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Weeze "The End" Chain Guide Review

Nov 30, 2011 at 13:51
by Fraser Britton  
There are plenty of chain devices on the market for the 2012 season. Most follow the same two or three major design points; with a bashguard or without, rollers or sliders, ISCG or ISCG 05. Weeze's "The End" chain guide from Poland does not stray from this trend. A simple bashguard-less chain device that fits ISCG 05 mounting, the Weeze guide tries to differentiate itself in one major way: ludicrously light weight made possible by its full carbon construction and aluminum hardware. The result is a 64 gram chain guide that retails for $200 USD.

<Deleted photo>

The details: The first thing that will strike you about this part is the packaging. Weeze's chain guides arrive in a nicely built wooden box. Slide open the lid and you get a rainbow of aluminum hardware and a carbon fiber backplate. Minimalism is what they seem to have been going for, and they succeeded. No bashguard, no taco style grind plate; just a carbon fiber backplate, carbon fiber top and bottom guides, and aluminum pulley wheels and mounting hardware in a range of colours. Total weight: 64g. Yes, you read that correctly. An astonishingly light 64g with all mounting hardware included, using their own aluminum ISCG bolts. All aluminum parts on The End are 7075 T6 Forstal aerospace grade products.

<Deleted photo>

Performance: The guide's ISCG 05 backplate bolted right up to the tabs on a Specialized Demo II frame, spaced out in much the same way as an e.13 or MRP guide would. That's about where the similarities ended, however. There are loose bits of hardware everywhere. None of the fasteners are captive, making installation tricky. While the Weeze guide looked great, and weighed absolutely nothing, it lacked in the performance department. Before it was even on the bike, we noticed that the carbon backplate was warped in all three axis. In order to get things mounted up and aligned, it required a bunch of spacing various parts of the guide out in directions. Luckily, there are approximately one thousand aluminum washers included; shades of Mr. Dirt guides of old. Once it was finally close to straight, Weeze's own chainring was mounted up to some Truvativ Descendant cranks and we were off to the races. Only, if you used this at a race, you wouldn't be able to hear any of the fans along the course. The lower idler pulley sits extremely far back from the chainring, putting loads of tension on the chain. Normally this is a good thing, unfortunately, it is also a machined aluminum pulley that is bolted to a carbon backplate. The high tension, along with the guide's construction makes it extremely loud when pedalling. While performance was acceptable, we did manage to drop a chain twice due to the fact that the twisted backplate made it almost impossible to get things lined up 100% accurately, no matter how hard we tried. Not ideal for a guide costing $200 USD.

<Deleted photo>

Pinkbike's take:
bigquotesWhile this guide delivers on the promised "lightest guide ever" front, performance was seriously lacking in the sample we received. A relatively simple $200 product should not show up with its only major structural part twisted in three directions. This made it impossible to run a proper test, as even just getting it mounted and spaced properly was a headache. Finally, we're not sure how much louder you could possibly make a bike part. Sure, the aluminum idler pulley is fantastic looking, and extremely light, but a regular pulley would be almost as light and many decibels quieter. It also needs to be noted that a guide with no bash guard or skid plate is not going to last long (Weeze is currently working on a version that uses a guard) Our advice: go with a slightly heavier guide that will save your chainring, and potentially your crankset.- Fraser Britton


www.weeze.pl


146 Comments

  • 131 7
 It's a little stupid that modern DH is all about weight savings. Why do you need such a light and vulnerable chain device for DH? Maybe for trail or all mountain it's good, but for DH not really. It would only take one rock to finish your ride.

Thanks, but I'll go with those 200+ grams of chain device and rock ring and not worry about the rocks and stuff.
  • 33 2
 Exactly, I would much rather a bike that is a kilo or so heavier knowing that it will be able to withstand riding. Theres nothing more frustrating then breaking a part on your bike especially at a race and you cant ride.
  • 20 36
flag Svard75 (Jan 25, 2012 at 1:30) (Below Threshold)
 I'm not into DH myself but wouldn't it be easier to throw the bike around if its lighter? Think about those moments on a dh run in a quick left then right switchback. If they add a strip of hard plastic to the bottom of the chainguide it would help. Leaving the cf exposed to hits esp at that angle is calling for early delamination and failure.
  • 16 2
 yes it would be, but not easier than running down holding your bike because the chain's mashed up in a broken chain device! It does look pretty cool though and 64 grams is amazing.
  • 13 0
 I have an older e-thirteen LG1 taco with some scars to show me where my money went. Super solid, less than 200g, and less than $200. Taken hits to get over many rocks and logs in Colorado and some in Cali. Love it. My next bike will have the newer version for better ease of maintenance.
  • 3 0
 I was about to say "let's buy one" but I need to protect my chainring... E-13 saved it more than once!

But except that, I love the look :d
  • 8 1
 Ok, so I have only run a carbocage for over 2 years on 2 bikes. One Dh the other AM. I have broken 1 outer plate, not from a rock strike but from my chain getting a stick caught in it up front, coming off and to much of a bend being placed on the chain device where the lower jockey wheel is. I have never bent a chain ring either. I do know people who have bent ISCG tabs with an LG1 and with the new LG1's had 1 run out of them in Whistler before 1 rock disintegrated them. my carbocage's have many small battle scars on the under side and have ridden some of the roughest terrain there is. And.... never dropped my chain.
  • 3 0
 it would be great for a 4x bike but for dh you really need a bash plate like you guys said
  • 16 1
 $200! Are you kidding me! I can get a working car for that money!
  • 5 11
flag o0sea0o (Jan 25, 2012 at 8:35) (Below Threshold)
 that must cost about £1-£2 to make (as batch production of course)
  • 2 1
 I have been riding in the past a Carbocage chainguide which is also a full carbon guide in a similair fashion & way,also came with alloy idler pulley wheels,full alloy hardware but also no bash or taco style guide.That chainguide was only 26g heavier than the Weeze guide and a allot cheaper but non the less very fragile for DH abuse.

I think a guide like that Weeze that is so damm light shouldn't been even used for DH,lets face it my Carbocage was broken after some DH abuse in the Alps,the backplate just snapped in two when it was hit by a big rock.Carbon chainguide for 4x yes for DH no you're better off with a solid alloy chainguide that is 100g or more heavier that can take allot of more abuse than a overpriced & super light weight carbon chainguide.
  • 11 0
 "A relatively simple $200 product should not show up with its only major structural part twisted in three directions. This made it impossible to run a proper test, as even just getting it mounted and spaced properly was a headache."

Frasier, let me get this straight: The guide you tested was messed up out of the box? So this is a review of a broken chain guide? What made you think that it was going to work properly? This is basically the same as testing a bent wheel and saying it wasn't good because the tire rubbed against the frame. Of course it's not going to be good. It's broken.

Don't get me wrong: I agree that a $200 part shouldn't show up broken. But that's what RMAs and warranties are for. Any chance we can get another review of this guide with a sample that isn't messed up from the get-go?
  • 2 0
 Radarr, you do bring up a good point. I actually thought about requesting one to be honest. However, I believe that with a nice straight backplate the guide will function as intended (ie: no dropped chains.) I got it pretty close, but there is only so much one can do with washers.

The noise, the price and the lack of a bashguard still remain, however, and are the major downsides for me. I have seriously never heard a louder drivetrain.

As an aside to a comment saying it was badly installed; I have been setting up chainguides since the original bullet brothers guides, and have ridden and tested prototypes from Mr Dirt, MRP and e.13. Heck, I even built my own out of random parts way, way back before they were being sold as a bike part. It worked very well. Setup was not an issue. In fact, the photos are of the final setup that seemed to work best. It wasn't like it was just tossed on and ridden once!

Aluminum and carbon fibre plates carrying a steel chain under tension is going to echo and make noise, end of story. The location of the idler pulley makes it worse. To be fair, the noise level might have dropped a bit had the backplate been straight, as the top piece would have been slightly more in line with the chain resulting in less rub under power and on rough trails.
  • 2 0
 i have a ghost dh an this would fit perfectly since there is no chance of hitting the guide (its rotated 45°)
  • 1 0
 Fraser - Is the noise something that comes from the aluminum lower roller? In other words, could at least some of the noise be remedied by simply installing a plastic or carbon fiber lower roller? Or is it that the chain rubs on the actual sides of the guide that causes all the noise? In either case, could the noise be lessened if there was a half mm or so more space between the plates?

Also, do you think it would be possible to run a bash guard - something similar in design to those aluminum ones Truvativ made that flared-out away from the frame a little bit - that would clear the rollers?
  • 1 0
 There's really no point you guys all going on about it not being tough enough for proper DH use, its designed for 4x! When weeze bring out a DH guide that isn't tough enough then feel free to complain. Also although as you say Fraser that you set up the guide to the best it could be in the circumstances (and i have no doubt that you did so) it was never going to be perfect and that will seriously affect how noisy the guide will be in use. Its a shame not to have a reveiw of a working product tbh...
  • 1 0
 I have not seen in the article that it's for 4X, and on the pics it is mounted on a Demo 8.
  • 3 0
 @fraserbritton

I had the misfortune of owning a Mr Dirt Gizmo chain device on my 2002 Big Hit and always had a slight friction in the drivetrain and constant noise, despite the best setup that was possible, however I never ever dropped a chain

the E13 LG1+ chain device is truly the benchmark for easy mounting, hassle free, bombproof performance in modern chain devices

this review does not give me any confidence in the product, whether the backplate was warped, or not?

a chain device is one area where a little extra weight is a weight penalty well spent

if you cannot pedal your bike because your chain has jammed / fallen off...

....or the chainring and chain are mangled when you bottom out your bike on a rock or log (which is common on modern bikes with their low BBH) then its a big fail as you have "saved weight" at the expense of a functional bike
  • 2 0
 That's too bad. Poland needed something nice to get them out of their funk. They're kinda the Mexico of Europe.
  • 2 0
 This is the most useless place to save weight on a bike since it's very close to the center of gravity, same thing with cranks. It's 100 times more worth it to spend the extra money on a nice set of wheels or something far from the center of gravity.
  • 1 0
 Carbocage are bringing out a Dh bash guarded version of their chain device. It is all over facebook.

www.carbocage.com
  • 1 0
 Yup, 200$ is what we in Poland earn per month. If it's a good month.
  • 1 0
 mullaly doesent need a chain so there no point of having a chainguide at all
  • 61 2
 "Hey guys i ruined my cranks and chainring and im down 200$ but it looks cool right?!?!"
  • 15 1
 There's no way you could be down with only 200$ if you crash this on a rock.
  • 8 1
 Haha its not as if like an E thirteen weighs a ton either
  • 25 3
 $200 and no bash guard, really? Only to smash it 6 months later...Looks great, but I could find something better to spend my money on...
  • 4 3
 its stupid for DH but looks ideal for an XC bike, I run an old LS1 (no bashguard) on mine
  • 4 0
 Or, orr.... you could get a bash guard separately, i mean, if you have $200 to spend on a chain giude why not another $50 or so for a bash guard...
  • 1 0
 I agree, but then why not just buy a MRP or E-Thirteen that comes with a bash quard for ~$135 and use the rest to get some new threads>?
  • 16 2
 This product is just a marketing stunt. It looks like a freshman year engineering project at university. (e.g.) It's lacking on may fronts. I will go so far as to say, this product was marketed by thieves.
  • 9 2
 bang on, I remember on pinkbike when this fella 'weeze' first started making these, he was at college or something and made one for a project, since then its all carbon fibre and bling, I ended up deleting the user from my list as I got fed up of incessant marketing spam updates... the design very clearly lacks knowledge of whats required, the top guide plates are only pinched together by two bolts leaving plenty of room for flex in the plates allowing the chain to come off as well as the lower pulley being mounted miles away for no apparent reason... - it doesn't take much to get some sheet cbfr and mill it to shape, but its not intended for structural use, normally just for aesthetics like car interiors and stuff, its not directionally strong in any one way, hence the warping... good to see pb slate a product when its bad, its reassured me in the rest of their reviews now! oh and the lack of captive hardware is a terrible idea, it would be impossible to fit on some frames!
  • 5 4
 This product would never get a bad review if it was made by a big company. The only only reason it got slated is because it's made by a small company who can't afford to pay for a good "review".
  • 1 0
 "I ended up deleting the user from my list as I got fed up of incessant marketing spam updates..." - funny, I've got the same.
  • 14 4
 Well.

Let me start by saying that $200 for a few water-jet cut pieces of carbon is somewhere between dumb and retarded. That being said...

Noise coming from any guide is an installation error. Period. We can dispute if the installation istructions from Weeze were sufficient ( which may be a factor ) - I don't know since I don't have one, but still it is an installation problem. There may be some issues here since ISCG05 "standard" is not a standard in relation to chainline, but a competent mech should be able to resolve them.

I would also question the weird angle the upper cage is angled - is it supposed to be so? That is asking for dropped chains.

Anyhow - this is not a product for DH. This is a product for an lightweght XC/Trail 1 by X bike - Weeze seems to market it incorrectly Smile
  • 2 0
 the weird angle of the upper cage is because the bike is set in a normal angle as soon as you step on the pedals the rear shock compresses and then the upper gides move to the perfect place......... my question is why the down pulley is so far off the chain ring the noise would come from there as the chain hits the down giude side plates in my opinion All overalll if you want to build the lightest dh bike in the world this would be a perfect sollution to bad the fabrication of this chain guide costs less then 20GBP ..... if i had the carbon plates 1 day and it would be fabricated by hand not by a cnc machined water jet or drill
  • 2 1
 uzurpator, you're right 'bout the noise but... this thinny thing costs over 600pln. It should mount on your bike itself, without any rider's effort...
  • 3 0
 Not an installation error.
  • 4 0
 ukal: The nature of stupid - light components. They have so little material that usually they require some fiddling to make them work. You pay for those 150 grams you don't get in comparsion to, say LG1.

fraserbritton: obviously, I cannot check this Smile but honestly, Chainguide is a part so trivial that if it does not work correctly then it is either compatibility issue or installation error. What sort of noise were you experiencing? Was the pulley spinning freely? Were both pulley and chainring aligned perfectly? Or maybe the chain was rubbing agaist the plates?

You seem to run Truvativ cranks, so you get no possibility to micro adjust chainline, which might also contribute to the problem.

Anyhow - I'll stick to my guns - this was an installation issue.

EDIT: BTW - complaining about a lack of a bash guard was IMO an underhanded move. Pretty much half of chainguides availabe on the market share the same construction as this contraption ( ie - lower pulley + upper cage, no bash / taco ). Talking about this is like saying that Totem is a bad fork because it is not dual crown.
  • 15 2
 No taco, no bash, no buy!
  • 7 0
 Take it for what it is- a super light, beautiful chain guide. If you are not in the market for this then of course you are not going to like it! Comparing it to guides three times the weight just isn't a fair comparison. I think if you are spending this money then you should have the required brain cells to realise you shouldn't expect chain ring protection from it and also be prepared to put in the time to get such a specialist product set up Wink

Sure it may have niggles out of the box and a bad review is somewhat refreshing... but I can't help feeling if it was on a GT under an Atherton then it would be reviewed as the best thing since sliced bread Smile
  • 7 1
 f*ck yeah sliced bread.

Love that stuff.

I have advised for Weeze to make some sort of bash about 1-2 yrs ago, but nothing has been done. Remember, everyone likes good protection, why do you think they invented condoms?
  • 5 1
 Just as many of you already pointed out - this ain't the DH guide so no surprise it scores low. Put it on a lightweight trail bike and it will look great and shave some weight for those who cares. As for the price tag, I think most of the chainguides are overpriced.
  • 2 0
 Seems like they are marketing is incorrectly ... I wouldn't put such light chain devices on DH bikes.

Just on my hardtail, with a LG1 from e13, I see soooo many dents on the taco that I probably would have had to change like 5 or 6 times my chain ring. And I'm not hardcore-DH-ing !

I would say this guide is perfect for 4X racing, and maybe light enduro/all-mountain where you don't need 2 chainrings. Except if it's really that loud (but with my knackered pulley wheel on my e13, can't get much louder Big Grin )
  • 2 0
 Cool concept , looks great, and everyone likes carbon but if your seriously worried so much about weight savings on a chain guide ,then you dont need to be on a bike, you need to be training to NOT be a p*ssy . Im sorry but i dont DH just yet but i do ride very aggressively on my bike and i would never buy something like that to know i just payed 200 bucks and it broke . Also , DH with no bashguard? , i dunno how i feel about that ...

I dunno what kind of DH you guys are doing with that chainguide but it sure as hell must be some kind of super smooth groomed trails .
  • 2 0
 Squared off Laminated carbon fiber also peels/splits when force is applied to the edge, such as a chain going through the slide and box... as it looks like it already happened in their short test. Bevel the edges PLEASE. Also, autoclaving the carbon fiber will result in a MUCHMUCH stronger product and even lighter still. Why not use derlin for the pully? Its just as light and has self lubricating properties?
  • 2 0
 i am an absolute weight weenie [ at 68 years old and 135lbs i've carried enough weight around in my decrepit life ] and my DH rig runs a Straitline guide that has NO noving parts, is Canajun eh! is plenty light enough WITH an aluminum bashguard that i have whacked more than a few times and it still hasn't bent [ and if it does i'll probably just bend it back ] and this Polish guide looks like a carbon fiber trainwreck waiting to happen ! [ i'll get my fiber in my cereal thank you ] and even i, with my rickety ol bod am not looking to fly [ i'll get wings when i croak ] but i just want a reasonable DH ride that is light but still heavy enough to hold the ground when i drop in from Garbo down to GLC...
  • 6 1
 everything will be carbonized. except tyre and spring. imo.
  • 1 4
 who knows? Maybe one day tires and springs are carbon too! I´d think springs would be the first of these two.

For the article, this chainguide would be nice on a trail/am bike if you don´t care about the price. I wouldn´t use it for DH, maybe if it would have a taco and if I was a rich guy.
  • 2 0
 Composite springs have been around for almost a decade already. As for cycling applications, not sure when it will trickle down. They also build carbon fibre reinforced sidewalls in car and truck tires. Bike tires have nylon probably because its much more flexible. Carbon fibre is rigid.

Re: chainguide: Seems like they rushed you a sample that was defective.
  • 3 0
 Carbon springs (coils and leaf springs) have been around for at least TWO decades. At the 1992 Eurobike show, several manufacturers were showing full suspension bikes with carbon frames and carbon coil spring equipped shocks.
  • 1 0
 OK, didn´t know that, but somehow I thought that using carbon fibre to reinforce tires or to make a spring out of it could be a possibility. Is it the price or what why the carbon springs are not used more often?
  • 2 0
 Price is why carbon anything isn't used more often. The larger the part the more expensive it becomes to do it out of CF than in say, Aluminium. A headset spacer for example, which is nothing more than a straight carbon fiber tube, cut into slices on a band saw is about 2 1/2 times the price as one made from aluminium. Is it 2 1/2 times better? Not really. Its lighter sure, and looks prettier most would agree, but its less durable and in fact can be completely incompatible with some stems. If you have a stem made from titanium or chromoly, then the steerer section of the stem is likely to be very thin in profile, and as I discovered years ago, when you tighten a thin stem section down with the preload cap of the headset, it can press a groove into the carbon headset spacer which then causes your headset to loosen while you're riding.

Coil springs are basically precision wound wire, which can be made on automated machines over and over all day long, quick and easy. In steel as is most common they're dirt cheap to produce. In titanium they're a bit more expensive due to material costs but still, its something you can do with little human supervision. But making one out of carbon fiber in the right spring ratings for bicycle shocks/forks... that would cost quite a bit more than titanium. In the car world, you now see CF coil springs in car seat backs replacing what used to be steel springs. But they cost about ten times as much per spring. And that's when you order them a thousand at a time.
  • 1 0
 I usually install my lower wheel much closer to the chainstay but considering most chain guides are a pain to install - I can understand just bein happy getting it working with minimal rub. Hmmmm, I wonder what happens to the carbon if your chain rubs a little ?
  • 4 0
 What about try to test this one: www.pinkbike.com/photo/7564691 ? Smile
  • 2 0
 If you're gonna go with "focus on outright light weight rather than providing protection for your chain ring", why not go the whole hog, up the price a bit and drop the weight even more by using hardware made of cake...
  • 1 0
 This is pretty much a homemade chainguide!!! Buy an alloy pulley, some spacers, nuts and bolts, and a one foot square of 5mm carbon fiber sheet for about $30... You'll need a drill press, a belt sander, a hacksaw and some patience. Use an old chainguide backplate to make a template, trace all the bits out on the carbon sheet and rough cut everything out with the hacksaw. Then smooth and shape the parts on the belt sander. Drill out the mounting holes. Assemble. Install. Ride. I made one just like this in High school. Lasted about a week, just like the weeze will!
  • 1 0
 id rather have a slightly heavier device that wont break and protects the chainring than having something that will probably break with one firm strike with a rock especially that it is carbon fibre and costs alot more than i am willing to pay for a practicallty disposable component
  • 6 2
 MOZARTT! chainguides are two times cheaper, look better! and they truly guide your chain !!!
  • 2 0
 ^this. weeze is bollocks compared to mozartt. overpriced homemade stuff.
  • 3 2
 If you are looking to shred weight off of your bike and have the money then go for it. This product is perfect for the racer trying to get as close to factory race level as possible. If you don't like it, if it's not enough protection for bike, or costs too much... then simply don't buy it.
  • 1 2
 Not exactly a winning sales strategy, "don't like it? Don't buy it"

A better attitude would be, "don't like the look of it? Try it and let us change your mind"
  • 1 0
 Not going to lie, all the negativity hasn't stopped me from wanting one, it looks like a very simple effective guide that if aligned properly would function as intended... I'd like to hear from the company on the warped back plate.
  • 1 0
 Talk about a preemptive product release..! this should be back at the drawing board before letting anyone snap pictures of such an impractical design...
yes, it is light, but at what cost really..?
It probably should called the Weenie guide instead of Weeze...
  • 4 1
 Ill stick with my Straitline guide its silent its light and ooh yaaa.... It works!
  • 1 1
 Just buy about 27 of them and get your mechanic to fit one to each of your matching downhill bikes, so if one or more go wrong, you're still fine! The only minor problem is you'll most likely want to achieve millionaire status first. Must say though, I love the styling and the chainring too! Maybe next years version might be worth a try!
  • 2 0
 For 4x or even hardtails in general i think it'd be good. But on a full suspension with no underprotection and its lightweight carbon. No.
  • 2 0
 yep i agree i simple think maybe they have aimed at the wrong market. althoutgh sure it may have a couple of other flaws too but yer its certainly a consideration for 4x
  • 1 0
 DH weight is all about bragging rights. In my shop they guys are obsessed with DH weight. They aren't even serious racers, they just want to see who can have the lightest bikes.
  • 1 1
 The best chainguide hands down: Straightline's silent guide!!!!

The best! carbon crap like that is for wangers. carbon should only be used for brake levers and some frame types.

PS: Im secretly making carbon spokes and 200mm forks! PURE CARBON... send me 2000.00 cash to pre order 64 spokes and 5000.00 for the forks. I used beeswax and hydraulic oil for super plush fork action... state of the art!!
  • 1 0
 based on the review and comments, i'm guessing sales won't be "up", as they say. it's a shame too because a web/magazine review is part of the process of releasing a product to market in order to create a good following.
  • 2 0
 i would think that as a DH rider you would want some sort of chain ring protection, taco or full on bash ring. but today its all about weight
  • 2 1
 This ^

I'm pretty sure I'll always run a bash of some kind...
  • 1 0
 Try it before talking, I don't use any bash guard and i had never break down any chain guide... This one do his job, your chain is guided... how can you tell that it will break if you don't even break one ?
  • 3 0
 Great potential, but seriously let down by poor design
  • 3 0
 that's stupid, it won't last or be able to take any knocks!
  • 1 0
 this is looking good if your a tarty dher but if your a proper dher its a no go for me unless there was a bash gard fitted to it Smile
  • 3 0
 its for the kids whos mummy will buy them it!!!!
  • 1 2
 $200! I'll give it a miss!

Does anyone else remember the 24Seven Darkangel stuff? I had a set of Superfatt cranks (possibly the heaviest cranks known to man) teamed up with the chain device, it weighed an absolute tonne, but did my chain ever wander from it's designated path? You bet your ass it didn't.

The time I saved by not skipping cogs or getting off to put the chain back on will MASSIVELY outweigh the time this thing saves you in the weight-weenie dept...
  • 2 1
 the chrome 24seven cranks are mint strong aswell Smile
  • 1 0
 Good in concept but lacks execution.

Sending something 'twisted' to a reviewer is insane, why would that happen?

Some refinement and it would work for a trail / am bike.
  • 1 0
 It would be great for 1x10 setups on AM bikes...if only it worked. Too bad to see good looking products fall short in the quality
  • 2 0
 I don't like the finish of it. $200 for this. I would stick with a Straitline Easy guide if i wanted something light.
  • 1 0
 That guide look sweet, might not put on my dh bike but for a jump bike or am setup thats perfect. 200 bit much but you paying fir grams one way or another.
  • 1 0
 i'll stick to my mrp , you put it on and a coupple of days later you've forgotten all about it , 4 years of abuse and still counting
  • 1 0
 Awful chain guide for the yeti DJ the back plate catches on the frame. Poor design, I was promised a replacement but 6 months on and I'm still waiting.....rubbish
  • 2 0
 if it comes with a weeze blocker it would be good value
  • 3 1
 Interesting for smooth 4x racing, but forget it for rocky DH
  • 4 3
 I do hope Weeze kick off and go huge all over the world!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
  • 1 3
 With their crummy products?
  • 2 1
 Crummy? What sort of a way is that to describe something that isn't food? Have you even tested one of these?
  • 1 1
 Not personally tested it no, but I'd say that's the point of the above. An impartial party testing something for the masses and giving feedback.

I'm basing my opinion on the review which I think is pretty solid, PB have no reason to trash the product in their write up so why would they if it wasn't a bad piece of kit? The price should reflect the workmanship and design. It doesn't seem to in this case which is why my opinion leans toward the chain device being poor, and a company "kicking off all over the world" with substand, expensive products is unlikely to happen. If it does, there's something seriously wrong.

As mentioned, this is only my opinion so feel free to suck it if you disagree.
  • 2 3
 Rather not you twisted fuck...
  • 2 2
 *sigh* another valid discussion ruined by a moron with a total lack of communication skills. Enjoy your substandard quality of life.
  • 2 2
 I'll try be best Wink
  • 2 0
 what was wrong with MRP or eThirteen?
  • 1 1
 they are loud and fragile!
  • 1 0
 If by "loud and fragile" you mean "quiet and strong", then yes.
  • 1 1
 I'll take my E.13 LG-1 TR any day. It may be 51g heavier than this carbon beast, but it's 100% reliable and much more robust than a few slices of carbon bolted together.
  • 1 1
 sure seems worth the cash! even more value for money if those edges start delaminating! can definately see this on my must have list for 2012.
  • 2 1
 Wow, I wanted to say something... Like wtf or 200$ no bash guard or just WTF lol but the word is out!
  • 3 1
 Yay! A negative review on a product! Maybe PB reviews are worth something!
  • 3 5
 I would say it is very marketing orientaited test, i had a go on a bike with Weeze device and was perfect for me - and it was DH bike! Simply - other companies dont want to have too much competition on chain guides market and that is why it got bad review IMO!
  • 9 1
 Nonsense. It got a bad review as it was not a good product. End of story.
  • 1 0
 Good job for 4x, useless part for dh. I love that choice long live free market
  • 1 0
 Looks super rad. Add a taco-style bash guard and eliminate warped carbon, and Im signed on
  • 1 0
 Yup, looks like a great way to waste $200. That much $$ and no sort of bashguard, that sounds disposable.
  • 2 0
 It really means THE END of your chainring
  • 1 0
 i have to say it looks really clean! but i would never run that on my DH bike a bash guard is a must have when your racing!
  • 1 0
 2011 demo low bb + carbon chain guide with no bash guard = waste of 200$ ,chain ring ,chain and possibly cranks .FAIL!
  • 1 0
 And really self made carbon chain guide for under 60 euros . www.pinkbike.com/photo/7667555
  • 10 9
 I am a member of Weeze. I am very satisfied ..
  • 2 1
 What chainring is he running?
  • 2 0
 the chainring is also weeze stuff.
  • 1 0
 All it needs is a taco! Then it's gonna be a proper chainguide for DH. Razz
  • 1 0
 Needs a carbon jockey wheel.
  • 3 0
 That would make it $300 haha
  • 1 0
 Carbon pulley wheel + tons of tension on the chain = worn down pulley wheel. If they're making it out of the same carbon as the rest of the guide, it'd probably cost upwards of $25 per wheel, making the cost of maintaining a guide like that very expensive.
  • 1 0
 But can u put a taco on it if you want
  • 1 0
 I gotta get one, it would look soo cool on the bike rack on my sports car.
  • 2 0
 csixx ftw
  • 2 0
 no bash no way know how!
  • 2 0
 E-13. Canna beat um !
  • 1 0
 What chainring is that?! It's amazing!
  • 1 0
 how did they come up with the $200 price tag...yikes!!!
  • 1 0
 200 USD , wow !!
  • 19 6
 One of the most useless pieces of carbon I have ever seen
  • 4 2
 I can make this at home for under 30 bucks. I'll give it a shot.
  • 1 0
 Hi mate , under 30 $ not bad and this in Europe ? Quality 3mm Carbon plate with delivery min. 24 Euro , alu bolts pice 1,50 euro +, +, +, cutting and and = min. 50-55 euro . But you made this under 30 $ = 25 euro . Please , please make one for me !!!
  • 1 0
 It looks really good
  • 1 0
 What chainring is that?
  • 2 1
 It's also Weeze. Good stuff judging by this: www.pinkbike.com/photo/7519221 Smile
  • 1 0
 I am afraid not many people will be able to understand that as it is all in polish....
  • 2 1
 The description is in english, what more do you need? :]
And there is something called "google translate", you should try it Wink
  • 2 0
 it is time to learn more than one language Smile
  • 2 1
 If I was learning a 4th language, Polish would still not be one of them, no offense. Smile
  • 1 0
 If I were a canadian, I wouldn't even think about learning polish. As far as I know, our language is difficult for foreigners to learn... and it's not the most useful one tbh Wink
  • 1 0
 awesome looking ring, not too sure about the guide though. sounds like there are some issues to work out. thanks for the honest part review PB
  • 1 0
 Actually polish wouldn't be a bad choice to learn here, we do have a fairly significant part of the population being of polish ancestry.
  • 1 0
 Trust me - our language in difficult as f*ck and 50% of our population can't write correctly.
  • 2 0
 Haven't you ever read the commentary and forum posts on here? 50% of the canadian pinkbike population can't form a proper sentence or spell correctly in english, and its technically one of canada's two official languages.
  • 1 0
 I read, but I thught they could - just don't need here. I learn english and german and there is a outrageous gap between them and polish. It makes me feel kinda' special Razz However, if you want, you can.
  • 2 2
 ME LIKE!!!!!!
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