct technique is to turn your body mostly from the hips in the direction you want to go. It is the same technique in skiing,moto and so.
  • 4 0
 With that said, he is a world cup racer and I'm pretty sure he won a race
  • 5 1
 So remember, when making those turns:

www.youtube.com/watch?v=7PbRZ5QMAs0
  • 1 0
 Don't have problems with cornering but certainly would like to learn how to do more of a controlled cuttie. Any advice? I want to be able to do a power slide through a corner without grabbing any brake. Other than going fast and unweighting the rear end what's the secret? Basically I want to be able to do what Fabien does at 41secs in on this video www.pinkbike.com/news/Fabien-Barels-videos--how-to-cornering.html
  • 4 0
 He locked up the back wheel. You can see the wheel stop spinning.
  • 1 0
 drifting both wheels is all about perfect weight distribution. You need to be able to ride so that you need minimal movement to put more weight on the front to steer or more weight over the rear to get the front to slide too. Practice getting your body position right by riding an easy trail with a loose grip on the bars and getting it so you support your weight through your legs not through your arms. You'll have to have a good posture on the bike to do this without nailing your back...
  • 1 0
 It requires balls. When you feel it starting to go don't grab up on the brake and get vertical.
  • 1 0
 i can tell you the secret right now. I learned this on snowy roads but you can do this on wet grass, or loose/fine gravel (has to be consistent not rutted or bumpy). take your hands off your brakes, get however much speed you're comfy with, (doesnt take much) and do 2 things: lean the bike over DRAMATICALLY before turning the wheel (helps break traction) and put a foot down/footplant (takes weight off the back wheel)
Any directional change at that point will bring the rear out pretty quickly. Counter steer with the front as needed.
Then, as you go faster and get more comfy, you will get longer and more controlled slides, and need less force on the foot plant, until the foot plant isnt needed any more (you can preload the front/back before steering and get the same effect) (kinda like a "wiggle")
By the way, this method, (if you remember to LEAN the bike over to break traction early), is a great way to get the front wheel loose in a controlled manner, and get some nice 2-wheel slides going, and get used to the breaking point of traction of yer front wheel too.
The reason i learned this was cuz i was riding a bmx with no brakes in the winter, and i basically learned how to hockey stop/carve with it to slow down
  • 2 0
 pball91ac I've been trying to do this for years. I just can't seen to get my back wheel to break traction that feels controlled Funny though it wasn't too long ago that people screamed when ever anyone broke ground on a trail. Now it seems you can't watch a vid without seeing roosters fly on every turn. I still don't think trail builders dig it (literally). My feeling is that it looks cool but isn't as functional. Just a thought, no ill will man.
  • 4 1
 this isnt too different than what i learned at sgc. STEER WITH YOUR BELLYBUTTON
  • 1 0
 i have much more difficulty in turning right than left! i can really rely on turning left with foot off, but to the right no... even when riding my motorbike it happens this... why?
  • 3 0
 you're not an ambi-turner.... =)
  • 1 0
 i have much more difficulty in turning right than left! i can really rely on turning left with foot off, but to the right no... even when riding my motorbike it happens this... why? what can i do better my right turns?
  • 2 0
 Depends which foot you ride forward. I can lay into left handers because i ride left foot forward so its easier to drop the right pedal, dip the bike to the left and let it hang out. I also find it easier to countersteer right when I'm turning left because, being right handed, thats my natural direction. Just play around with it and try riding your opposite foot forward. Its just one of those things which comes with experience. Find a steep field, stay off the brakes and carve your way down as tight as you can. Oh yeah, and get loose for the grin factor.
  • 1 0
 I have the exact same problem. I ride left foot forward and have a much harder time railing right turns. Thanks for the insight. This was a great video! Thanks PB!
  • 5 1
 Point with yer pecker!
  • 1 0
 I miss the Fluidride shop... so close to where I lived when I lived by UW... but Big Tree Bikes is right down the block so it's no biggie =)
  • 2 2
 I hate you Big Grin
  • 4 1
 Nice - more like this please PB!
  • 3 0
 Interesting. Cool to think about why certain movements make things happen.
  • 1 0
 Hey Simon I don't know if you'll look at the comments but I was that kid who ate shit hard on gravy train a few weeks back. You are one hell of a rider.
  • 2 1
 its way to complicated just push you back end out and look, just enjoy the whip not all this scientificy stuff
  • 3 1
 Great instructional video! RideOn!
  • 2 0
 Really appreciate the crotch shot!
  • 2 0
 Looks like a very similar technique to edging your skis to turn a corner
  • 1 0
 Kyle Thomas looks like Rafterman out of Full Metal Jacket
  • 1 0
 Am i the only one that had absolutely no idea what "Hip flexion" is..?
  • 1 0
 What is the advantage of wheeling out of a burm?
  • 1 0
 thankx for the tips bunkey
  • 1 0
 Duthie hill!!!
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