2013 Scott Gambler - First Ride

Jul 31, 2012
by Matt Wragg  
 
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FIRST RIDE
2013 SCOTT Gambler
WORDS Matt Wragg
PHOTOS Will Walker

Scott has set its sights on the World Cup Downhill this year and the effort is spearheaded by an all-new chassis with a single-pivot suspension that drives the shock through a novel-looking 'Floating Link' design. Scott's 2013 Gambler was revealed January in prototype form at San Romolo in Northern Italy, and saw its racing debut under Brendan Fairclough in South Africa. The production version is now finalized and we were invited to Chatel in the Portes du Soleil for a first-ride on the new Gambler on the slopes where it was developed. Product manager Ben Walker was on hand to explain the Gambler's rule-breaking high-pivot suspension and the unique process with which the team at Scott used to re-design the bike from the ground up.


Scott's Ben Walker Explains the New Gambler

Views: 37,718    Faves: 139    Comments: 12



High-Pivot Swingarm

Compare the new Gambler to other downhill bikes with single-pivot swingarms and you may notice that its main pivot location is higher than most. The accepted logic in frame design is that a high-pivot swingarm creates excessive chain growth which causes unwanted pedal feedback. The benefit of the high-pivot swingarm, however, is that it handles severe impacts like rock gardens and square-edge bumps better. Ben tested a wide range of suspension theories to see what they actually did out on the trail and in 2010, he started moving the swingarm pivot higher to improve big hit absorption, and then experimented with idlers and pulleys to help improve how well the bike braked and pedal better with today's low bottom bracket heights. Scott's design team built a number of prototypes to explore the limits of the swingarm's pivot placement and tested them with with riders of different levels. What they found was that the negative pedal feedback and braking issues that conventional suspension theory predicted didn't matter as much in a downhill situation and that unanimously, testers preferred the high-pivot placement.

Ben working.
  Product manager Ben Walker smoked everyone who showed up to ride the bike. He's the real deal.


Floating Linkage

On first glance the Gambler's shock linkage looks incredibly complicated, but once you look closely at the bike, its simplicity becomes apparent. Scott uses a pair of rockers to control the shock rate so it doesn't ramp up too quickly. The floating linkage (cunningly called their “Floating Linkage” system) is an idea that is not entirely new – Astrix used a similar idea a few years back. Ben explains that the Floating Linkage minimizes the amount of rotation at each link, which reportedly increases small-bump sensitivity. The shock placement inside the frame also keeps mud from packing up in the suspension, which can add a considerable amount of weight to a bike on a muddy course.

Details of the shock and linkage.
  The Gambler's Floating Linkage (left) allows the swingarm to drive a longer-stroke shock which makes the suspension easier to tune. A look at the chip at the lower shock mount (right) used to adjust the bottom bracket height.


Adjustability is something Scott wanted to build into the Gambler's design - and it has a full range of options: 15 millimeters of wheelbase adjustment at the dropout; one degree at the head angle; ten millimeters of bottom bracket height via a two-position chip at the lower shock mount; and an additional one or two-degree head angle option is available using Syncros' angle-adjust headsets. This means you can rake the Gambler's head angle way out to 60 degrees, or bring it in as steep as 65 degrees. Scott's idea is that the Gambler can be fine-tuned to whatever track is in front of you.

The dropout system.
  Scott's IDS-X eccentric rear-axle system offers two positions for quick wheelbase changes. The off-center axle prevents the shaft from twisting under torsional loads, while the tapered head acts as a second locking mechanism.


It becomes apparent that the Gambler has been designed by someone who rides a lot. That someone is again Ben Walker. Take the rear dropouts – Ben found that his were continually coming loose smashing out run-after-run, day-after-day. With some help from a machinist friend, he developed the IDS-X rear dropout system, which uses an concentric axle as well as locking tapers at each nut to key the through axle into the frame. Now the Gambler's axle can (and does) handle hitting the Champery World Cup track ten times a day (Champery is one of the tracks Ben is responsible for in his other job as a trail builder). The suspension pivots are easily serviced and the cables and hoses are external so they can be replaced quickly.

Scott USA Gambler geometry


Riding the Gambler

I was given free reign for two days to put the Gambler up against whatever I could find in the hills around Chatel and Morgins. With some help from Fox we set the bike in the lowest, slackest setting (what’s the point of going into the Alps with a downhill bike if you’re not going to go for it, right?), the short setting on the chainstays and a firm, fast tune on the suspension. At first I struggled to sum up what I experienced in those two days, but a friend put it into words. On the first morning, we headed for one of the 'less official' trails. It was a technical, steep line with ugly roots, wet mud and virtually nothing on-camber (there are local names for it - 'Brendan’s Track' is one of them - which seems quite appropriate). After a morning of dodging trees and saving high-sides on near-vertical chutes, the friend said, “you seemed pretty comfortable on the bike.” And that’s the nut. On that first ride, I wasn't thinking about the bike or how it rode, I was trying to see how far I dare hold the throttle open on that kind of terrain.

Testing the Gambler.
  We set the Gambler up for Chatel's most difficult downhill trails, but the Scott's easy handling was equally suited for park riding.


The Gambler is easy to get on with. Many linkage-driven single-pivot bikes work well when you’re at race pace, but when you back off the gas they stop being fun to ride. The new Gambler doesn’t do that. When you start working the bike, it rewards you with quick, decisive handling - and yet it remains neutral and enjoyable when you’re taking it easy. Scott states that, with a less aggressive tune on the suspension, the Gambler will be suitable for nearly any level of rider. On longer descents I did start to notice some leg-pump, and whether this comes down to that extra bit of tension from the pedal feedback in the suspension design or physical condition would be hard to tell without back-to-back runs on different bikes. I would have to agree with Ben that on the whole, I didn't notice much pedal feedback and for a bike this low, I did not catch the pedals and bottom bracket as much as I expected I would.

Testing the Gambler.
  The Gambler's high-pivot rear suspension was designed to level the rock gardens and roots of World Cup DH racing.


In the comments around the launch of the Gambler, some asked about the need for a 62-degree head angle. We’d say it’s a good thing – we are encouraged to see a company as big as Scott pushing World Cup geometry. Downhill bikes are supposed to be the extreme evolution of our sport. Of course, when you take the bike away from the big mountains, a 62-degree head angle and a slammed bottom bracket setting may be overkill, but with all of the adjustments in the Gambler's frame, most riders will be able to find the perfect balance for the terrain at hand. Sticking our necks out, we’d say that if you can’t find a suitable setup in that range (60-65 degrees), maybe you should be asking questions about whether a downhill bike is what you need for the trails and speeds you are riding at.

Pinkbike's take:
bigquotesScott developed the new Gambler to be a World Cup contender that is versatile enough to be enjoyed by any good downhiller. The fact that we could simply get on it and ride hard indicates that Scott's team has achieved that goal. After only two days on the bike, though, we are left with more questions: Will the Gambler hold up to daily abuse? What is it like on different terrain? After my short time with the Gambler, I am confident enough to say that Ben Walker and the Scott team have created a top-level downhill bike. - Matt Wragg

www.scott-sports.com



The 2013 Scott Gambler




182 Comments

  • + 57
 I love how in the vid he says "the bike is a lot harder to drift it just wants to hold its line" and the pic below is him drifting
  • + 29
 It's harder, not impossible. Smile
  • + 8
 if you put enough weight up front any bike will drift even if the chainstay length is 2km long, the new gambler holds its line alot better when in a neutral body position
  • - 4
 bold bold bold bold bold
  • + 7
 Its funny that every review on here sounds more like a sales pitch...they make it seem like every new product is miles better than the previous. Im just skeptical...until they send me one to demo to prove everything this sugar coated "review" claims
  • + 4
 Course it's a sales pitch, how do you think PB makes it's money.
  • - 2
 PB, like any publication, online or print, makes its money from advertising, not from articles, reviews or press releases.
  • - 1
 @bikebuster: chances are, most of us will not be able to demo all the bikes we want. So most of us are happy with reading reviews.
  • + 3
 smike, his point is that they aren't objective reviews, they are just sales pitches. And they do make money indirectly from articles, no one would see the ads if it weren't for the articles because no one would come here. Don't be so naive.
  • + 4
 "like any publication" - lol, publications also make money from people buying the end product (i.e. the publication itself). I love how people on here sound like they're in on every industry.
  • - 1
 How much do you pay to read pinkbike?

Articles attract readers. Ads are placed on and around articles so that they are viewed. The implication that article makes money is false. Scott bikes does not pay for this article to be written, so no, it does not make the site any money.

In print publications, the price you pay at the newsstand or for your subscription usually doesn't cover the printing costs. All revenue comes from advertising. Believe what you like.
  • + 4
 Articles attract readers who see the ads. Without the articles there would be no ads. It's very simple. And the rest is very dependent on the publication.
  • + 2
 Smike, like most arseholes on here, appears to know everything.
  • + 1
 @redrook: my original reply was to you saying "Course it's a sales pitch, how do you think PB makes it's money." This, to me, implies that it is the "sales pitch" that makes the money by having the manufacturer pay PB to run the article. No? But if you want to change the argument to "Without the articles there would be no ads", well, then I have no argument. However, a negative review would attract viewers the same way, no? So in the end, PB makes its revenue from ads whether the article is s sales pitch or not. I was merely trying to shed some light on an incorrect statement. But if you're not interested, and resort to name calling from a simple discussion, then I'll be on my way. Cheers!
  • - 1
 Sales pitch would explicitly imply that the article was promoting the bike, which it is. In no way does sales pitch imply any payment between manufacturer and the website. PB would not post a neg review for fear of losing advertising, hence the advertisers hold control. It's the same with most magazines, I can't remember ever seeing a negative review of a product made by a company which advertised within the publication. Name calling?
  • + 0
 redrook: really? Almost every product review I have done has been negative in some way, some glaringly so. There's no way, that in 2 days, you can write a complete review. That is why this is a "first ride" style article, or a preview. It takes weeks of riding a particular bike to be able to write a concise, review.
  • + 1
 Name calling was directed at rbeach.Thank you, Fraser.
  • + 4
 @everyone, you really think that people writing these sort of reviews, in this case Ben, pays for their own trips to Champery etc. to test out new bikes? PB might not get direct payments for writing such articles, but a free 2-day trip to europe doesn't make you wanna say anything bad about the product, does it? In that case you dare to do, you definietly won't get another free trip to test the next model coming around..
  • + 1
 Sorry Fraser but I haven't seen an actually negative review on here, and yours may be more objective, but this was not an objective review. It was very much designed to promote the bike.
  • + 2
 Forget it, never criticise a PB article, the suck-ups who hope they might get a freebie for arguing on a forum will be all over it.
  • + 0
 Smike, go ride your bike.
  • + 1
 I can't. I'm "working".
  • + 1
 Well played, smike. Well played.
  • - 1
 Smike..so PB just have a scott ad at the tope of the page out of kindness? in any sport there are brands, magazines and consumers, brands pay the magazines for advertising, as part of the deal, the brand is given a certain amount of "editorial" essentially free space in the magazine for reviews. product placement etc. very naive to think that PB make nothing out of the brands that have product on here,, in some magazines you will not find a brand featured at all unless they are a paid up advertiser,, it's business after all..
  • + 1
 Why are all these questions directed at me? Why not ask pInkbike instead if you're so sure? Oh wait. You don't need to ask because you're already 100% sure. My bad.
[Reply]
  • + 27
 This makes me proud to work for a scott dealer!
  • + 9
 I'm the same. I have 3 scotts and would love to have the cash to make this my 4th
  • + 5
 I'd love to have this bike, shame it's gonna cost a bomb! :'( haha
  • + 2
 I hear that , it looks sooo nice
  • - 7
 i'm going to say its alot better then shitty bikes such as the demo 8, it actually looks like they put hought intpo this bike
  • + 4
 they should have made a poll answer: "like, but id only consider the gambler as my next dh bike if i won the lottery"
  • + 4
 to be honest a demo 8 is probably alot better than what you ride
  • + 2
 samtomkins - you mean "than" not "then" kiddo. The demo 8 looks awesome btw.
[Reply]
  • + 14
 And in the end it's still a single pivot bike...
  • + 5
 truer words have never been spoken!
  • + 2
 nothing wrong with that...
[Reply]
  • + 13
 Dear Scott USA. Brendan's name is Fairclough, pronounced fair-cluff. Brendan fair-claw is someone else. Thanks.
  • + 31
 that 'o-u-g-h' is a tricky sucker:

'uff' as in rough
'aw' as in thought
'ow' as in bough
'oo' as in through
'off' as in trough

I'll just call him 'Brendog' and save myself potential embarassment.

[Edit] Or I'll find a video of him pronouncing his name and declare that you, sir, are correct.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=ogLC1sF_ne0
  • + 3
 Alot of people who do not know how to pronounce Fairclough will say it like Fair-claw or Fair-clow. But to anyone who does not know how to or is unsure of how to say Fairclough its like Fair-cluff. i only know this because my last name is Fairclough. Anyways that scott looks sick in my eyes, i would love to try one out.
  • - 1
 I hate to be the bearer of irritating and pedantic news, but it was originally closer to "claw" than "cluff", though nowadys it's generally "cluff". But there you go the original English name was pronounced "fair-cloh" back in the day.
[Reply]
  • + 11
 dropouts that cause increased traction lol
[Reply]
  • + 11
 nice job done, Ben....
[Reply]
  • + 8
 Since when 65 degrees is STEEP? And who needs 60 HA anyways (except 2-3 riders in the world), that's just too slack IMHO.
  • + 3
 You'll be able to ride 90 degree grades
  • - 1
 65 is steep for a DH bike with triple clamp forks these days, usually 64 or under. I'd like to try a 60 but sounds very slack to me.
[Reply]
  • + 6
 love my gambler. gonna miss the old frame design but out with the old in with the new i guess
  • + 1
 i second that... my gambler is F#!@in amazing.. realy wasnt much to improve on.. besides shaving a pound or two
  • + 1
 Yeah true, my gambler is pretty heavy, but rides like a dream and is indestructible feeling (stock 09 DH10) im going to wait it out for a year or two and see if i can pick up an ex demo one or something
[Reply]
  • + 6
 I want one, too bad its a scott. itll be out of my price range because of that
  • + 1
 Scott's pricing is supposed to come down as of next year so u might be surprised.
[Reply]
  • + 6
 Does the rear suspention stay active under hard braking? Its a single pivot.
  • - 3
 id never of guessed THAT was a single pivot...
[Reply]
  • + 6
 How do you put the shock into that knot of linkages nice bike anyway
  • + 16
 the video showed him installing one,didnt look too hard
[Reply]
  • + 5
 not even a word about pricing.... YOU´LL SEE!!! €€€€€€€€€
  • + 4
 $224,000....you'll see.
  • - 3
 no no no!. its gonna be more like $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$
  • + 4
 that went off my screen!
  • + 5
 your screen must be tiny
  • + 8
 should see the size of my 5.10s though..
  • + 3
 to be fair there were more dollar signs earlier, so his screen might be big.

...

No comment on the size of his 5.10's though. Wink
  • + 1
 £6999...in the UK....is the real price.

www.damianharriscycles.co.uk/prod/dua_0100_sc/Scott/Gambler-2013

The linkage is the same as popular MX bikes by suzuki etc...they're in it to win it Scott.

For that cash id rather have a demo and month in whistler.
  • + 2
 What about those of us that live in Whistler? For that cash we can have the Scott AND a month in Whistler. Wink
  • + 2
 for people in whistler, go biking. and not a chance im buyin that. way to much ill ride my bike and have a month in whistler
[Reply]
  • + 4
 Why dont they make an xl version for us taller riders? I'm 6'6" and feel as if there are only 2 maybe 3 dh bikes out there with the geometry that fits.
[Reply]
  • + 5
 That is one sexy ass bike....... just sayin'..!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Definitely a stretched and flattened Voltage iteration.The extra Gambler link is articulating the shock, otherwise would not be necessary. Ride mine in a similar setup like the new Gambler. Long, low BB, supersoft springs and firm damping. Voltage already works and lasts very well in the rockgardens of the alps. Gambler will up that. Now I want a frame badly...in aluminum.

Scott: no crapy carbon, or the price goes to a Labyrinth or Commie.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Got the Old Gambler, but will consider buying this one as it looks like an improvement all round. I like the old gambler, but the rear end is not that sensitive, and living in alice springs, that could help out a bit.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Never had my rear dropout come loose before as far as I can remember, plus, have I been saying Brendan Faircloughs' Sir name wrong all this time? I must admit though, it is a pretty impressive frame tech wise, if a little ugly.
  • + 6
 Dunno about 'Fairclough', but it's surname, not Sir name...
  • + 2
 Yeah, my mistake, although he should be Sir Brendog Smile
[Reply]
  • + 2
 I like to know how is this bike doing compare with mine Commencal supreme dh 2011...and also I am very skeptic about most tester who claim they are rough riders under mine supervision nothing survive :-)
[Reply]
  • + 3
 first i felt weird about it ,now am sold whit all those option looking sexyer eveday,,, good job!!!
[Reply]
  • + 2
 For some reason I find the new Gabler more as an evolution of the current Voltage Fr than of the old Gambler?
What is the weight by the way?
  • + 1
 well the old gamlber was more or less a big freeride bike, and wasnt a true race steed like the new one!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 The weight it's around 18 kg guys . I try one last week . It works pretty good . In fast bump it's work amaizing . And for drifting this bike drift but it's really harder to drift whit .
[Reply]
  • + 0
 hey guys, i know this isn't related to the article (sick bike btw), but i wanted to post it on a popular page.

is there any advantage to mounting a shock upside down? i have seen this a few times and i was just curious.

a lot of you know quite a bit more than i do about full suspension set ups so i figured this would be a good place to ask. thanks. happy shredding!
  • + 1
 forums man.... forums... but to answer your question no, however it fits in the frame
  • + 1
 alright well thanks anyways
  • + 1
 people do it so that the lighter bit of the shock (not the piggyback) is moving instead of the heavier side. but i doubt you could actually feel that when riding trails....
  • + 1
 yeah i kind of doubt it too... and lol who was bothered enough to neg prop both of my posts, one of which being a thank you
  • + 1
 No the piggy back end needs to be connected to the frame... Lowers the unsprung mass and the shock doesn't work as hard.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 i like the bike but i dont like the warranty of scott in his downhill/freeride frames
[Reply]
  • + 3
 Can't wait to give one of these a proper flogging! good work Ben! bike is looking amazing
[Reply]
  • + 3
 I still think it's a horrendously ugly bike
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Would like to see a diagram of all the different geometry settings overlapping.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 soo much great new technology. great to see companies trying new things and being more innovative
  • + 3
 There's nothing new about it! Single pivot is as old as the hills and the complex linkages just add weight. Innovative it is not.
  • + 2
 haters gonna hate
  • + 7
 lovers gonna love
  • + 1
 I wouldn't say it's innovative, but I'm sure it will have fine tuned small problems other bikes had with similar designs. That's how the majority of bikes work these days; what's innovative is the ways in which they make those small changes in the R+D...
  • + 1
 I dont even want none of the above. I want to piss on you.

Chappelle/ R. Kelly

Haha. Had to do it.
  • + 1
 Only took a month for someone to!
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Very nice features on the gambler...like that idea of changing wheelbase and ride height.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 very impressed overall with the design and adjustability options
[Reply]
  • + 1
 the only thing im not sure about is the productions bikes colour scheme brendans black proto just looked savage but the bike its self get the thumbs up all the way
[Reply]
  • + 0
 If I didn't have a bad back. If I had more money. If there was a downhill park near where I live. This bike would be mine. Except in black. For now I'm happy with my Genius!
[Reply]
  • + 3
 This bike needs more pivot points!
[Reply]
  • + 3
 Perfect. Now do a 160mm enduro version and I will be happy !
  • + 2
 And the money to buy it
[Reply]
  • + 2
 low, slack, long wheelbase, adjustable, looks the business. peachy.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 Like to gamble in Vegas
[Reply]
  • + 2
 I saw 1 of these rippin morzine last week, look sweet as
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Ill trade my soul, my current girlfriend, $20 and a pack of gum for that beautiful bike
  • + 1
 then your current girlfriend has to go buddy..
  • + 1
 you can have her bud
  • + 1
 maybe if i can see a photo of her ahaha
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Soooo nice... I hope they aren't gonna cost a lot tho.. But then again.. They probably will !
[Reply]
  • + 1
 High single pivots are trendy again? Shit, shouldn't have sold my floating brake equipped bullit last week.
  • + 1
 there are a few very effective single pivots out there that have very good ride characteristics
[Reply]
  • + 1
 The new Gambler is looking NICE... I prefer it to the old one in many ways.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Scott pumps out some of the nicest looking DH bikes in my opinion. I'm sure they preform as nice as they look.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Is this frame compadible with my sunlite goldtec rear rack? I need to carry a towel while i shred.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 That bike is wow. Not to mention the colors! tup
[Reply]
  • + 1
 hmmm if the commencal stays alloy im buying the scott if it goes carbon sorry scott
[Reply]
  • + 1
 any one know what the pricing is going to be like on these bikes? or is that still TBA?
[Reply]
  • + 2
 i like it! and everyone knows GREEN is the new black!
[Reply]
  • + 3
 Does it come in black?
  • + 2
 Yeah, the DH20 is matte black with blue graphics.
  • + 1
 oh! im so excited!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Haha he says: It doesn't drift so well'
Next picture: someone drifting ItSmile
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Less of an epic frame like the old frames, but more epic suspension layout. HMMM can I warrant buying one is the question???
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I like it. Im glad they went away from that goofy head tube the old gamblers had.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 What's the frame WEIGHT?????
[Reply]
  • + 1
 That looks amazingly slack!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 this seems to have the same advantages of the new nukeproof dh bike
[Reply]
  • + 2
 swap it for my 2010?
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Salute looks solid ,i like the adjustable chips tup
[Reply]
  • + 1
 nice to know that its not always so slack
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I wish I could get one of them bikes
[Reply]
  • + 1
 i would sell my soul for that bike oh wait im ginger poo Frown
[Reply]
  • + 1
 6k +!!!!!! and they'll no dout take out a carbon version next year!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 this gambler is right on the... money? :p
[Reply]
  • + 1
 What the shock length? 10.5?or 9.5? eye to eye
  • + 1
 wow looks promis on the bumbs....
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Will there also be a frameset aviable or only the complete Bike...?
  • + 2
 Yes, there will be a frame set.
  • + 1
 When will it be available?
  • + 1
 October, I think.
[Reply]
  • - 2
 i just had an idea to change the bike up and befor i get the nego props it would also slightly lower the center of gravit wile retaining the adjustability no ganna say how till i patent it though
[Reply]
  • + 1
 am I the only one whos wondering why the comments are in bold???
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Very keen on a new gambler frame!
[Reply]
  • + 2
 beautiful bike
[Reply]
  • + 1
 What does she weigh
[Reply]
  • - 1
 i just wished it had boxxers!
  • + 1
 buy it. give me the 40s. and ill give u my boxxers
  • + 0
 whoa man... nobody wants to see that Wink
[Reply]
  • - 1
 Brendan didn't do jack with it.
[Reply]
  • - 2
 什么时间能上市?
  • + 4
 obviously the great firewall of china doesn't block pinkbike
[Reply]
  • - 2
 i would much rather have a tr450...
  • + 1
 A TR450, Norco Arum (these look/sound amazing.) or a Commencal V3 would be my first choices too...

Still, it's (the Gambler) a nice looking bike IMO and it sounds like it rides great. I still think the Voltage DH would be awesome too (IMO the Voltage FR is one of the best FR bikes around next to the TR250, the Spec. Enduro EVO Drool and the new Commencal V3-FR) , Scott has really stepped up their game over the last few years aye. As long as they don't throw away/ruin the Genius LT they'll have an amazing bike in every single category IMO.
[Reply]
  • - 1
 bla bla bla bla
[Reply]
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