RockShox Reverb Review

Nov 30, 2011
by Mike Levy  
Dropper posts are quickly becoming the norm for many riders, especially those who frequent rolling terrain and want to avoid stopping to adjust their saddle height when the trail gets dicey. Even pure cross-country riders are seeing the light as they realize that the handling advantages in tricky terrain easily outweighs the additional weight over a standard post. There are now many options to choose from, but RockShox's Reverb is the only telescoping post that makes use of a hydraulic hose to control its movement. The Reverb offers either 100 or 125mm (tested) of hydraulically controlled travel, along with infinite saddle height adjustments anywhere between full extension and completely dropped, and is controlled by their XLoc bar mounted remote. The Reverb is available in 30.9mm and 31.6mm diameters, and retails for $370 USD.

The Reverb offers 125mm of drop, and is the only telescoping post that is activated with a hydraulic remote.<br><br><span style='font-size:17px'>RockShox Reverb details:</span><br><br>- Hydraulically controlled telescoping seat post<br>- 100mm and 125mm drop options (<i>infinite height adjustment</i>)<br>- Full lengths: 100mm drop - 355, 420mm, 125mm drop - 380mm, 420mm<br>- Zero offset, two bolt head<br>- XLoc handlebar remote only<br>- Diameters: 30.9 and 31.6mm<br>- Weight: 520 grams (<i>including remote, hose and hardware</i>)<br>- MSRP:
The Reverb offeres 125mm of drop, and is the only telescoping post that is activated with a hydraulic remote.

RockShox Reverb details:

- Hydraulically controlled telescoping seat post
- 100mm and 125mm drop options (infinite height adjustment)
- Full lengths: 100mm drop - 355, 420mm, 125mm drop - 380mm, 420mm
- Zero offset, two bolt head
- XLoc handlebar remote only
- Diameters: 30.9 and 31.6mm
- Weight: 520 grams (including remote, hose and hardware)
- MSRP: $370 USD


The Details
The Reverb is available in two different travel options, either 100 or 125mm of drop, to best suit your riding, height and seat tube length. While a lot of riders will question the reason for going with the 100mm version, it will make sense for shorter riders thanks to its 355mm total length. The 125mm version that we review here can be had in either 380 or 420mm lengths, with my long legs requiring the taller of the two options. A dual bolt head without indexing offers infinite saddle tilt adjustments, and the bolts thread into steel inserts to prevent heavy handed home mechanics from causing any fatal damage.

RockShox Reverb
The Reverb's opposing saddle clamp bolts (left) make for easy saddle angle adjustments. New, burlier hose fittings at the head (right) should stand up to abuse better.

The post is activated with RockShox's XLoc remote - the very same that controls their fork's lockout function - by pushing 2.5wt hydraulic fluid down the line and opening the Reverb's main oil flow valve. The setup is not only slightly lighter than a more traditional steel cable and housing, but should also offer the advantage of not being susceptible to contamination when riding in the rain and mud. It also features an aluminum dial that is used to adjust the post's return speed. Turning the dial alters the oil volume within the remote system, raising or lowering the height of the main valve within the post. Different heights allow you to use more or less of the taper on the valve, dictating the amount of oil flow that is allowed to move between the inner and out tubes.

RockShox Reverb explained

One of the key design features hidden within the Reverb is that its 2.5wt hydraulic remote fluid, post oil and air springs are all kept completely separate from each other. The remote fluid is contained within the XLoc trigger, hose and the post's head, while the air spring is enclosed at the bottom of the outer tube. The post oil that allows the Reverb to travel up and down, and also be held firmly in place, flows between the inner and outer tubes, and is backed up with an internal floating piston (IFP) to keep the Reverb from becoming soft if the saddle is raised by hand.

Installation and Bleeding
The Reverb installs like any other seat post, with the addition of routing the hydraulic line and mounting the XLoc remote. The Reverb's remote is available in both left and right options, and can be attached to the same clamp as the brake lever and shifter via their MatchMaker X mount, or run separately for a more independent position. Many riders, including myself, have found that using a right hand XLoc remote mounted to the underside of the bar in place of a front shifter offers the best ergos, but that choice obviously won't be ideal for a lot of riders out there. While using the MMX mount will make for a clean cockpit, we'd suggest going with the independent Discreet clamp to allow for maximum adjustment. The saddle's rails are supported by longer than average clamps, and tilt adjustments are a cinch thanks to the angle of the head's opposing bolts that allow for easy access with a full sized hex key. This may sound like a simple point, but you'll appreciate it if you've had to struggle with a sawed off hex key to make angle adjustments, as required with some of the competition.

Riders who don't run a front shifter can mount up a right hand remote on the underside of their bar in its place. We found that this provided the best ergonomics possible, as well as helping to protect the button from damage.

Some riders are likely intimidated by the Reverb's hydraulic hose, so with that in mind we set about shortening the hose and performing a bleed to see just how tricky the process actually is. The answer: it's less complicated than swapping a shift cable, especially considering that everything you need is included in the box - a torx key, syringes with fittings, instructions and the required 2.5wt hydraulic fluid. In fact, trimming the post's hose will likely not even require you to perform a bleed unless you make a mess of it. If that's the case, bleeding should be an easy, drip free affair thanks to fittings that screw into place. It does need to be stressed that only 2.5wt hydraulic fluid should be used, and never the DOT brake fluid that is employed in Avid's brake systems. Three of the four Reverbs that equip our rotating test fleet came from RockShox ready to roll, but one unit did require a bleed before it would function properly. We've heard of others who have had the same issue, and while the process is simple, we'd like to see them all come out of the box in working order.


Performance
The Reverb has very little play at its head out of the box, with roughy a millimeter or two at the nose of the saddle - not enough for even the most sensitive of riders to feel under them. Despite the relatively tight tolerances, the post cycles up and down smoothly and freely when new, something that can't be said about all of the competition. There is slightly more wiggle after a full season of use, approximately another millimeter, but it is still nothing to be concerned about. Rocking the saddle front to back with your hands can produce a small knock as the stanchion rocks slightly in the outer tube, but this is eliminated once the saddle is weighted.

Pushing the remote's button with your thumb and weighting the saddle will lower the post to the desired height, and regardless of whether the post is traveling up or down, letting go of the button stops the saddle from moving at whatever position you'd like. The XLoc remote takes less thumb pressure to activate than most cable operated versions, a trait that many lady shredders and younger riders will appreciate. A dial on the remote allows you to control the return speed as the post extends, although I found myself preferring to leave it at the fastest setting. Wy would you want to run it slower? Riders who consistently lower the saddle a touch for technical climbs will find that the slower return speed will make finding that perfect height much easier.

The Reverb lets you choose the exact saddle height that you're looking for, whether that's slammed for a gnarly downhill, full extension for a long climb, or down a touch so you can charge that tricky up hill section or find the flow on some fast, rolling singletrack.

While most other dropper posts offer a "cruiser" postion that is slightly lower than full extension, the Reverb's ability to stop it at any point in its travel - the adjustment is infinite - allows you to lower it to the exact height that you're looking for. This is great for those fast, rolling sections of trail that still require some pedal strokes, but are enjoyed that much more by getting the saddle out of the way. It has been said before, but a telescoping post can also actually help your climbing as well: dropping the saddle slightly can aid steep, technical climbing where you might be worried about committing fully and not being able to get a foot down if it all goes South.

RockShox Reverb
Riders with small hands and short fingers may find that the XLoc remote can be a bit of a stretch to reach. We'd suggest that if that sounds like you you're best off mounting it as a standalone unit up against your grip instead of using the MMX or brake lever mount option.

Why hydraulic?
While the idea of using a hydraulic hose to activate the post instead of a standard steel cable may intimidate some riders, it proved to be both reliable and easy to work on. We never once damaged or pulled a hose out, despite a full season of crashing and abuse. In fact, the Reverb's hydraulic operation is what puts the post head and shoulders above the competition. Whereas other designs use a shift cable that will need to be adjusted as it and housing settles in - with some posts being headache inducingly sensitive to cable tension and require that it be spot on to function properly - the Reverb has no such issues. On top of that, unlike a steel cable that can quickly become contaminated and require much more lever pressure to operate, mud and water will not effect the Reverb's action, with it being indifferent to nasty trail conditions. All four of our Reverb posts that are in the test rotation have performed nearly flawlessly in this regard, with consistent lever and post action that refuses to change regardless of how shitty the weather becomes or how often we hose off the bikes. Only now, after a year of solid use, is one unit moving slightly rougher than when it was new. That is a reliability record that other designs can only dream of at this point.

SRAM in Les Gets France. Photos by Sven Martin.
One of the biggest complaints with most dropper posts is their head mounted cables that create a surplus loop when the saddle is lowered. The Reverb Stealth routes its hydraulic line from the bottom of the post and down into the frame tubes, eliminating the issue. We've spent a bit of time on a 2012 Trek Slash equipped with the new Stealth model and loved its invisibility. The catch? They will only be available as original equipment on select '12 Trek and Scott models.

Issues
With it's proven reliability and smooth operation the Reverb is head and shoulders above other options on the market, but some of the competition does have it beat in a few specific areas. While the post's XLoc remote is bound to remain smoother in the long run than even the most well setup cable option, I'd like to see the button protrude less for better ergonomics - it can sometimes feel like a bit of a stretch to reach in the heat of the moment. With the XLoc remote positioned atop the bar as intended you should also refrain from flipping the bike upside down (when repairing a flat for instance) due to causing damage to the button. Having a more compact XLoc remote would adress this issue as well.

Although all posts shipping now are equipped with much sturdier hose fittings at the post's head, early models came stock with somewhat fragile pieces that could be easily damaged if one forgets that he or she should never clamp the upper tube in a repair stand. The damage caused should be put down to user error, but RockShox has addressed the issue and all newer models come fitted with burlier hose attachments that can take more abuse.

Are you a lanky rider who likes to run a post with an offset head? If so, you're out of luck. The Reverb is only available with its current zero offset head, although the long lower saddle rail clamp does allow you to slide the saddle back without worrying too much about bending saddle rails. Is it enough? Not for some riders out there.

Pinkbike's take:
bigquotesThe Reverb is the clear leader when talking about telescoping posts. While some riders may shy away from the hydraulic hose, this is the very thing that puts the RockShox dropper ahead of the field. No rusty cables or constant tension adjustments, just reliable action from the get go. A layback head would be a great option for some riders, and we'd like to see the remote ergos tweaked slightly. Still, the Reverb's reliability and install-and-forget nature make it our first choice when riders ask us which dropper post they should consider. - Mike levy





172 Comments

  • 70 4
 the middle question is pretty funny. everyone should ride hardtail singlespeeds too in order to be more of boss rider.
  • 4 4
 yeah i laughed when i saw it. and i would rather just stop before every downhill if i had a quick release. but since i dont i just put it about a centimeter lower than usual
  • 11 1
 Haha I put ride with your saddle up like a boss just cause its funny.
  • 18 2
 i always have my saddle down Razz
  • 14 19
flag WAKIdesigns (Nov 30, 2011 at 0:14) (Below Threshold)
 heh LTmtb - many people do ride with saddle up and pride themselves with it. Then even more people ride with saddle too low. Guess which ones are faster? A person who buys dropper post very early in his/hers biking days will miss the great lesson that high saddle gives in technical trail riding - moving around on the bike.
  • 19 4
 so you're saying someone who learned how to ride bikes back when you didn't lower the seat to go downhill are faster than those who have always lowered their seat. read that back to yourself and think about it a bit. there's so many ways to describe you being wrong with this one i don't even know where to start. maybe you should have a category where you have to race downhills with the seat up? then you might have a point. Instead though, you could just buy a dropper and shred wherever you want.
  • 7 19
flag WAKIdesigns (Nov 30, 2011 at 1:55) (Below Threshold)
 eee... most good downhill riders, even at national level ride with their seats very high up... good guys racing enduro have those limiting clamps on their dropper posts so it doesn't go too low. If you ride technical trail with seat up you are much more likely to learn to move on the bike as you want to get the seat off the way, than when riding with seat all the way down. This exactly how I learned to move all over the bike. Is it just me noticing that in bike parks it's only brake burners riding with seats slammed all the way down?
  • 13 2
 When you've already learnt to move around the bike, I don't see any advantages of downhilling seat up high as it only limits your room to move around. I've been dj'ing for many years and I've recently got into fr/dh riding, and I always keep my seat quite low so that I've got plenty of room to whip and turn the bike around. Just my 2 cents... or maybe I've missed something?
  • 4 5
 yes waki something must have been missed in your translation. obviously riding with your seat way too low is for slow inexperienced people. but your first comment implied that we should all learn to ride with our seats up.
  • 4 4
 yea translation was required indeed, sorry. I meant that in some point of "biking career" it is good to ride with seat up. I actualy do it on my HT to conserve skills, you know: riding a 6" bike with a dropper post on trails will make you move less and less in time. On the other side of spectrum it is also very common that beginners ride with the seat too high because they are told to do it this way by their knowledgeable friends balancing in road and XC racing area... the pedalling efficent positions and other stuff very helpful when riding over rocks, roots and negotiating between obstacles. People in bike shops doing all this "classic bike fit" stuff are guilty as hell also.
  • 2 3
 Got to love the classic bike fit
  • 3 1
 HELL YEAH LIKE A BOSS
  • 20 2
 So far had 2 joplins, a gravity dropper, and 2 different ks's. The gravity dropper went through 4 bikes and 7 seasons without as much as a housing service! Wish I hadn't sold it with a previous bike! The others require constant maintenance. Another key feature of the mechanical design is that when it engages, it is impossible for it to fade down or up, as the others do when seals fail. My KS currently sags almost two inches. The joplin sagged an inch and a half after 2 weeks of riding! I haven't owned a Reverb. But despite my respect for Rock Shox, I don't think the hassle associated with "infinite adjustment" is worth it. How many positions do you really need? Maybe 4 index points? I find placing the saddle "exactly where I want it" is elusive and kind of a distraction. But who cares what I think!!
  • 46 2
 I care what you think.
  • 6 2
 I'd say that it's the post's lack of index points that make it so useful. I've been on the Speci, and fiddled with the GD, and always had a tricky time finding that cruiser position. With the Reverb there is no set spot, you just put it where you want and be done with it. I know others out there don't seem to have an issue finding that indexed spot, so maybe it's just me.
  • 4 0
 It isnt just you. So glad I went with the reverb for my remedy. The Command post on my buddies bike doesnt compare. I cant for the life of me actually nail the middle position on it. On the street, sometimes, but on the trails, never.
  • 7 1
 Wait till fox comes out with theres.
  • 1 3
 Suntour is gonna be where it's at mate.
  • 4 0
 +1 for Gravity Dropper. My Reverb lasted less than 6 months before starting to sag. A little at first and then eventually failing mid-ride. Just didn't hold the pressure in the post. Rock Shox took 2 months to eventually respond to the warranty claim and to my surprise they haven't fixed it.. I got vouchers for equivalent amount from CRC. BTW, that was my second warranty claim on the Reverb - the first was when I snagged the remote actuator piston on my shorts and it snapped in half! I got the vibe from CRC that there were a lot of issues with the Reverbs. I would not risk getting another hydraulic post. Keeping it simple now. Not a single issue yet with GD.
  • 1 0
 Agreed with peddle, the KS brand is complete junk. I've sent mine back 4 times now. It lasts about 2 weeks then it's broken again. I have to pay shipping every time. The original reason I bought it was that it had a lever under the saddle that is less susceptible to breakage and less clutter on the bar, which is great. But, I've since gone back to a regular old q/r seatpost. These posts are convenient when they work, but they all have their issues, and they all add weight, cost, and maintenance to the bike unnecessarily.
  • 2 0
 Anyone looked at the command post blacklite? It's mechanical so in theory no sagging, and three fixed positions which physically lock in, so actually definitely no sagging!!!
  • 3 0
 We have a Blacklite on test as we speak that has a solid 6 months of use through some very shitty conditions. Review to come soon!
  • 1 0
 Good, I actually just got mine yesterday but (can you believe it) stupidly said it could be a christmas present to me, so I have to wait a month to use it! From ones I have used/sold, they seem decent. I await the review.
  • 1 0
 I've been riding the KS i900 with the lever under the saddle for the last 6 or 7 months with not a single problem at all. no sag or anything. just consistently working... i dunno, just my experience with the KS
  • 7 1
 Uh oh. Bring on the I love it; I hate it comments. Nice review Mike. The cutaway shot in particular is slick. A how-to video for maintenance and hydraulic bleed would be nice although perhaps that's for Tech Tuesdays? Anecdotally, the posts do seem to need periodic maintenance so that might be useful.
  • 7 0
 sram's youtube page has every step by step needed
  • 10 0
 Thanks dab - didn't know that/ Here's the page if anyone's interested fyi www.youtube.com/user/SRAMtech
  • 15 0
 helpful courteous people! too rare
  • 5 0
 had a joplin 3L and loved it. sold it with a frame because I heard that a 5 inch dropper was coming out. now I've gotten used to the QR situation again. most of the guys I ride with like to stop at the top of a trail and chinwag so I have lots of time to adjust. Now I don't know if I really need a dropper anymore. for instance I was in a race and crushing a DH section with my lowered post and a logo spandex XC dude blurred by saying something like "on your left" with his post five miles in the sky. not saying I'll never get one but people seem to get used to their riding positions after a while.
  • 10 2
 Gravity Dropper, still the best.. ..shame it's so ugly.
  • 2 0
 You tell'm zorba! Keep it mechanical. All the others sh*t the bed one way or another. Who wants another "suspension" item to service! The cable housings don't need as much service as this article suggests. The internals will be the maintenance issue.
  • 2 1
 KS, still the best. Only company with 150mm of drop that isn't an abomination.
  • 1 0
 I wouldn't even remotely want that much. I think few people would...I know you are riding a smaller bike than you generally would or something like that.
  • 1 0
 I have a short torso and long legs, so I always buy a medium when someone who is my height could easily ride a large. I need the 22.5-23" top tube to fit my torso/arms, and the extra seat height/saddle drop to fit my long legs.
  • 3 0
 Well aren't you just a freak of a person......I kid I kid.
  • 4 0
 If it was so reliable, why would there be a 20 page thread on them breaking over at MTBR? And FWIW, mine is on its 2nd RMA in 2+ months of riding. First for the barb breaking, replaced with the new version. Second (current) for being unable to hold air.
  • 2 2
 All dropper posts are unreliable - some are just slightly less and some are more. It's an element on which you place your heavy butt, that is thinner than thinniest suspension fork leg and unlike fork it does not compress under load. It has many elements, and more elements more chance to fail. You either look at the positives of having one, putting negatives completely aside, or you just don't buy it at all, regardless of maker.

Dropper is tons of fun, really squeezes all juices of XC trails, that you normally wouldn't extract in ondulating terrain, but if my it fails again (I broke the piston), I repair it and sell it right away. Slightly lowered regular post isn't that bad if you have the power in the legs.
  • 1 0
 I can't comment on other's failures, just that the four Reverbs in rotation here have performed well. It's no secret that there have been some issues, we note that in the review, but ours have been reliable.
  • 3 0
 my Reverb was flawless for several months of abuse, until the remote trigger shaft sheared off (metal looked somewhat brittle - I never crashed on the remote)

sent it to the UK Sram distrib. for warranty and back in my hands within 3 days, complete with a free service. awesome service Smile

really missed the post once it went away as I was going on a big mountain ride the next day and having to use a Q/R seatclamp with regular seatpost totally sucked, my left thumb kept going for the remote trigger (it becomes a habit..) and nothing to push!


a new inclusion with 2012 Reverbs is a neat machined aluminium rockshox clamp which fits the stanchion so you can preset the drop height, as some riders prefer to set a minimum seatpost length. riders had been doing "homebrew" fixes with plastic seatpost reflector clamps and whatnot, so RS came out with their official clamp which looks real nice and is easy to install

in my opinion (after all the cr*p dealing with customers with faulty Gravity Droppers, Command Post, KS and Joplins), the RS Reverb with its fully hydraulic system is a "game changer" for the serious trail and all-mountain rider

its basically a hydraulic fork leg with a hydraulic remote, and RS have been in that game a long, long time (my first RS fork was 1992)
  • 1 0
 I've had barb problems..... and I don't even know how it breaks. no crashes, no strange handling. that is the ultimate weekness in fact. Love the post, but when you just finished climbing 1500hm (~4500ft) and are foaming at the mouth for the earned downhill.... then you somehow see that its not going down cause the barb is broken- dohhhh. at least with a cable, you can jimmy something to work. I still love the thing though.
  • 4 0
 I also hear that in cold weather the fluid will almost gel up, causing the post to return ultra slowly. Good design, just needs some factory tweaks to get it working right. Nothing ever comes out perfect the first time.
  • 1 0
 I've read that as well.. ours has been used in below freezing temps (maybe -2 or 3c, no colder) and it didn't return any slower. They do have the new line on them though, which may help.
  • 1 1
 I rode reverb in sub zero temperatures for the first time last week. Surprisingly enough it worked better than in the summer. It went down much easier, just the return was a tiny bit slower.
  • 1 0
 Why would it act slower, hydraulic brakes never just freeze up. It thin mineral oils people. That stuff won't freeze.
  • 1 0
 It doesn't freeze but its viscosity changes. It does get thicker. Same thing happens to your suspension, thats why people change to a lighter weight oil if they are doing any serious winter riding. I have noticed the effects of cold temperatures on suspension (say like -20 C then add windchill). I assume your post went down easier because the air cartridge pressure dropped from the cold, can you adjust that pressure with a shock pump WAKI? Might make it work "better" for you in the summer months if you drop a few PSI.
  • 1 0
 True, guess I never ride in a cold a weather as you north of the border guys.
  • 1 0
 Gravedigging time. I just rode my 2012 reverb at -15c. Elixirs 7 worked well, fox suspension did ok but my reverb stopped working entirely after 30 minutes. I could cycle it all the way up and down with my hand without touching the remote. Not good.

When I got home I let it warm up and it didn't get any better, so I removed it and plugged in a shock pump. 0psi. That's odd because I didn't hear an air leak or anything blowing up while riding. Once it was full of air, it cycled through the travel but it was choppy and noisy. It looks and sounds like some air got into the oil circuit, I guess I'll have to bleed it. For the record, I had a full maintenance on it when the season started so it wasn't neglected and it worked flawlessly before I left home.

I rode it around -5 with no problem before so maybe I was unlucky but from now on I would advise refraining from bringing one outside when its below -10.

First thing I thought when it happened was "I guess that's a good argument for cable actuated droppers" but after looking around on the web a little, some people claim their cable droppers seized when it was cold enough.
  • 1 0
 Time for a lurker's first post:

I've had my Reverb for about 9 months now and it has performed very well and I have been quite happy with it. Last week I was riding in -16 and after about 20 min the Reverb would not hold it's position. I could raise it up it's full travel but as soon as I released the lever it would quickly drop back down to it's lowest position. I ended up having to raise the seat post to continue the ride, which was less convenient because parts of the ride were on a frozen river and it would have been nice to quickly drop the seat down to keep your feet close to the ice when things got sheer. After getting it inside and letting it warm up it behaved normally again.

This is not a complaint, considering the conditions, just adding my feedback that cold temp does seem to cause issues. Maybe (as suggested above) a thinner fluid would help?
  • 3 0
 I have this post on my Reign X1 and love it. It has a bunch of travel so you can mess around with it a lot. It can go from one extreme to the other since there's 125mm travel. These posts tend to be a little heavier of course, but I think its well worth it.
  • 3 0
 I have a Reverb....one of the best things on my bike...for AM riding, you can't beat it. The one WARNING I will say is that its natural to flip your bike over and stand it on the bars and saddle while changing a flat....the Reverb lever/actuator REALLY doesn't like that. Judging by the shots of scuffed the up actuator in the review, mike has done just that. I know I did it till I was warned. Essentially, that little lever is not designed to take on the weight of your bike and can break easily....FWIW.
  • 3 0
 the secret to that is to buy the post with the opposite side lever you want to mount it as, and mount it upside down on your bars... I did and its so stealth that people go "whoaaa, nice:-)" and I can put my bike upside down no issues.
  • 2 0
 I think having more sizes would be a benefit. Although the sizes mentioned might be the most common, it would make sense to expand. At least include some sort of a shim or sleeve for larger seat tubes. Other than that, it looks to me like they did a pretty good job. Just some minor tweaks, and it would blow away the competition.
  • 2 0
 I'd love to see a 27.2mm size that you could easily swap from bike to bike using shims, but it's more complicated. The general lack of sizing with posts that use hydraulic fluid is due to fluid displacement - there just isn't enough room within them when built around a 27.2mm tube. KS actually has a model that uses a remore piggy back at its head to take up the volume needed with their 27.2 post.
  • 2 0
 According to their website, the X Fusion Hilo is available in a 27.2 without piggy back, but only in a 100mm
  • 2 0
 Good call, forgot about that one. It's smaller amount of travel lets it get away with the 27.2 size. Perfect for older or steel hardtails.
  • 1 0
 dunno how a 27.2 would hold up to abuse, i've already bent a couple of usual aluminum 27.2 seatposts and i only have some 60 kilos...
  • 1 0
 Pretty sure the Hilo uses a steel upper tube so probably a lot stronger, but it is heavier - I've got the 27.2 version and it's holding up well.
  • 1 0
 that would make sense.
  • 1 0
 With a 27.2 post size you're limited to 100mm of drop due to the decreased diameter not being strong enough to support more height.
  • 1 0
 I've heard that basically the hilo is horrible with reliability and heavy on top of that..
  • 2 0
 So you've had no issues with reverbs needing to be bled at regular intervals? I had a '10 model which needed a bleed every few months and then had a failed poppet valve after about 10 months. The '11 warranty replacement has been flawless however. Even with the headaches, it is so good when working correctly, its worth the money, fuss and weight.
  • 1 0
 Nope, no regular bleeding required.
  • 3 0
 My Reverb has been flawless for almost a year. No play, no bleed issues, and it just plain works... Can't say I've heard the same from anyone else though. Sometimes it seems like I got the only good one they made.
  • 2 0
 Mine has been perfect to ive never had to bleed it evan when i cut the hose down.looks like we both got lucky
  • 2 0
 Definitely looks good, but looks aren't everything! Hopefully they changed more than just the hose routing, We had more Reverbs being sent back for internals being replaced or rebuilt. Nice review, but it would be a lot more helpful if you y'all reviewed items and gave constructive feedback; Such as name the post you are referring to that have more problems than the reverb so when readers are considering their options its not completely one sided. My opinion is, the new reverb has some great additions to a design that was decent at best. Now the post looks good and hopefully is more reliable than its predecessor, hopefully it lost a little weight as well. I rate the Reverb as third and considering there is so many posts on the market, that is pretty good. The top three in my book would be The Specialized Command post 2nd gen. More than likely the Blacklight will be much better. The Gravity dropper would be my second choice if looks were not in the question, as they are VERY reliable yet VERY UGLY and chunky. Third would be the SRAM Reverb, Very innovative with being a hydrolic system, but bleeding can have its issues, The looks are very good, The reliability is in question. Overall the Sram post is an amazing post if your sponsored, made of money or get them free or just plain have a back up for when they fail. I don't mean to be so blunt but please provide better feedback to why this is the best product on the market, FACTS would be best not just your opinions!
  • 7 0
 Basically, every cable operated post that we've used has given us more headaches than the Reverb. Many of the issues are down to the simple fact that they depend on a steel cable and we are based in Southwestern B.C., a place that can feel like the rain capital of the world during parts of the year. That was the gist, that its hydraulic design puts it above all other cable operated posts, not just a single make or model.

A review is an opinion. We share our experiences with said product and then readers have to weigh the pros and cons to decide if it's for them. The only FACTS are the tech specs, weight and price. Reviews that are this positive will always catch heat, that's understandable, but I stand by my words: the Reverb puts the rest to shame.
  • 2 0
 Stand by your words Mike. You are bang on. I've owned and/or worked on the others and they're all relative failures in comparison. Certainly not saying the Reverb has been absolute perfection, They've had a few issues but all easily fixable.
I would suggest people get the left side control if they run front and rear gears and ride back brake right. It seems a lot safer to go for the lever and unguard your grip of bar and brake on the front than the back brake. Cuz when you want that thing down at speed, you really want it down.
  • 1 0
 every single time i rode my gravity dropper in Wales- the home of grinding paste mud, it failed in under 3 hours. The cable was also constantly needing to be replaced during the winter. And yes, i looked after it.

that said, my reverb also failed after 6 rides. but was warranty repaired in 4 days.... no complaints there. when it is working, it is by far the best i have had, KS included (a close second).

IMHO
  • 1 0
 bugger, dont say that. ive just bought a gravity dropper and im in south wales.
  • 1 0
 Mike, Thanks for the reply. I agree a review is an opinion. Your review was a good one, and you made a good point about were your located and the conditions the product will be used in. I understand why the hydraulic post would work better in that situation. I am located in southern utah where it is sunny over 300 days a year, so the rain is not a factor. In the rain with a cable actuated post possibly a Gore kit would be a response to help your cables last longer. Yes all cables stretch, I've been in the habit of pre-stretching the cables so this isn't as much of a headache. Usually if any adjustment is needed on a cable actuated device, usually a slight turn of the barrel adjuster will fix the problem. Like you, I stand behind what I stated. My top three stands, from experience of failure with each post, dealing with the companies on warranties with each post, and normal wear and tear of each post! Thanks again!
  • 1 0
 Bastard! 300 days of sun per year eh?
  • 2 0
 I've got two reverbs and my first gen version had issues (needed a couple bleeds over its first six months) but after a switch to the new housing it has performed flawlessly. The newer second gen version has been solid through its first season. Can't speak for the mechanical posts as I haven't owned one but I have no problem recommending the reverb. Kind of expensive if you pay retail and its more of a convenience item, not a necessity, so its definitely not for everyone. If you have the cheddar though, I say go for it.
  • 2 0
 Nice review and I wish I was smaller to be able to use a Reverb. I'm over 6'5" and the only dropper post that has enough range is the KS i950 with 150mm. Until now it has worked flawlessly and must say setting it up has been easy. Previously I had a Gravity Dropper that developed a lot of play and was a pain to set up. I hope they make a 150mm version of the Reverb, for when the i950 fails :-)
  • 2 0
 Adding the Reverb to my bike this season was a HUGE upgrade. I've used it on long West Coast rides (Whistler), flowy Desert singletrack (Sedona) and back home out East on rolling Quebec trails and no matter the terrain the convenience it delivers has me sold!

It may sound weird - but with the Reverb it felt like my bike has more travel. I think it's because I am able to absorb more of the trail (pumptrack style). Yes, I could get the same feeling by lowering my seatpost - but the fact of the matter is that I wasn't doing this on anything but really long descents. Now, I'm constantly adjusting things and really getting the most fun out of even the shortest downhill. Now that I've been riding the Reverb for a season I really can't see myself ever going back to a mountain bike without one. If you're serious about how your bike handles you need to atleast try one out. My 2 cents.
  • 1 0
 Same here, I was skeptical about dropper post but I've been ridding my reverb for a year now , and it changed everything, bigger cockpit, more room to move around the bike, more range to pump, better sense of control and i go faster in general which is always a good thing ;-) My only complaint would be the remote button which i think is just too vulnerable. I plan to get rid of the front mech so that button will end up head down on the left side. So far so good, bleed the post once when i first got it (very easy), and forget about it, it just work.
  • 2 0
 I like the idea, however, I´m not shure of how tough and resistant it is. I´ve had expirience with other posts and with not so hard creshes they start bleding out, and they are not really cheap equipment!!!
  • 1 0
 solid introduction, describes the purpose and need of dropper posts.

personally, I have only ridden a couple of rolling super technical trails and don't race on anything super gnarly, so I will lets these dropper post companies beat the shit out of each other even more as the product improves.

good to see a 400mm+ length. I mean, most people undersize their bikes a little in the 6"+ range (or at least I had to because the max size was only 19") for better handling and it's a shame there aren't more longer posts out there!
  • 5 0
 The ks supernatural post comes in a 435mm with 150mm travel.
  • 3 4
 So much travel is useless, unless someone is a really poor rider that thinks moar is better. Riding skills wise, too low saddle is as bad as too high, even though it feels better. 150mm means plenty of leverage and short bushing spacing, on frames with slacker seat angle it's a perfect recipe for excessive play and irreversible dropper post fail after not too long time.
  • 1 0
 WAKI, not if you're 1.96m tall (6'5"+?).
  • 1 3
 I think if you are 196cm tall + you have way more suspension in your legs to use, so it sort of equalizes + you are heavy enough to snap a 150mm travel post so a thing to consider before buying one. I have a 125mm Reverb weigh 80kgs and I have lots of play already.
  • 1 0
 How does being taller allows me to sit and rest my legs better with a shorter seat post? I agree with longer legs I need less travel suspension wise, but also means I need a taller seat to pedal efficiently. I also find that 125mm set up high enough, so that I can pedal in the right position, is not low enough in the compressed position for me to comfortably ride my XL Nomad as I like to ride my V10. 150mm did just that. 105kg and my KS has no play,riding between 4-7 trail hours per week.No heavy mud riding yet though.
  • 2 0
 At 6'2", I enjoyed the 150mm travel of the KS, and I'm one of those people who gave up on these pieces of crap posts and went back to standard post, riding it high until I get to the big descents. I ride with tall guys with Reverbs and on big descents they have to lower the post in their frame via q/r collar because 125mm isn't enough.
  • 3 0
 Love mine, its on the CANFIELD and ones going on the Sunday for the non race season. Works beautiful I have the 2011 no issues 230lbs and its still fine.
  • 1 0
 the reverb only comes in 30.9mm and 31.6mm sizes, it wont fit the 30mm Iron horse Sunday post size.
  • 1 1
 Dropper o DH bike?!
  • 2 0
 Bah, i have a reverb and 2 KSi 950s. aside from cable adjustments now and than the ks posts have been more reliable than my slow motion reverb that I have to bleed again after 3 months of use.
  • 1 0
 I use the KS 27.2mm version with the piggy back cannister, not had a single problem and ride this through crappy English winters, one of the best upgrades on the bike, not yet come across anyone using the reverb, but generally only seem to hear fairly good things about them, I wish someone would do a 30mm version as there are plenty of manufacturers who are using this size tubing.
  • 2 0
 Are there any problems with these when strapped to a hitch rack using one of those adapter bars that attach to your seat post and stem? Will it damage the seatpost over time? Thanks!
  • 2 0
 I haven't test fit a rack adapter bar, but I'm betting that it wouldn't be a good idea... I can see it possibly damaging the fitting at the head.
  • 1 0
 I was an early adopter of this post and have gone through the process of changing the original hose to the new version, swapping out the barb fittings, bleeding, etc. for more than a year. In that time frame I have broken the barb at the remote twice (the old style that came with it and the new threaded style with the reinforced collar) in really minor crashes. The post also needed to be bled a few times and the latest development may be blown seals. When the post works it is awesome. But it just seems like it is so problematic or fragile. I also hate the fact that I can't easily put into my bike workstand. My 2 cents...
  • 1 0
 It's actually surprising how much of a pain not being able to easily clamp the post in a stand actually is. It's easy enough to rotate the cable, but a lot of people bunged their line/fittings up by not thinking about it. Good point.
  • 1 0
 this is only negative I have with my Reverb (although this might apply to other dropper posts on the market)

every time I want to work on my Devinci Dixon with its Reverb, I have to cut the zip-ties on the frame's cable guides and RS plastic clamp, raise the post enough in the frame to fit the workstand clamp head

then lower the post and install new zip-ties once the work is done

kinda annoying compared to a regular seatpost where the bike goes straight into the stand, but the advantages of the dropper post completely outweigh this workshop issue Wink
  • 2 0
 My first Gen reverb shit itself after 6 months of hard abuse and no servicing(wouldn`t hold air). since it got warrantied and had all the parts changed to 2012 spec, its been faultless. Amazing bit of kit!
  • 1 0
 I've used a joplin for this season and it was peaches and cream for the first couple of months, and now it wiggles back and forth and creeps down. I was interested in this post as a replacement but it sounds like there are problems as well. I think I will be sticking with good old thomson post until someone makes a dropper post that lasts longer than half a season.
  • 3 0
 The Joplin was great at introducing people to the idea of dropper posts, but wow, that thing is the most unreliable hunk of shit ever. It's amazing that it is still for sale.
  • 1 0
 I had the original 3" Joplin, and you are totally right. I had all the problems as everyone else, BUT it did get me hooked on the dropper posts! I sent it in for service, and they said I could upgrade to the new Joplin 4, better seals, extra travel. Honestly, I have ridden it all year, raced it in a 24 hour, left it in the garage dirty, and got it muddy. It has had ZERO issues. Maybe I lucked out, or maybe they actually made the changes needed to improve reliability. Just my 2 cents, but the new Joplin seems just as good.
  • 1 0
 to the problems with the Joplin, I would add the pedals and headsets from the same manufacturer = big fail Frown
  • 1 0
 I have had some serious issues with mine. Upper air sleeve unscrews itself and pops the air seal. This happened to me after only 1 month of riding 6 days a week. Top bolts are also a bit creaky, need to be greased an torqued quite tight. Remote system is flawless. Note that if your seat sucks up when you lift the bike by the seat, the air seal has blown or is about to blow. If your seat is not working I recommend that you aways check the air pressure before doing a full system bleed. I hope that they fix the upper air seal problems because I really love this seat when it works. Frown
  • 1 0
 Have to say that I've seen plenty of problems with the Reverb. Maybe not as many as the KS and certainly not as many as the Joplin but defo more than there should be. Some seem to take a lot of abuse but there are some lemons out there that I've seen blow up very quickly after return from warranty service of an initial problem.
  • 1 0
 Awesome review. Sounded like you had a very positive experience! I would love to trust one of the dropper posts enough to buy one. I've heard they change you riding style, the convenience far outweighs the weight. Having ridden a Spec CP and a Gravity dropper, both which failed UP before steep descents. I'm afraid. I've heard the KS were supposed to be good. Bummer to hear so much negative.
  • 1 0
 So don't get me wrong, the hydraulic actuation does seem to be better but how much better? if RockShox could offer the post at a significantly lower price point maybe 50-100 bucks lower by using a cable, then i think bang for buck would dictate that cable actuation is a better value (but i'm just speculating, i don't know how much less expensive it would be). The only thing that would make this hydraulic actuatuation a clear winner for me is if i had stealth routing which requires it. But if some other company could figure out how t make the cable actuation run to the base of the seatpost, then again, no clear winner for me.
  • 1 0
 These are great working and smooth BUT where the line connects to the post itself is highly susceptible to breaking not to mention when you first get the post its mandatory to cut and bleed the line which is kind of pain. KS-ones are good in my experience. I've sold a lot of them, and some on our demo bikes and we never saw any problems.
  • 1 0
 As I've repaired a couple of them, the most common failure on those post is that the stock seal head's lock tite isn't strong enough to keep it from unscrew itself while cycling up and down over time. Eventually the outer o-ring will fail and the post won't hold air anymore. It's an easy fix if you haven't lost some oil. Just go to the post's service video and when you end up with the stanchion, the seal head will likely be unscrewed. Put a new O-ring in place ( but don't unscrew it more than what you'll need to replace the o-ring or you'll mess up the oil volume), put it back togetter and go ride!

I hope my fellow at Sram now use a stronger bond lock tite! Smile
  • 1 0
 I've heard plenty about all the early issues from the first models but I think these have been addressed pretty well now.
I have a 2012 125mm 30.9 version on my Marin hardtail and a 2012 125mm 31.6 version on my Scott Ransom full suss.
They haven't had a long term testing yet, but they already look, fit and work better than the Joplin I was running before...
I got to say there's no finer feeling than rolling up to the edge of something steep, rocky and rooty... Pushing that button to drop the seat well out of the way and then cleaning the downhill section...
Well, apart from maybe after you've finished the downhill section with your thighs and lungs burning...
To effortlessly at a push of a button, have your saddle slide up comfortably under your butt, to the perfect climbing hieght, letting you to just peddle off up that next rise...
If you get a chance to try one out... Do it!
It'll open your eyes/minds and definitely change your perceptions/opinions...
And if you can afford it then just buy one... It'll change your riding for the better! IMHO
  • 2 2
 Only when I'm 100% happy with the rest of my bike would I ever consider a dropper post.

To me it's like a $150 saddle. It's great to have one. But really some $30 saddles are actually pretty good. I ride for the exercise, and I don't mind spending 5 seconds to drop a seat post when I'm having a rest anyway.
  • 1 1
 Then maybe you haven't encountered trails that combine steep and technical downhills with well, short (but not short enough to just stand up and sprint) uphills. Or trails that have speedy traverses after some leg burning downhill. Dropper posts just help keeping your flow and saving energy for when it matters.
  • 1 0
 No we have those, I just leave the post low and have a non-premium pedaling experience. If I was in the Megavalanche then I would certainly try to find a way to buy one.

I'd rather have a skiing holiday than a dropper post, but hey, if you got the money for both, why not?
  • 4 0
 That's one cheap skiing holiday.
  • 1 0
 I am curious how you can remove the internally routed cable remote from the frame (Trek/Scott frames mentioned) without getting oil all over the inside of it? What exactly would it take to remove?
  • 3 0
 X-Fusion Hilo is treatin me pretty good so far.
  • 1 0
 Yeah, Hilo not too bad...I like the look of the reverb though and I am sold on adjustable posts...Had the Hilo out for a service a couple of weeks ago and rode for a while on a normal post...I enjoyed the novelty, but kept trying to push the remote lever that wasn't there...
  • 2 0
 It's definetly the smoothest..... Hopefully sram will step up their game as far as replacement parts goes
  • 2 3
 wow couldn't believe how many people voted for it being able to add flow to your riding.... i know the direction biking is heading into but i guess i still prefer to be "old school" and make due of what i already have. interested to see more of what is to come in the future.
  • 2 0
 The next step is: a XC bike that transforms into a DH bike with a push of a button!
  • 2 0
 Already exists, Called a Bionicon I think
  • 1 0
 Noooo, I thought of something like a transformer bike, not just an expanding shock. lol
  • 1 0
 To be fair that was the only option for people who wanted to say "Yes I want/have a dropper post and like it" lol. How old school do you wanna go? Don't go too old school, or your bike won't have anything but 2 wheels...
  • 2 0
 I want one! Wireless/cable-less RF remote option next?
Until I can afford one, I'm rocking my Joplin!
Let the haters hate!
  • 5 1
 I'd like to see one that lowered w/o body weight on it... maybe with some sort of negative air chamber that pulled it down.
  • 2 0
 It's a nice idea to have "automated" lowering, but I wouldn't make it "button" actuated, rather make with some sort of dial, so that you know, how high it is, since you don't have the "ass"-feedback to know where you are.
  • 1 0
 Spot on guys! Let's get it patented!
  • 2 1
 Wireless? like Kegels actuated? If the made one I would order it NAO!
  • 1 0
 Yep. Go with this: www.freepatentsonline.com/7717132.pdf
Add a simple receiver and driver for the piezo circuit. Battery access on the bottom of the post. Add a handlebar mounted transmitter with one button. No wires, cables, or hydraulic lines! Easy to remove and replace with a standard seatpost for racing, etc,....or to install a standard seatpost to put it on a workstand.
  • 2 1
 brilliant!
  • 1 2
 This Post is the SHIT!!!! I have had mine since they came out, definitely does have some mechanical issues. ie. if you run the lever on the top like they show, it will break off if the bike flips and you will have to completely redo the hose line and bleed, easier than bleeding some avid breaks though. other than that i have had as many issues with my traditional cable post i have been running for the same amount of time (specialized command post). So i would say the infinitely adjustable hydraulic post wins by a long shot. and this is coming from someone who HATES SRAM.
  • 1 0
 Be civil and constructive because reading is fundamental, and don't run by pool with scissors.
  • 1 2
 Let me just start this off by saying that I support sram in every way and have never had issues with their products ( even juicy brakes) as long as they are set up and maintained correctly. However, this post is an overcomplicated piece of crap. Lets start with the hydraulic cable junction on the post itself: if you look at this thing wrong it snaps off and dumps oil all over. oh yeah, they redesigned it but it still breaks and sucks. Come on this is supposed to be for mountain bikes. Moving right along, I don't know what the author of this article's idea of easy bleeding is but this post is a bitch. It s messy and sram's tech document on how to do it is incomplete and useless. Once it is set up it works well... That is until the line breaks at the post any you have to start all over again. Back to the drawing board sram. Oh and some advice, use a cable.
  • 2 0
 I'll agree that the original hose fittings were a bit fragile, but the new ones are much tougher. I've never had either snap on me, and the only ones I've heard of breaking are the original ones, and then it was often due to people forgetting about the hose and snapping it off in a bike stand. I'm not saying that it couldn't/shouldn't be even stronger (it is for use on a mountain bike after all), just that it didn't give us trouble and other's issues were often caused by user error.

I'm not sure what problems you had with the process, but bleeding the Reverb is pretty damn simple.. far easier than bleeding their brakes. Have you watched this vid: www.youtube.com/user/SRAMtech#p/u/8/MsRlj_JJ8t0 It shouldn't take more than 5-10 minutes after you know the steps.
  • 1 2
 Since I bought my Reverb I had to change tyres to something more heavy duty, as suddenly it became so easy to pick up speed on downhills on my XC trails, that I started to loose knobs and get cuts in sidewalls of my Nobby Nics. Coped with a bit of strength training (James Wilson rules) XC trail riding became bikepark-like experience. You can pump more, clear bigger root/rock gaps.

Though I must say that if someone is looking to buy one, don't waste time and thoughts to try to choose "the most reliable one". Dropper post is a complicated piece of equipment (comparing to normal seat post) and that means it will fail in one place or another; the only question is when. The button sucks, it is easy to break, due to shtty material of the piston and plastic ring holding it in place (CNCd stainless please - doable, a great lad from Aus fixed me one). As Mike pointed out it's too long as well - my take, if you ride baggy pants, it's easy to catch them on it, I've done it several times. Even though I run mine inder bars, it broke off. Availability of spares is none at the moment. Thinking about that "button snap" issue, I have one thing to say to potential owners of FOX dropper with enormous trigger mounted over the bars - buy 3 spares with the post and good luck!

I like that they made 100mm version for 2012, I think I would like 80mm one or shorter to reduce the leverage and increase bushing spacing. I doubt if a person with some fundamental skills really needs to drop it all the way to the bottom with 125mm version. Mine developed ugly back/fwd play after half of a year and I rarely drop it to the end, and if so only by mistake. The limiting spacer for 2012 is cool as well.
  • 1 0
 i want there to be a adjustable seatpost tht can be used with the the ccable and push dropper but still be able to use it on a frame tht doesnt have the routes for the cables
  • 1 0
 Guys, what's a minimal length of cutted seatpost ? On my RM Altitude seat tube is pretty short but want sometimes keep saddle as low as possible...
  • 1 0
 The seatpost usually has a minimum insertion point and usually its marked. You're not thinking about cutting the Reverb are you? Or is this a standard seatpost you're going to cut? Frames also have a minimum insertion point and they're usually a bit below the top-tube and seat-tube junction
  • 1 0
 Actually i do Smile My current seatpost RaceFace Respond was cut almost below the marked line because of size of frame. I need to push saddle almost in null position.
  • 1 0
 OK whew - I thought you were going to try to cut the Reverb. If I recall correctly the Altitude has a bit of a kinked seat tube so yeah - you're not going to be able to cut that post as much as you might like
  • 1 0
 Yeah. Correct. Now i realize that. Thanx for your advice Wink
  • 1 0
 ice lift dropper post is 3 times cheaper than this... maybe not so good, but... i think dropper posts are a bit expensive right now. we need more brands in the market.
  • 1 0
 I've just started using a Giant Switch. Its cable-actuated and 4" (which I find is plenty, but my terrain is not so steep). Too early for opinions on it.
  • 1 0
 My reverb has been back to Sram 3 times so far, and they will not replace it for me with a new modle, takes about 3 weeks each time for a repair.
  • 1 0
 you need to get in contact with a different person in the warranty department. the person i spoke with gave me the option of overhaul or replacement. funny but tends to be the case with sram that who you speak with makes all the difference.
  • 1 2
 Damn, a SRAM product review from someone who has a custom SRAM XO nametag sticker on their bike. Next week: Sam Hill tells Pinkbike whether or not the Demo is a good bike for DH racing! ok, I'm making a hyperbole, the article seems to be unbiased and does cover some of the 'issues' with the reverb. I also know that it is damn near impossible to find someone in the bike industry that won't have any bias or brand name disposition. However, as much as I would like to trust Mike's reviews, it would be nice if most of the pictures were not from SRAM and if Mike wasn't on a full XO equipped Trek. BTW this is not directed as an insult to Mike, just a general comment on Pinkbike's journalistic practices. Does anyone else feel like this is a problem, or do you have a solution? I was thinking publish it as "product promotion" rather than "tested". Just because you rode it for a year doesn't mean you don't have incentive to promote it. Also, did anyone notice Pinkbike is running Reverb adds on the homepage right now? yikes.
  • 5 0
 No offense taken... But I fail to see how a sticker would sway my opinion. The sticker thing is common practice, just a nice personal touch on the bikes that all journos receive. We also have a huge sticker making machine of my our sitting about six feet away from me right now =) Also, none of the photos are from SRAM, only the exploded diagram FYI.

My "incentive", as you put it, is to provide a detailed analysis of how the product performed, something that I take a lot of pride in and not in anyway something that can be leaned on by any companies. I'm a massive tech nerd and I straight up enjoy putting these reviews, not "product promotion", together. This is especially true when it is a product that I've had the opportunity to use for a year and have had four different samples of it to beat on. Positive reviews take heat, but I'm OK with that because I'd much rather write the review as I see it instead of adding in negative feedback to simply look like I'm not bought off. I liked the product, move on.

Mike.
  • 1 0
 cool, thanks for the response. Your review is well written and I don't disagree with it. Also, I respect that you are a tech nerd and it is apparent that you put a lot of effort into the review. My point about the sticker is that it represents affiliation with the brand, not that it is hard to come by or that the sticker itself would change your opinion. I am not say the sticker proves a bias; affiliation does not necessitate bias, but it could suggest it. As I said in my original comment I was mostly asking what others thought about your review. I do feel like I was unclear, I was trying to say that I DO trust you, but that I feel like articles like this could (if written by someone with less integrity than yourself) be very biased. I am also assuming that some bias is necessary, such as "sram products do not have a large discrepancy from one to another, therefore the product I reviewed will be similar to the any that can be purchased". After some thought my one request would be that in the description of the picture you have the source, i.e. is it from pinkbike staff or SRAM. Thanks so much, -Paul
  • 1 0
 Perhaps a retarded question but, can you put the seat up and down whilst your still on the saddle or do you have to take your weight off it??
  • 4 2
 LIK A BAUS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! don't need a dropper, i just haul ass.
  • 1 1
 I bought mine last February for a little under $300. I can't believe the price has jumped almost $100 for no significant changes.
  • 2 0
 i'll save my pennies until bob fox releases his production dropper post.
  • 2 0
 I've heard the new Specialized Command Post is the tits.
  • 1 0
 It's like Pam Anderson in her baywatch years.
  • 2 0
 Is there any issue with putting them in a workstand?
  • 1 0
 Yes, you have to be quite careful when clamping it in the stand and never ever clamp the stanchion tube, only gently the outer tube. Care also needs to be taken to not crush the hose. Good question.
  • 2 0
 You guys would cut a frame just to show that there's cable inside :/
  • 1 0
 That is a display frame for trade shows and press camps that was cut by SRAM, not us.
  • 1 0
 I can't wait till fox makes one... it would be awesome to have kashima coat on the post
  • 1 0
 The reverb is supurb in every way. Ever since i bought one life is totally bosanova.
  • 1 1
 Would really like to see a Reverb tech tuesday. Bleeding, hose shortening, other maintenance.
  • 2 0
 Check out the SRAM youtube channel: www.youtube.com/user/SRAMtech#p/u/4/Pv6jH_Hoiac
  • 2 0
 a great tip for the Reverb after cleaning your bike is to use a teflon rich dry chain lube like Finish Line "Dry Lube" or silicon based spray like "Fork Juice" (silicon spray is also available in aerosol form from many other sources)

treat a Reverb just like your forks and rear shock - adding a little dry lube or silicon spray to the stanchion / seal area after cleaning your bike pays dividends because it will clean and lube the wiper seal and keep things running sweet in bad weather conditions.

once you have washed your bike and let it dry, apply the lube or spray, lower and raise the Reverb a couple of times, with a clean cloth or tissue wipe any excess dirt off the stanchion (this will often get lifted off the top inside of the wiper seal during this procedure) and then apply a little more lube or spray to the stanchion and and rub it in with a clean cloth
  • 2 1
 Works great when it works, but I'll stick with my GD.
  • 2 1
 In this case size matters, 9" rase black mamba FTW.

...
  • 1 0
 Too bad they went under...
  • 1 0
 i have a 9 inch black mamba Wink
  • 1 0
 I think the person who designed it left and will be coming out with a newer version soon.
  • 1 0
 MRP was looking into the design. Sounds like it's up for grabs.
  • 1 0
 yeah it is really simple, I actually modded one and shortened the travel which allowed me to run it slammed in a bike with a curved seatpost tube.
  • 2 0
 LIKE A BOSS.
  • 1 0
 i adore them but they don't last longer than 3 months
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