First Ride: 2023 Cube Stereo ONE77

Feb 8, 2023
by Dario DiGiulio  
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With increasingly gnarly courses being featured in enduro races, and the steady resurgence of "freeride" as a market category, it's no wonder we're seeing more and more long travel bikes meant to tackle the heaviest terrain around. While many of these bikes can seem to be cut from the same cloth, each brand has their own special flavor, including the newest release from the German engineers at Cube.

Cube makes a whole bunch of bikes, and the naming scheme can be a bit... technical. So you're forgiven if things get a bit confusing when parsing out which model is which in the lineup. In this case, I'll be covering their new long-travel Stereo model, the ONE77. This is an update to an existing model, and the geometry changes are pretty subtle, so let's see just what makes this bike stand out from its predecessor.

Cube Stereo ONE77 Details

• Wheel size: 29"
• Travel: 177 mm, 170 mm fork
• Carbon fiber frame
• 63.8º or 64.4º head angle
• 76.5º or 76.7º seat angle
• 435mm chainstays
• Sizes: M, L, XL, XXL
• Weight: 33.9 lb / 15.4 kg (size XL, ONE77 C:68X TM 29)
• Price: 3,199 € - 7,399 €
cube.eu
Cube bills this as a bike for "long days on rowdy trails in the mountains," and given the frame's overall simplicity and the build kits available, that seems like a pretty realistic expectation. There are three build options to choose from, each with a corresponding color, as well as two aluminum-framed builds that strike a lower price point.

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Frame Details

With a similar silhouette to the prior model, the ONE77's biggest change is in material. Where before it was an alloy-only affair, the big Cube is now available in an all-carbon construction, with an alloy frame still on offer. Mostly thanks to that material change, bike weights have gone down by nearly 3 pounds on average, which makes for an impressively lightweight long-legged frame. Our test model weighs in at 33.9 lbs on the scale, with the cheapest/heaviest build kit available.

With the move to a carbon frame comes the shift away from traditional internal cable routing, and the introduction of a new crowd favorite: through-headset cables on all models. This topic has been beaten to death at this point, so suffice to say it's a bummer to see Cube make the same decision that many other brands have this year. On the bright side, they've added a second set of bottle cage bolts to the underside of the top tube, allowing for easy and accessible accessory storage, while still leaving plenty of room for a full-size water bottle in the main triangle.

As with the prior model, the ONE77 sports the ability to switch between coil and air shocks via a flip chip on the main link, in conjunction with a different lower mount position. This changes the progression and overall leverage of the bike, and is meant to suit both options equally well.

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Clean tubes, thanks to that suddenly common Acros headset.

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No speed metal to be found here.


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Geometry

As I mentioned earlier, the geometry hasn't changed much from the prior ONE77 models, but there are some updates to note. Reaches have grown across the size range by about 4 - 6mm, depending on the setup. Otherwise, it's all the same story as before, with angles and measures carrying over as they were before. For those on a size Medium, there is a shorter seat tube, so that's an improvement when it comes to dropper sizing.

In addition to funneling all your cables (and a little bit of water) into the frame, that Acros headset also doubles as a head tube angle adjustment, via some well-integrated flippable cups. The steep/slack position accounts for the two options you see on the geo chart, though Cube states that it only provides 0.4° of adjustment in contrast to the 0.6° reflected in the geometry numbers. Very slight discrepancy, and really not something you're likely to distinctly notice.

There is very little info for how to make that geo adjustment, but I found a German instruction manual on the Acros website that shows the process with a similar product. Having made the change myself, it's quite easy, and doesn't require any tools besides the hex wrenches to loosen your stem - you could do it trailside, should you be so inclined.

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Not sure why the photo bike had the coil shock in the air position...
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...but maybe this is a secret menu item.

Spec Check

I've been riding the poetically named Stereo ONE77 C:68X TM 29 olive´n´chrome, which is positioned as the cheapest of the three carbon models, retailing for 4,399 €. I think this spec presents a decent value for what you get, with a couple of low points and highlights in the parts kit.

This model features RockShox suspension front and rear, but you'd be mistaken if you think you're getting the newest stuff with this new bike. The fork is the V1 Zeb in the Select+ finish, which means you get a single compression knob as well as rebound adjustment. Out back is the Super Deluxe Ultimate Coil, but again not the newer version with a wider selection of adjustments. Though the fine adjustment is lacking, the two are easy enough to balance out, so long as you have access to a few different spring rates to try on the shock.

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Hard to fault this choice.

There are two highlights for me on this build, the first and foremost being the Hayes Dominion A4 brakes. After spending time on just about every "best brake" on the market, I keep returning to the Dominions as my true north when it comes to performance and reliability. They're fantastic at what they do, and are surprisingly rare as OEM spec. Needless to say, I was stoked to see them on this build, and they've been flawless for the duration of the test.

The other standouts were the Newmen Evolution SL A.30 wheels, which I hadn't had the opportunity to try prior to hopping on the Cube. The rear hub is damn near silent, which is something I'm increasingly fond of in a world where having the loudest hub seems to be a new form of competition. The aluminum rims have held up very well to some sloppy lines and plenty of hard cornering, and the tension has remained even and tight, which isn't terribly common with alloy wheels on the lighter end of the spectrum.


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Stereo ONE77 C:68X SLX 29 actionteam, 5,199 €
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Stereo ONE77 C:68X SLT 29 flashwhite´n´grey, 7,399 €

Sadly it's not all rosy with this build kit, as there were a couple annoying - if not baffling - choices made on the spec. The one that really bugs me is the 150mm SDG Tellis dropper post, which feels unusually short in conjunction with this bike's geometry. It's not a dealbreaker, but it would certainly be my first upgrade were I to end up with this bike. Unfortunately, the frame design has fairly shallow post insertion, which might prevent a lot of people from maximizing their saddle drop on the descents.

One other nitpick I have with the build are the EXO+ tires front and rear. As something billed as both an enduro race bike and a bike park rig, I have a hard time seeing these tires fit those use cases. The compound and tread patterns they chose are spot on, but I'd want to see a more durable and supportive casing. On the bright side, these light tires might be part of why this bike pedals so easily...

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Here's the whole run, in case you missed it in Seb's article. (You're going to need a magnifying glass.)



Ride Impressions

Given the travel numbers and general look of this bike, I came in with certain expectations, most of which were wrong. It's a pretty spartan long travel Horst-link bike, which typically errs on the side of cruisin' along when it comes to the climbs - not at all the case with the ONE77. Thanks in part to the relatively light weight, but also due to how sporty the rear suspension feels, the Cube was more than happy to keep a quick pace on the climbs, so long as you're putting in some work. Obviously it's no cross country bike, but the chassis feels stable under consistent pedaling, and doesn't dip too deep when you're shifting weight around while seated.

That positive climbing characteristic might be part of why things felt a little more nervous on the descents, as the ONE77 feels like it has a whole lot less travel than you'd expect to be on tap. The ride feel isn't harsh, but the bike starts to ramp up right when you're hitting the mid-stroke pocket when you're poised over the back of the bike. These moments, when you're picking your way down something steep or trying to pump hard to keep traction through rough sections, can make the bike feel like it's stinkbugging, which is a rare sensation on most bikes these days. This is compounded with the fact that the V1 Zeb lacks a lot of support that other forks in that travel bracket are able to provide, leading to a pretty steep-feeling bike at certain times.

To me, it's telling that despite the fact that this is the longest travel bike in my garage at this point, it's far from the first that I'll take out to ride gnarly trails or new-to-me features. Compared to other contemporary bikes in this travel bracket, like the Nomad or the SB160, it feels quite a bit more reserved, and more like a long-legged trail bike.

With a rather high stack height and fairly short chainstays, the Cube is very easy to pop off jumps and trail features, which makes for a very fun ride on mellower terrain. While that high stack and fairly slack head angle help a lot on the steeper pitches, the sporty rear suspension and chainstay length can make the bike feel pretty unbalanced. Not dissimilar to older 29er enduro bikes, the long reach paired with the short back end can push you out of the pocket right when you want to be the most in control

The rides where I handle this long-travel rig like a smaller trail bike have been where I've had the most fun with the ONE77. On trails that I know well, where I can trust my memory and intuition and simply go a little faster and boost a little higher, this Cube has been a treat. Probably not the bike I'll be reaching for when I'm trying to race course that I don't know well, but for folks who want something to rip on mellower terrain that they're familiar with, this could be a great option.

I'm keen to try the ONE77 with a different parts kit, as an air shock and more tuneable fork could change the balance of this bike quite a bit. That said, the geometry is what it is, and in my mind it's a bit behind the times.




Author Info:
dariodigiulio avatar

Member since Dec 25, 2016
148 articles

116 Comments
  • 73 2
 This bike looks really good, but I guess it doesn't check all the boxes. It's like it has 4 equal sides but not quite square. Pinkbike was as cold as an ice chunk on this review.
  • 49 2
 They literally could've typed "something something something, headset cable routing, something something" cause that's how I read it
  • 17 2
 By no means a total flop, there are just a few areas that ought to be improved to compete with the other new bikes in this category. Things like bad seatpost insertion and rear-center geometry deserve to be buttoned up at this point.
  • 3 0
 @dariodigiulio: I noticed you listed rear travel at 177mm... The previous PB Cube article (2023 Lineup) has it listed at 170mm.
  • 17 4
 I wouldn't say "cold as ice." They pointed out the bike's negatives, which I actually think is refreshing. They also pointed out who this bike is for, and its positives. And the value is much better than many other big brand bikes coming out recently.

I'm tired of all the other nearly perfect reviews that are afraid to say anything bad, then later on in a separate article or in a podcast they mention its negatives. Why didn't you tell us that up front? Especially the "pedals good for what it is" statement in a lot of big bike reviews. Just be honest: its a huge bike that really sucks your energy compared to a short travel bike.

While I'm ranting: I also get tired of PB reviewers trying not to say certain words when describing the bikes ride. "Playful" is OK to say and is a good description for those of us in the market for a new bike if the bike boosts well and the back end is easy to swing around. Plush, plow, poppy, energetic, flexy, etc. are all OK to say, and we want to to know these things!
  • 8 2
 @dariodigiulio: I've enjoyed your no bs takes over at Loam Wolf. You might be one of the few reviewers that seems to get the El Roy. I hope PB doesn't dull yr edge for telling it like you see it.
  • 2 0
 It's as if the review was only two-dimensional
  • 5 0
 I don't think any of the criticism in this article is unjustified. It's always good to see media call out flaws or bad design as it can only benefit the consumer in the end. I just wish every manufacturer would be treated equal in that regard.
  • 2 0
 @tatchle1: It’s a bike, not an affair. Seems like every bike review from any source has “affair” in it. Don’t know why, but anymore it makes me wince.
  • 1 0
 @idecic: Obviously some kind of conspiracy
  • 3 0
 @hellbelly: I appreciate the kind words! No plans to change my tune anytime soon, people deserve to hear the full range of thoughts.
And yeah, that El Roy is a wild little bike.
  • 39 2
 Headset cable routing...once again forcing this garbage on us until we will accept it...because ordering a headset with a hole in it is easier than doing more work to the frame....
  • 21 0
 Dangit - well, one more off the list. Shame.
  • 11 0
 About 20 months ago that Acros sales team was busy flying all over the world.
  • 4 0
 something inside me still asks "where did the cables go?"
  • 5 0
 How funny would it be if pinkbike just gave heinous reviews to every bike with headset cable routing.
  • 19 4
 Is it bad or good that we've gotten to a place where I don't even bother checking geometry? I already know that the size for me is probably going to have about 480mm reach, 440ish chainstays, 64ish degree HTA, etc.

The geometry revolution is ended, and pretty much all bikes ride really well now. Is this sad? Theres no where left to innovate from a geometry perspective, and there aren't really any wild, out-there bikes like Pole back in the day. Kinda depressing, but at the same time I'm glad people aren't being tricked into buying an Enduro 29, billed as a mini-DH bike, but with a 67.5 degree HTA
  • 11 1
 Yep I just check reach / stack, seat tube height and then I’ll just give the chainstay a quick once over just to make sure they’re not in a different time zone so it still wheelies and I’m good to go.
  • 8 0
 No where left to innovate??

The Grim Donut has entered the chat.
  • 4 0
 @thenotoriousmic: different time zones LOL
  • 4 6
 @mikealive: Even Doughnut 2.0 backed off on its extreme HTA.


In the EWS (RIP) pro riders are sizing down, and the fastest bikes all hover around 64 degree HTA.
  • 1 1
 @hamncheez: That reach though. 535mm on the Grim Donut 2.0. But it seemed to work out rather well. 8 seconds faster over a 2 minute track is no joke.

In general I'd say we see geometry converging on a new "norm" rather then evolving. The arms race seems indeed to have come to an end.
  • 3 0
 "The geometry revolution is ended, and pretty much all bikes ride really well now. Is this sad?"

No it's great! As you've implied, you can now go out and buy a bike without having to scrutinise every single dimension and be reasonably confident that it's A Good Bike. Also, you won't have to replace the frame in two years just for the new hotness, because (I hope) we're basically at maximum hotness already.

I'm going to guess that its anti-squat curve probably falls through 100% at sag and its anti-rise curve is probably 50% throughout most of its travel. Just like almost every other modern Horst link or split pivot bike.
  • 1 0
 frames designed for shorter cranks
  • 2 0
 I read this kind of comment for 20 years now
  • 1 0
 I consider the seat tube a serious miss, long with limited insertion. That is a deal breaker for me.
  • 1 0
 @Karlhess80: Ya, thats unfortunate. It doesn't bother me as much personally, but I can understand why it would be a deal breaker.
  • 2 2
 @boozed: I love the new, the strange, the innovative! I loved the Kona Magic Link even though it was too complex and ultimately could be replicated with a cilmb switch. I loved the Cannondale weirdness they used to have back in the day, even though they could never sort out their quality control. Nowadays every suspension platform rides really well, no brand has bikes with dangerous geometry, and all the colors are starting to look the same. Just show up at a bike shop and choose by the suspension travel you want and it will be a good choice. Its just so.... boring.
  • 14 0
 acros must really be laughing at the comments section of all the people complaining about headset cable routing, from their private jet flying over a fiscal paradise, with hookers and blow.
  • 14 0
 Why are these Acros headsets specced on so many bikes? The bearings seem to fall apart when you look at them the wrong way.
  • 2 0
 Good question. I have some Acros bottom brackets in two different bikes and they are very good. Why do they also make crap? I guess someone wanted cheap bearings and they said 'sure, we can do that too'
  • 2 0
 @ak-77: Can only praise my Acros BB that replaced the crappy Sram BBs which were done every six months but heard from friends that the Acros Headsets are Failing very fast.
  • 2 5
 Cause German
  • 7 0
 cheap, cheap, cheap, pick 2
  • 3 0
 Basically their sales people arrived at the factorys and asked: "hey,do you want to save some money not designing holes on your frames? I've got just the thing."
  • 11 1
 What the flippin’ heck is ‘stinkbugging’?!
  • 18 1
 no idea but I'm going to use it in a conversation today and see what response I get
  • 2 0
 I was wondering the same. It might be 'using a derogatory word that does not actually exist'
  • 7 0
 It's when the rear end lifts up when braking down a steep slope.
  • 5 0
 When the rear comes up during braking, a la Klein Mantra and other URT bikes. Terrifying feeling, eject-o-matic collar bone destroyer.
  • 3 0
 @Joecx: oh! Like the bug that lifts the ass to spray its stinky piss(?) on you. Got it! Had no idea either.
  • 2 0
 @Joecx: Oh damn, ok! I had no idea! That's really bad!
  • 2 3
 The pictures show a coil in the "air" flip chip position. Makes me think the bike wasn't even set up right from the beginning, and probably rushed a review.
  • 3 0
 @cfox109: As I mentioned in the review and in the comments, it was set up correctly on the test bike, which I've had for multiple months.
  • 1 0
 I think it's like mudsharking.
  • 6 1
 So that´s about how a cheaper spec (Zeb S+) can spoil a possibly good bike - but I dont think I would like a X2 in the rear.

Cube sells a lot of bikes to younger folks that are riding in the same spot over and over until the chainstay breaks. As they are still growing, they usually have it in one or two sizes on the smaller side - so those geometry treats wont affect them very much I guess Wink
  • 5 3
 No, it's the RS older coil shock + probably wrong frame setting. This shock is very uphil oriented by design, add more linear and maybe less leverage setting and this is a recipe for disaster. I had exactly the same problem in my Meta with this shock, only complete revalving solved it. Or maybe they just got the very wrong tune for it.
  • 5 0
 @lkubica: Is it? I have that shock (from a Meta) on my Mk2 Capra, I always thought it is quite plush compared to the (same tune) RS SDU Air. Rebound is fast enough for my 550lbs spring, compression near open but ok that way.
  • 4 2
 @cxfahrer: Probably the key point here is 550lbs spring, I was runing a 375lbs spring, a lot of difference. And you say that compression is near open. So how someone weighting 72kg may even use it? The same with rebound, the force is the spring force, so if for you rebound is fast enough, it will not be fast enough for someone using sub 400 spring. The rebound stack is preloaded, it may work ok for 550lbs sprng, but it works like sh*t for sub 400 spring. Even the lightest factory tunes for this shock do not work for lighter riders/lower leverage rates. Air versions have different tunes and work much better. This is the irony.
  • 8 4
 So if the rear-end of the bike felt overly progressive with the shock in the wrong setting, why didn't you just swap it over to the right setting?

Also that shock doesn't look like a Super Deluxe Coil "Ultimate", but rather the lower-spec "Select+" version, as it's missing the low-speed compression damping adjustment dial.
  • 21 1
 To be clear, it was in the right setting on my bike - the supplied photos from Cube show it in the other setting.
  • 9 0
 @dariodigiulio: it just says air or coil for dummy’s what it’s really means is more or less progression. There’s absolutely no reason why you couldn’t run ether type of spring in both settings depending on what you wanted out of the bike.
  • 4 0
 @thenotoriousmic: yes and by the sound of this first ride article the bike could benefit from either more SAG or put the shock in the "linear" position.
  • 2 1
 @dariodigiulio: and yet you told us it was too progressive, panned the bike but didn't adjust that tiny, trailside adjustment?

Isn't that like bike setup 101?
  • 1 3
 @BarryWalstead: I've tried it in both positions, for the context of a First Ride it only makes sense to speak to the manufacturer recommended setup.
  • 2 1
 @dariodigiulio: referring to bikes three times the price but not mentioning an easy setup change at an affordable one? I am expecting more from this site.
  • 1 0
 @WilliSauerlich: Geometry and kinematics are free, the price of a bike should have no bearing on that.
  • 2 1
 look at the pics, it is in the right place, with the exception of the one where they called it out.
  • 5 1
 Looks like a winner - I don't have a tendency to break things on the trail so this would be a good fit.

The top tube starts to get a bit wispy at seat tube junction, but I haven't seen any (or rarely) break at this junction. Props to the clean design and light weight.
  • 6 0
 Headset cable routing.... ugh, why?
  • 6 1
 i like the un-decaled suspension
  • 6 0
 i wonder if it’s because they’re specced with last seasons forks?
  • 2 0
 @frigofff: That's my guess as well, they might do a rolling change to update to the newer models.
  • 4 0
 @frigofff: and since new ones came out "Old" zeb is trash and doesn't have the mid stroke support for descents lol
  • 1 1
 I do too, although i do think it's just 1. Jet black details and 2. creative lighting on the shoot. you can see the glint of light off the rockshox box on the fork. I'd like to see laser engraved decals in the future, that would be sweet Cool
  • 5 4
 Good looking...good price...decent spec...not a great ride. Another example of why many great bikes cost what they do...a bike is more than a sum of it's parts and the R&D that needs to go into building a bike is not easy, or cheap.
  • 7 4
 It actually is easy and cheap. Anyone with decent production facilities can just copy the "great expensive bike" and mimic the characteristics. Bike frames are pretty damn simple in terms of engineering complexity.
  • 4 4
 @Nygaard: Sure, they're simple if you don't care about producing a crappy bike. Flex, durability, reducing stress on the shock shaft and seals, preventing too much load on bearings that results in premature failure, ease of repairability...those aren't what is considered simple
  • 4 2
 @Nygaard: I suppose you can run a frame, it's links, etc. through a 3d mapping tool and spit out a reproduction. But you're not going to capture the things beyond simple measurements. The carbon layup which effects stiffness/flex/lateral play, for example.
This same mentality...the one the alibaba people are taking with the Chinese knock-offs, happened in the moto industry over the last decade + as well. The people who touted their "cheap" bikes that were "just the same" as the Japanese equivalents slowly stopped posting about their brilliant moves. As the reliability, maintenance cost, etc. all started coming to the forefront.
It's really easy to make a bike look like a great bike, it's not easy to make it perform like one.
  • 2 1
 So basically if you buy the more expensive one with more suspension adjustments, the issues are mostly solved (except that headset). The review makes this bike sound like a bad design but in actual fact it's the component spec that is letting down the lower spec'd model - I suspect many big brands will have the same/similar issues on their 3rd tier model...
  • 1 0
 Though I'd be curious to ride the higher-spec version, there are a few things that can't be fixed by nicer parts here. Bad seatpost insertion, too-short chainstays, and suspension kinematics that don't fit the use case are the first three that come to mind.
  • 1 0
 @dariodigiulio: Fair enough in this context.
  • 1 0
 As a rookie i bought stereo 170 3 years ago, had tonnes of crashes on it, i enjoy jumps the most so thats my style and never had any issues with the frame. Had seat stay replaced on warranty, first bearing failed just now (main pivot one), all other bearings are fine. For sure there are easier bikes to ride but i see it this way: if it was good for Remmy it should be good for anybody. 99% ppl are over biked anyways.
  • 1 0
 Sorry, I just can’t get behind the headset cable routing. If enough people speak out and also don’t purchase what they’re trying to force upon us, perhaps they’ll finally listen the customers.
  • 5 1
 Nevermind.
  • 4 0
 Looks like a Transession
  • 1 1
 No. It be a Slash
  • 2 2
 Don't fuck up on its pronouns
  • 2 0
 Dang, I've already been temp banned twice for jokes like that.
  • 2 0
 @JohanG: damn sorry @JohanG. I do find it funny that these people can choose to be something other than what they were assigned at birth and everyone else has to go out of their way to accommodate them to the extent of stepping all over your freedom of speech
  • 2 0
 Looks like a Ransom Sight Sentinel Process Sommet am I detecting a pattern here
  • 3 0
 "Rip on mellower terrain" isn't what I think of for a 170mm bike
  • 1 0
 that cable routing looks like a nightmare, i miss external cable routing. rember on the gt forces from like 2020 they had that groove tube, i want that on my bike.
  • 3 3
 Sounds like an air shock and better fork would sort this bike. Compared to other pinkbike reviews this one seems written poorly with the overall review for the bike
  • 6 2
 I thought it was well-written.
  • 2 2
 Seems like the pictured adjustable link in the 'air' setting with the coil might be the solution. I hate reviews like this where the reviewer didn't really bother with accurate and correct setup. Like when a review says 'it might be better if you added a volume spacer in the shock' but then go on to say how lousy it was when they didn't bother.
  • 2 0
 @BarryWalstead: @dariodigiulio said above that his bike was set up correctly. The photos (that you're referring to) were studio photos sent over from Cube (presumably as part of their press release).
  • 5 3
 @mwysel: and as Dario said he ran it in 'coil' mode with a coil shock but then complained about the ramp up, or excessive progression. So the obvious choice was to swap the flip chip and see how that very same coil worked with LESS progression.
Again, bike setup 101. It's the basic intro class, why do professional reviewers get this wrong so often.

Like on my personal bike I had to adjust the sag and volume spacers a bit to get the ride and travel I wanted. Judging a bike without doing this is like not adjusting seat height and complaining or doesn't peddle well.
  • 3 1
 @BarryWalstead: I spent a while riding the bike in both modes, and am simply writing about it in the intended configuration. The bikes gives up a ton of it's pedaling performance in the other setup, and doesn't handle heavy bottom-outs well, not worth highlighting in my opinion.
  • 3 3
 @dariodigiulio: okay, cool you did your due diligence on testing and setup but how do you figure it wasn't worth mentioning in the article? As written it seems you missed an easy magic fix or at least a big change. And maybe it's one that would make it a great park bike where some people don't care about pedaling much.
Thank you for cleaning up that you did try it both ways.
  • 2 0
 Everything's beginning to look like a Norco Sight these days
  • 1 0
 it looks like a sessio-sight
  • 2 0
 Olive green is the new teal
  • 2 0
 Olive green was big in the 2000´s. I prefer it over Teal.
  • 3 3
 Did Pinkbike ride test this bike with the flip chip in the 'air' position using that coil shock? If so, no wonder the rear suspension was off....
  • 2 1
 Jokermtb: Not sure why this is getting downvoted. Not only is there a picture, but even a caption acknowledging the air setting with the coil shown.
  • 2 1
 Reach numbers are different from the First Look article?
  • 1 1
 Why a flip chip and "coil" vs. "air" graphics have different orientation? Lack of perfection! NO BIKE FOR ME! NEXT!
  • 2 2
 Who is buying these things? I've seen a Cube in the wild maybe once. How are they staying in business?
  • 8 0
 Come to Germany...they are all over here. Great Specs for the Price but Rubbish Frames.
  • 2 3
 @funkzander: germany Brands 101 right there.
  • 2 1
 @HeatedRotor: Not all German Brands are that Bad. Nicolai for Example make super reliable Frames but in another price league of course and Handmade in Germany. Cube on the other Hand...their Full Suspension Frames are really rubbish with too small Bearings that quickly wear and Cracking Frames. They have some great budget Hardtails and Road Bikes that are good Value but for a Bike Lover i dont like their Brand. Loud Colours, terrible Branding, Soulless Design, Oldschool Geometry from Years ago.. For me they have the Vibe of Walmart Bikes. I personally would prefer a Canyon even if their Bikes were equally terrible in the past with really bad customer Service but they had somehow better Design.
  • 1 0
 @funkzander: sorry it was more of a kick at canyon/yt an ment as a light hearted joke - Although both brands new stuff is pretty damn good.
  • 1 0
 @HeatedRotor: i was mainly thinking of both Brands Bikes from a few Years ago. the actual Bike shown above is pretty nice i must admit. The Lines remind me of my Sentinel and the Colours now are subtle and not so loud 90ies Techno Style with Branding all over it like Pivots from a few years back. But for the prices they cost right now i would never buy it! I could get every Hi end Bike i want for 7000 Euro as i always build a Bike myself.
  • 2 1
 They are the most popular mainstream/entry-level mountainbike brand in Germany. Like, by far.

The Cube over here is what the Trek Marlin or Specialized Rockhopper is in the US.
  • 2 1
 Aston Martin called - they want their name back
  • 1 1
 15,4 kilos without pedals (as always). My Trek Slash 2015 (Large) is 2 kilos lighter!!....and cheaper!!
  • 8 8
 decent price, nice frame/colors, good parts. Its hard to hate.
  • 30 3
 The dated geometry and headset cable routing make it easy to hate...
  • 11 6
 @forum747: Dated geometry? Seriously now? IMO the geometry exactly is pretty much the only thing about this bike that you can't really criticise. It's perfectly fine.
  • 2 2
 @Muscovir: It would be nice to see some longer chainstays in the larger sizes. Because the rear end wants to extend more than pack in, the bottom bracket tends to feel a bit higher than bikes with similar drop numbers.
  • 2 2
 @forum747: didnt notice that. i agree noe
  • 3 1
 @Muscovir: It is really dated indeed but tbh it doesn't matter because the cable routing disqualifies it anyway even if it was the next grim donut haha.
  • 1 0
 Close but no Cigar
  • 1 0
 It's pretty!







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