“Pedal-Driven” Comment Contest

Mar 30, 2011 at 12:30
by Howell at the Moon Productions  

Want to win money for your local trail builders? Now's the time to show your opinion and let your peers decide if they think you deserve to win, so let's hear it!

Mouth off and win! Just lay down your strongest opinions and comments directly on this blog until May 1st and you could win a License to host a screening of Pedal-Driven to make some money for trails in your area. Additional prizes include Osprey packs, Camelbak packs, Pinkbike merchandise, DVDs, and more from the makers of “Pedal-Driven: a bike-umentary”!


Here’s what we want to hear your opinion about:

Pedal-Driven: a bike-umentary explores the question of whether mountain bikers should be allowed on public lands and if it can be done legally and sustainably. What do you see going on in your world?

- Are legal trails better or worse than illegal trails?
- Share a story (good or bad) about getting legal trails on the ground near you.
- Share any tricks you’ve found for dealing with the ins and outs of government land managers
- What’s the most positive thing you’ve seen happen where the future of mountain biking is concerned?


Judging: Contest will be judged first by peers who will bump your comments up or down. Then the Pedal-Driven producers will review the top user-rated comments to select the final winners.

11 Prize Winners: 1 Grand Prize and 10 Runners Up

Grand Prize: A license to host a screening of “Pedal-Driven: a bike-umentary” once at the theater or venue of their choice and the right to keep all of the proceeds.

Runners Up: Osprey hydration pack, Camelbak hydration pack, Pedal-Driven DVD, Pedal-Driven T-Shirt, Pinkbike merchandise and more!

Deadline: May 1st, 2011. Post your comment now!

You can get more information about the story and see additional trailers at www.pedaldriven.org .

Views: 26,063    Faves: 134    Comments: 11
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167 Comments

  • + 72
 I think as mountain bikers we should have access to the woods. If you ask me all mountain bikers take better care of mother nature and the trails and mountains than any other sport that uses them. I've never gone to a hill and see mountain bikers throwing their wrappers/cans and garbage on the trails , we always put them in our camelbacks or pockets. But if you go snowboarding, snowshoeing etc they are always throwing their trash wherever they see fit. As mountain bikers we take huge pride in having clean and well maintained trails so that we aren't getting in trouble or kicked out of a prime riding area. So for me I'd like to win the money and host the video presentation so that the money can go towards Moose Mountain and help expand their LEGAL trail system into something bigger and better so that even the rookies and young guns can come out and get some riding/trail building experience without having to go to a lift accessed mountain every weekend. Vote for me and help out Moose Mountain!!!
  • + 1
 Part of the fun of riding/trail building is knowing your not surpose to be even stepping foot on the land, but having bike parks is a mintanium way of riding, but if you really want to give it some gnar your own private/secret trails are unbeatable.
  • + 11
 In my area, the trail systems are on conservation land and are dominated by horseback riders, walkers, xc riders and nature enthusiasts. I am very pleased that we have access to a decent trail network, but the only problem is that me and my friends all have larger travel freeride bikes that don't exactly fit into what we are given. We resorted to building our own trails illegally in a woodlot that was quite hidden. We experienced a ton of fun in building our trail which encorporated drops, berms, and jumps, until a group of others showed up and decided to litter, destroy our jumps, and steal our shovels. If that wasn't bad enough, a few months ago a letter was sent to every house in my area saying that the city of Hamilton had recently acquired the very woodlot our trail was on. The activity of trail building is not permitted in this area as it is a fragile environment and we were apparently destroying it. So, now having nothing, we contacted the city about this letter that we received. The lady that we talked to was very understanding, she said that the city looked into giving us riders a place to build but had no where good to do it as they believed the only place that would work would be in a forest. When we told her that it does not need to take place in a forest, and that any open space such as a field would more than suffice. She assured us it would be brought up in the next city's recreational council meeting. Since we have no other options and our illegal trail has been found, we have nothing else to do but hope the city gives us somewhere to build. A group of us will be attending the IMBA trail building session this weekend at Christie Conservation Area to pay our dues to the biking community so that we may all have more trails to ride, but it still doesn't give us the same satisfaction of having our very own local freeride trail like we used to.
  • + 15
 GO MOOSE MOUNTAIN!!!!!!
  • + 3
 Mountain Bikers think all feel that it’s their responsibility to look after and maintain their local trails. Otherwise we all know that it can be simply taken away quicker then it took to build. It’s terrible when people leave their garbage on the side of a trail, but it’s also just as bad when you ride by a piece of garbage and you don’t stop to pick it up. Riders and People in general should always try to remember to "Leave the Trail, CLEANER then when you arrived." Because it will benefit both bikers, and hikers. I think there are some ups and downs, to both legal and non-legal trails. Legal trails are usually well looked after, and are generally pretty easy to maintain, but at the same time they are often ridden more, and might also be made to allow different rider ability’s. Non-legal Trails can be more fun because of the different types of features that people have built, and can be pretty technical, also because of different features it can allow a rider to progress and get better, the down sides are that they can be hard to maintain, they have a tendency to get destroyed quite often, and can be hard to get to if hidden.
  • + 2
 have you ever had that one day were you wake up and all you hear is your little brother screaming your bad mood level is now at a level 2 then you get outa bed and find that dad was useing the soap and theres a hair on it level 4 so you get out of the shower get dressed go have fruit loops and theres not enough so just dust comes out level 5 you get on the bus to school and the radio is on justin bebier the hole way to school bad mood level 7 you get to schol get through 2 classes and its lunch you go to your locker to put your stuff in for lunch and you forget the combo level 8 by this time your about to rage you kick your locker and turns out mr princeipal was right behind you now your off to the office level 10 you get out at the end of lunch and go to class you think ok this day cant get any better WRONG your just passing english and mr teacher ishanding out a pop quiz for 50 marks and you tottally bomb it level 12 class over off to cooking you think sweet cooking exept your partners not here and your stuck with that one ugly smelly chick who can fart the ABC's level 15 reached you get home and you look at the computer and see your bro wants to go for a rip on your favorte flowey trail you ride your bike to the mountain you meet your bro there you climp up and get to the top and its like every ten feet of bikeing you ride you level down 1 and you forget everything you have not but a care in the world you feel like your on top of the world your so relaxed no message or ciropractor can make you feel the same way biking does to me biking is a message biking is a way of life i started biking a couple years back and i havent found anything that can compare nothing makes me as happy as i am when im riding my bike if you have had one of those days give me a props take it easy pink bike
  • + 18
 Scroll through some of the original photos uploaded to Pinkbike and you'll see photos of trails like Toothless and Special K. The thrill of the ride born on the steeps of these trails was shared on the website that today has become synonymous with mountain biking. These are the trails that form the origin of the sport locally, and due to their presence on the original Pinkbike have played a role in shaping our sport on a whole. As documented in Pedal Driven, the task of legalizing our beloved trails is not an easy one and for the Moose Mountain area where Toothless and Special K are located, there was no exception. In the winter of 2008 these trails faced their darkest hour, they were not legal and therefore not even recognized as trails and were set to be logged in the coming years. The riders of Moose Mountain banded together to form the Moose Mountain Bike Trail Society (MMBTS). With great effort from all involved the trails were legalized and recognized as sustainable trails by the province. MMBTS continues to gain steam, just this year proposals for two new trails were approved by the province along with a conceptual 5 year plan that includes even more trails to be built in the future. In a matter of three years the trails of Toothless and Special K, along with the 8 other trails now maintained by MMBTS have gained legal status and will continue to ridden long into the future, sharing the ride and the thrill of mountain biking with many generations to come.
  • + 2
 Please congratulate Dchomey and the rest of the crew from Moose Mountain Bike Trail Society on winning the grand prize of the Comment Contest. Way to rally support for the cause, we're excited to see how Pedal-Driven can help facilitate cooperation on Moose Mountain!
  • + 17
 In our community, there is no limit to the potential for mountain biking. The terrain is unlimited and the government is behind it. The only limitation I see is the energy people (mountain bikers) are willing to put into moving mountain biking forward.

In our community, we have core builders that put ridiculous hours into their trails. We have people spending their evenings writing grant applications and trail proposals. We have people organizing trail maintenance days, races, bbq's, and free shuttle days. We have people approaching local bike shops and businesses for support, people running www.MMBTS.com, and more.

The best part is that these people do it out of their passion to push our sport. Better still is what we've accomplished: $90k in grants; mapping and legitimizing our trails; and 1000s of hours of trail maintenance to name a few. What's even more impressive is the above is driven by less than 10% of our riding community. What's disappointing is the amount who spend their energy complaining about “the man” or wishing, without taking positive action.

Times have changed along with a generational change in the public and in government. Mountain biking is no longer an renegade “extreme sport”. It is as viable and valuable as a neighbourhood soccer field or hockey arena. And for those that think legitimate, standardized trails are boring - check out Silverstar or Whistler trails.

Overall, i guess my point is that we control our destiny. We are the government, we are the industry, and we are the riders. Riders need to organize so the builders can build, the advocates can advocate, the planners can plan, and all the rest falls into place. So far, I think it’s work for us.... oh, and we'd like to host a screening ;o)
  • + 15
 Working within the system of legalized trails can at first feel intimidating, but there are many benefits including:
- Development of a mountain bike community that can be openly proud of their accomplishments and get more people involved in what is a highly exciting sport.
- Development of trails which are constructed in more sustainable ways. This is not a dummying down of trails but an exercise in more creative trail building to create exciting technical riding in accordance and with respect to the topography of the mountain.
- Development of a relation with government with a commitment to transparency. This works both ways and as a result of our relationship we have been advised of changes that may be coming so we won’t be blindsided. As well a line of communication allows government to see your organization as it is – which is not represented by a few irresponsible users that are out there (you know who you are).
And here’s the secret the government wants to develop awesome mountain bike trails – they just don’t know how to do it – and that is where we come in.
Government is developing their legislation on trail building around how Moose Mountain Bike Trail Society (MMBTS) is proposing the building of new trails. MMBTS is pioneering how the landscape will look for downhill mountain biking in Alberta.
We would really love to host a screening of Pedal Driven to support our organization and increase awareness of legalization of mountain bike trails in the Calgary area!
  • + 14
 Watching that trailer I was thinking this could be a movie about the Moose Mountain Bike Trail Society!

So many great points have been made in other comments about the benefits of legalized trails. I’ll just add one. Over the winter, several MMBTS members worked hard on two new trail proposals and a 5 year plan for Moose Mountain Bike Trails. TWO NEW TRAILS have been APPROVED. Part of the process involved a stakeholder review with cattle grazers and Shell as builder and maintainer of the Moose Mountain road. Both were very cooperative. Kananaskis Country is a big multi-use area where logging, cattle grazing, recreation and resource extraction all co-exist. We need to check with others how our plans will effect their use and enjoyment of the land. With a legalized trail system, a long term plan in place and MMBTS as the trail stewards, We are now STAKEHOLDERS. Suddenly I like that buzzword.
  • + 6
 (part 1 of 3)
I live in the San Francisco Bay Area, the east bay to be exact. Biking is a growing sport in the area, and there are many who support it. This includes not only the riders, but parents, teachers, spectators, and people who just think it's a cool sport and like the idea of kids hucking their bikes for fun. Years ago, before riding became a real trend in the bay, there were a few underground spots scattered throughout the various towns in the east bay and those who knew about them rode them frequently. I myself first became addicted to the sport at one of those spots. These areas were well maintained, kept clean and in general respected by those who used them and those who knew about them. While still illegal, nobody really seemed to mind the riders using the small and well hidden spaces to do what they loved. Then, one day, that all changed.
  • + 6
 As mentioned by a few others, the Moose Mountain Bike Trail Society has made incredible progress since it's inception two years ago, The passion of the original builders/riders who began building a decade ago has only grown and been past on to those of us who haven't been around since the beginning. The pursuit of a legal trail system has solidified and grown the local mountain biking in a way I don't believe anyone would have expected when the idea was born. The efforts of the MMBTS to date have given the society a positive reputation with the government unmatched by other user groups. This reputation has already payed dividends as two new trails have been approved and the five year plan has been submitted to the government with positive feedback. These fantastic results clearly indicate that legal trails are possible when the local riding community bands together and puts the wide variety of skill sets to use to achieving a common goal. Not only has the MMBTS worked with the "system" that so many complain about, the MMBTS has managed to produce professional trail proposals which the government intends to use as the standard template for other user groups' trail proposals. All of these results speak for themselves; getting organized, building a community of passionate riders and builders with a variety of skill sets and moving toward a common goal leaves the future of mountain biking in the hands of the riding community. We are a legitimate user group who deserves every right and privelege of other recreational user groups in our quest to build our local riding communities while promoting the sport of mountain biking and so long as we continue to respect the concerns of other stakeholders, the land we are using, and the trails we ride, the future of this sport lies somewhere out beyond what we can even imagine.
  • + 6
 Mountain bike trails are a very controversial subject, whether they are legal or illegal, people always seem to have an issue with mountain bikers and the trails that we ride and build.

I totally agree that legal trails are great and its awesome to see more legal and mountain bike oriented trails popping up all over the world but even with the growth of dedicated mtb trails I think we all still tend to ride illegal trails or build jumps/drops in places that we shouldn't. The city that I live in, there really are no dedicated freeride/downhill trails, thus mountain bikers are forced into the woods in the river valley (city owned land) to build trails, jumps and drops. Technically this is illegal, but is it really that wrong? As long as the trails are maintained and not polluted what is the big concern? Is it liability, if so I can just go to my local public skatepark (owned by the city on city land) and crack open my skull there as well.
Regardless of this controversy, I don’t think it will have any effect on mountain bikers riding and building in illegal locations. Looks at skateboarders and BMXers, technically they have dedicated places to ride (skateparks) but they are always seen in urban areas jumping stairs and grinding rails and benches, just like we go into the woods and ride illegal spots.

In terms of good news story on legal trails: A couple years ago the Hinton Bike Park was opened to the public. “The vision of the Hinton Bike Park was to build an exceptional mountain bike skills park that is fun, free of charge, and ride able by all ages and abilities"
Check out the article I wrote on it a while back: vics26.pinkbike.com/blog/hintonbikepark.html
  • + 6
 (part 3 of 3)
This project needs all the support it can get, and once up and running it will be a fantastic place to ride, have fun and it will be completely legal. I have witnessed the destruction of trails that have had years of work put into them, and it is simply devastating. Riders only build the trails because they have not been given anywhere legal to ride their bikes in the area, and if they were given that legal place to ride then the illegal trailbuilding would all but cease. Authorities do track down trails and give tickets, (a polite and apologetic attitude with promise to leave immediately is the best way to get out of these tickets; it's what I do and I haven't gotten one yet) and the riding community of the bay is tired of dealing with that. We just want a legal place to ride, and while we certainly are on the road to that goal, we need support and we must show that we are truly dedicated to getting a legal park to finally achieve what we are working for.
  • + 6
 (part 2 of 3)
Local riders woke up one morning to find their largest and most worked-on spot, called creek, being destroyed by city employees. Nothing had been heard on the subject, and everyone was shocked. This set the trend for secret and illegal sites in the east bay from then on. Today, there really aren't that many secret trails that are still around. However, this wave of destruction and crackdown on illegal trails brought forth an effort to make a legal safe haven for the riders of the bay; the Lafayette Bike Park project. It was started when a few riders who had built and maintained creek came forward to the city with a proposal to build a legal bike park and satisfy both the city and the riders. The idea was met with widespread enthusiasm by the biking community all throughout northern California, and the city seemed onboard with the project as well. However, thanks to a few locals who dislike the idea, the project has been greatly slowed because of their efforts. These people have attempted to degrade the riders with the project (admittedly some angry teenagers have sent nasty letters that are then displayed on the opposition's website, however quite a few have sent more polite and reasoned ones which are not shown), along with the city themselves for supporting it. They have gone to great lengths to stall the project and although it is said to be moving forward now, it is not going anywhere quickly.
  • + 6
 For me biking is about freedom in a world where very little is free.

With that in mind, I also think illegal trails tend to be unsustainable. Just because of their lack of maintenance, once the hoards find them it is almost impossible to avoid destroying them. Also many of them aren't built to IMBA specs. My favourite trail, was a small illegal one two summers ago, not many people know about it or ride it, but only two years of run off have almost completely destroyed the fun parts. There is environmental damage that happens with trails like that. While I'm inclined to say its worth it for a good bike trail, I'd be pissed if so equestrian riders illegally built a trail in a park and caused increased erosion, and I'd think the government should stop them...

But then what happened to the freedom of just doing? and did it ever exist? I'm not sure, but I think this documentary is a huge step in the right direction and I'm proud the mountain bike community can help create steps towards a positive solution.
  • + 2
 There are surely two sides to this coin.

Overall, legal trails are much better plan. They can be safely maintained, and you never have to worry about the landowner taking a shovel to your jumps. Sanctioned parks in my area (I5 Colonnade, Beacon Hill) receive attention and maintenance from builders, and greatly contribute to the local race scene as well as progression of the sport in the region. When both builders and riders create a united front (like in "Pedal Driven") much can be accomplished; trails may become sanctioned, building funds acquired, and mountain bikers as a whole gain reputation as a law-abiding citizens, contributing to communities everywhere.

Illegal trails also have benefits-privacy, you can build how you like, and the thrill of creating something to ride that is wholly your own. The fact is, if everyone, everywhere could have banger trails, for every discipline of mountain biking, of every skill level, there would be ALMOST NO need for illegal trails!!! the fact of the matter is, this is not possible in most communities. The urge to ride compels riders to turn outlaw and build trails, often illegal, to pursue the love of riding.

I feel fortunate to have such amazing trails in my area, and that i can keep illegal trail building to a minimum in my area is great. The most positive thing i have seen in terms of progression is the gathering of a group of determined riders, pushing for the legalizing of trails in their area. this marks a huge progression in the maturity of our sport, and the commitment of our riders.
  • + 2
 Through legal trail communities are aided in times of recession, people and youth are provided with outlets unto which they can express themselves and their energies. In Washington duthie hill really helped the community. You started seeing more kids on huffies riding for the first time on a board walk through picture perfect scenery and trees. People started to rediscover the thrill of the wind through your hair and face going fast on your bike. You'd overhear people talking about how they'd started getting more exercise and losing weight. More parents would be in local bike shops getting entry level bikes and when asked about where their children were riding they'd say duthie hill. Duthie hill unlike illegal trails had real lines and was super fun to ride. Volunteers helped knowing that they all had to help to make it work, and duthies popularity even got some people to be hired by evergreen to be official trail builders. We need more of these ride centers. Even collonade under i5 cleared out drug dealers and homeless people and prositutes. None of this happens with illegal trails WIth illegal trails they are unhealthy for the environment, people get hurt, mountain bikers get a bad reputation and less people are encouraged to check out mountain biking. Communities are hurt as often these trail builders who are busted are considered bad people and fined. THey are not, they're good people trying to help a good sport, but we need to recognize that trails need be built properly and legally if we really want mountain biking to progress as a sport and one day be on the scale of other sports such as swimming, road biking, maybe even foot ball or even basketball. Legal trails are the only profitable way to expand mountain biking as a sport and help the communities and people it entails.
  • + 1
 In my opinion illegal trails are way better than legal trails because I've found when you build a legal trail there is too many rules and restrictions and they never let you build anything big. I've previously helped build a legal downhill trail and dirtjump park and it drove me nuts have everything has to be so small and easy. At the dirt jump park the local government was scared shitless of the beginner line so you could see the expert line was tiny. Any tricks ive found for dealing with land managers is that the more people you know the better and what they don't find out wont hurt them so try to keep good dirt jump spots and DH trails secret from them as long as possible.
  • + 5
 Free-ride and downhill mountain biking is still seen as a new and rogue sport by most of the public, it is simply a misunderstanding of the sport and the people who enjoy it. It takes time for acceptance to come from other user groups and that can only happen through collaboration and a mutual understanding. While many trails start as illegal, it is only through public knowledge and acceptance that these trails become legitimized. While an illegal trail may be seen by others as a one-off, bad apple, that can be easily destroyed, a legal trail will have support from the government and likely a user base to keep it legitimate. Keeping trails hidden away is not an answer to the long term sustainability of the sport. Trails should be publicized and shared to create a community that will stand up for the trail if need be. Most users of public land understand that it is potentially for the enjoyment of everyone. Once in a while, a user will not understand the legitimacy of mountain biking. Direct collaboration between the mountain biking world and other users is essential to overcome obstacles and move forward.
  • + 8
 One case study can be seen at Moose Mountain in the Calgary region. For years, guerrilla builders developed a system of mountain bike trails in this multi-user area and tip-toed around the government, hikers, equestrian users, and even industrial development. As the sport became more popular, the government could no longer turn a blind eye to the increase in user traffic and potential conflicts. At least one trail was even closed. The builders and riders banded together to ensure their voices were heard by other area users and the government to protect the trails that they had worked so hard on and enjoyed so much. With power in numbers and organization, the MMBTS was formed and quickly lobbied the government to have their efforts and enjoyment of the land legitimized. They can now address other user groups' concerns head-on to create solutions agreeable for everyone instead of hiding in the bushes when someone comes near. Though organization and collaboration, common concerns such as liability, environmental degradation, and public conflicts can be resolved to create fun, challenging trails that help grow the sport and the community. The future is bright for mountain biking, but not if the sport is kept in the dark.
  • + 5
 November 2009 I was forced to drop everything, including my bike and move to Northern Germany.
I've grown up in California and spent some time in Nevada as well. I was fortunate enough to be located near Northstar - Tahoe and various other questionable trails. It was a great environment to hone my skills.

This past year (10th grade) I became student body president for an international school. I organize fun events and activities for the 300 or so students grades k-12. One of my plans includes a school ground pump track. Something fun for all ages which would be built and maintained through the schools soon to be bicycle club (Permission and build plans have been acquired).
HOWEVER! We do not receive funding from the school board for this project. There is land available for use, but I would like to have a proper track network which could accommodate everyone from the average tike who just wants to roll up to even a more experienced dual slalom rider. Not much money would be required, but some would help.
What better way to get people involved and interested, while still being safe secure and legal than a student organized track.
  • + 2
 Bremen, the town I live in, is a flatass town with flatass people. However there are some zones in Hamburg built by a humble group of riders I've come to know quite well. There is an even closer zone in Northern Bremen. Both spaces lack sufficient trail features and getting supplies is often tight. Since I got here I've gathered a few kids at school, who are interesting. I want these younger guys to have opportunities, just as I have in California, to get out and ride without spending 200 euros on travel expenses to a bike park 4 hours away by train. I long to once again be able to just head off right after school to some trails with my chums. To keep building with my friends until the sun drops down beyond the horizon and sharing (our love) for the sport with any interested newcomers.....who abide by No dig no ride rules tup

Rather than giving the money to someone located in say Canada or the united state where there already is a well established riding scene why not put it to use in Northern Germany?
  • + 5
 hi kenny, " why not put it to use in Northern Germany?" thanks for this statement. the fact that you as a young american recognize our biking-problem in northern germany, and try to etablish this sport in our region is worth every penny. bikin is a passion of all of us. ridin with your buddys, compete with dem at races, havin a good time on tracks and trails... but not at all. in this case it means international relationship and northern germany needs every help. Now our story:

Dirtforce.de

after 2 years of using legal trails on leased land the regional gouverment canceled all contracts. hundreds of hours that we spend to build northshore-lines, racelines, jumps on flat land was shot down over night. they leave 40 riders of all ages in a deep depression. okay they knocked us down but we were not knockout. after 4 years of hard negotiations with our reg. gouverment, strugglin for new land, involving radiostations and the newspapers, we were successfully.since last year we got new land inkluding a 26 year leasingcontract. meanwhile we finished the downhill and the pumptrack. northshorelines, dirtlines, slopestyle and a 4x-track are in prozess. we have to pay thousands of € for trees to compensate our trailbuilding. we need every penny to finish this project. please help us to make a dream come true. please help us to give northern germany his lil' whistler. you have the chance to support not only the northern german bikescene. we expect riders from poland and an american bwoy known as KennyKillsIt. so we are back to international relationship...

Thank you a lot for readin this... (hell, my english is so bad!)

kenny u r welcome every time...
  • + 6
 Thank for that, it means a lot, it really does.
You're english was spot on and far better than my German tup

I'd rather not just sit back and complain about every little detail in this area, I'd rather get up and do something about it. Weather that means breaking out the shovels for an all day dig or running for student council re election to make sure that bike club project goes through, I'll do it.....Then take one hell of a nap cuz this shit's hard!


I say give some grant money to Dirtforce.de, they have an established organization that is in touch with the local government, but also slide a bit our way further west here. For that school ground pumptrack at the least. For the kids ya know Big Grin
  • + 4
 Part 1 - It’s easy to go into the woods and build a trail, build TTF’s, and large high penalty features that are fun but high risk. We all know today “in most places” the best trails are illegal, leaving a huge gap between land owners/managers and recreational users. I challenge everyone to take a step back and look at the bigger picture and realize there are opportunities to bridge this gap it just takes more work and vigilance, but not the kind you may be thinking. It takes keeping the pressure on and dedication to the process which can take a long time. You have the make the choice and man up to the fight or back down like a coward
You may be asking at this point how does this guy know this? “Oh no…not another tree hugging hippie”. Well I can tell you first hand I speak the truth. I want to tell you about our (Cold Creek Mountain Bikers) project here in Washington State working with the WDNR. I am not going to lie, it is a painful process that started over 6 years ago and finally is becoming a reality with the hard work a of a few old school free riders.
It has been a long process of disagreement, knowledge transfer, and finally compromise. Everyone needs to fundamentally understand that land owners both private and public typically view their land as a limited resource or an investment. This fact is priority number one and you have to work with that expectation unless you are lucky enough to be working on a project in public or private land set aside for recreational use only. Given the nature of our sport that is not a reality as we want long fast gnarr filled sections of trail that will likely pass through many different land types. You have to understand people can be very passionate on both side of the table, to the point of willingness to get physical. I can speak to this knowledgably on this as I am both a trail advocate and a land owner.
  • + 2
 Part 2 - Our project “Thrillium” (named after one of the logging operations we are passing through an the idea it is a thrill ride…) is located in the Yacolt burn state forest just 25 minutes north of Portland Oregon. This project is the first of its kind on Washington State owned lands and is part of the Yacolt burn Recreational Plan that you can find out at on the WDNR recreation website. It is a single use (DH MTB) one way trail! This trail comes down the northwest ridge of Larch Mountain and is fully shuttleable (Paved) from top to bottom. The trail will be 3.5 miles officially from top to bottom and descends approx 1600’. We will be looking to extend and adopt existing trails to the top of Larch Mountain which will extend the trail to over 5 miles and 2500’ of descent and pure radness!
  • + 2
 Part 3 - Planning this is the important part because communication, understanding the rules, limitations, and knowledge of general good trail design are keys to a successful project and fun legal trail. So here is where my challenge to all the illegal trail builders out there comes in who say legal trails can’t be fun, well I call shenanigans on that strait up! You have to take more time to design the trail utilizing natural features to make the trail both challenging and safe. We put in over 400 hours in just the scouting and design phase of this project. That is a lot, but the results will pay off big time in the level of thrill and enjoyment people will get riding this trail. We had to really look at natural features and how we could in the future develop and link things up so they could be come bigger higher risk for those that wanted to kick it up a notch but safe for those not ready to go big. Really almost any trail you can find spots to do this and develop lines that use the existing trail but maybe gap a corner off a stump, a set of old trees you can go through that will eventually be a root garden with natural cascade, or quad up a set of tabled small doubles into a 30+ foot gap. Smart planning for future development recognizing all skill levels is what makes this work.
We have started the build process of this trail in 5 sections and 3 of those sections are almost complete. We have 2 zones with in 2 different sections where we need privately contracted owned and operated heavy equipment (IE they carry their own insurance) to build two short sections of trail like A-line/crank it up. We also need resources to build two parking lots, a trail head, and to install another gate to finalize this project. We plan to have most of the trail “rollable” at completion of the next work party. Reality is recreation funds in this slow economic time are hard to come by and the WDNR needs our help to raise funds to complete the trail.
  • + 6
 Part 4 - I almost forgot to mention we also Maintain Cold Creek Trail which is 7.7 miles of the 35 mile loop of the Tarbell multi-use trail system located across the Yacolt Burn State and Gifford Pinchot National forests. Cold creek is an amazing trail and can be partially shuttled as a downhill trail and is a intermediate level descent, but here is where it gets amazing….The Cold creek trail can be ridden up as a expert level climb to the top and then connect up to Thrillium for a 5+ mile expert descent. Making a 13+ mile all mountain loop you would be challenged to find anywhere in this area all trail and all rad! Most importantly ALL 100% LEGAL……

Thank you for listening and I hope you accept my challenge!
  • + 3
 Part 5 - An additional very important factor is the the way we build this trail and its success will be come a model for the future of mountain bike user specific trail systems in the state of Washington. Both the Thrillium and Cold Creek / Tarbell System will serve as a training area for the next generation of riders and racers of all genres in the Southwest Washington and Portland Metro Area. The Cold Creek mountain Bikers also supports the High school mountain bike league through our members. This is the area's first ever cycling team for the Washington High School Cycling League. We have assembled a handful of students from 4 Clark County schools as well as adult coaches and volunteers. All of these projects are a huge investment in our trails, our stewardship, our future generations that will all lead to a solid future for mountain biking in the Pacific Northwest.
  • + 3
 you guys are all trying so hard, and giving negative props to people to try and help yourselves out. negative prop this you losers. heres my comment, way off topic too... i like boobs, boobs and bikes... boobs then bikes, bikes then boobs... no specific order, its all gravy
  • + 3
 The most positive thing I have seen happen personally in mountain biking is my local park called Duthie Hill. It is a state park park so it is partially funded by the government and fully legal. It is a great safe place to progress and ride your bike because there is something for everyone there, from long xc loops to flowy jump lines and within each category of riding there are trails for all ability levels. I think this park is great for the community as it helps us come together to build and maintain a safe and legal place to ride and have fun! Thanks to everyone who has helped make Duthie Hill a living working reality!
  • + 3
 Unless, we as mountain bikers step up. Join your local club. If your town doesn`t have one, start one. Simply start talking to people in the business, make contacts. Get involved. Become an advocate. The very least you can do is to educate yourself.
Get on IMBA,donate, they have such a large resource of information for advocates.

To sum it up: A legitimate, dedicated trail society, with a legal trail system has huge benefits.
-To be able to secure the huge amount of private and government funding for the building and maintaining of trails.
-To be able to advertise the trails you built, show off, tell your friends!
-To be an environmental steward.
And to me, the most rewarding of all:
-To be allowed to build and ride bike awesome bike trails, with no fear of them getting cut down. To have everything we put so much time into protected!


Please check out our trail society website: The Castlegar Mountain Bike Society

Vince
www.castlegar-mtb.com
  • + 2
 It really all comes down to one thing… Passion. Whether the trails are built legally or not, the quality of work going into the trails is influenced by the building crew’s drive and creativity. If builders don’t get their hands dirty and create the sustainable trails that we need, safety and reliability then becomes a concern and the reputation of the mountain bike community is put into jeopardy.

If you’ve ever ridden a poorly crafted and unmaintained trail, you know that there are dangers all over. Rusty nails to catch you or your bike on, small or unstable berms on corners that really matter, or jumps that are pointed at trees. I personally don’t want a rusty nail going through my hand again. These hazards all contribute to how people view the mountain bike scene in your area, but trail quality isn’t the only problem either.

We need to keep our trails clean. We need to be the example that doesn’t leave energy bar wrappers or empty PBR cans lying around. If we can do just that, I feel a lot of opportunities will start showing up out of nowhere for more trails to be constructed, which in the end equals to more fun to be had. Soon enough, there will be epic trails everywhere for all ages and styles.

contiued...
  • + 1
 ...contiued from above

It’s crazy to see mountain bike parks popping up everywhere, especially ones like Duthie Hill in Issaquah, WA. What’s better than a FREE and LEGAL bike park that has everything from simple XC trails to trails that have 20-foot booters? Not to mention volunteer hands pretty much built the whole thing and if you want, you can volunteer your time to new trails or polishing up some old ones.

Duthie Hill is a great example of what can be created and maintained by a mountain bike community. If we can show that effort in the illegal trails we build too, we might be able to turn some important noggins our way. Take pride in building your trails and be fervent about cleaning up after yourself. Putting passion in both of those areas is our key to the golden age of mountain biking.
  • + 2
 First introduced in 1817, the bicycle has been a transformative force in world history. Susan B Anthony referred to the bicycle as a “freedom machine” which enabled an unprecedented level of mobility and freedom to women. Fast forward 194-years where today the global bicycle market represents a $61 billion industry where 130 million bicycles are sold every year globally.

There is a certain irony that exists where a “freedom machine” can be at the center of so much controversy I think you might agree. In a time where politicians build their brand and create a platform around concepts like freedom; less big government; go green; curbing childhood obesity; lowering taxes; the bicycle transcends all of these themes. This irony also begs the question do citizens really want their state and local leaders focused on solving this “problem” of rogue trail building or do citizens want their elected officials focused on more pressing issues like the creation of jobs and improving our living conditions? It stands to reason that the mountain bike industry as a whole helps the political agenda more than the political agenda helps our biking community. Any fraction of $61B in sales tax is a huge number not to mention the indirect impacts of biking to health and reduction of greenhouse emissions.

Part1
  • + 2
 Part 2

State Parks and state land are maintained and paid for by our tax dollars. These lands are generally considered multi-use by land managers. Depending on the park it’s not uncommon to see hikers, runners, climbers, and equestrians all sharing the same land just the way parks were originally envisioned. With the exception of foot traffic, I would argue that equestrians and climbers represent a larger environmental impact and represent more liability and risk than bikers. It could also be argued that equestrian and climbing industries generate less tax revenue than our biking community. To this end, why do we continue to get singled out as being such a negative force in our communities? Do we have fewer rights to the land than other sports enthusiast? Apparently we do, and our elected officials don’t want to deal with.

I have participated in trying to “legalize” a DH trail system and was unsuccessful. The state was offering some sort of amnesty to the rogue trail builders [state term] whereby if we stopped cutting our own trails, they would reciprocate with a section of the land where we could cut more technical trails. 5-years later, nothing...except 10x rogue trail building once it was recognized we were getting slow rolled government. Many of the trails we have created have become multi-use trails that support hikers and in some cases equestrians. That said we don’t litter or bring in any pressure treated lumber…we build all natural.

As someone who has invested hundreds of hours of personal time into trail building and tens of thousands In bikes, I will not stand down on unauthorized trail building until the government and state land managers develop a formal process that will accommodate our sport.

Happy trails!
  • + 2
 From riding I have gained more popularity on illegal trails compared to the scarce, flat, legal ones! Rather than just the few local cyclists; I guess you seem to attract more of a crowd of the general public such as dog walkers, runners, walkers... as they're sometimes near it!

There are however the ups and downs of all this!

You get some (not all) old grandparents who strictly forbid it. On the other hand you may get a family out on a sunny afternoon stroll who watch in gasps of AWERSOMENESS!

Personally I feel more motivated to hit bigger or jumps or even pull the occasional trick (as I'm a dirt jumper). As if I’m with a training friend I'm scared that crash and will both be in some chain reacting injury with a broken phone and no contact.

From experience of this sort of situation I once encountered a mother (walking) and her young son riding near an illegal trail. He asked me how to hit the jump. Told him the technique and he landed it rather well for a first timer (no crash or injury, just a slight over clear). After mum was feeling overwhelmed and no one could have been happier... well except one.
He had to be there didn't he. As the Pensioning birdwatcher was dragging along the pavement he peaked into the small kicker and came down a pessimistic attitude. Beginning with judgementally accusing me and my friend of building it, he went on about whose rights it was to build, suing for injuries, littering (where no detritus was in sight)...
However as I replied, his argument of picky comments diminished.

carry on -
  • + 4
 The conversation went a little like this:

"Why are you digging up the ground for a bit of fun and leaving rubbish everywhere."
"Where's the litter?"
"Eeeeeemmmmmmmmmm... but I know local trails,"
"Really with jumps?" (Because me and my mates didn't know and we had been doing the sport in that area for roughly 4 years)
"Penshurst,"
"You mean the trail an hour away (drive) which my mother can't drive me to daily because she works abroad,"
"Well can't you stay inside and play with your video games or whatever?"
"What and become obese, I think not I like to keep active, fit and adrenaline pumping, furthermore I'm not going on diet, I like my food thanks."
"Supposedly what happens if someone gets injured then and they try to sue the council?"
"I haven't heard of anyone suing the council yet for this reason, besides its on an illegal trail and it's COMMON SENSE!"
"Well you choose you place to build it didn't ya; cause I saw it!"
"WWWWWOOOOWWWWW why where you walking on the pavement and not in here (it was in the middle of a triangle where roads secluded it - so no one goes in it, also about a quarter of an acre in size). Crucially we live on the Ashdown Forest! 8000 acres!! And you have to pick on this one free spot here!!!"
By this point he just left in silence.

IN MY OPINION MTB’S HOULD BE ALLOWED ON THE FOREST AS WELL! WE SUPPOSIDLY CHURN UP THE TERRAIN! HOWEVER HORSES ARE ALLOWED AND THEY CHURN PATHS INTO A STICKY MUD BATH THAT GETS WIDER AS THEY WALK AVOID IT BY GOING TROTTING AROUND IT!!!
  • + 1
 Also just want to add. Once there was a wilting tree to the side of one of our trails and to restore it to its usual form we diverted water from the a large puddle in the middle of our Dirt sets. Its so strong now it resembles with the surrounding immnumrable ancient oak trees!
  • + 2
 Firstly I would say that legal trails are better for many reason. There are many different views on mtb trails to bmx trails and were i live the local boxers are very unpleasant and when you visit there trails you know that you are not welcome there. Also i have found that when building your own trails you are uassaly always wary because you know you are not ment to be there or digging there so its not that relaxed feeling say when you are building on your own land. That is why I do all the work at night but that brings other problems like animals making noises and creeping you out, i know i jumped a few times when a dog comes running out of the darkness. That is why i prefere legal trails because there is a very friendly atomsphere no matter how good you are. E.g. like a place called bedgebury which is a very comfortable place to ride were anything goes and its also a great place to meet new friend and ride with old one. Also this place is very family orientated so attracts a lot of people. It would be very nice to have more places like this to get more people into riding.
  • + 2
 Also round my way we've got a few legal trails recently like the parish council let the boxers have there trails as long as they fixed the river problem because the river banks kept collapsing in that area. However my friends and I had spent about two years working on a spot in the wood only two find that they had been biuldoes. It made me think why did they do that we were not doing anything wrong accept keeping kids off the street so we were actually doing a good deed. this really put me back and did not feel like spending any more time on the sport because I had no were to ride and if i did build a new trail it would be gone in a month or so. I actually felt like stoping the sport until a new place was built but it had its problems is was about an hours dive away but it really got me back into riding but i did not start building are local spot until I found pinkbike it really motivated me to build. That is why are local area could do with some proper trails because my friends and I had introduced loads of riders into the sport but then there sport stopped as are trails were destroyed.

Also I would like to pay special thanks to Amajors for letting a friend and I help build and use his trails they are some of the best hand build trails in the world check them out at:

amajors.pinkbike.com

My local area could really do with something like his because he talked to the farmer and he let him build there and because it is private there is no litter or rubbish that comes with some of the illegal trails build by less caring people.

thanks
  • + 2
 I know i already posted a comment but i have a new reason to want to win this.The local mountain I and many others that ride is possibly being shut down.Galbraith mountain is such a great place to ride and has the great potential to be better.Having trails like the ones on this mountain built by riders for riders.The mountain biking organization WHIMPs has put forth alot of effort to maintain and create the trails we ride on. This mountain is all we have in this area without having to drive a couple hours to ride. With everything i have and i know im not the only one out there i will do all i can to save this mountain.
  • + 2
 moutainbiking has to be one of the funnest sports ever...

i live in ireland and the mountain biking(downhil) community here is about 250-300 people ive found that my 3 years in dh that everyone are good friends when someone needs help to build a track or maintaining one all they do is ask.......over here legal dh trails are unheard ofwe ask the forestry for permission there is no money or funding just shovels wheelbarrows rakes and man power.....the best trails here are the legal ones as we are aloud to build/maintain them so if a jump is need of work we are able to do it.one trick to deal with land managers is to give them what they want eg respect,no big huge jumps,no litter,no road gaps
  • + 2
 Here in Austin most of the freeride stuff is hidden and illegal so new trails a mission to build, but there is a solid population of bums in the woods who make up a good labor force. I await the day that a skills park or some mountain bike specific trails appear for the purpose of shredding. I almost think that our Toys R Us trails could become a sanctioned freeride zone in the way that the famous 9th Street BMX jumps are legal.
  • + 1
 In my experience when legal trails get laid down it is a great thing for mountain biking in that community. It helps spread the word and in some cases get many new people out on the trails. It is also good to know that these trails will not be in a near future logging area or have the city tear them down. I think the same is true for dirt jump spots, with a legal and official dirt jump park they can be placed in more obvious places so everyone who wants can come and ride and gets people of all skills together and helps you meet more riders in your community that you might not other wise. I have seen several successful "legal" trails get laid down and I hope to see more.
  • + 1
 Living in California it is extremely hard to fight for land use for mountain biking. Even worse, gaining land use is harder to get for dangerous types of use such as downhilling due to liability. Unfortunately building and riding on illegal trails is the only way to go about following our passions for mountain biking. As such illegal trails are often hidden from the public and even from our fellow companions in mountain biking due to fears of reprisal and legal action if word ever got out that these trails existed. This means more illegal trails and less variety for the mountain biking community. If there was a campaign for the education of city officials and land managers on the great community building world of mountain biking, mountain biking centers could be built. This would bring more variety and a stronger following and acceptance for the mountain biking community.This would also potentially make mountain biking more popular which would drive sales of mountain bike goods higher. We should continue to fight for legal trails so that mountain bikers have more rights and more freedom to ride.
  • + 1
 here in vermont there arnt very many non resort run downhill tracks but yet alot of downhiller, in this respect there will be a few illeagal trails here and there but no "wow" trails that you see out west like in washington and oregon any many other places, bottom live after the lifts stop running alot of us riders around vermont are riding XC trails again getting in conflicts with the cross country people that refuse to move for you ever when your cordious enough to move when you are pushing your bike up the hill, thus i think that a better more devloped trail system for downhillers is needed around my neck of the woods and im pretty sure everyone in vermont can comply with me on this one.....
  • + 1
 Here in Vermont, the USFS recently awarded $154,000 to legal mountain bike trail building in the Green Mountain National Forest - this will see a 9-mile loop in the Moosalamoo National Recreation Area in Goshen. There will be an upcoming article in Dirt Rag Magazine about this project. In a nutshell, legal trails are much better, because they are permanent! In this case, legal trails are also being paid for by the USFS, which is an excellent use of tax dollars.

Regarding tips for working with land managers - be respectful, show them that mountain bikers are good people who want to do good work in the woods. Also, make sure and follow through on details to the T.

We have been working on this project for 4 years and this year the USFS are making a big investment, as a result of our lobbying and advocacy efforts.

Get in touch if you have questions. Thanks, Patrick

Patrick Kell
Executive Director
Vermont Mountain Bike Association
  • + 1
 In Finland there is a law called "jokamiehenoikeus." Which is loosely translated as "every man's rights or freedom to roam." It allows people to ski, ride, and hike the countryside where ever they please, as long as they do not harm the natural environment of the land. Ultimately, I believe this would be a best case scenario policy for the U.S. and Canada to adopt in regards to "public lands"
I find it a little odd that something that didn't belong to someone in the first place(our natural world), can become so exclusive. When I say "a little odd" I actually mean down right absurd. The idea that a particular user group should be ruled out of being allowed to enjoy the land, which I believe should belong to everyone who respects it, is beyond me.
With the "freedom to roam" policy being a pipe dream for now; I have found that getting involved:advocacy, assembly, and building trails legally is the fastest way to getting sustainable and long lasting trails. I was an active member of the MMBA, Michigan Mountain Bike Association, when I lived in west Michigan. The MMBA would team up to build and repair trails. We would also have fund raising races a couple times a year.
It didn't take long for all that labor to come to fruition. We got new trails installed on public and private lands. We also had a pretty sweet skills center installed at the local ski hill with some fairly progressive tables, bridges, and drops. Shortly after I moved out of state, the city I had lived in had a "bike park" installed within the city limits, thanks in large part to the MMBA. Initially it had a bmx track, pump track, and dirt jumps put in.
Anyways, it didn't take much effort by the individual for land managers to open their eyes and get on board when the collective efforts of those involved seemed so great. So get out there, assemble, and get involved.
  • + 1
 The way i see it, from my 16 years of life and 2 years of mountain biking, this problem is really just about how bad you want to ride and if you are riding for the correct reasons. I ride legal trails, but the closest legal trail to me are 30 minutes and 45 minutes away, which is quite a drive for my parents. But i beg them and plead with them and do hours of chores just so they will take me too these legal which are very nice. The problem is though not everyone has trails even 45 minutes away and they therefore feel the need to build illegal trails which is VERY understandable. They want to ride just as bad as i do they just dont have the means. Those same bikers im sure, if given the means and a goverment who would listen and pay attention to their needs, would VERY happily ride legal trails. In conclusion....... we all love to ride, so go and figure out the TRULY best way to do it for your situation. Thanks bikers who ride for the right reasons, Lowell
  • + 1
 im sorry but, I think Mt. Tam needs our help the most. Mountain biking literally started here and all we can ride is fireroad? Are you kidding me? There is singletrack but only for hikers. How did this ever come to be???!!!! I think the reason we ride all these illegal trails is simply because we thirst for new singletrack, I mean honestly, if you really are a mtn biker wherever you go you are always looking for what could be singletrack, think about it how many times do you like on the side of the road and you see this beaten path and it gets you excited only to realize its just a worn out path some bum walks down. In all fairness, Marin needs our help. WHO IS WITH ME!!!
  • + 1
 It would be stupid to allow everyone to build a trail, but to forbid it, it wouldn't help, either. There is no solution. To build trails is one of the most important things for mountainbiker. The trails must be build so that they don't hurt the natur too much.
  • + 1
 I think in a matter of building illegal trails in areas sometimes not even really worth, because it has to do all that work wooden ramps etc, I think is more worthwhile to seek a land you closer to your home that is legal and have lowered roots form natural stones, and doing so will not give problems of law or something tipo.com a clue to this method of construction I think it will be very good for both amateur and for professional, your friends will like it a lot of training on weekends, right here in my town has many mountains and savannah much rock my friends and I are looking for a clue to the type I mentioned above I think is so cool!!
  • + 1
 I believe the illegal trails can be good until someone gets hurt or alot of attention gets brought to it then it becomes a problem. Like the trails in Leavenworth, the forrest service comes in and tears out the trail ribbed because someone got hurt, or tearing out the road gap on another trail in town because someone gets hurt. That makes us look bad. Also like another person said the majority of us mountain bikers take care of the earth because weve been raised outdoors and have common sence about how to use trees that are already down so your not disturbing the environment as much.On the other hand legal trails like bike parks and state funded areas with trails for everyone are great because then it creats revenue for local buisnesses.Also bike parks like the potential one going in at Stevens Pass, give the novice rider a place to learn and its conviniant place to go and be tought by someone who is able to teach them. As for the rider who is more skilled it gives them a place to challange themselfs and be able to better there riding,instead of only being able to get one or two laps in because they have to pedal or push up, they can get 10 or 12 laps in. Ive done my fair share of trail building all illegal but I can see the benifits of having legal trails. If i win i would put the money towards getting either trails legalized in Leavenworth, or putting it towards the trail building at Stevens pass to give people from near and far a great place to ride in Washington state.
  • + 1
 In my city there's not much poeple who ride.But for those who ride they should make a place.A legal place is sweet for the riders because they'll not be affraid that the trails will be destroyed by the land owner but there's nothin' better than a secret spot that nobody ride it except you.But if someone reveals your secret spot,they may destroy it.
  • + 1
 In the long run a legal trail would be better for the riders and land owners, but there is nothing like a nice, hidden, illegal trail...



Theres something awesome about having your jumps tucked away where no one will find them (you hope), for just you and your buddies to ride, without worrying about grommelets, hikers, or crack heads.
  • + 0
 Thats exactly how i feel about this. Short term, an illegal trail is more exiting and gives you a sensation that you dont get from using a trail that everyone uses. Long term upkeep and worrying about whether people find it is the problem. I like our legal trails in Santa Cruz but they dont have the thrill that the illegal trails have. The illegal trails dont have to have limits. They have big stunts and ramps but our legal trails are adopted so that kids can use them which imposes limitations on waht you can do.
  • + 7
 Mountain biking is one of the funnest sports in the world and when my hubby introduced it to me, I was hooked! I am now part of a club called the Muddbunnies that encourages more female riders to get into the sport and holds club rides for all levels and all disciplines. This year, the club is hoping to get more females into trail building and trail sustainability and we have adopted a couple of local trails that we will responsible for - Team Pangor & Slash (both on Seymour mountain in North Vancouver). Last year we had over 25 girls come out to help maintain Slash and learn from the NSMBA trail builders. It costs a lot to get insurance for the club and as a policy, we can only ride on legal trails. I believe there should be more legal trails for all levels of riding, as I would love to take the beginners down some nice flowing single track, but can't, as most of them are illegal. We would use this premiere to raise funds and maintain trails for all members of the community. More females in support of riding = happy husbands = more children given the opportunity to ride = better future for biking and overall community understanding and support!
  • + 3
 Anyone else notice the spam Neg propping by destructide??
  • + 1
 Yes, it was noted along with a few others, and destructide and the others won't be winning anything from this contest. Thanks for pointing it out though.
  • + 1
 It would be stupid to allow everyone to build a trail, but to forbid it, it wouldn't help, either. There is no solution. To build trails is one of the most important things for mountainbiker. The trails must be build so that they don't hurt the natur too much.
  • + 1
 i live in shetland. a tiny island in the north sea, most northernly part of the uk, twelve hour ferry journey to main-land UK-and the nearest legal trails. the weather here is bleek, the winters are dark and the riding scene is tiny. there is not a single legal trail on the island. Two years ago i was down in england my parents took me to the dalby forest and i spent two days playing in the freeride area, not the best jumps around by anymeans but that didn't matter, i was hooked. all these people enjoying the space and doing what they love in a specialy created environment. i was blown away. as soon as i got back to shetland a week later i began searching for some land to build on. we ended up finding an interesting spot only half a mile from my house, a patch of reclaimed land only two meters above sea. we began work and did our best to keep it on the down-low but people kept destroyin our jumps. unsure weather or not it was the farmer that owned the land or just other locals that did not like what we were doing we phoned the farmer and asked him if we cold build on his land. he was in full support of what we were doing which was great so we continued to expand. most people riding here had never riden a dirt jump before so thing started small and took a while to get going. The saticfaction when you finish building a jumps and it fits perfectly into your line and you air it for the first time is imence. springs coming around, the weather is starting to ease up a bit and after a long hard winter building we have two lines of jumps an 8ft drop a 6ft wooden kicker with a wooden roll-in and huge mud landing that the farmer helped us build with his tracktor and everyone is looking forward to a great summers riding and much progression to be seen.
  • + 1
 We, as humans, are constantly altering the natural environment to suit our needs; be it mountain biking, skiing, or hiking. I recently took a backpacking trip to a place called Island Lake. Amongst all the beauty around me my buddy and I thought how we could build a lodge on the island and a bridge to it and a....then we caught ourselves. Here we were surrounded by all this beauty and all we could think of doing is altering it. I love mountain biking and trail building, but working with the Forest Service has to be incredibly more productive than going against it. And sure the is tons of red tape and politics involved in that route. Is it easy or fast? No, but it is one way that we can ensure that these beautiful parks we ride in our here for thousands of years to come.
  • + 1
 Are legal trails better or worse than illegal trails?
There are legal trails which are godlike, and those which are pure crap. Illegal trails arent ridden this much, which leads to a more natural aspect in a way. Its also the interesting aspect which makes illegal trails attractive, because when you enter a trail you have never ridden before, you never know what you have to expect.
But you cannot say this in general. That means, you can have bad luck with illegal trails as much as you can with legal ones. Same thing with good luck of course!

Share a story (good or bad) about getting legal trails on the ground near you.
In our local Freeride Team called "Gravity Union", we made it to a local bike trail, where we can build everything we want. The only thing is, that we are liable for the maintenance work. This was a long process of discussing with the local mayor, because of the dangerousness for others. But nothing happend until now - thank god!

Share any tricks you’ve found for dealing with the ins and outs of government land managers.
It's always good to enjoy the confidence of land managers, the mayor and other people, who are important for causing anything in your hometown - and so it is with building a trail. When they don't like you because of anything you did or did not, its pretty hard to receive anything good from them. We accomplished that with a workshop for kids in our dirtpark and our pumptrack. That was a cool thing, because it was LOADS of fun riding with the youngguns, for us and especially for them!

btw, sorry for my english.. im an austrian Wink
  • + 1
 Here on San Juan Island our trails just got handed over to the National Park system. So far we are trying to keep at lest some of the single track open to bikes, but it looks like a lot of trails will be closed. There will still be a fare amount to single track, but all of the fun (downhill) trails will be closed. The main reason that these trails will be closed are because they were not on any map, aka illegal. The NP thinks that the trails were not constructed correctly and therefor they need to be closed. Now we have no place to ride. Since we're on a island, we can't simply drive a little farther and ride somewhere else; we have to take a expensive ferry ride and spend most of the day just getting to the destination.
I don't know if money would help our problem, but I do know that we need help to either save the trails or construct a dedicated mountain bike trail system here that won't get taken away from us.
  • + 1
 in the last year I have been searching out my local area for new trails to ride I was told of a track that was 8 miles out but had been disused as the forestry commission had ripped it apart due to it being "unsafe" and apposed a "health risk" when I arrived there it was in one hell of a state rock gardens ripped out and thrown down the hill, trees deliberately cut down over the track and branches and logs piled onto the track. Now I am friends with the original builder and he has told me that this was an amazing track and had no dangerous features on it the most it had was a 2ft drop!
Any way I really wanted to ride this to in two weekend’s work me and a mate successfully restored the track to its former glory all trees removed rock gardens rebuilt and best of all it flowed beautifully. I was thanked by many riders and once again this was reopened and people flocked in to go ride a once well used track.
After this I spent many weekends riding there improving my skills and making new friends I also helped with modifications to make the track ride better and safer. So after a summer of riding the winter weather set in days got colder and snow was predicted.
I received news that the Forestry Commission had returned to the track. my heart sank I thought all that work that we had done to make the track once again safe and ride able had literally been flushed away. Though unfortunately the snow set in and temperatures dropped and there was no way I was going to try rebuild.
(part 2 of 4)
  • + 1
 I live in north of Scotland were you could say is one of the many homes of mountain biking. I am of course a regular rider and frequent user of illegal trails (hey we all do it). I have found over the past few years the world has decided to become eco friendly and everyone wants to be healthy. Now in my local area we have had huge encouragement by our council and schools and even the forestry commission to get out ride bikes and be healthy. A few years ago our area was given a grant to develop a trail centre. Of course this all went to plan and everyone turned out for the open day even 2007 Junior World Champion Ruaridh Cunningham turned up and I am not lying!
Of course as you may expect with these trails they slowly became less popular with the locals as over the years they have been subdued to lack of maintenance vandalism and lack of use, though I do have to say they were very poorly laid out. They didn’t use the full extents of the hill poor decisions on placement of features and a very cheap hard pack which has washed away to boulders and is unbearable to ride on.
In summer 2009 the trails received some modifications and new sections were put in and once again they regained a little spark but quickly faded.
(part 1 of 4)
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 I don't expect to win anything first of all. I can however say that state governments spend a ton of money on regulating, policing, and cleaning public lands for OHV use. I love riding dirt bikes, atv's, and even four wheeling my truck, but I follow the rules. Clean up my trash, stay on the designated trail, and tread lightly. Unfortunately there are many OHV users who do not follow the rules. It is not uncommon to see large amounts of trash, beer cans, appliances, shell casings, and even abandoned vehicles littering many OHV areas across the west coast. Not to mention various firepits littered with nails from burning pallets and broken glass from drunk idiots. Another common sight at many OHV parks is trails blazed outside the designated trails, contributing to further erosion and a bad name for responsible users. THIS BEING SAID, I have NEVER EVER been to a mountain bike trail that contained any of this mayhem. No exhaust, no noise, no partying. Just people out riding and enjoying the scenery. I feel it is very unfair that people on petroleum powered vehicles get away with tearing up their playground, while mountain bikers have to fight to even have a playground.
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 I live in north of Scotland were you could say is one of the many homes of mountain biking. I am of course a regular rider and frequent user of illegal trails (hey we all do it). I have found over the past few years the world has decided to become eco friendly and everyone wants to be healthy. Now in my local area we have had huge encouragement by our council and schools and even the forestry commission to get out ride bikes and be healthy. A few years ago our area was given a grant to develop a trail centre. Of course this all went to plan and everyone turned out for the open day even 2007 Junior World Champion Ruaridh Cunningham turned up and I am not lying!
Of course as you may expect with these trails they slowly became less popular with the locals as over the years they have been subdued to lack of maintenance vandalism and lack of use, though I do have to say they were very poorly laid out. They didn’t use the full extents of the hill poor decisions on placement of features and a very cheap hard pack which has washed away to boulders and is unbearable to ride on.
In summer 2009 the trails received some modifications and new sections were put in and once again they regained a little spark but quickly faded.
(part 1 of 4)
  • + 1
 Should the question really be whether illegal or legal trails are better? Should we really discuss, the 'thrill' of riding a trail that is illegal vs. the knowledge that a legal trail will be well maintained and built? Of course, our secret, self built, illegal trail is gonna possess a certain flair and will undoubtedly put a broader smile on your face than the council made, 2 meter wide dirt track 'for mountain bikers', but shouldnt our concern be to work TOGETHER with the community, to form a group, a council, a respected organization, by mountainbikers, for mountainbikers which actively cooperates with the government or whomever the land belongs to? I think what we need is understanding. Understanding of who we are and what we want from the land we ride on. Understanding that we do NOT make it our goal to go out and 'destroy the forests' or 'harm hikers' in the creation of a trail. Understanding that we are very well interested in the creation of legal trails which are still fun to ride.
Here, I have recently joined a group which tries to work TOGETHER with the local authorities to create safe and fun trails to ride, to keep these maintained and to make more and more of our favorite illegal trails legal. From walking down trails and as a group discussing improvements, to joining townhall meetings on the subject, the group has always closely cooperated with the authorities, gained respect and is finally achieving goals which every mountainbiker dreams of.
I think there are many people out there who should take an example of this, many who stand on one side or the other and refuse to shake hands and work together, for a world in which all trails are legal but will also still leave you panting, your hands shaking, your eyes wide open, shouting: HOLY SH*T I WANNA DO THAT AGAIN!!
  • + 1
 Though I have to say it was not all doom and gloom as this year we have set up a wee race series of our own and were planning races round our local area and the firs track on the list was the track I had renovated.
of course me and the original builder went up to fix the damage which wasn’t too bad just the fact every rock had been torn out leaving gaping holes in the track and of course this as I quote a "death trap" all the rocks that were there had gone and the race was the next weekend s we set out to try and recover the track and prepare it for the race. We successfully managed to repair what was done though new line had to be made round many features that had been destroyed.
I have to say the race was a success we had a big turnout of about 25 riders and quite a few spectators and a professional photographer turned up as well we all had a fun day and the weather managed to hold out though it was abit nippy but its Scotland and even though the timing system broke fun was still to be had hand the day was a success.

(part 3 of 4)
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 I just wrote my entire English Research Paper on the topic of both national and local governments closing down mountain biking trails. After I was finished with all 7 pages, I realized how dedicated we mountain bikers are to our sport. No matter who tells us what we can and can't do, As long as we keep wanting to ride, we'll go right on ahead and do it. In the end, it is easier for our governments to keep open legal trails because one: they have less to worry about trying to catch riders on illegal trails, and riders are much more likely to obey the laws and regulations of a well built legal trail as long as they won't get in trouble for riding it. If enough people care about the trail, they will take care of it, because if its not taken care of, no one can ride on it.
A few years ago, a small single track trail was closed down near my house due to "environmental destruction" from mountain bikers. The town failed to do their research which I found out in my paper that from many credible scientific studies, mountain biking is the least environmentally caustic to trails than hiking, horseback riding, and off-roading. The government needs to stop listening to the "environmentally friendly" tree huggers and do some research. Mountain biking is not a crime, and is just a large population of individuals who enjoy riding their bikes in what little natural beauty our planet has left
  • + 1
 I have just started mountain biking and i love it. Out off all the recreational sports i have played like snow boarding, skateboarding, rollerblading. Mountain biking is by far the best, im not just saying that because i am on a mountain biking site entering a mountain bike contest but because its the truth. Out off all the other sports mountain biking is the one that doesn't have many LEGAL places to ride. To do what you LOVE. yet when we find somewhere and make it our own, take care of it, watch over it. We get it torn out and then left with nothing. I live in London On. where i am from we have to hide so no one knows were are trails are and we only share secretes with the mountain biking community. I would love to donate what ever money i make to a fellow mountain biker who also owns his own Downhill/DJ bike shop.. The one man who has kept the sport alive for many of us. Because yet again he is doing his best to open mountain biking to everyone by opening his own LEGAL park where he would run a freeride area and also a summer camp to help expand out growing community. So please everyone lets help grow the mountain bike community and make mountain biking LEGAL and FUN!! You can help us out by voting up this comment so that the people at pinkbike can enter us in a chance to do something good for us all!! THANKS Big Grin
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 In Finland there is a law called "jokamiehenoikeus." Which is loosely translated as "every man's rights or freedom to roam." It allows people to ski, ride, and hike the countryside where ever they please, as long as they do not harm the natural environment of the land. Ultimately, I believe this would be a best case scenario policy for the U.S. and Canada to adopt in regards to "public lands"
I find it a little odd that something that didn't belong to someone in the first place(our natural world), can become so exclusive. When I say "a little odd" I actually mean down right absurd. The idea that a particular user group should be ruled out of being allowed to enjoy the land, which I believe should belong to everyone who respects it, is beyond me. With the "freedom to roam" policy being a pipe dream for now; I have found that getting involved, advocacy, and building trails legally is the fastest way to getting sustainable trails.
I was an active member of the MMBA, Michigan Mountain Bike Association, when I lived in west Michigan. The MMBA would team of for trail days at least once a month and would also have fund raising races and rides a couple times a year.
It didn't take long for all that labor to come to fruition. We got new trails installed on public and private lands. We also had a pretty sweet skills center installed at the local ski hill with some fairly progressive tables, bridges, and drops. Shortly after I moved out of state, the city I lived in had a "bike park" installed within the city limits, thanks in large part to the MMBA. Initially it had a bmx track, pump track, and dirt jumps put in.
Anyways, it didn't take much effort by the individual for land managers to open their eyes and get on board when the collective efforts of those involved seemed so great. So get out there, assemble, and get involved. For those of you that remember the A-Team..."I love it when a plan comes together!!!!!"
  • + 1
 one time i was riding some single track on public property and a ranger came barking up my tree, he told me i couldn't ride. i asked why and his explanation was bikes ruin the trails, i told him horses ruin trails. he started to argue against my statement, i fired back with; have you ever seen a bike take a shit on the trail?
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 What’s the most positive thing you’ve seen happen where the future of mountain biking is concerned?
Definatly the massive boom in the past 2 years. There are so many people who start riding since 2010 - this is kinda amazing because the community is getting bigger and bigger. A bigger community means huge possibilities, whether you want to have a big party, an event, trips or just the perfect sunday morning ride on the local trails!

btw, sorry for my english.. im an austrian Wink
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 ILLEGAL TRAILS ARE THE BEST!!!! why?? simply because its more exciting! There is more risk which means there is more of a thrill. If you are sneeaking around trying not to get caught you also learns skills like sneakiness. Also, you can have more dangerous/frowned upon things on them. It is overall a more fun process of maintaining, building, and riding! Illegal trails also add a level of responsibility to the riders/builders, you MUST leave them almost like you were never their or you can get caught. Illegal trails also give a person a certain respect for nature than a legal/official trail. illegal trails can be secret to. One last thing they are good for: an escape for the builder/friends. people can get away from others, be in nature, and have their own escape. just my two cents...
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 So just to conclude id say that illegal trails are lots more fun and are built by riders that know what is safe. Though we are encouraged to use legal trails they just don’t suit the standards and skills of today’s riders. mountain biking is an ever evolving sport with boundaries being pushed all the time for example Cameron Zinc's 360 off of the Oakley drop in rampage and Sam Pilgrims 720's at air king. of course I’m sure there are many more impressive stunts but this is a changing world trails are built and destroyed every day with riders aspiring to becoming pro or simply those who want to clear a jump without going over the bars there are many riders who are out there embracing what has been created by the natural world and we should have the right to build where we want. and as we all know we only have two wheels and don’t take up much room so I don’t see a problem with building a small trail through the local woods and people who try and sue land owners for something they inflicted on them self’s, it’s there doesn’t mean it has to be ridden know you ability walk before you ride simple things like that can save allot of haste.

And as I say live to ride and ride your way.


Lewis

(part 4 of 4)
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 I think that what Pedal Driven is doing is an admirable cause, and I think it's less about this "bikers call to arms" than it is about seeing a problem and finding a solution. What they have done is essentially teamed up with the National Forest Service, and changed illegal trail building into a program that not only works for mountain bikers, but the parks as well. People had made comments about illegal trail building and how riding on those illegal trails was part of the rush in mountain biking; I disagree. For me it's just what the trailer said, "the freedom that takes you back to your childhood, the wind blowing through your hair and being one with nature." I felt the same way about underage drinking once, but as we mature so does our perception. Other people have commented about how mountain bikers take better care to throw their trash away, and therefore are better at living with the woods than those who abuse it. First, I think saying that, “we as a class of all encompassing people act a certain way,” is slightly narrow minded. Unfortunately, there seems to be at least one exception to the rule, that one guy that doesn't pack out what he packs in. Humans are the only animals that don't live within their environments permitters.
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 Thanks to everyone for their participation so far, we just want to clarify that there is no cash award for the comment contest. "Grand Prize: A license to host a screening of “Pedal-Driven: a bike-umentary” once at the theater or venue of their choice and the right to keep all of the proceeds." This means you can host one screening of "Pedal-Driven" in any theater you want without paying a license fee, and you do have to pay for the theater or venue that you choose, but you get to keep all of the proceeds from the screening (which we encourage you to put towards trail building). There are also lots of other great prizes, so keep up with the great comments!
  • + 1
 I believe the Gorge Freeride Association is a top contender to host a premiere. Hood River Oregon is built 100% by volunteers and the 17 stewards use allot of pocket funds to complete projects. We are a well known biking destination and you can bookmark this blog to scope our fundraising efforts. Currently we have several new projects in the making and once complete will attract even more riders to the area. www.gorgefreeride.blogspot.com
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 Part 3
The Alpine Recreation Strategic Study met Vancouver's demand for trails and open space. This happened for a couple reasons. Pirate bike trails were devastating the riparian and diverse tree zones on Fromme Mountain. Trails and open space also ranked 2nd behind parks in a community survey by the District of North Vancouver. This made the (DNV) realize a sustainable network of trails that satisfied different types of riders was in order. I'd say the only benefit pirated mountain bike trails have had were the ladder bridges of the north shore. The significance of this wasn't the ladder bridges, but the concept of obstacles or technical trail features on a trail. Now some of the trails locals kept, while others were deemed unsustainable. The DNV did close some trails, but got a grant worth 800,000 dollars to enforce ones that were kept open. The door officially opened for gravity riders in Vancouver. Suddenly, technical trail feature were being utilized to limit the effects of mountain biking in Vancouver's almost jungle like environment. Native resource consumption is now endorsed and utilized by the DNV.

The most important part of the Alpine Recreation Strategic Study was that community benefits were directed towards mountain bikers by the local government. This takes a lot of the stress both financially and mentally out of rider's pockets. The only way this will happen around the world is if mountain bikers actively pursue political trails.
  • + 1
 I'm not really fussed about getting any money for building trails or such as I havent really ever needed it/there is nowhere near me where money could be spent to build a decent trail due to the landscape.

However, I still wish to comment on this discussion. On the front of illegal trails, I dont find that they are ever a problem to upkeep or look after as long as the riders that use it understand the rule that if you dont dig, you dont ride! Its fairly simple and it helps teach people how to build trails and get an understanding of the work that goes into making them. The main problem that I find is that the land owners often dont like us using their land because of the problem of liability if anything goes wrong. For a trail to exist the land owner should technically have insurance incase something bad happens, due to the ever growing sueing culture. I think this is one of the main problems here. We build the trails and the people that build them understand the risks and would not sue, however, when the pesky kids on their crapmobiles find out about the trail, ride it wrong and unsafely they do themselfs damage and their parents get involved and the land owner gets it in the neck.
Solution? I cant think of one to be honest and this is why the trails are illegal. We (trail builders) have talked with the land owner and said we will sign a disclosure on our part that we take full responsibility, but this doesnt cover the other people who turn up.
  • + 1
 As for legal trails, I always enjoy riding legal trails, however, I find that usually they can be too crowded. One problem is the have a go guys who try and ride something beyone their skill level. Just because they have an amazing bike its no excuse... They should be more pragmatic and think that they should improve their skills before attacking harder trails. This causes problems for me because I will be flying down a trail and there will suddenly be a group of riders stopped because they cant tackle a section and I have ridden straight into people before because of this. Better education of riders or signs that are more clear about what can be found on that sspecific trail should be used so riders can asertain as to whether or not they can ride it safely. Anyways, Illegal or legal, as long as you ride safe and wear a helmet I dont care where you ride, as long as you are out..... On that note the ssun is out and its nice and warm, Im going for a ride.
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 Legal VS. Illegal Part 1
Of course legal trails are better than illegal. It's not the legality that bothers builders and riders, it's the cons that generally come with a legal trail. Can you have a legal trail that is as easy to maintain and as fun to ride as an illegal one? I think so. I can understand the draw toward illegal trails, but it's selfish for a small group of riders to expect total control over a trail on public land. I'd love to have a trail like that, but I don't pretend to have any right to build one. Why should I get to have a private trail on public land?

To me, private trails are a great option for legal building independent of the government red tape. They involves some of the independence of a rogue trail with the benefit of legality, regular maintenance, etc. But you'll pay. Really, no trails are free, and it makes sense for the user to be the one to pay for and control the trail rather than the taxpayers who have no interest. Successful private ventures include BMX parks, Ray's, and all the lift assisted riding at ski resorts.
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 Part 2 Most illegal trails have no consideration for sustainable trail design. If mountain biking is ever going to be widely accepted, collaboration with local agencies is vital. Most park or recreation departments in charge of lands have a myopic view concerning mountain bikes. Places like Vancouver, Moab, and Colorado have taken steps to change that. Grand Junction in Colorado hosts a downhill only single track called LunchBox. This project took several years to even plan, but is totally sanctioned by the local government. Bartlett Wash in utah exposes riders to a quarry field of cliff and rocks. The local governments have recognized a communal demand for mountain biking. This is the best and most efficient way to build trails. Having the government on your side opens the door for a whole new range of resources.
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 Part 1
In today's society of rapid industrialization, the dwindling amount of nature we have is a precious commodity. There are innumerable demographics all competing for usage of these lands. Who is given the divine right and who are excluded from these lands? Overall, activities harmful to the environment we all enjoy would probably be cut first. Mountain biking can enable riders to flow harmoniously with nature if some routine precautions are kept in mind. The same could be said for driving down the street in your car. Some things are just common sense. Would it look out of place if i drove my hummer through city park? Maybe. The same could be said when you are riding single track. There is always the potential to devastate the environment you're riding in. Just like there is always the potential i COULD drive down the wrong side of the high way. Environmentally destructive mountain biking could be attributed to neglecting sustainable trail designs, or from off-trail impacts on a well maintained trail.
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 For me, biking defenately means freedom, lifestyle, to enjoy and never the less have huge amount of funn. And it is also educational: You can see places and paths that you never eaven imagine that they exist. I dont know why people think that we are going to destroy their roads and paths and pollute the nature with garbage. WE ARE RIDING BIKES, NOT TANKS!!! And here in Slovenia we are crossing with this problem very often. Yes, we have some trails and parks which are preaty good, but when you turn out of there, you can just pray that some owner wont come with his shootgun and make you a half of kilogram heavyer Razz . So I think, we need a diferent approach to this problem and not being so rude to the owners of the land.

This is my thinking, and I apologize for the language Razz
  • + 1
 Here in Vermont, the USFS recently awarded $154,000 to legal mountain bike trail building in the Green Mountain National Forest - this will see a 9-mile loop in the Moosalamoo National Recreation Area in Goshen. There will be an upcoming article in Dirt Rag Magazine about this project. In a nutshell, legal trails are much better, because they are permanent! In this case, legal trails are also being paid for by the USFS, which is an excellent use of tax dollars.

Regarding tips for working with land managers - be respectful, show them that mountain bikers are good people who want to do good work in the woods. Also, make sure and follow through on details to the T.

We have been working on this project for 4 years and this year the USFS are making a big investment, as a result of our lobbying and advocacy efforts.

Get in touch if you have questions. Thanks, Patrick

Patrick Kell
Executive Director
Vermont Mountain Bike Association
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 Legal VS. Illegal Part 2

Despite all the difficulties, public legal trails are a viable option. They've worked for various recreational groups for years. The real issue comes from the new wave of mountain biking (FR,DH,DJ). The MTB revolution has thrown a curve ball at the system because we now require mountain-bike specific trails that are difficult to share with hikers and horses. Here in Phoenix, we have the biggest city park in the nation, and it has had share-use trails all over it for decades. Some of those trails turned out to bee fun to shuttle, and suddenly we have issues. Clearly, the gravity biking set is a little different user with a little different need. We think it's obvious, but non-bikers don't see the difference. Thus, we need to educate those who don't understand the need. Freeride MTB is in a similar position to skateboarding back in the 80s/90s and I hope we follow a similar path. Whether public or private, legal trails done right trump illegal trails any day.
  • + 1
 Success/ Failure stories?
I moved to the Phoenix area four years ago and as I got involved in the local scene, I learned about a rogue group of freeride trails on National Forest land. Not much of a secret; these trails are known of by the government but they have turned a blind eye so far. Efforts to legalize or destroy the trails have been made by different groups, but neither have succeeded. I don't feel like I'm sneaking around when I ride these trails, but I start to feel it a bit when I dig, and I almost always think about how bad it would stink if they finally lived up to their threats and shut it down.

Since these trails are on National Forest Land, the same as the trails on Teton Pass in Wyoming made famous by the Teton Freedom Rider's, I've had hopes that a similar precedent for legalization could be followed here in AZ. Legalization or privatization of our local trails would allow us to really do some cool things and the pros would far outweigh the cons. Over the last few years, efforts to organize riders and move things forward have started and ended multiple times. I'm guessing most riders are like me; I'd love to take on advocacy but I have a full time job and a family and I know I can't commit to the time necessary to do it alone. I wish I could. The sad thing is, we have the numbers to justify it and the heart to make it happen. We just need a spark to light the fire!
  • + 1
 (Part 2 of 2)
Where there is a will there is a way. Sometimes we think that our only option is to build illegal trails to ride on. But it is frustrating when you go to all this hard work and the next day it is destroyed. It wasn't until the abandoned road was closed that I looked at the other options.
I never dreamed of building a pump track or dirt jumps on my property; I was too busy being satisfied with the abandoned road. But now something greater has come along. I am going to build something that will last. And it will be there for anyone who wants to come and enjoy it.
If anyone is discouraged, I encourage you to get busy. Do you or someone you know have property that you can use? It can’t hurt to ask them if you can build something on it. Contact your city park board. Before you ask for permission get your plan laid out. Make a drawing of what you are going to be building. Do you know someone with heavy machinery that you could trade work for? (For example, you mow their yard in exchange for them doing a little dirt work for you.) You could have a meeting with your riding friends. If you can recruit a couple of your friends and work for a few hours a day, before you know it you will have an awesome place to ride. The options are out there, we just need to seize the opportunities and work hard.
  • + 1
 So this contest is long over, but as a mountain biking community there are always opportunities to support builders and groups pushing for the advance of the sport.

This is an appeal for support of mountain biking in Calgary, Alberta
Help make Calgary’s first mountain bike skills park a reality by voting for funding here:
www.avivacommunityfund.org/ideas/acf11512

1 vote per day for the next 15 days. Please take the time to cast them, THANK YOU!
  • + 1
 i want the money because where i live we have all the facilities to make a sick trail, but we don't have the equiptment to do it. it would save us having to ride miles just to find a decent gravel track or something, im sick off that; i want a propper trail!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
  • + 1
 PART 2 -

Legal / sanctioned trails are the future of the sport. They are generally better constructed and maintained, offer a more consistent, properly signed rider experience and allow more people to get into the sport. Crown land management groups only require that we construct trails to ‘Whistler Standards’, which is easy as it simply means following IMBA standards. The majority of illegal trails are constructed without sustainability in mind and need constant maintenance.

Due to the array of trails already in place, trail maintenance is a priority, as opposed to the creation of additional trails. But getting folks off their bikes and onto the trails with tools in hand - for even a single day, has proven to be quite a challenge.

Oddly, most riders fail to grasp the fact that they have a part to play in keeping their favorite trails in good condition. We have a bright future with recreational trails and land access in the Okanagan. What we need moving forward is more participation from riders, and an open mind to realizing that change is good!

Andrew - President - PACA
www.bikepenticton.com
  • + 1
 Tricks for dealing with The Man?
Be nice! Be humble! The best thing we can do is leave a good impression on everyone. The more people think that guys in full-face helmets are a bunch of Hell's Angels who don't give a crap about anyone, the more our cause is hurt. Until some skaters cut their hair, pulled up their pants and started playing the game the big boys were playing, nothing happened. We can't act like we're the center of the universe and that we're entitled to whatever we want. We aren't. We're incredibly blessed to even live in a place where we have the health, time, and money to enjoy any amount of the incredible pleasure that riding a bike brings. Most of the people who have or who will ever live on earth have never had that taste. I thank God for it every day.

The same progress that brings incredibly technical bikes also brings, unfortunately, cumbersome government and society. We have to understand the world of red tape we live in. Things take time. The right people have to be educated so that they can understand the need and the proper way to meet the need (that's exactly what Pedal Driven is for). I think most people are good and want to help. If they see a worthy need, they'll make an effort to meet it. Let's show the world that we need trails! If this is the biggest struggle we have in our lives, then we have great lives!
  • + 1
 PART 1 -

In the Okanagan we are blessed with an abundance of trails on which to ride, most of which are wildlife trails that have been cleaned up for riding.

Local riders have created trails everywhere, regardless of who owns the land. With the creation of a bike club in 2009 however, some local riders have begun to work within a framework of respect and negotiations. The ‘duck and hide’ method of land access is ridiculous. Given that we are surrounded by crown land, avoiding land access issues is short-sighted.

Our local bike club has reached out to numerous groups, including BC crown land ministries, BC Parks, The Land Conservancy, The Nature Conservancy and private land managers. In every case we were amazed at the open-armed welcome that we received. We’ve integrated into local hiking clubs; provided them maps, hiked with them and worked side-by-side with their members during trail days. In return, we gained their respect and are often shown new trails!

...
  • + 1
 SOCAL needs this. We have suffered long enough. We get bashed from all ends of society, XC riders, hikers, horse riders, and even the government. Big Bear was (snowsummit) my bike park back in the NORBA days up their. But now it has been taking form us. Everywhere but Socal has a great DH scene.
  • + 1
 By living in Kamloops, BC we are fortunate enough to have a great trail system and mountains around us that allow for amazing rides. However, if we were to have the prize money allocated to us, it would be donated to a charity that uses bikes as their only means of transportation. Operation Nicaragua is an organization that helps impoverished families with basic necessities in life. The profits would not only go to providing bicycles to help individuals carry basic necessities back and forth, it would also be essential to helping transport others to school, work and other means that make a community blossom. Mountain biking is our passion and if we are able to share that same passion in any way with people who aren't as fortunate enough, this would be a great opportunity to do so. Vote for us to help Operation Nicaragua!
  • + 1
 In my opinion illegal trails are better than legal trails because all the legal trails you have to pay to get into and don't have much say in what gets built or not. When your out building your own "illegal" trails it really relaxing and you get a sense of pride knowing that what you just put hours into making you can have months of fun hitting. After all you have to BUILD TO RIDE right?. And the freedom of not having to wait in queues and just push to the top and ride back down. And if half way down you find a change you want to make you can just go ahead and make it. You also get fitter without an uplift so you find after a while you can ride for hours none stop. Were not "litter bugs" we take all our litter home the dog walker with all their poo are doing more damage. Lets bring good trails to Dorset, UK!!!!!!!!
  • + 1
 While I love legal trails and having access to legal trail systems, most of them started as illegal trails at one point. So arguing against illegal trails is like shooting yourself in the foot. The reason for that is we start riding an area and as it gains popularity it gets more attention and once the landowners find out they try to close it down....that's when we as mountain bikers start working to keep the trails that we have grown to love, sometimes the areas get closed down, but sometimes through lots of hard work and devotion we get a new trail system that is legal to ride. I believe illegal trails are a necessary evil, we are coming in late to the game and have to fight for the land that we do get...and in doing so it has made us stronger. Without illegal trail builders and then the awesome people that fight for our rights there is not much land we would have access to, so thank you to all the hard working, behind the scenes people that make this sport so awesome.
  • + 1
 so legal or illeagal? although the land owner supports our jumps they are private, the council has no input what so ever, health and safety are no were to be seen. this means the land is our canvas we can create whatever we please, however big or crazy. we'v also noticed that since our jumps have got bigger and more impressive passers by are impressed rathwer than scowling at us. as long as they are well kept - all the litter is picked up and not too much of a mess is made people generaly don't mind trails so go ahead, ask the land owner if he mind. you might just be plesantly surprised. personaly though i would never recomend getting your local council involved no matter how enticing the funding may be they only bring bad news in the form as demons such as health and safety. happy digging!Smile
  • + 1
 I am living in a fortunate area, right next to Gethin forest, but its getting screwed over by the motobikes, creating huge troughs and ruining the berms. We are also suffereing from a bad case of drug use in the car park where the course ends begins. I believe this is turning away us younger riders who havent got cars and gotta put up with the shocking social behaviour after and before a sweet run in Gethin forest. I think that Gethin forest should get the funds so we can put out signs that clearly show its a DH course and provide a better sense of security in the area. There is an insane DH course right outside people's doorstep, yet they have no idea about it which seriously sucks!

Cheers for reading Smile
  • + 1
 This is just my opinion of the trails in Ireland I may be wrong on some facts.

I'm going to start by saying that I see the benefits of official trails in Ireland and understand all the hard work that has gone into getting them. I know Coilte(semi-state forestry body in ireland) wants to make more because of the there success but the way the trails are being built now I think less is more.

Like these trails are great fun and all, fast, flowy and the new one in 3rock has tonnes of great rocks to jump off(almost overkill) . The trails open the door for tonnes of new bikers but I fear they could be come a step back the progression of mountain-biking if we begin to rely on them.

Why? Well these trails are stagnant, they're relatively similar, not particularly challenging and they're not built by mountain bikers. My progression in this this sport has been from exploring, taking wrong turns, discovering something new and that never ending quest to come across that perfect trail. Something that is simply not possible with Coilte trails as there is that lack of diversity and sense of adventure.

Until there is more power to clubs and trail builders to build legal trails I feel the future of biking is in the illegal trials
  • + 1
 mounting biking for me is were you just forget about everthing an just shread yeah

well it hard to beat good hidden trail were no one knows wheres it is only you and your friends and are never busy
with people and you can change the berms and jumps without any hassil or anyone complasning about like if you done that on a legal trail you would probabley have the police on you or the forest service in an instant and they talk about legal trails costing loads of money were are they going to get it all to build all of these "legal" trails anyway although i think most legal trails are a good idea because you can meet new people but you will get some pricks who just wreck everthing.......
  • + 1
 I'm not writing this to win a prize but a quick constructive comment!

Nobody should neg the hell outta one of these comments to make sure you get more "Mad Props" and win your prizes!

Some of these opinions are damn well valid and interesting so can we make sure the decent ones get to the top as I for one don't want to have to scour around for them as lets be honest LOADS of people are going to write summin

Thanks Players
  • + 1
 Me and my buddies were always biking around Wellington, and we got kicked out of quite a few places because we didn`t have anywheres to ride, so me and a couple of guys went to some people on the committee of Wellington and told them we wanted to build a bike park, and it would give us a place to ride were we wouldn`t get kicked out all the time. We had a couple of meetings to decide what we wanted to do. After a while we got together again with a few people from the committee and planned out what we wanted.A few months ago we got the OK to get the bike park in, and the bike park will be for the whole village. All we need is a little more money and they will be starting it as soon as the snow is all gone.
  • + 1
 Near my hometown we have one legal trail, it is an xc trail and is about 7 km long. It's a decent trail but only if your into xc. with all these laws and insurance problems nobody has the motive to try and get some legal gravity trails made, we have few illegal trails as well and they are usually only ridden by a certain group of people so to be able to receive some funding to build public legal bike trails on Manitoulin Island would be great.
  • + 1
 Whether or not mountain bikers should be allowed on public land is not a new question. There has been an ongoing conflict between
bikers and the public for over 15 years. Just look at the North Shore trails in Vancouver. For years people were building world class illegal trails, but unfortunately they were continually getting torn down, by land owners, rangers, etc. It took many years, and a whole lot of determination and time from many volunteers to establish trail societies, working with land owners and the provincial government to reach a common ground to work on.

In many towns/cities there has been great headway made as far as the development of mountain bike trails. I feel this is due to the persistence of the individuals, and more so the creation of organized societies. It is mainly through advocacy that we can hope to gain the respect we are trying so hard to earn.

If you talk to just about any biker on the Pinkbike forums, they will all tell you the same: basically all of the trails we ride are illegal. This is unfortunate because these trails we love are at risk of being destroyed. Whether it be by private land owners, the province, or people that simply don`t think we should be there.

The fact is, we do deserve to be there. Crown land is public land. Every citizen has a stake in it, we all have the right to use this land, within certain scopes of course. The province has made a lot of headway on this topic. They have created a mountain bike policy, which I urge every mountain biker to read: www.sitesandtrailsbc.ca/about/mountain-biking.aspx
There have been extensive studies on the environmental impacts of biking on trails. It has been determined that hikers on a trail do as much if not more damage than a mountain biker.
  • + 1
 Sustainability is the new power word in the eyes of the Officials. They want to see trails built in environmentally responsible areas, not in watersheds for example, or not disrupting the native species of animals. They want to see trails built to combat erosion, and features that are built to last. The last thing our cause needs is for some kid to get hurt on a poorly built stunt.
  • + 2
 This is where illegal trails hurt our situation. We have such a serious lack of legitimate trails to ride. Bikers on a large scale are building illegal trails simply because they have nowhere else to go. There towns sell the bikes, but no one is trying to legitimize any sort of trail system, so naturally illegal trails are built. This is where trails may be poorly built, unsafe, environmentally damaging, etc. Thus, these trails will ultimately be torn down. The alternative to this is, if a bike club chooses to reclaim old trails as there own. In this case the existing trails may be upgraded to meet modern standards. This doesn`t mean downsizing either, if you think legal trails cant be fun, please look at the trail system in Black Rock Oregon.

Unless, we as mountain bikers step up. Join your local club. If your town doesn`t have one, start one. Simply start talking to people in the business, make contacts. Get involved. Become an advocate. The very least you can do is to educate yourself.
Get on IMBA,donate, they have such a large resource of information for advocates.

To sum it up: A legitimate, dedicated trail society, with a legal trail system has huge benefits.
-To be able to secure the huge amount of private and government funding for the building and maintaining of trails.
-To be able to advertise the trails you built, show off, tell your friends!
-To be an environmental steward.
And to me, the most rewarding of all:
-To be allowed to build and ride bike awesome bike trails, with no fear of them getting cut down. To have everything we put so much time into protected!


Please check out our trail society website: The Castlegar Mountain Bike Society

Vince
www.castlegar-mtb.com
  • + 1
 Been building trails since i could hold a spade along with all my mates. Mostly illegal trails in farmers woods in cornwall, but in london its been disused places or places where people have gotten permission to build. We could use the money to rent lands to build bigger and better trails for everyone to use and enjoy.
  • + 2
 Just want to add we've never destroyed trees we've always built around them.
  • + 1
 there is no other mean of transport in the world than a mountain bike to take you close to the heart of the nature, it also makes you apreciate and enjoy being part of it, so there is no way that we could possibly think of doing anything that can destroy the source of the immence pleasure we get out of it, that's why we choose to ride responsibly.
  • + 2
 Maybe it is time to make buying a bike a legal contract that you will be responsible for your own safety. No liability, way less resistance to trail building.
  • + 0
 (Part 1 of 2)
It was a cool Kansas afternoon last fall. I got my Specialized Pitch Pro out and put my helmet on. I raced at full speed down the road, the refreshing wind blowing across my face. As I pedaled toward the old abandoned road near our house, I thought, “How could this get any better?”
The trail wasn’t as technical as my friend’s trail in California, but I had built some jumps, and it was rocky and fast. As I flew around the corner toward the first jump, my heart stopped. The bold letters on the sign seemed to laugh at me as they said, “No trespassing.”
It had taken about eight months and a lot of sweat for this fifteen- year old to earn enough money for his new bike. And after all that work, his only trail was shut down.
After some tough thinking and talking to my friend, I asked my parents if I could build a pump track and some dirt jumps on our six acres we have. They said, “You can, but isn’t that going to be a lot of work?” I told them that I wanted to work this summer and fall to save money. If I had a loader, I could build legal trails on my property as well as help out at some local trails here in Kansas. So my dad surprised me and said, “I will pay for half of the loader if you earn the other half.”
  • + 1
 i live in eastern washington where this movie was started! all i can say is: public property is public property.... respect it and we might get respected by those who help manage it!
  • + 1
 lots of comments here giving out about not having easy access to ski lift bike parks.in ireland ski lifts cable carts are unheard of be grateful to the fact that you have that we dont!
  • + 1
 there is no solution, mountainbiker will ever build trails. It's one of the most important things to do for a biker. They have to build them so that the natur isn't hurted too much.
  • + 0
 we need trails in 100 mile. we have no trails at all. all we have is a super pooy "bike park". i think it would be sick to have some solid trails to ride. because not everyone kan go to w.l every weekend to ride fox mountain. =]
  • + 0
 I know my say might not be important becuase i ride bmx but f*cking hell i love trails, i have public trails up where i live and they suck then when i built illegal trails, supposedly, i get arrested for it. I mean what happened to freedom of what you think is right. i think it should be a human right to build you own trails and not have them taken down because learning to ride a bike and the feel of freedom are the two most satisfactory things in life. i mean come on we dont cause trouble drinking and inject like most yobs do so whats the worst that can happen gypsy's can get away with legally building settlements but we get arrested for piling a piece of mud into a work of art and that work of art is trails.

It is probably all down to jealousy, the governemnt feel they need more money off of the tax payer and if we build better quality shit than them then they lose out, how pathetic.

i will leave you with this: Who do you choose at times like this, fellow riders or the Governments?
  • + 0
 Sustainability is the new power word in the eyes of the Officials. They want to see trails built in environmentally responsible areas, not in watersheds for example, or not disrupting the native species of animals. They want to see trails built to combat erosion, and features that are built to last. The last thing our cause needs is for some kid to get hurt on a poorly built stunt.

This is where illegal trails hurt our situation. We have such a serious lack of legitimate trails to ride. Bikers on a large scale are building illegal trails simply because they have nowhere else to go. There towns sell the bikes, but no one is trying to legitimize any sort of trail system, so naturally illegal trails are built. This is where trails may be poorly built, unsafe, environmentally damaging, etc. Thus, these trails will ultimately be torn down. The alternative to this is, if a bike club chooses to reclaim old trails as there own. In this case the existing trails may be upgraded to meet modern standards. This doesn`t mean downsizing either, if you think legal trails cant be fun, please look at the trail system in Black Rock Oregon.
  • + 0
 I enjoy building places to ride but walkers or land owners don't like it so i have to travle which limits how much riding i can do and how much i can improve. I would love to be able to build some trails to help the comunity get into biking and make the sport more popular.
  • + 0
 I agree that in some cases illegal trails can be damaging and harmful. But they express the true nature of mountain biking styles and creativity. Without them a lot of riders wouldn't flourish and develop. As far as I know any jumps or trails I build in my local woods aren't harming anyone. We don't litter or get in the way of people walking, and they aren't visible from the paths. I don't have the time to trek to glentress every weekend, so the trails we build locally are the best we've got. But they keep getting torn down because people think we are 'vandalising the hillside.' It's pretty stupid that something we spend a lot of time on can be ruined so easily by people who are bothered by occasionally coming across a berm or jump. Legal trails are great, but without the illegal trails we build I know a lot of people would be worse riders as a result.
  • + 0
 illegal trails seem to be the best because there is no health and safety regulations or anything, the only down side is that dog walkers and horse riders destroy them Frown the best thing to do is build the trail in the woods but make sure that is doesnt go over any foot paths. then hopefully people are less likely to see them and are not fussed about them because they dont obstruct anything
  • + 0
 Mountain biking is a stay-cation in a sense, it releases stresses caused by the world and lets us be who we are while enjoying life. Legal trails are more fun because the guidelines meant to keep trails safer for little kids, are lifted so their can be larger and therefore, funner trails. But still, illegal trails are what's giving all of us, the responsible mountain bikers, a bad name. Government land managers think they're doing their job by shutting down our area's, when really they only need to be shutting down the illegal ones. If you have one coming to your local area, keep them away from the big features, you see fun, they see a potential injury. Also, for every bad thing they see, show them three good ones, even if they are small. The most positive thing I've seen about mountain biking is that we became aware as a community about what is happening before we got put on the defensive. What I mean by this is that we're being proactive by making sure our area's don't get shut down, before it's going to happen. Don't ride the smooth lines fast, Ride the smooth lines fast. Get out their and enjoy!
  • + 0
 i feel all trails are good weather it be legal or illegal. i see comments already talking about how awsome it is to have trails that you build all to your self ya thats cool i understand that but by building illegal trails you kind of giving bikers a bad name. saying we will do what we want where we want. and i understand if in your area you have nothing to ride but if you find out who the land owners are just go ask i knwo i have 4 or 5 nice trails all to my self up at my grandparents. no the trails arent on there property. but instead of being like well this land isnt being used for any thing i took the extra week to find out who the owner was and ask him if it was ok that i did some building. and he said it was fine ya your gonna run into nay sayers but thats part of the hunt. on top of that i live with in 20 mins of black rock which is run by a great group of volunteers that love the land and want it to be used to its fullest i have yet to go up there and not see some one up there working and the work is amazing.
  • + 1
 there is no solution, mountainbiker will ever build trails. It's one of the most important things to do for a biker. They have to build them so that the natur isn't hurted too much.
  • + 0
 well i think that mountain bikers get a bad rep from all the other things that are lumped in with it. when you have people coming through and destroying the land, making disturbances, and polluting then the park services are going to get more more defensive of the land. i know of at least a dozen trails in montana and colorado that have been closes to mountain bikers due to people with atv's and dirtbikes going in tearing up the land littering and making too much noise. so really i think a the point needs to be made that a mountain bike trail even if building it changes the land is about keeping the land and Terran as natural as possible while making it ridable and most mountain bikers have enough respect to not abuse the land they are on. as well as a distinction between bikers and motorsports.
  • + 1
 there is no solution, mountainbiker will ever build trails. It's one of the most important things to do for a biker. They have to build them so that the natur isn't hurted too much.
  • + 2
 PROBLEM: no one is gonna give anyone else props because they want to win....
  • + 1
 I get props, then the disappear, no joke
  • + 1
 as long as you are a little respectful of your enviroment a d dont destroy all the trees etc ... can i have that money .. im representin the west coast
  • + 2
 DIG & BUILD. SWEAT & SHRED.

Legal or not, it's in our blood to never stop.
  • - 1
 I live in Zurich, Switzerland. Like some of you know, our political system has got many different groups of interests.

You have 2 possibilities to build something: Wait for 1/2 to 10 years until you're trail is legal or take the shovel go into the forest and build.
At the moment I do both of these options.
But if ure trail is illeagal u can get really creativ and build some really nice things what u ant. We had a little concept of building our trail:
In the first year it was a little trail with mo berms and no jumps.
Now we are in the 3rd year and there already exist some fun stuff. There was never turn down anything, beause i think that hikers and landowners became accostomed to what we did. If we build that stuff in one month it would have been torn down.
An other thing is to build with the underground and not against it. That means: Dont build something where u have to shovel for ages: 1) too much work and 2) nature should be respected (who wants to have some big northshore ledders in there own forest?, no one)

Nevertheless, most important is to be lucky about the people who own the land and the forest officials.
We were:
They came from the Northshore Big Grin
  • + 1
 The comment contest is now officially closed and Howell at the Moon Productions will be notifying winners directly, thank you all for your participation!
  • - 1
 i would love to win this and get some moneys for the local trails but they arent exactly legal trails... i built them cuz the resorts around here suck!! so if they would be willing to give the money to a resort for them to build trails that would be sweet!
  • + 1
 you know what even though illegal trails are usually short lived, it is totally worth it to build again!
  • - 2
 I would prefer a legal trail to an illegal one, for two reasons. 1. An Illegal trail can be taken away from you, no matter how many people love to ride it. In my town, a trail called Family Guy was destroyed, because the owners of the land sold it to real estate developers. Although a hundred riders showed up to council meetings, the developers still tore it down. 2. In contrast, legal trails will always be there, because the government grants bikers the land, and because they provide funding to repair the trail. My favorite trail is a blue trail that has pumps and rollers, and one drop. It is similar to Ninja cougar on Whistler. Little rippers can shred it up, as can DHers, or XC riders. It is a fun trail which anyone can use, but better still is that it has proper drainage to ride in the rain, and it is maintained regularly. I would rather have a legal trail that is just as fun, then having an illegal trail, which never gets maintained, and could be gone if someone builds apartments.
  • + 1
 Too many people have been kicked off of legal trails so the government could sell the land to developers to validate your statement. Sorry bro. I wish legal trails were always backed up by the government, but too many other activists are working against us. Pedal Driven hopefully will help us get some more publicity and recognition from the local governments that prefer not to acknowledge us.
  • + 2
 THE BEST TRAILS ARE ILLEGAL.
  • + 2
 i like building trails to and cake
  • + 1
 dont give me the money- i already have a shovel and saw whether building is legal or illegal- im going to build anyway
  • - 2
 Well its pretty much how you like it. With legal trails you can always just go hit them up knowing that it won't get destroyed and you can always go by yourself and have a good chance to meet someone new you can shred with. With illegal trails it's usually built by yourself and with buddies or someone else in a secret place so the city won't find out. Also with illegal trails you can make it as gnarly as you wan't to ! I've had a recent experience with getting me and my friends dirt jumps legalized, the city shut us down because they thought we would sue them if somebody got injured and they tore our jumps down. It was the only place to jump on that side of town. The most positive thing I have seen with the future of mountain bikes is EVERYTHING ! Now i have only found out about mountain biking over Summer 2010 but im sure we have come a long way since it started ! And making hardtails under 30 lbs is crazy ! the tricks get gnarlier, the parts are way sicker, the designs are wicked, and the trails are just ready to shred ! The only negative thing is electric bikes .. it ruins the idea of a bike !
  • + 2
 give this comment random props.......ready, set, go!
  • + 1
 I ride in Florida!
Enough said!
I win!
I can expect the check in the mail?
  • - 3
 What i dont get is why They can build trails and yet up in BC, we can. Although we may get told off, we dont get a huge fine and get locked up. Plus, those trails are build in the middle of know where and is NOT effecting wild-life and any other walking trails. I always build my own trails just a little bit away from my house and they haven't been destroyed. why? Some say that the bush up at BC is thicker but i say the Saanich Park people know about my trails and see that they are well maintained and aren't disrupting any walking trails. So they just let me build them. In my opinion, The people down in Montana are setting a bad example of how they run things down there. From what i can tell, there is absolutely no freedom for the citizens and everything is law, law, law. Yes, law is important to keep the State going, but it cant get carried away like in this situation. I encourage to every bike builder to keep going!!! if you get caught, tell them what you think about Freedom. They will listen
  • + 1
 Peer driven contests.... meh.
  • + 1
 anyone pee down the side of the toilet to make it silent?
  • + 1
 The visceral approach.... NIMBY assholes need to STFU.
  • + 1
 to me. mtb is gods idea of having fun with your mates. simple as
  • + 1
 everything, everywhere should be a downhill trail with a lot of berms
  • + 1
 this is a pretty awsome oppertunity for builders.
  • + 1
 Song's is?
  • + 1
 i like turtles
  • + 1
 Pears decide if I win?
  • + 2
 Yes, Bartlett, Anjou and Bosc have spent their lives in the trees; they know what's ripe.
  • + 1
 Excelent People Smile
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