GT Force LE Review

Mar 4, 2013
by Richard Cunningham  
TESTED
GT FORCE LE
WORDS: Richard Cunningham
IMAGES: Ian Hylands

Dan Atherton put the stamp of approval on GT’s Force LE by riding it to win all five stages of the Superenduro at Finale Ligure, Italy – the crown jewel in the world’s most hotly contested Enduro series. The Force LE certainly has what it takes. From its 740mm-wide Kore handlebar and 50-millimeter Easton stem, back to its Easton Haven rear wheel, the Force LE’s spec chart reads like an Enduro racer’s Christmas wish-list. It’s all there: two-by-ten drivetrain, roller chainguide, Reverb dropper post, Fox CTD suspension, and GT even outfits the Force LE with a Cane Creek Angle Set headset for that just-right head angle. The heart and soul of the Force LE is a proven-tough, welded-aluminum frame built around a 150-millimeter-travel version of GT’s ‘Independent Drivetrain’ rear-suspension system. Constructed with a combination of butted and profiled tubes, and a hydroformed monocoque top tube, the GT frame employs aluminum forgings at key points, such as suspension pivots and at the swingarm junctions for precise alignment. Beautiful welds and additional strength in the form of gussets in key areas remind us that GT’s designers understand that Enduro racing in Europe is contested on courses that could easily have been World Cup Downhills less a decade ago. The Force LE comes in X-small, small, medium, large and X-large sizes. Our medium-sized model weighed 31.2 pounds sans pedals and the MSRP is $5,550 USD.

GT Force LE construction details
  The front derailleur clamps to a stub on the swingarm (left), so it's cage follows the chain as the suspension cycles. Molded-plastic carry-through guides (center) located on either side of the shock, make for a clean routing for its full-length hoses and housings. Forged aluminum dropouts bolt onto the Force swingarm. The arrangement provides a super sturdy rear derailleur hanger and also makes a good home for the Formula rear brake caliper.


Force LE Construction Details

GT’s Force platform has been in production long enough for its designer to optimize every aspect of its chassis. The attention to detail is extraordinary. The swingarm pivot rides on bearings and a shaft that are equivalent in diameter to those in a bottom bracket assembly and the anodized aluminum pivot hardware is beautifully CNC-machined. Cable routing is all external for ease of service at the races and with grime-proof, full-run housings throughout. Molded plastic carry-through guides on either side of the shock route the rear brake hose and derailleur housing clear of the crankset area. Well-designed bolt-on rear dropouts facilitate a 142/12-millimeter through axle and the left side dropout doubles as the brake caliper mount. There is ample tire clearance in the swingarm for tires up to 2.4 inches, but a full-sized 2.5-inch DH tire might be a bit of a squeeze. Oddly, the Force frame features an interrupted seat tube that would be perfect for the internally routed hose of a RockShox Reverb Stealth seat post, but the GT design predates the Stealth, so its external dropper hose guides are located beneath the top tube, well out of range of the opening below the frame’s seat tube.

GT Force LE rear suspension
  GT's one-piece triangulated swingarm design pivots well above the largest chainring, which is the Force's secret weapon for taming rough ground.

GT Force LE frame geometry


Stand-out Components

GT chose a two-ring RaceFace Turbine crankset, outfitted with a bash ring and backed up by an e*thirteen Heim-2 chaingiude. The two-by crankset and its 36 by 24 tooth gearing is a great match for the technical terrain that the Force LE is intended to thrive in. The Turbine cranks power a Shimano Deore XT drivetrain, capped by a clutch-equipped Shadow Plus rear derailleur. Brakes are Formula’s elegant looking and powerful stopping ‘The One’ models, upgraded with in-line engagement-point adjusters and its top-range 180-millimeter rotors with aluminum spiders. Suspension is all Fox, with a 160-millimeter 34 Float CTD fork and a matching Float CTD shock. GT picked all-mountain-width Easton Haven wheels, mounted to Maxxis Ardent tires (2.4 front and 2.25-inch rear) and up top, the star of the show has to be the RockShox Reverb dropper seatpost. If you’ve read this far, you’ll probably agree that the Force LE is one of the best outfitted AM/Enduro bikes around.





About Independent Drivetrain Suspension

GT's Independent Drivetrain rear suspension takes advantage of the superior responsiveness that a high-pivot swingarm enjoys when rolling over high-amplitude impacts like square-edged bumps or large exposed roots. To negate the extreme chain growth associated with a single-pivot swingarm suspension that has such a high hinge point, the GT's bottom bracket pivots beneath the swingarm on a sturdy rocker that is connected to the frame via a compact, four-bar linkage. The linkage causes the bottom bracket to track the rear axle as the swingarm moves through its travel. Independent Drivetrain's unusual configuration eliminates chain growth and to a great degree, any negative forces that would normally be fed into the suspension because of chain tension. The slight fore-aft movement of the bottom bracket link is not noticeable and it does not alter the distance between the crankset and the saddle. The benefit of the system is that the suspension is free to track the ground in both climbing and descending situations.




Specifications
Release Date 2013
Price $5550
Travel 150 R, 160 F
Rear Shock Fox Racing Shox Float CTD
Fork Fox Racing Shox 34 Float 160 RLC FIT, 15mm axle
Headset Cane Creek Angle Set (1mm adjustment)
Cassette Shimano 11 x 36, ten speed
Crankarms RaceFace Turbine, 36/24T w/ Bashguard
Chainguide e*thirteen Heim-2
Bottom Bracket RaceFace X-Type
Pedals None
Rear Derailleur Shimano XT Shadow Plus
Chain KMC X10
Front Derailleur Shimano XT
Shifter Pods Shimano XT
Handlebar Kore OCD-TR, aluminum, 740mm Width
Stem Easton Haven 50mm
Grips FR clamp-on
Brakes Formula, The One, 180mm rotors, alloy spiders
Wheelset Easton Haven
Hubs Easton Haven
Spokes Sapim 2.0/ 1.7/ 2.0
Rim Easton Haven
Tires Maxxis Ardent 2.4" F, Ardent 2.25" R
Seat WTB Silverado Race SL
Seatpost RockShox Reverb, dropper-type, 31.6mm



GT Force LE Fox 34 Float CTD fork 160mm travel






GT Force LE
Riding Impressions

bigquotesFirst impressions of GT's premier all-mountain/Enduro bike brought mixed reactions, as it takes a few rides to unlock its secrets.


From the outset, the Force LE’s steering feels stable enough to handle rough terrain at high-speed and its suspension feels well balanced front-to rear. The bike feels tall, like an old-school all-mountain bike, probably due to in part to its 14.25-inch-high bottom bracket (measured). GT’s attention to detail, especially in choosing capable components, gives the Force LE a decisive pro-bike feel, both in the cockpit and in the bike’s handling traits. That said, however, the bike requires a particular style of riding to bring out its best performance. As testing progressed, it became clear that the Force LE favored an aggressive technique and that the word, ‘finesse’ was not to be found in its dictionary.

Setting it up: The Force LE’s rear suspension is a bit tricky, as the shock pressure needed to maintain its ride height at the recommended 25-percent sag is much higher than a typical push-on-the-saddle parking lot test suggests. More than one test rider remarked at how stiffly the rear suspension was sprung before riding the bike – and all were surprised that the suspension felt quite soft under saddle. Fox makes it simple to dial in its Float CTD fork and shock. Set the spring pressure to 25-percent sag and then dial in the rebound to suit. The CTD’s Black ‘Trail’ adjustment is handy, as it controls low-speed compression when the fork is set in Trail mode, so if you don’t agree with Fox’s pre-set compression levels in ‘Descend’ mode, you can use the black dial to find your preferred compression damping in Trail mode and then leave the blue selector lever there for the duration of your ride. Pinkbike has consistently hammered on Fox CTD forks for blowing through their travel in the Descend option. Happily, the GT favored the Descend modes on both fork and shock, and its pedaling felt efficient enough with the suspension wide-open to retain the Trail and Climb options for their intended purpose, to further enhance pedaling firmness on demand.

Climbing/acceleration: Weighing over 30 pounds, the Force LE takes a few pedal strokes to get moving and its Independent Drivetrain suspension feels a bit dim under power while on paved surfaces. Once the tires come in contact with dirt, though, the GT wakes right up. The suspension keeps the bike sailing effortlessly over minor trail chatter, so the rider can pedal and maintain momentum more effectively. Much of our testing was done in Sedona, Arizona, where many climbs are stepped with small stone ledges. Experimenting with the suspension’s three settings quickly determined that the bike’s rough-ground climbing was at its best when the fork and shock were set to the open, Descend option. The GT could then suck up square-edged hits without slowing, bumps that would arrest the upward travel of most bikes. Ascending smoother trails allowed us to make use of the firmer-feeling Trail option for the shock, but we always left the fork open. We did not like the feel of the GT in Climb mode because it caused the bike to ride higher up in the suspension travel, which tended to destabilize its low-speed balance and steering.

  Cornering on gravelly surfaces will send the Force's rear end hunting for traction. When the tire does break loose, the bike is easily controlled, but the GT could benefit from more substantial rubber.


Technical riding: The Force LE feels best at speed. The Force can get around corners quite well. It is easy to get from hard left to hard right in a series of corners, but it will skip and slide around on uneven surfaces unless its rider plants the bike firmly in the turn and holds it there. This is not an agile steering bike, so don’t bother hunting for the perfect line on the trail – it does not tolerate a rider who is light at the controls and who constantly bobs and weaves in search of perfect patches of dirt. The key to riding the Force LE is to point it at the next corner and take the straightest line. The GT will bash through and jump over almost anything in its path and the harder you charge, the more obedient the Force LE will be. It has the braking power and the suspension to back it up bold moves, but it will not tolerate indecision. Slow the bike to a crawl and start picking your way down a steep chute and you will discover the dark side of the Force – its tall bottom bracket and firm suspension will most likely push you out of your comfort zone, skidding and bouncing your way to the bottom.

Same goes for technical climbs. The GT has plenty of weight transfer to the rear tire, so loss of traction is rarely an excuse for failure. Keep a good pace or attack the climb out of the saddle and you could scratch your way up some tough sections, but the Force LE’s tallish feel, combined with suspension that is firm in its mid-stroke, make for an unwieldy bike at slow speeds. We got bounced off line in the boulders and caught flailing when rounding tight switchbacks on trail sections that seemed relatively easy aboard other bikes.

Richard Cunningham
  Get the wheels rolling and the Force LE becomes fearless in the rough. It feels balanced in the air and lands like a cat.


Downhill: The Force LE’s shining moments come at speed on downhill tracks, where it is an easy jumper and takes well to fast successions of bermed corners. The Force lands to flat or transitions with equal ease, which gives its pilot the choice to roll rock sections or to choose a big one at the lead-in and jump clear of the boulders. The bike stays at its ride height under braking, which is a good thing, but the rear suspension will feel choppy if the rear brake is dragged into a rough section. Downhill tracks are where the Force LE’s straight-line stability plays well, because as long as there is a decent run-out at the bottom, the GT can be trusted to survive a fairly nasty drop. The chassis feels quite stiff, which is a good thing, because its 66-degree head angle (65-degrees with the Cane Creek Angle Set) puts a lot of torque into the frame when threading the front wheel through boulders or shoving the bike around a tight corner. As a result, the minimal tread of its 2.25-inch Maxxis Ardent rear tire is easily overwhelmed and will break loose easily around flat turns. An edgier tire would be helpful. As fun as it is drifting around on the Force, it’s only a pleasure when the track surface is consistent. When cornering on imbedded rocks, ruts or gravel, the rear of the bike is constantly being upset. The front wheel, however, sticks firmly to the soil - shod with a larger, 2.4-inch Ardent that is more aggressively trimmed with meaty edging blocks and a flatter tread profile.

GT Force LE components - Cane Creek Angle Set RockShox Reverb seatpost Formula The One brake lever
  GT equips the Force LE with a Cane Creek Angle Set (left), but the fact that the bike feels best in the slack setting hints that the option may have been a fix. If you are going to spec a dropper post, you may as well choose the RockShox Reverb. A low-rise, 740-millimeter-wide Kore handlebar and Formula's excellent 'The One' brakes give the cockpit a pro-bike feel.


Component Report:

Cane Creek Angle Set: Good - the Force LE arrived with its one-degree Angle Set adjusted full slack, which technically results in a 65-degree head angle. We never tried the bike with the steeper option because it would have raised the bottom bracket slightly and it was a little high. Bad – the headset gave off an alarming screech every time we pounded G-outs. Grease and a re-fit of the headset eventually solved the problem.

RaceFace two-by crankset: Good – the 36/24-tooth gearing paired with an 11 x 36 cassette was low enough to move the 30-pound monster uphill at a good pace and tall enough to keep up a good head of steam on downhill tracks.

RockShox Reverb dropper post: Good – a good dropper post is a must-have on the Force because you need to get low to push the bike around corners.

Easton Haven wheelset: Good – tough, relatively lightweight and with slightly wider rims that open up the tire’s tread profile. Bad – difficult to convert to tubeless due to a deep rim well. Three wraps of Gorilla tape were needed to get the job done.

Maxxis Ardent tires: Good – 2.4-inch front tire gave excellent braking, rolling and cornering performance, and it mounted up tubeless with little effort. Bad – wimpy 2.25-inch Ardent rear tire was an unreliable pain to convert to tubeless and lacked cornering traction.

E*thirteen Heim-2 chainguide: Good – keeps the chain on when back-pedaling and it runs relatively quiet on its clever, two-step roller. Bad – we dropped the chain to the inside of the crankset, occasionally, but enough to wish we had a better chainguide.

  The GT's rear suspension makes easy work of chunky climbs, as long as they are approached with a reasonable amount of speed.


Pinkbike's take:
bigquotesGT's Force LE has a distinct personality that plays well to a hard-charging rider who has no problem throwing a bike around to obtain immediate results. Dan Atherton proves that in the hands of the right rider, the Force LE can be a screaming fast bike - but you have to be that special person to take full advantage of its attributes. The Force LE is well appointed for high-performance Enduro and all-mountain use, so outside of tuning the suspension to your liking and ditching the rear tire for something like a Minion, there are few, if any modifications that will significantly alter its performance or its personality. If you are light on the controls and prefer an intuitive-feeling bike with a good flow, search elsewhere. If you are a point-and-shoot rider who makes motorcycle noises while smashing corners, GT's Force LE could be perfect for the job.- RC



129 Comments

  • + 36
 I have a force 1.0 from a couple years back that i have basically set up like this LE. dropper post, slackened out the HT angle with reducer bushings, 2x with a bash guard, wider bars, a shorter stem, and chainguide on it (who knew me and Dan Atherton thought so much alike).Overall, if found myself agreeing with RC's review. This bike does do best at speed everywhere and plows through rough stuff. Even though i do love my Force, i've got to say that there RC kinda sugar coated the cons. That BB is REALLY high, which means you sweep a lot of technical climbs but i could go for a lower bb to have better cornering (he attributed it mainly to the tire choice but i can tell you that with a 2.35 highroller in the back, its still an issue). The bike also feels longer to me than other bikes i've owned, which makes it more stable when bombing those straight lines, but its less agile when you get to tight switchbacks. But my biggest issue with the bike is THE PIVOTS. They are super big and stiff, very easy to service and bc they use HS bearing, cheaper to overhaul BUT... this system is so exposed that after 5 rides the suspension gets noisy bc of the dirt and dust that gets in there. Look at the picture next to "about the idependent drivetrain suspension" heading. See all the caked on dust? all around and on and in those big ass pivots. That shit gets crunchy like doritos. I think that there is a balance between bearing servicibility and insulating them from the outside world, but the i-drive falls too far on the servicibility side of the spectrum. I had a giant with maestro suspension and i serviced that once a year and it newer so much as squeaked at me. With my force, i have to overhaul it every couple months or so of riding or the grinding noise just drives me nuts.
  • - 11
flag wakaba (Mar 4, 2013 at 1:36) (Below Threshold)
 Ardent tires are absolutely fine and very predictable while cornering. Bigger one is a bit tougher.
Fox shock performs quite ok in single pivot designs.

High BB and steep 66 HA tend to destabilize the ride, looks like there is too much flex and induced bearing binding in the i-drive - the BB aera looks underengineered. Oversteer is a sign that front and rear might not rotate in a predictable way and are outof alignment. Something is wrong with the design of the BB/rear suspension.
  • - 6
flag samminett (Mar 4, 2013 at 1:55) (Below Threshold)
 Theyvforgot another bad about the haven hub they like to brake and wobble alot when i say alot i mean it they are so shit hubs faulty design if u get this bike change the rear hub or you'll have a bad time
  • + 3
 yep my mate aswell .. one megavalanche .. and the hub was killed..
  • + 25
 Tldr, but really, im just glad to have a review where the writer doesnt expect every bike to act like a DH bike. Salute RC
  • + 4
 @freestylAM. If you live in dry climate (I'm from CO, but CA or AZ would be the same) the pivot creaking shouldn't be an issue. When they sell the bike they don't do the proper service so it starts to creak pretty soon, but once you get a good agricultural lube in there its fine. I've been riding pretty hard--at least once a week--for over a year without a peep, squeal, or croak. So maybe you just have to find the right lube. But I have heard that if you're in muddy conditions a lot it becomes more of an issue. Anyway, I love my force so I guess I must be a point and shoot rider, though I never really thought of it that way
  • + 3
 Bassnote - Agreed. When I built up my Force 2011 frame it creaked two rides into its life. I knew it would and was prepared to service the pivots and hasn't given me any issues since. Also there are a few tips that can be applied to keep a good portion of the dust out of the pivots if you look for them.
  • + 19
 "that shit gets crunchy like doritos"lol
  • + 1
 PM600 in the pivots FTW!
  • - 1
 GT's problem from DAY 1 is the idiotic dogbone that the entire bike's load pivots on. 2 small bushings will last about a week and then the play and other issues start. I highly advise any other bike. My own opinion fueled by 3 years of GT hell. That was fromm 99-2001 and it's 12 years later and they still bank on I-drive and a dogbone the size of a large popsickle stick.
  • + 5
 That's actually not true. The dog-bone link now is pretty darn sturdy, though it is true that the original i-drives had a ridiculous, cheap, and weak dogbone for a few years while they figured things out. So you were a little unlucky to get it so early. But 12 years is a long time, and not it's pretty bombproof
  • + 2
 I rode a GT force for a week in Durango and this review is spot on for it's performance. When it comes to descending it was either balls out or nothing at all. When you push this bike hard it truly rewards you. The best way to ride the GT Force is without brakes :-)
  • - 6
flag MadMax883 (Mar 4, 2013 at 18:41) (Below Threshold)
 65 degree headtube angle for a 150mm travel bike............ seems a little pointless with a 32mm fork and only 150mm of suspension in the back
  • + 1
 @ Bassnotesteve - I live in CO and what i have found is that our fine dust is what gets into the pivots (like that orange doritos powder in the pic). I've even gone and put O rings right on the gap where those pivots rotate and it still gets in. I've tried cleaning it all out so there is no grease near those seams, but still its grinds and squeaks. I've tried lathering on the grease in the hopes that the dust wouldn't make it past layer into the pivot, and still it finds its way in there. I don't know. If you have any suggestion i sure as heck am open to them. I will say my bike is from 2010 and it does not have the new locking collar doohicky on the pivots, and maybe that somehow would addresses my issue (please tell me if you know how it would, cuz i don't. And if not to fix the pivot noise what was the point of that anyway?). Also I'll second your comment about the dogbone. They're beefy now and no longer an issue. I worked in a shop and we had a number of the older thin rubber covered one come in broken but the new forged links are boomproof. @mojojoaf if you know of another tip for keeping the dust out of the pivots, hook me up. You'd be my hero cuz the noise is driving me nuts.
  • + 3
 It has a 34mm fork
  • + 1
 @freestylAM - I hear what you're saying about the noise driving you nuts. Even if it doesn't affect the ride quality it makes you feel like you're riding a complete piece of shit so it kinda throws off your game. There was an agricultural lube that a mech at Performance, who owns a force and works on them all the time, used on mine and it's done the job. I'm not sure exactly what it was, but here's a shot in the dark after some internet searching: Super Lube® Multi-Purpose Grease and Oil with Syncolon® (PTFE). But I'm not sure if this is the one. Maybe you could try the PM600 that shmoodiver recommends too. The other thing I've done with success when there was a minor croak was shoot Tri-Flow (make sure it's got the plastic straw on it for accuracy) right down into the pivots where the swingarm and frame meet. I do this after washing the bike. Once you get some tri-flow all around it jump on the bike and compress the suspension a bunch of times and it seems to help the lube work its way in there. Maybe I'm just lucky but this has pretty much completely solved the problem for me. And I'm not the kind of guy that keeps his bike super clean and maintained all the time either. I haven't disassembled the i-drive in like 18 months and it's still buttery. Good luck with yours. Hopefully you didn't just get stuck with a lemon.
  • + 1
 @freestylAM again - If none of this sounds promising let me know and I can try to ask the mechanic about the exact lube he used
  • + 1
 I had a 09 Sanction for about 1/2 a season. I hated how the distance from BB to handlebars/seat changed when pedaling hard or on rough sections. It made lots of noise. It was hard to maneuver. It was only good for jumping.
  • + 23
 I don't normally post comments on atricles, but I've got to say... Even for a simple bike write-up, Pinkbike's photography is world-class! Great work.
  • + 2
 Agreed. They choose some amazing photos -- both overall action shots and product detail pics. Smile
  • + 18
 Another great bike ruined by Fox CTD

I have a 2009 force one and don't have these issues now the Fox is gone. Why don't reviewers just say its no good having to keep faffing with dials all the way round the trail? Are you all scared of Fox? Are they the mafia?
  • + 5
 Not surprising too me that you got neg-propped for this, but people seem to have an allegiance to brands that's just plain ludicrous.

That said, considering the article says, "combined with suspension that is firm in its mid-stroke", it seems they were seeing the same things you were before junking the junk Fox CTD.

But oh well..... I'll get neg-propped too I'm sure.
  • + 0
 I actually like the CTD rear shock, but the fork is just a f#@ing joke. The newer CTD forks are not up to par to say the least. FYI, I currently ride a 2012 Yeti SB-95 with updated 2013 Fox CTD on them as my reference.
  • + 3
 I agree with pwcutajar. I have a 2010 force 1.0 and the thing I love most about it is that once you get the suspension set you don't have to mess with it. Like RC says in the review, even climbing is best done when shock is in open-mode. So you can leave the suspension in one setting all day long. If you're a gearhead this bike probably isn't for you, but if you just wanna ride it's great. The only time I use pro-pedal on my RP23 (or CTD or whatever you wanna call it) is if I'm riding a paved or dirt road on the way to the trail.
  • + 1
 Thanks for the support.
  • + 17
 I take issue with the phrase "30 pound monster". I really don't think 30lbs is that big of a deal. Just my two cents. Most of us can't afford a 25# 6" trail whip.
  • + 1
 Being close to 30 pounds or more is only cool if it is a 29er, with less than 140mm of travel front and back.
  • + 2
 @ampa Are you saying 30# is *good*? I don't understand.

From this article, it's as if PB is demonizing a 30# bike. In reality, a 6" FS alloy-frame 26" bike with all of the modern amenities like a telescoping post, tubeless, high-end wheels, wide alum bars, a bash guard, a proper 6" fork, and a full drivetrain is easily 30 pounds yet pretty affordable, and completely usable as an all-day bike. It sounded to me from the article like the GT needed to be lighter to be a contender.

To me a(nother) reason to shy away from 29ers is that it's even more challenging to create a big-wheel bike with usable travel, durable and light wheels at this weight figure. So if that's what you're saying, I agree somewhat. But I'd want more than 140mm travel. I'm waiting for the next crop of long-travel FS 29ers, like the Mason FS and the Enduro 29er.
  • + 3
 @sngltrkmnd

That was meant as sarcasm bro. RC loves his 29ers and raves about them, and fails to mention that the lightest and highest end trail (not even all-mountain) 29er builds are rarely under 27 pounds. But the one time he is reviewing a massive travel 26" meant to take the huge hits, he knocks the 30 pound weight.
  • + 2
 @ampa - oh! gotcha. thanks for the clarification.

it seems like reviews of affordable 29ers rarely ever discuss the weight penalty of the bigger hoops.
  • + 11
 My only problem is that, RC is better looking than the bike!!
  • - 3
 Big Grin Even with that ugly ass helmet!
  • - 3
 Sorry, accidental negative rep. Meant to positive rep your comment.
  • + 7
 Had an idrive 5 for 4 years, nothing bad to say about it except the price, when i bought my bike it was fair priced but since then and especially since the athertons stared to ride gt the prices shot up.
now that i have a titus el guapo , i can tell you that fsr climbs better than i drive , on the downhill side of things the idrive was amazing, that is until a weld broke (rear triangle) and the lifetime warranty promised turned out to be warranty on the stickers not the frame, that's when i got the el guapo! (800$ frame!).

its a great bike but not at the 5k range!.
  • + 4
 Agreed, flogged my GT hardtail for many years and loved it, but bought a 2013 Reign 1 for $3,000 less than what this bike goes for. RRP difference is ~2.5K. For sure the components are better on the GT, but the difference between SLX and XT seems to be pretty small.
  • + 9
 I agree. At 5500.00, it seems like you're not getting a lot of bike for the money. I think I rather get me one of these for that type of money...


www.specialized.com/us/en/bikes/mountain/endurofsr/enduroexpertevo
  • + 1
 Aibek,

Still tuning my El Guapo, So I'm curious about a few things (If you're happy with your setup) What rear shock are you running? and you mention that the GT was amazing on the DH side, do you find the EG to be less so, even accounting for the 1 degree steeper head angle? I'm thinking about an angleset for mine.
  • + 0
 Running the stock rockshox monarch rt3 that came with it, not overjoyed with it as i have to run it at max pressure to get 30% sag (i'm heavy Smile ), the gt seemed to take big hits better even with a fox float. (i like my bike setup pretty hard front and back)
my gt was a large frame and the EG is medium so i think it is the main reason why i felt the gt was amazing downhill.
as for the 1 deg i ran 160mm fork(55's) on the gt so i got a slacker than stock head angle.

long story short i think i just need to get used to my EG and maybe loose some weight and/or replace the monarch .
and for the price that i got it i really cant complain.
  • + 1
 I have a el guapo built up with a older rp23 on it. we run it at 30% sag and it rides really good. But last year I rode a GT Distortion and it felt so good by far the best all mountain bike i have had. it has all the things the force needs except unwanted rear travel. The bb is low the head angle is slack and the bike flat out rips singletrack. The only down side to the Distortion is frame weight.
  • + 1
 So you might have been close to 65 degree, instead of the EG's 67? Yea, that would account partially for it feeling like a better decender. As far as shocks go, the problem I'm finding is that if it works good for climbing, it feels too stiff decending, and vice versa. Tried the RT3 and a DHX air on it so far. I'm thinking about rebuilding the RT3, though: there's lots of anecdotes online about the quality control on the RT3's being off, and that they don't really ride correctly unless you rebuild it or buy it from Push. Supposedly, it's really simple, too.
  • + 1
 We use ours as a spare bike so it doesnt get ridden that much build a titus ftm carbon for my wife with dt shock iam curious to see how it rides. Some are running db airs and having good luck with them. A X fusion Vector air would be another I would try. Ya it was at 65 or 66 i ran a 150 fork on my distortion. I think most of it was the low bb of the bike that made it feel so good.
  • + 2
 Only problem with the DB Air is the cost...
  • + 6
 I ride a 2008 Sanction, which is almost the same frame, but with a steeper headangle (67deg). RC's suggested riding style definitely suits me, and the chunk-swallowing climbing in an open shock is very well known to me Smile
However, I'm pretty sure that most cons can be attributed to 2 simple causes: The whimpy rear tire, and the CTD shock @25% sag!
I ride my sanction with a Manitou Evolver ISX-6 with at least 30% sag, and it's just great! I just don't get why these tough enduro bikes are being set up with XC platform dampers anyway...the 150gr they save?
  • + 2
 Great points!

And my experience says you are right on the money concerning sag! In Super D's, this should be more of an issue since those have sections where you have to pedal AND some downhill as well.

But for Enduro nobody is timed going up so why keep the XC setup when it's time to point the rig downhill?
  • + 1
 Two One - also agree with you that I am riding my 2011 GT Force with 30% sag and still get exceptional climbing out of it. I am riding the still stock Fox Float, with nothing more than rebound damping and spring pressure as adjustments. Its an excellent all mountain rig in the very best sense.
  • + 2
 I have a 2012 Sanction 1 and installed a volume reducer in the Fox RP23. Turned the bike from a falling rate feel to a progressive rising rate feel. Soft at first and feels bottomless. I have only ridden DH bikes since 2000 and this bike fits my riding perfectly. It goes up just good enough to get me to the top. It goes down just like a light weight DH bike, stable, jumps shreds corners if you push hard. I have even taken it to the local DJs. I have so much confidence in this bike I hardly remember why I have a DH bike. The 65deg head angle and Fox 36 is a great combo. I also have the wimpy rear tire and dont have any issues with it, even on the shore in the pissing rain. This bike really gives me a wood!
www.pinkbike.com/photo/8937768
  • + 2
 Volume reducer would be a good fix, because it you set the bike up with 30% sag it gets through its travel too easily. Good call.
RC
  • + 1
 Thanks for both replies. Will look into getting a kit.
  • + 6
 This review sums up much the way I felt about my force. It bombed through rough stuff but certainly was NOT the most finesse of bikes. I never ever got rid of that noisy squeak...tired everything in the book and eventually just lived with it. I had the bike for 3 years, got it new and used it extensively in a riding environment that is best described as a rocky, bone jarring and bike wrecking and it delivered reluctantly, but as RC mentions this is for those riders willing to sacrifice the sophistication of the latest high tech smooth sailing engineering marvels. I personally think its massively overpriced for the performance on offer and age of the tech on offer. When I heard Dan won a Enduro series on this bike I must admit I was seriously surprised and can only pinpoint it to his incredible riding abilities. Was it the exact production version bike? It rides seriously high. It would be very far down my list of Enduro bike choices 2013 and to be frank my Trek 9.9 Modified fuel 140mm up font with reverb, floats, jumps, climbs and does everything so much better than the Force its left me wondering why GT still uses this old design. And the Trek is not the latest tech either. Compared to the latest bikes the Force needs a complete upgrade, the rear end is sorely lacking and that creak!!!!! Nice picsSmile Love the Tree shot on red soil.
  • + 4
 RC or anyone else - please explain how a 150mm travel MTB costs the same or more in many cases than an moto-x bike. Is it because they really cost so much to produce or is it because MTB is fashionable and the market allows bike co's to sell them for infalted prices...
  • + 2
 yes that right
  • + 3
 Mx bikes are produced on much larger scales, so production cost will be much lower because of scale of economy. Also, it is much more expensive to produce strong, light weight parts. Mx bikes don't have to worry so much about weight, so the strength to weight ratio on mtb's is much higher.
  • + 2
 MX bikes are pushing 10K right now. You get aluminum bars, non lock on grips, basic pedals etc at that price. Comparing a 8 or 9k pedal bike to a moto would be like comparing to one of the race tuned bikes that are over 100k.
  • - 1
 Um, you forgot the cost of transporting the MX bike.

You need a truck, jeep or trailer.(5k-50k)
A bike only needs a $500 rack.
  • + 4
 More negative props for presenting verifiable information instead of fantasy.
  • + 0
 Willie you are correct. 8 or 9 grand will get you a CRF450R ... but it won't be exactly race ready. For that coin you can ride the same bike Gwin rode to victory all last year. So yeah, there is a bit of a diff. Also, like someone else mentioned the market is much bigger. Also, you are also talking about Honda, a company that dwarfs even the biggest mountain bike companies in it's size and scale of operations. Tooling costs for making these engines and frames are already largely in place. Mountain Biking is a rapidly evolving high-tech niche market. It's expensive. No way around that. But having said that, to put things in perspective.... You can have a very capable bike these days for much less than you ever could before. The good stuff trickles down.
  • + 1
 Some people MX some MTB. I wouldnt pay 9 for a MX. Id get one a year old for 4. You can probably pick up a new GT Force LE at the end of the season for 3. Just ride what you want and be smart when you buy.
  • + 1
 @ Darkstar

"The good stuff trickles down". Beautiful and eloquent wording right there. Smile
  • + 3
 I could be wrong but I think Dan runs his bike with a lowered BB compared to the stock bike, so it's maybe not just you who finds the standard geometry a little high. I guess one of the advantages of the rear being a straight single pivot is it makes that kind of thing much easier to tune if you want to though.
  • + 3
 I ride a GT Distortion (quite similar to a Force). I totally agree with PB regarding these bike. If you like the putt around and just go for a leisurely cruise on the trail, this isn't the bike for you. I had a tough time finding a bike that fit my riding style: a bike that could be pedaled uphill, and still perform when being pushed aggressively. I have finally found it with the distortion. The harder I push the bike the better it rides. It climbs quite well, and the weight doesn't bother me because it absolutely charges downhill. If you ride in attack position all the time, and you charge the trail, you'll be pleasantly surprised. I am in love with my distortion. I'm sure the Force LE is an incredible bike as well.

Great photos, and thanks for the review. I'm a huge fan of the GT I-drive, and it's good to see it getting some exposure.
  • + 3
 Honestly, I bought a brand new 2012 GT Sanction 1.0 a couple of months ago, my third I.Drive GT and love it. Suggestion, never pay retail price, shop around for bargains.
Before I owned a 2011 GT Sensor 1.0 (no squeak from the pivot) and a 2011 GT Force 1.0 (which I heavily rode for a year, with no squeaks from the pivot).
I love the I.Drive, and as long as you take good care of it, it will work fine.

2012 was the last year GT produced the Sanction. In 2013 they just renamed the Sanction 1.0 as Force LE. The 2012 Sanction 1.0 is a similar bike, probably has better specs than the 2013 Force LE, since the Sanction came with an XTR derailleur with clutch, a 36 Fox Float 160 without the CTD business, and the same CaneCreek angleset and RS reverb found in the LE.
I agree with the test report about the riding style required, but it makes me want to go faster,
Having owned and ridden for a while GTs, I can say that this one feels much more well set than the regular Force, probably because of the slacker angle and longer wheelbase, and I have yet to find a terrain that will stop her, steep downhills full of broken rocks are a piece of cake at speed with this baby.
On the negative side I miss the 2.4 Ardent I had on my 2011 Force, but that is an easy fix, and the coil shock I put on the rear suspension, I am looking to upgrade to a DSP Dueler once available in the 7,5 x 2 size required. Everything else is as tough as it can be, and I am happy to keep on buying these bikes.
  • + 1
 Me too. Soooooooo stoked on the Sanction 1.0. Mine creaked like an old tree but I have been riding in soppy north shore muk. I tool apart the pivots and drop outs. Put a liberal coating of regular old bearing grease and put it all together. Silent and smooth.
For me I found it blew through rear travel too much. Now I run a volume spacer in the RP23 and it feels a lot more like my DH bike. Best mod ever. Try this before you swap shocks. www.jensonusa.com/Fox-Float-Volume-Spacer-Kit
I ride this thing like my DH. Just dont need the truck to get to the top anymore.
  • + 3
 Ok. I own this bike (well, Gt force, not force Le) and this review sugarcoats the hell out of it. Not only did I manage to crack the original frame (incredibly common problem with this design) but it creaks more than any other bike I've ever ridden, unless you completely disassemble and reassemble the idrive suspension. I've done every trick in the book to get it to where I want it, and the stock geometry on the Force, is crap. 69 degree head angle, really? So, after putting on reverb, db air, fox 36, and cane creek angleset, I've turned a slow responding, bad at going downhill, trail bike into a overall pretty good, enduro bike. Like it or not, this is a mediocre bike at best, and there are much better bikes and designs out there, especially for almost 6 grand.
www.pinkbike.com/photo/9233488 So, after far too many upgrades, its still a mediocre trail all mountain bike. If I had to do it all again, I'd have gotten a bike with a better design, that didn't crack on me after only a year of riding.
  • + 6
 Wow, Great photos there Ian...RC goes EuroEnduroFluoro!
  • + 2
 I've owned 2 Mongooses and 1 GT Sanction which are all running on the Idrive/Freedrive system.
both are amazing systems especially for uphill but can get a little stiff and harsh for the downhills.
and like many others who owned a GT, the pivots are CRAP as they produce really loud 'cracking' sound after a few rides.
GT should look into this problem which is the reason why many (including me) riders do not prefer to own a GT.
  • + 2
 • Easton Haven wheelset: Good – tough, relatively lightweight and with slightly wider rims that open up the tire’s tread profile. Bad – difficult to convert to tubeless due to a deep rim well. Three wraps of Gorilla tape were needed to get the job done.

-Aren't Havens UST? No tape required.
  • + 2
 No tape needed for UST tires but hardly anybody actually runs UST spec tires anymore. To use a Tubeless Ready tire, which doesn't conform to the UST bead standards, you need to build the rim up so they have a tight fit. RC probably should have clarified that you need 3 layers of tape for TL-Ready tires.
  • + 3
 Really?? Negative props for explaining the difference between tubeless ready and ust tires? I wonder if PB adopted the same change mtbr did where you can see exactly who is giving you props, if a lot less people would leave negatives if they could no longer hide their doing so.
  • + 1
 Three layers of Gorilla tape has got to weigh close to a tube.......hmmmmm, lol. Yeah deelight they had that for awhile. I think it was muddling things up because people were just propping back and forth at each other. Like you neg prop me Ill neg prop you, you know, childish stuff that Pinkbike is not usually known for ..... Wink
  • + 5
 Oh boy I pee'd in somebody's cheerios.
  • + 0
 I've run two different Conti's and a Schwalbe on my Haven wheels. Didn't use any tape or a rim strip, just the bare rim. None were UST, all were tubeless-ready.
  • + 0
 Problem with TL-Ready tires is that they're still primarily just tube designed tires that happen to have an extra inner-casing layer of rubber designed to hold air when employing a liquid sealant as well as a somewhat better fitting bead lip. They still require a tight bead seat fit to seal properly though, not to mention the right sealant mix to literally glue the beads in place. Notubes sealant for example is great for sealing the beads, and not so great for sealing the tires themselves. Other sealants are often great at sealing tires, but not so good with sealing the beads. I've got TLR labeled Schwables which have so many pinholes in the casing that it takes days of constant re-inflation, and shaking of the tires to get the casings to finally seal up and hold air for longer than an hour long ride. I finally had to resort to paintbrushing the sealant onto the casing while the tire was unmounted, and letting it dry so that it forms a complete extra layer of latex rubber inside the casing so it would be air-tight.

UST tires are designed to fit tight perfectly every time, and don't require any sort of sealant at all to retain air. The tires have stiffer casings and often weigh significantly (50% extra is pretty typical) more than regular tube-type versions of the same tires.
  • + 3
 For the record, To get the Maxxis tires to inflate on the Haven wheels, I needed to raise the height of the rim's well to better contact the tire beads and start a seal. The larger 2.4" front tire was easier to inflate, the 2.2 rear was more difficult. I have had good luck mounting other brands of tires on the same rims. By contrast, almost any tire will mount up to a Stan's rim, so there is a design variation that Easton apparently uses that is not as well optimized for tubeless conversions.
RC
  • + 2
 For all of the pros and cons of the pivots, the linkage, etc and whatever else, RC nailed down GT's general philosophy when he said "Get the wheels rolling and the Force LE becomes fearless in the rough. It feels balanced in the air and lands like a cat."

There may be many reasons not to buy any number of bikes out there. However, I bought my GT carbon Fury for a few great reasons: at-speed pedal efficiency, balance, handling and stability. She's agile, fast and feels oh-so-good... GT makes great bikes and the Force is another one of those great bikes. You have to be prepared for certain eventualities, such as pivot lubing, etc.

Obviously, I drink plenty of the punch. Wink
  • + 1
 I've had my Force for a few years now. 5 years I think. The review is spot on for me even with my bike being a 2008. I have ran it with many different tire sizes and it likes the beefier ones better. I have a set of Pythons 2.0 on there right now and the bike isn't the same as if I ran the Nevegals or pythons in a 2.3. I gotta put the meatier tires back on there. As for the creaking, I think I solved the issues with mine. I had the rear stays removed and powdercoated and I installed some o-rings from my local hardware store around the front pivots. It's been over a year since I heard the creaking and I've only serviced it once. The powdercoating is alot tougher and slightly thicker than regular paint so there's no debris or dust getting in there to cause the creaking. It's my favorite bike to take on nasty rocky trails.
  • + 1
 After coming back and reading this again I can't help but wonder if the reviewers ride impressions of the bike were the direct result of the "stiff" rear setup.

"More than one test rider remarked at how stiffly the rear suspension was sprung before riding the bike..."

Then....

"Cornering on gravelly surfaces will send the Force's rear end hunting for traction. When the tire does break loose, the bike is easily controlled, but the GT could benefit from more substantial rubber."

"An edgier tire would be helpful. As fun as it is drifting around on the Force, it’s only a pleasure when the track surface is consistent. When cornering on imbedded rocks, ruts or gravel, the rear of the bike is constantly being upset"

It seems to me that the suspension was too stiff, just as hinted at in the first quote. That said, the 2nd and 3rd quotes are the results of this. Blaming it on the tire isn't really fair. Tire choice can go a long way to help with this issue, and if you prefer a stiff setup in the rear, then a different tire pretty much is the only solution for introduction more compliance into the system.

The problem with a stiff shock setup and too little or too stiff of a tire is that there is not enough give or compliance in the system to absorb the small stuff that warranted the 2nd and 3rd quotes. Now the tire can't even stay in contact with the ground consistently enough to maintain traction, which results in it skating across the surface. Or drifting as we like to call it.

This also explains why the bike started to "make more sense" as the speed went up and you elected to choose the straightest lines through corners.

All that said, I would seriously bet that a different shock AND a different rear tire could give this bike the ability to carve and maintain traction while losing none of the ability to ride it with just plain brute force.
  • + 1
 " Bad – difficult to convert to tubeless due to a deep rim well. Three wraps of Gorilla tape were needed to get the job done."

Why is this "bad" according to RC? Some of us are perfectly happy using tubes.
If you want to go tubeless just get a UST Wheel and UST tire and do it right.

But don't knock the bike for not being able to "ghetto convert" to something it may not have been technically designed for in the first place.
  • + 1
 Unless you slime up, riding a bike with tubes in Sedona is not going to be a long journey. Lots of pointy bits. Even then, pinch flats are frequent and Slime usually fails to seal PFs. We had five punctured tubes in less than 20 minutes sessioning a steep uphill. Just sayin' RC
  • + 3
 " If you are a point-and-shoot rider who makes motorcycle noises while smashing corners, GT's Force LE could be perfect for the job"
Big Grin made my day !
  • + 1
 I think it is a good looking bike, would be nice to see a carbon version of this frame. The price seems a little steep to me. I have a classic triple triangle hard tail in my garage, I love a good GT. But for $5500 I can get an XT build on a carbon frame with a better fork for the same $$ (Yeti, Santa Cruz, Intense) at my local bike shop. Still a good looking bike love the choice of bars, would not want the angle set head set (have not heard good things) especially if the bikes straight geometry was the one I settled on. Imagine some green Industry Nine Wheels on this bad boy!
  • + 1
 Good review RC! Refreshing to read a non-biased review of a bike and how it rides and handles demanding terrain in real life. I felt like this was an honest and good review with good pros and cons that was appreciated to hear. I have had a similar experience with the products listed above as well. I will be in Sedona too in less than a week with new ride on board and interested to see how it will handle the unique terrain as well.
  • + 3
 Nice bike with very solid build. But for sake of being accurate - Easton doesn't make a 50mm Haven stem. It's most likely a 55mm
  • + 2
 The spec is remarkably similar to my Lapierre spicy 516 which only cost me £3100. Stem, cranks mechs, suspension front and rear, I even got a reverb stealth?
  • + 2
 There are like zero GT's in BC, why is that? More shops should supply these, every shop sells the same crap up here everything is the same no real variety at all
  • + 1
 I was considering a used 2013 Force LE, but after reading the reviews and the comments about the rear suspension service issues, I think I'll give the bike a pass. Thanks to all who helped me make an informed decision.
  • + 0
 Nice right up, gave me some interesting insight in my bike. I have 2006 idrive sz small that I built up over time.I got the frame new for 150$
Im running 140marz, 1/4 inch shorter rp23, a steve peat styule cut nev in the front.I have it set up as 2x9 (24/38- 11/34) with x9 derailleurs and xo shifters,720 bar,60mm stem. On an mavic wheel set.
I find riding it at slow it is def awkward. When I relax my grip on the dh's and just point it and let it go it seems to be very predictable and bomb over roots and rocks that make me cringe. Oh yeah brakes who needs brakes , it likes speed..
  • + 0
 I have a Force with a Rockshox, Sram and Avid set-up and am loving it so far. They are absolutely right about high speed stability - I hit Inners downhill and felt so much more in control at speed. The bike just worked.
  • + 1
 Sweet rig. Great review! I've ridden GTs for most my life.
I have a Force LE for sale here: www.pinkbike.com/buysell/1265787
  • + 3
 Very nice, I got to touch one when Gee did the fox hunt Smile
  • + 0
 Seems like a good bike, although not cheap. It's just not my riding style. When I try to plow straight ahead, I tend to end up in the bushes and off the bike.
  • + 2
 Can we get a video of RC riding ?
  • + 1
 BB to high .. Oh and Fox if it aint broke don't fix it unless it really works and, CTD, FYI guy's don't work
  • + 1
 I can see that the higher bb would be helpful in allowing the rider to pedal through more stuff... Being faster... My low bb all mountain bike doesn't like me to get on the gas when the trail is rough and the suspension is in mid stroke or deeper... Maybe it helped Mr Atherton win?
  • + 0
 So it's heavy and cumbersome? Just goes to show how good a rider Dan Atherton actually is. Imagine how fast he would've gone on a really good bike...
  • + 4
 Pure speculation, so don't take this as a complete disagreement...
Perhaps Dan, being from a downhill background and being somewhat fitter than most actually finds this bike pretty agile. I guess we'd have to see one of his setups to say for sure but from what I've noticed, actual enduro racing only really counts on the downhill time so naturally the sacrifices would be on the climbing performance. The negatives noted in the article probably translate into confidence once up to race speed... Which is likely the goal.
I'm interested to hear what you would see as a "really good bike".
I think you're right, the average trail rider probably wouldn't suit this bike but I think someone with a strong downhill skills would see it differently.
  • + 4
 It was more of a joke comment to big up Affy. One of my favourite riders - hoping he has a really good season in the new series. Joking aside, you're almost certainly right. I'm sure the GT would be a bit of a slog for most ordinary riders to have as their only bike - that weight would start to make itself felt on really long rides - but for enduro it probably isn't such a big deal. That said, 31lbs is pretty porky - that's a full 5lbs heavier than the new S-Works Enduro. I'm sure Dan will be able to handle a heavier bike - he used to ride DH, after all - but that doesn't mean he wouldn't be faster on a much, much lighter bike. It may only be a tiny bit faster, but in a race setting, that can make all the difference...
  • + 1
 Yeh no doubt! That guys style on a bike is only outdone by his style on a bike in the air! That vid with them in the quarry is nutty. I'm pretty pumped to see this next season of enduro. I'm surprised gt hasn't tried to push a 650 or a 29er on him yet cause everyone knows those bikes are gonna win all the races this year....haha.
  • + 1
 Now who's joking... Wink
  • + 1
 @silocycle... Wait for sea otter press releases. The 650b models will be revealed then including dan's new enduro bike.
  • + 1
 I don't doubt your insights deeeight, it was more a poke at those who preach it like a gospel. I'd be game for a go on the mid size. I've come to a personal conclusion on the wagons though, through trial. One thing I know for sure is that the bike I'm on rocks my world! I don't ever bitch at her cause she didn't roll over this or that easier, and honestly I'm usually trying to slow down to get my technique right anyways.
Don't ever change mate, I apreciate your knowledge even if I don't see it quite the same.
Ya dig?
  • + 2
 That s-works enduro seems almost too light. I am curious to see what the long term reviews of the bike end up saying about its durability. The weight if the Gt doesn't seem to be that much considering my bike weighs a pound less due to carbon, but also doesn't have a bash guard and chain guide.
  • + 1
 Yeh, I wouldn't consider my bike heavy either but it just weighed in the same as the gt. Even after a 4hour XC ride I've not thought it heavy. I do know where I can loose a pound or so but those changes will be made for other reasons anyways. I guess I gotta start paying more attention to all these numbers...
Saidrick, what drivetrain are you running without a guide? Clutch rear mech?
  • + 1
 X-9, 2x10 with the clutch.
  • + 2
 love this bike,one of the best (:
  • + 0
 @RC I thought I heard that GT was planning a carbon version of this bike, which would bring the weight down closer to other similar bikes. Do you know if this is true?
  • + 0
 Nope. The Force Carbon's you're talking about have the original force geometry--a lot steeper and a sort of XC/AM mix. So I was wondering if they're making a carbon version of the LE with a 66 degree HA and such. I agree that the force carbon is a great bike though
  • + 1
 www.bikeavenue.de/b2c/GT-Force-LE-Carbon-MTB-Fully-All-Mountain-160mm-2013_1
At a quick glance it comes with the same geo as the standard force, and a CC angleset to give it a degree either way. 160mm fork and a few other goodies, but otherwise same frame as far as I can see(?)...
  • + 0
 whats up with those cables? should go with internal ones would give it a cleaner look, nice bike tho almost bought one but than i found my pitch :-)
  • + 1
 Aluminum, Non-Kashinma, needing frequent service....doesn't seem promising.
  • + 2
 cool!
  • + 1
 been waiting for this one for some time now !!!
  • + 1
 RC and a 26er, sitting on a tree, K.. I.. S..S... .... I forget the rest.
  • + 2
 Sexy mix of colors
  • + 2
 Amazing bikes!
  • + 0
 yet again another over price america (taiwan) mtbbike
  • + 2
 take up skateboarding if you can't ante up son
  • + 0
 I swear i saw that at Wall-Mark
  • + 0
 *Wall-Mart
  • + 1
 Too damn much.
  • + 0
 The center of mass always looks so high on these bikes.
  • + 1
 Yup. Looks only. Its the weird high pivot and I drive. The BB is still fine.
  • - 1
 You could have a Specialized Enduro EVO for this kind of money. From what I've read, it just doesn't quite seem worth it.
  • - 1
 why would you go downhill if you can go uphill?
If its not a hardtail carbon 29er its gay
  • + 0
 Why ride all that bumpy dirty crap when you can ride on the road?
  • + 0
 Excuse me I meant *nice WRITE up* not right up....
  • + 0
 Does aonyone else think this looks like a trek!? lol Razz
  • + 1
 Hahahahaha! Just like a Session 88!
  • - 1
 like it...

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