Evoc Bike Travel Bag Pro and Bike Stand – Review

May 5, 2017
by AJ Barlas  
Evoc Bike Travel Bag Pro and Bike Stand

After years of traveling with various bike boxes, carefully cramming wheels in around the frame and spending a good chunk of preparation time padding everything up, it was time to try something developed specifically for the task. On recent travels from Canada to Australia and New Zealand, my bike was thrown into Evoc’s latest version of their Bike Travel Bag Pro.

The bag itself is designed to work with anything from a road bike to DH bikes, accepting wheels up to 29”. The max wheelbase that it can fit is 1,240mm, which should be adequate for a lot of riders, though newer, longer bikes and a lot of size large and bigger DH bikes may be a problem. The stock bag comes with a plastic box that the rear of the bike rests on, but we’re also testing Evoc’s new Bike Stand. The stand can mount to any current axle combination and adds an additional 1,400g to the 8kg bag.

Bag and Stand Details

Bag:
• Fits Tri, road, XC, AM and DH bikes
• Accepts up to a 29” wheel
• Eight Internal straps secure bike within bag
• Eight plastic rods support case structure
• Large, durable wheels
• 136cm x 80cm x 39cm
• Max wheelbase: 1,240mm
• Bag weight: 8kg
• MSRP: $599.99 USD

Stand:
• Fits Tri, road, XC, AM and DH bikes
• Front Mounts: QR 5 mm, Thru axle: 12/15/20 mm, Boost
• Rear Mounts: QR 5 x 130 mm, Thru axle: 12 x 135/142/148/150/157 mm
• Adjustable length, alloy base
• Max wheelbase: 1,240mm
• Stand weight: 1,400g
• MSRP: $139.99 USD
www.evocsports.com

The bag is collapsible for ease of storage, achieved by removing the hard plastic rods from the fitted slots strategically placed around it—two at each end and another two on each side, over the wheel pockets. The base of the bag is constructed of a hard plastic, with two alloy sliders attached in an effort to add more durability to the bag. An update to earlier Evoc Bike Travel Bags is around the brake rotors within the wheel pockets. These now include a hard plastic pouch of sorts, which provides protection around the rotor. There is also an included third wheel that attaches to the alloy handle at the front of the bag, which is supposed to make rolling the bag around without lifting anything, easy.

Evoc Bike Travel Bag Pro and Bike Stand
The updated rotor protection in the wheel pocket.
Evoc Bike Travel Bag Pro and Bike Stand
Between the bag internals and the wheel pocket is a sheet of plastic board.


The alloy stand features a poplock pin style system to adjust the length and once locked to the size that your bike is going to work with, determining the axle mount location and style at both the front and rear is required. Once this has all been determined the mounting process is very easy and straightforward. Mounting the bike is best done with the stand removed from the bag, and attaching the front, before even removing the rear wheel, I found to work best. From here, using the stand to hold the bike up while the rear wheel is pulled out makes life easy.

Once both the front and rear axles are attached to the stand remove the bars, wrap the front of the frame with the supplied pad, and secure the bar with the velcro loops on the pad. At this point I found it super simple to place the bike in the bag. Obviously pedals need to be off before the bike is put in the bag, but otherwise, this is it. I found that the stand makes it simple to prepare everything and get the bike into the bag itself. There is a pouch on the inside of the bag for pedals, small tools and other bits and pieces.

Evoc Bike Travel Bag Pro and Bike Stand
  Evoc Bike Travel Bag Pro and Bike Stand

Evoc Bike Travel Bag Pro and Bike Stand
The range of mounting options based on hub size and type of bike.
Evoc Bike Travel Bag Pro and Bike Stand
Front axle mounting options. For the XL bike mounted the lowest possible mount was needed.


Performance

The bike that was used with the bag was an XL Transition Patrol, which contains a wheelbase bang on the max that the Evoc Bike Travel Bag is listed as being able to accept, at 1,240mm. With the fork deflated the bike just fit to the stand and within the bag. If your bike has a longer wheelbase you will likely be stuck with the usual, large cardboard box, especially if you’re a rider on a size large or bigger DH bike, with a number of current, popular DH bikes in a size large containing wheelbases of more than 1,240mm.

As it was, I found that my XT derailleur made some contact with the rear of the bag, so I removed it and let it lay in the bag with the cable still attached. This takes five seconds to do and there were no issues with it like this. Throwing a pair of socks or rags around it, or at least between the derailleur and the frame isn’t a bad idea either.

Evoc Bike Travel Bag Pro and Bike Stand
  The fully packed bag, including an XL bike, shoes and some other bits and bobs.

Evoc Bike Travel Bag Pro and Bike Stand
Straps securely hold the frame down in the bag.
Evoc Bike Travel Bag Pro and Bike Stand
The derailleur resting under the chainstay.


The strapping system inside the bag is well designed and the straps for the seatpost and stem are adjustable through three different positions—beneficial for different bikes and frame sizes. With the bike mounted in the stand and all of the straps secured everything is very well locked into place. Toss in any extras (I threw in some tools, my riding shoes, and two riding kits) zip it up and move to mounting the wheels into the side pockets. The bag only opens up from one side, but I found this to be plenty and it also held the bag upright while trying to place the bike within the bag.

Evoc Bike Travel Bag Pro and Bike Stand
The strap for the seatpost has three options for placement.
Evoc Bike Travel Bag Pro and Bike Stand
Placement for the stem strap also has three options available.

With the updated rotor protection in the wheel pockets, I ran the gamble and threw both wheels in with the rotors attached—one 180mm and the other 200mm. The rotors remained straight throughout my travels with no issues. Lucky? Perhaps, but they are sturdy boxes surrounding the rotors. The Patrol runs on 27.5” wheels and with the tires deflated, it’s an easy fit into the side pockets, but there isn’t a lot of room to spare.

All packed up with some small tools and some riding gear, the bag weighed in at around 30kg. The max weight allowed for an oversized piece of luggage, like a bike bag, is generally 32kg—there isn’t a lot of room for movement on the scale. Flying with a DH bike would be a different story and would likely result in only the bike being in the bag, though I haven't had a chance to try with one.

The included third wheel attachment was the only let down with the bag. The wheel mounts with a clip over the alloy handle at the front of the bag, and lining up two pins in the clip with holes provided in the alloy handle keep it in place… until the pins break off. I lost the first pin before checking the bag in on my first flight and the second disappeared shortly after landing in Australia. It’s a nice option to have with the bag, but how it attaches needs to be rethought. I also found that placing the hard plastic support rods at the front and rear of the bag was cumbersome and as a result won't be taking them out, which results in the bag not being so collapsable.

Evoc Bike Travel Bag Pro and Bike Stand
  The plastic rods that are positioned at each end of the bag were pretty tricky to get fully in place.

Evoc Bike Travel Bag Pro and Bike Stand
The sturdy alloy handle is great for dragging the bag around but also doubles as an attachment point for a third wheel.
The third wheel attachment. Note the missing pins that were inside the clip which line up with the holes in the alloy handle.
The third wheel attachment. Note the missing pins that were inside the clip, which line up with the holes in the alloy handle.


Pinkbike’s Thoughts

bigquotesThe Evoc Bike Travel Bag Pro with the Bike Stand made packing and unpacking the bike a quick and painless process. Traveling with it was pain-free and the bike made it through all travels unscathed, as did the bag. There's no denying that they're a larger investment than some will be willing to front, but if you travel with a bike regularly enough, having something like this is a no-brainer.AJ Barlas







MENTIONS: @evocsports




119 Comments

  • + 120
 To me the geometry of the bag needs updating and being brought into 2017. A steeper seat angle to help on escalators, and lower slacker at the front would help win demanding airport baggage races. EVOC have also missed a trick by not including a dropper post, at this price point that would really help the bags descending ability,

4/10
  • + 40
 Agreed. Would've also preferred a 40 mm boosty boost handle for better stiffness when charging through terminals.
  • + 0
 Jajaja
  • + 19
 Also need 2.9 inch wheels, cant be a dick unless we get maximum roll over peoples toes ability.
  • + 6
 We are interested on its stiffness too. How stiffer is it compare to its predecessor.
  • + 23
 If you travel regularly with your bike, great (pro racer, cycling journalist)

If you're a mere mortal, cardboard and tape does the job



I've had a bike bag, and it mostly just took up space......
I had a cardboard box and I was able to set that on fire.....
  • + 4
 @Boardlife69: psh 2.75 inch wheels forever.
  • + 36
 Climbs like a backpack, descends like a duffel. 10/10
  • + 4
 That comment made the coffee come out my nose. Brilliant
  • + 1
 @Waldon83: Aussie wisdom FTW.
  • + 15
 Why no one is making bigger bike bags, when bikes are getting longer every year?! What kind of manufacturer thinks it's ok to make a "Pro" level bag where only half of mountain bikes will fit?
  • + 23
 You're thinking of that Pole bike right? Wink
  • + 2
 I think I've seen a bigger bag from evoc recently. Should fit Fatbikes and other big bikes. Can't find it now, but I'm sure they have one in near future.
  • + 3
 @Archimonde: Yes. And i happen to own one. Just bought a CRC bike bag thats 140cm long, the L size Evo 140 fits just.
  • + 3
 Didn't they unveil an "xl" version or was it poc? I thought I remember seeing some sea otter coverage on an "XL" sized bike bag.
  • + 1
 Yup, I just built up a Banshee Prime XL and the wheelbase with a 140mm Pike is 1243mm. pretty sure sticking a 150mm one on there doesn't help either.
  • + 2
 They had one at the sea otter classic. It's only 1cm longer though (max 125cm wheelbase).

About halfway down:
fat-bike.com/2017/04/2017-sea-otter-classic-report-part-2
  • + 1
 douchebags make some pretty solid good sized bags
  • + 1
 I have a Biknd Jetpack and have fit 3 different full suspension trail bikes (both were large GT Forces a 2014 and 2015 as well as a medium Giant Trance 2017) on different trips AND have fit my DH bike (a medium Giant Glory 2014) in the same bag with room to spare. My friend also has the same bag and travels with an XL Santa Cruz Nomad, a Large Trek fuel 9.9 29er and a large GT Fury. How much larger of a bike bag is needed? That is a pretty wide range of bikes and brands. Most airlines also have size parameters that need to be met so travel bags can only be "so" large before they are completely useless. On a recent trip another friend used an EVOC bag with his new 29" Kona Hei Hei that was either a Large or XL and it fit with no issues. The only thing he needed to do was deflate the tires a bit to fit in the external wheel pockets.
  • + 1
 @Kenfire24: That much larger that a REAL large and X-large will fit. There's plenty on bikes with around 1300mm wheelbase nowadays, and mine is even longer. Like i said the CRC Bike bag is the biggest i found, and works with airline regulations, so i don't see why others couldn't maker theirs bags a little longer. Like more than 10mm...
  • + 1
 @hirvi: The reviews i saw on the CRC bike bag were quite bad, apparently the damn things wobble too much.
What bike do you have to have a wheelbase over 1300mm? even the xxl v10 is not that long
  • + 1
 @zipeldiablo: Well, the Evocs frame is supported better and the wheels are located wider, so yes, it's more stable than the CRC one. But it's also double the price. If i would travel more the Evoc would be a nobrainer, but for flying once in a year or two, it's a good value in my opinion

I'm riding a large Pole Evolink 140. Fits in a bike bag with a few tricks. Smile
  • + 1
 @hirvi: could you elaborate on the few tricks you used please? Smile
Yeah the cost is a bit high for a bag that small, i don't get why they made it that small, increase the size by 6cm is not really an issue...
  • + 1
 @zipeldiablo: Rotate the fork 180 degrees and/or deflate and compress the fork down. I heard some people also deflate the shock to compress the rear, but then you can't secure the rear axle to the bag. I also have to remove the seat or lower the seatpost to clear the height.. Smile
  • + 1
 @hirvi: I don't understand why you can't secure the rear axle if you deflat the shock a little bit :o
Thanks for the tips Smile i assume that if your bike fits my xl nomad will fit too
  • + 14
 I've got the normal without the bike stand Pro bag of the this.. the small wheel at the front constantly collapses due to the plastic pins in it being to short and popping out, its a pain and kinda needs rethinking Evoc if your listening... :-)
  • + 4
 yeah, had the same problem. just threw the palstic rods in the garbage, found some iron ones at the hardware store that fitted in the litle pockets, and problem solved; its a bit heavier now, but bikes are light this days.
  • + 3
 Yeah, the front wheel is a throwaway item. I don't even use mine.
  • + 4
 i drilled through the wheel clip and handle when it is in place and push a spring clip through it, it now works perfect and makes those long walks through airports much easier. But ye as standard it's totally useless.
  • + 3
 @mikekay: Might have to try that. Thanks! I was thinking a pair of built in wheels on either end of the handle would work but I don't mind rolling it on just the two wheels it has.
  • + 2
 @mikekay: good hack that! cheers
  • + 4
 For those not aware, you can get a free replacement clip on wheel from Evoc with metal pins. The plastic ones were a poor design and broke after 1 trip. I've yet to try the replacement, hopefully it'll be better.
  • + 5
 Very good review. I got the bag last year and flew with it four times (once w small Spec Demo DH bike, the rest with medium AM bike). It's a good bag, but nothing is going to be perfect.

One rotor did get bent, so you are still better off removing the rotors if you do not want to risk damage on arrival.

The attachment points for the third wheel are weak, as is the whole area around that wheel. The third wheel is nice for the few hours that it works before collapsing/breaking. :/

If your bike has an asymmetric R triangle it is not going to sit too great on the back. The bag will want to lean over.

It is incredibly expensive to use this bag domestically on some US airlines. $150 PER TRIP on United and Delta.
If you overpack and get it over 75 pounds, it goes to $200.

I used this bike on BikeFlights shipping service once also (within US). That was fine, but they use Fed-Ex ground. If you read the fine print for Fed-Ex ground they say they do not accept packages with wheels. I got lucky, but there is no guarantee you will also be lucky. Just something to be aware of.

The bottom line: flying with a bike is painfully expensive.
  • + 2
 No doubt, I have this bag. I think United ( which sucks ) charges more over 50 lbs. My bike and bag where just over and they wanted to charge me more. I complained and got it down to $150 one way, ridiculous..Renting can more expensive , but less hassle depending where your traveling. Screwed either way I guess
  • + 1
 It's not so bad here in Europe - I've flown with a bike a couple of times recently and you are looking at £30-40 each leg of the trip. It works out cheaper than 2 days bike hire, plus it's your own bike so you know it. Saying that, my flights are only around Europe, but I think some flights (British Airways) give you free bike carriage, so always check prices locally as some of the more expensive airlines and up cheaper...
  • + 2
 23kg is the magic number. Bike goes as part of your checked baggage on many airlines when at that weight or under (including on American Airlines).

If you have a pretty decent trail/AM bike - 30lbs = 13.6kg, plus 8kg for the bag + 1.4kg for the bike stand = bang on 23kg. Have to do bike only though, no stuffing your shoes in there Smile
  • + 1
 @antennae: 13.6 with an enduro bike would be hard to reach even with full carbon
  • + 4
 Are these easy for Security to inspect, and re-pack?

In the USA, bikes get inspected 100% of the time.

I have a Thule hard-case, and it's absolutely the worst possible option for flying. They require a lot of finesse to pack, and Security can never get it back together—resulting in a loose pack when it actually gets on the plane.
  • + 1
 It should be. You can lock the zips, but I've found that security will just cut the locks off anyway. Although not ideal, now I fly with it zipped up—no locks—which is super easy for them to open up and have a gander at what's inside.
  • + 7
 It's as easy as you make it for them. Packing the bike in is easy, they won't take the bike out, but they will ask you to take out all over contents so they can check them. When i travel i use the bike bag as a spare suitcase as there is a lot of spare space and you're already paying for the oversize. If you pack the loose stuff so it comes out easily and can be checked quickly and repacked it is dead easy.

Pro-tip: check in online or at a self serve kiosk. Don't declare as a bike and get luggage tags and go straight to oversize to put your luggage in. Airline insurance only covers $1000 anyway, so you're better self insuring as any damage will be beyond that, and save yourself the $100 bike fee. If anyone asks what is in the bag: "work materials"
  • + 3
 @AJBarlas: If you use TSA locks they're supposed to use their master key to open them. I've heard they often don't put them back because they lose them, so one trick is to tether the TSA locks to the bag using zip ties.
  • + 1
 FWIW when I flew from YVR back to the US May 2016, the agent in YVR asked me to take everything out of the bag EXCEPT the bike frame and wheels. I had to put my shoes, clothes, tools, etc into a separate bin. The Evoc and the bin were both run through X-Ray. So prepare to be able to unpack the contents again at the airport.
  • + 1
 I had to open mine at customs in NZ, it was pretty easy as the bike is all strapped into the bag.
loose items (like riding kit) i put into plastic bags, just so they weren't so loose. like @RONDAL said, it's as easy as you make it.
  • + 5
 • Max wheelbase: 1,240mm
• MSRP: $599.99 USD

hey? today is 2017- a lot of enduro bike in size large have longer wheelbase, not saying XL or DH bikes
  • + 3
 In NZ we have a 23kg weight limit per bag (50 pounds). This bag with my carbon everything enduro bike and my pedals packed into another bag comes in at exactly that... I do run heavy tires but so what.

It's an awesome bag but really sucks that I can't squeeze anything else in with it...
  • + 1
 I flew into NZ from overseas last August. I landed in Auckland and needed to catch a connecting flight to Queenstown. The international airline had a 30kg limit while Air NZ has a 23kg (domestic). I had to unpack and repack my other stuff elsewhere from my Evoc bag. I ended up hand carrying: a full face helmet, knee pads, roost guard, flat pedals, hand pump, shock pump, 5-10's, and thru-axles. The one that got me the most in trouble were the thru-axles as I had to explain it to airport security that it wasn't your typical construction bolt (these are apparently not allowed). Fun times.
  • + 3
 Bike bag AND a surf board bag? Looks like someone travels deeper than I do!

The EVOC bag doesn't handle baggage trucks though. nsmb.com/articles/air-canada-destroys-bike

Even with a wheelie board bag with a massive red fragile logo on the nose my boards were badly damaged this winter... Frown
  • + 1
 Surf boards? Oh man! Baggage handlers probably get a good laugh when they launch them into the cargo hold. I bought a Beater foam board for traveling, just for that reason!
  • + 1
 @Beez177: I assume they're like Hogan from the top ropes in Wrestlemania...
  • + 1
 not sure why the issue with the wheelbase came up? I've got a YT Capra L, and we flew to EU and raced there all summer last season, bikes in and out of the bags constantly for van-travel, never had to let air out of forks or anything. Kept 3 of us on the dirt, in the air, and there and back with zero issues. Great bad. Exterior fabric could be a little tougher. Dealt with some tears, but other than that... all good!
  • + 1
 Six trips Sydney>Vancouver (Whistler) with an XL V10 (it only fits if you remove the rear derailleur and push hard on the swingarm), 3 trips Sydney>NZ and 4 trips Sydney>Vancouver with an XL SB66c (shorter than the V10 but still have to take off the rear derailleur). One slightly bent rotor in all that time. This in the regular Evoc bag, not the Pro reviewed here.

Had to get a new one this year because my Yeti has been replaced with a 29" trail bike and the big wheels didn't fit in the old bag wheel pockets - and the airlines has nearly removed one side handle from my original bag (otherwise it still functions fine).

With 2 climbing quickdraws I can lash pairs of Evoc bag handles together and pull all four through the airport (2 with each hand).
They're good bags and they protect the bikes well.
  • + 1
 The Evoc bag is the second type of travel bag I've owned (I won't mention the first brand I owned as it was a cheap & nasty). The Evoc is a great bag and enables you to pack the bike quickly however they need to be lighter. Air New Zealand (for sporting equipment) has a weight limit of just 23kg (50lbs) which means you can't put bugger all in this bag after the bike.
(Lastly making the bag transparent would also help prevent my travel mates filling up my bag with household collectables which can be embarrassing when removing stuff in public with a 'it's-not-mine' look on your face)
  • + 1
 Love the Bag, had it for 12 months so far.

Its all good but the 29inch wheels with Magic Mary tyres have to be deflated and forced in, but it works.

The third wheel is a joke. I lost both pins in about 2hours. Got it replaced under warranty but only had it for few minutes before it broke too..

Great Bag, needs more space for 29er wheels and cheap plastic third wheel attachment need some alloy/steel version.

Come on Evoc !!
  • + 1
 I've been really happy with mine. I travel for work to places with trails nearby, and being able to take my bike along is a great option. The bike stand looks like a nice addition to my Pro bag. I've never had any problems with the old setup but the extra structure inspires confidence and looks like it might make packing easier. I've used the pro bag with my old XL Nomad and currently a size L Evil Insurgent. The Nomad was a snug fit but it worked (I removed the rear derailleur too), but it's roomier for the Insurgent.
  • + 1
 I've got one and right now its the best bike bag I've had. Survived a United flight in Houston airport. Only thing I didn't like, like he mentioned was the rods that go in the front and rear. I had to tap them in with a hammer to get them down, so those SOB's aren't coming out. Didn't think it was an issue till we needed to load 5 bags in the van and my bag was the only that wouldn't fold.
  • + 27
 Your bike survived the United flight, but how did you do?
  • + 1
 @the-one1: hahaha lmao. the bike had a better chance lmao
  • + 8
 Remember the good old days when we only had to worry about our luggage taking a beating? Smile
  • + 1
 Traveling with United should be a must part of such review!
  • + 2
 @the-one1: Come in as a doctor, leave as a patient.
  • + 1
 Unfortunately Evoc don't have this bag 'nailed' at all. The design is good in many ways, but has an inherent weakness; the zip. I have just replaced my trusty old Polaris EVA case which has lasted years and many flights. The Evoc failed after one flight; the problem is the zip is very exposed and stressed on the top corners (where the black patches are) and basically the metal spiral of the zip has parted from the fabric meaning it won't unzip beyond that point and if used again, things might fall out through the hole. Bad handling? One off manufacturing fault? Well, my wife has the same model of case and hers has done exactly the same thing (it lasted 3 flights before doing this). Some velcro protection pads on the corners might help, but frankly bending a zip 90 degrees at an obviously vulnerable place on the case is asking for failure. Nice idea, but for the price not durable enough IMHO
  • + 2
 I have the regular EVOC bag and love it. I travel a good bit for work and it's awesome. Trail bike and DH bike fit perfectly. This new one looks like a step up. I can afford a new one....but this is a good looking bag.
  • + 1
 I don't understand, the transition patrol in XL size has according to transition website a wheelbase of 1268
How could you fit in considering the bike shouldn't accept a wheelbase bigger than 1240 ?
  • + 3
 9.4kg for the bag and stand, empty! I guess if you can afford them both, you can afford the excess weight charges.
  • + 2
 The bike charge is usually the bigger hit, and on the airlines I've flown they usually don't hit you with both.
  • + 1
 @DrPete: Delta will. Ask me how I know!
Signed,
Just 'cause the bag is big doesn't mean you can fill it up for free.
  • + 1
 @fgiraffe: Well, that's lame.
  • + 1
 PS. Forgot to mention - 29inch wheel and boost rear hub - forget it. Had to take the cassette with freehub and the end caps off to make it fit. Good that DT Swiss and few others don't require any tools to do it.
  • + 1
 any recomandations for a bag that can take a V10cc. use a biknd bag, air out of fork and shock and "fold" it just works.but is sure not ideal. l
  • + 0
 Does anyone have a rundown for the fees that different airlines charge? I was interested in a bag, but had a hard time determining the cost of traveling with it. Decided to just rent a bike instead.
  • + 1
 Just went to Pisgah in March from CT. No fees on the way down but leaving Asheville I got hit with a $150 bike fee.
  • + 1
 @nyhc00: I've been looking to go to Pisgah (from NYC), via Amtrak, to the nearest stop that's on a "bike friendly" line, and then rent a car. It seems like a hassle, but probably better than flying? Did you have to rent a car once you got to Pisgah, via plane?
  • + 1
 Generally it's $150 and that covers you up to 32kg. That is unless you're flying within Australia/NZ. There they fricken hammer you with fees and what they charge is inconsistent at best. Frown
  • + 1
 @dukesofhazzard: Pisgah is huge. How would you get around the area with no rental car? I'm sure some locals could do some shuttling around, as everyone around there are super friendly people....but some spots are pretty far and deep into the hills.
  • + 3
 @dukesofhazzard: fortunately a friend of mine lives in Asheville so he did the driving.
  • + 1
 @nyhc00: What airline?
  • + 2
 Seems to be about $100-200. Each way. There's a rundown of fees and guidelines for the different airlines here: www.bicycling.com/bikes-and-gear-features/travel/fly-your-bike It might need to be updated, it's from 2011, but it seems about right.
  • + 2
 @Scott-XT: United...and I didn't get beaten up either
  • + 3
 will the stand fit and work with an older evoc-bag?
  • + 1
 I second that question. Being able to purchase the bike stand alone would be a nice upgrade to the standard bag. Anyone have an answer to this?
  • + 1
 Yes. The stand can be used in all bags other than their BMX bike bag.
  • + 1
 Came here to ask exactly this. Looks like I have a purchase coming my way.
  • + 1
 Been meaning to pick one up for myself for a long time. I just can get over the price. CRC needs to have them on sale before I can pull the trigger on one
  • + 1
 My EVOC bag has worked out awesome over the years. Makes it to Whistler ready to shred every year !!
  • + 2
 Is the bag idiot-airport-baggage-handler proof?
  • + 3
 Generally yes. I once watched with dread as two baggage handlers at London Heathrow chucked my two Evoc bike bags onto the trolly (landing flat) and then chucked/threw loads of bags on top of them. I was seriously worried but the protection and bag design did its job and the bikes were undamaged - phew!
  • + 1
 I would like to see an article comparing this (or the now Pro-version) to the Biknd Jetpack.
  • + 1
 I can't compress my fox 40, as it is spring , not air and my wheel base is 1260, d'oh!!, won't fit, damn it.
  • + 0
 A 600$ bag that's not perfect, doesn't accommodate all bikes, and is guaranteed to put you over the weight limit when traveling. It's a bargain!
  • + 2
 Bikes generally get charged a flat fee regardless of weight. What bike do you have that won't fit? I've used quite a few travel cases. They're all imperfect. This one is by far the best I've used.
  • + 2
 @DrPete: nope ...all airlines have weight limits on bike bags.these days..the good old days are long gone. Been flying with my bike for a good 10+ years...as in back when you could fly to Europe and pay zero in fees as you were allowed two bags no weight limit or size limit..flights to NZ... no charge for it being a bike bag, but you pay for it being an additional bag (100+ ) and weight is limited to 23kg and yeah they check...air Canada you pay for the etrxa bag, then for the bag containing a bike (handling fee) but you get a 75 pound limit. I don't know of any airline that allows a bag that exceeds 32 kg pounds without excess weight fees....granted, my old school evoc + large nomad weights in at at 22kg so that leaves you 10 kg for crap..aka tools
  • + 1
 @DrPete: any xl bike won't fit, per Evoc. Nor many L DH bikes. XL dh, forget it. I don't know why it's so hard to make a bag fit an adult size bike, but since no one makes on, I guess there's some difficulty I'm not seeing.
  • + 1
 @Weens: My XL Nomad fit, per me.
  • + 1
 @chantalfelten: Not all. If you ever come to the Pacific NW, fly Alaska Airlines. $75, max weight 100lb. www.alaskaair.com/content/travel-info/baggage/checked-bags.aspx
  • + 1
 @DrPete: Same. Best way to take the bike to Europe!
  • + 1
 @chantalfelten:
Westjet's bike limit is also 100lbs, and is generally fairly cheap. Just flew two bikes Ottawa-Vancouver for $56 (for the pair).
  • + 1
 @ciszewski: I clearly fly the wrong airlines..
  • + 1
 @DrPete: get a Alaska airlines credit card and all over sized bags are free. I take my board to whistler for the winter and my bike in the summer. it is part of the member percs.
  • + 1
 @ciszewski: I flew WestJet LAX to Calgary last summer for a Fernie trip and was pleasantly surprised that they only charged me $25 each way. I have the Dakine bag and kept it under 50 lbs. That trip I got 10 good rides so it was way cheaper than renting.

I had flown WestJet with a bulkier cardboard box from Vancouver to Orange County CA before getting a proper bike bag and it was $75 each way. That trip I only got 3 rides in but it was still cheaper than renting a bike.
  • + 1
 @DrPete: i thought the wheelbase was too long ?
  • + 1
 @DrPete: I assume you compress the fork ?
  • + 1
 @zipeldiablo: No compressing the fork. Wheelbase for the pro bag is up to 48” too, and the XL Nomad fit-barely.
  • + 1
 @DrPete: i see, do you have the aluminium stand? nomad v3 or v4 ?
  • + 2
 Bike bag and surfboards bag what can a guy ask more
  • + 1
 The front wheel just needs to go away. It's the only thing on the bag that's just completely useless.
  • + 1
 Does it come in a men's size????
  • + 1
 wheres the bike stand at?..
  • + 1
 If it only didn't cost almost 500 dollars
  • + 1
 Where is the "Like to Win" button?
  • + 1
 Wish I travelled to far flung places with my bike enough to need this!
  • + 1
 Is that a new bike from Transition?
  • + 1
 longer lower slacker lighter less money
  • + 1
 I Will wait for the enduro specific version at 999$ us. Than i Will buy.
  • + 0
 Does it ha e room for my cocaine?
  • + 1
 that's a sick bag!

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