PB Exclusive: Pivot's New DH Bike

Aug 15, 2013
by Richard Cunningham  
 
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Pivot team manager and DH Pro Bernard Kerr received the first prototype version of their 2014 race bikes - air-freighted from the factory - and it is a huge departure from the Phoenix it will eventually replace. Bernard built it up immediately and was returning from his first hot lap on the bike when we caught up with him. The new chassis is designed specifically around 27.5 inch wheels, for starters, and it features X-Fusion suspension front and rear. Bernard said the graphics and component spec was not production and that Pivot was still settling on a proper name for the bike. He was impressed with the bike's performance from the start and was keen to get back on the mountain. The following is as much of the story as we could piece together in the brief time we had to get some spy photos.


Pivot 2014 27.5 DH Racer
  The profile of Pivot's new DH bike is much simpler than that of the Phoenix. The dual-link rear suspension is retained, but the shock is now driven by a large yoke and mounts to the down tube instead of at the bottom bracket junction, presumably to flatten out the suspension's leverage curve. The long-stroke X-Fusion Vector HLR shock suggests that the suspension also has a low leverage rate like the Phoenix.


What We Know About the Frame Design

The new chassis is longer, lower and slacker than its predecessor. Reportedly, the top tube is a half-inch longer, the bottom bracket is slightly lower than the Phoenix, and the head angle is slacked out to 62-degrees. The seat tube is a stub, welded to a large, two-piece welded forging that carries the pivot locations for the rear suspension and also forms the bottom bracket shell. Pivot pioneered the technique of manufacturing critical parts of the frame from thin, matching halves that are then welded together to form a rigid and lightweight structure with precise locations for key components. The dropouts are bolted to the rear suspension and the left-side dropout incorporates the brake caliper mount. Pivot confirmed that a 26-inch-wheel option will be available in the form of modified headset cups and a different dropout combination. The through-axle screws into a machined nut on the drive side that also integrates the derailleur hanger. Up front, the tapered head tube has no form of adjustable cup - yet - because the team protos are intended for World Cup competition. Cable routing is mostly external, but all cables and hoses run cleanly through a tunnel on the down tube formed by the shock mount. As a nod to the future, the down tube has a port to route a Reverb Stealth-type dropper seatpost.

Pivot 2014 27.5 DH Racer details
  (Clockwise) A look at new DH bike's oversized suspension linkage. No news on the bearing strategy, although Pivot is a fan of large ball bearings and wide, rigid pivot locations. Unlike the similar yoke setup that Specialized uses, which requires a dedicated shock, Pivot's yoke arrangement attaches to a conventional shock eye, which means that the customer has more options for future upgrades. The last run of derailleur housing is routed through the right chainstay to keep it out of trouble. The bolt-on dropout incorporates a post-type brake caliper mount, dedicated to 200-millimeter rotors.


Suspension Notes

Acceleration and pedaling is virtually ensured by the bike's dw-Link arrangement. Mechanically, the suspension linkage creates an instant center that is high and forward at the beginning of the suspension travel, suggesting that the new configuration is intended to perform better than its predecessor on square-edged bumps. Rear travel is listed as 207 millimeters. The nature of the suspension curves was not known, but the bike feels very plush through the first half of its travel. X-fusion is the suspension sponsor of the Pivot Team, so we got an up close and personal look at the new RV1 DH fork. The lowers looked like production items, although both crowns were CNC-machined prototypes - a tipoff that the fork offset was adjusted for 27.5-inch wheels at the crown and not by altering the dropout castings. Bernard says that he and team-mate Austin Warren have been impressed with the performance of X-Fusion's shock and fork, and also by the support that the X-Fusion factory has provided them.

X-Fusion Prototype RV1 DH fork
  A few details of the X-Fusion RV1 DH fork showing the prototype machined crowns. Spank Components is a co-sponsor of the team, so the direct-mount stem, handlebar and prototype DH rims were all Spank's Spike-level items.


We were not told who was going to be racing the new Pivot - either Austin Warren or Bernard Kerr - but from all accounts, the bike is ready to do battle in its present form, and with Whistler's trail network in rougher shape than it normally is at this time of the year, the big wheels should play a supporting role in the race this weekend. As for when and how the new chassis will appear in final production, we will have to wait and see. Knowing Pivot's expertise with the material, we are hopeful that a carbon version will also be available. Pinkbike will keep you updated as we get more information on Pivot's new DH weapon. - RC

Pivot Cycles

144 Comments

  • + 69
 id like the old one - much better
  • + 100
 I'd like my old Phoenix too Frown . Whoever stole it can eat a big bag of dicks. R.I.P.
  • + 90
 Well, considering your user name, I wouldn't wanna steal anything from you....
  • + 6
 @chainsawgeoff someone on pinkbike stole my transition double! I feel your pain bro! Frown
  • + 26
 Oh man, if anyone steals any of my rigs and I catch him... He'd be dead. Hha a cop once told me, (and I quote) "if your going to do something back to a thief, or burglar, or who ever.... Make sure he can't talk after to defend himself."
  • + 4
 Wow, did you find it in the buy/sell section?
  • + 14
 How are they spy shots if he brings it over and poses it for you so you can get detailed photos from all angles? Journalism has changed. Smile
  • + 2
 I posted it there, I know who did it but he lives thousands of miles away in canadia. His name is Doug rochon, lives in Ontario. He sent me a fake money order. Not sure how. I actually posted it in buy/sell that it was stolen but when I filed a police report I was forced to take it down because that pussy Doug felt "threatened" from the add. He actually said he got "knocked out". Smh
  • + 6
 Classic Doug!
  • + 6
 Mine got stolen out of my brother's apartment while I was living in China. Didn't find out about it until I came home for vacation this summer and was asking if he could bring it to me so I could get a summer of DH in. Turns out it had been stolen 2 months ago and my mother told him to not tell me because she didn't want me freaking out while I was overseas. Thanks mom, it's nice to know that you have no faith in a 27 year old expat's abilities to control his emotions. Damn that made me mad.
  • + 2
 Sorry to hear that Geoff!!!
  • - 1
 Looks like a transession.
  • + 21
 you look like a transgender
  • - 19
 Why spec such a top end DH bike with XFusion componentry? Give us Fox or let us settle for RS! What is this world coming to? Holy Cow!
  • + 2
 Because Xfusion stands shoulder to shoulder with fox and rockshox...
  • + 3
 I disagree, not saying they make bad suspension, just saying no, they do not stand shoulder to shoulder with the big dogs in the suspension game.
  • + 0
 mnorris122 was being sarcastic. thats why there was an ellipsis. i mean, are you guys idiots....? -- see there?
  • - 3
 I don't see the point of Pivot. I mean, you're paying a lot of money for a low tech, shitty looking tank of a bike. With bikes like the Wilson, Session and V10 available for similar money, do Pivot actually sell any bikes?
  • + 1
 I dig the paint job. It's something new and crazy. Maybe pivot will have two DH bikes! Similar to what Nukeproof does.
  • + 1
 FUGLY! ZapStrap a steak to the htube and maybe the dog will play with it.
  • + 1
 Pretty expensive chew toy if you ask me. I think it looks okay.
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  • + 25
 We want the Phoenix CARBON Smile
[Reply]
  • + 19
 Man...seems like every single new bike that has come this year has the, "yoke" link driving the shock.
  • + 69
 You're not yoking.....
  • + 0
 That yoke seems like it would put a bending load on the shock shaft. Anyone else think that???
  • - 5
 Perhaps there are other reasons, I'm no experienced suspension designer, but yoke compresses the shock in more linear way, then allows for a bit more freedom with pivot placement for the links. I suppose it allows for better arrangement of tubing, as it happens in Specialized bikes (yoke instead of that hole for the shock) but judging by that seat tube, Pivot certainly did not use that advantage... Yes it increases force on the shaft but it's due to buckling not bending, I guess you meant that. It's a compromise, hard to tell whether it's good or not, but it goes further than just a fad fkng up the shock.
  • + 12
 It's so that the designers can place the pivot locations exactly where they want them without having to use an interupted seat tube. Pretty smart if you ask me...
  • + 0
 Or WAKIdesigns, Pivot is tired of paying for the DW design and with Spechies patent expired they can jump on some free new to them tech that hasn't been on the podium in a while either, but is a top player in the WC. Phoenix looked way better. This looks like a Wally World knock off bike. I find it hilarious that for all the talk about 650b wheels being fast and outright better no one on 650b wheels in WC DH or EWS is doing any better in terms of results, and quite frankly getting Hammered by 26ers riders. What a joke, but just keep lieing to us will ya.
  • + 0
 It allows some manufactures to tune their leverage ratio on the shock with out changing the axle path
  • + 1
 That made me laugh a little. Hahahaha
  • + 5
 @DrthVadr look closer, you will see the DW sticker and desigh here. Wink
  • + 4
 When it comes to wheels I am much more excited for new light weight super-wide rims (like Syntace MX35) and new tyre side walls and casings (Schwalbe), than for a stupid wheel size. That will change "how we roll" much more than 650b. If a brother can shred on a 1ply tyre as he used to on a 2ply, then how can you believe in 12.5mm radius?! Sad that industry decided to concentrate so much on something changing so little, and so dependent on riders physiology and trail type.
  • + 2
 [Edit, barzaka said it.] I'd like to have read about this rig's DW link in this article though.
  • - 1
 I'm old, my eyes are bad. let me get my reading glasses. Oh, I see now......Frankinsuspension. I guess two designs are better then one?
  • + 0
 @DrthVadr and even if they were going 4-bar, these are the same guys who ran Titus, which licenses FSR from Specialized, so it wouldn't exactly be "new to them"
  • + 1
 Yoke link - great. I am sure years of development and qualified engineers have got it right.

...But, why not have it slightly re positioned and have a full seat tube?!
  • + 2
 Am I the only one that noticed the "DW Link" decals that are still on the bike?
  • + 5
 Those extension yokes are a terrible idea from a structural standpoint. When the shock bottoms out, the effective eye-to-eye length is much longer than if no yoke is used, which means that instead of the end shock pivoting at a point ~20mm away from the sealhead, it's now pivoting ~100mm or more away from the sealhead which means it wants to buckle much moreso than a normal shock. As a result, we are seeing lots of shocks with broken shafts, worn shafts (from the extra bending load that the sealhead bushing has to support), and eyelets coming loose on frames with these yokes (eg the Demo 8, 303, Enduro etc).
  • + 4
 the yoke gives freedom is seattube and pivot location!!

it also makes front triangle tubing less complicated, and thus less expensive!!

one thing to consider though:

with this change in the phoenix, do factory statements like ''centered position of the shock'', ''low position of the shock'', become a bit marketing bullshit??
  • + 1
 One of the reasons they decided to use a yoke in their Mach 6 was to circumvent using the shock bushing and increase small bump sensitivity. There's likely much more to it than that because otherwise they could have just used needle bearings in place of the standard shock bushings and got the same result. At least they don't for e you to use proprietary shocks like specialized.
  • + 0
 Looks like the Big S was on to something...
  • + 1
 Chamberlink - do you really believe that resistance of shock bushing vs ball bearing has any bigger influence on small bumo sensitivity? Sure there were those cosmetics like bearings supporting coil spring but ww can put it into SCi-Fi when it comes to what mountain trail throws at the bike and the rider.
  • + 1
 I will back up what I just said by pointing out that I just pulled apart a Float that was on a Stumpjumper (with one of those yokes), that has had the damper shaft come loose twice, and is now snapped. This does not happen with Float shocks on bikes without the extension yoke (nor do Double Barrels snap shafts on bikes without such yokes - this is unbelievably common), and in my opinion it is a poor idea on the part of the designers to use a yoke like this that SEVERELY compromises longevity of the shock simply to make the packaging of the bike easier to design.
  • + 1
 Waki - I think it might have a little influence, especially after time. But I wasn't trying to take a side one way or the other, just trying to explain what I read about the Mach 6.
  • + 1
 3 things. This bike is still DW link for those few people who are saying its not. The yoke allows pivot to have the top link of the suspension in a position where it achieves their ideal pedaling characteristics without making clearence for a shock which passes through a hole in the frame. look at devinci Wilson and you'll see how hard it is to make clearance there. the yoke also affects leverage curve as it does not pivot concentrically to the top pivot of the link. its pivot is closer to the rear axle for a more progressive suspension stroke.
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  • + 9
 Def a step backwards to me as well, the Geo looks good has better cable routing, but the Pheonix was one of my fav bikes was better looking too, that seat tube is not interrupted? Its not full length! Sorta looks like a Pivot crashed into a TR450 and a Knolly came out the other side with 27.5" wheels, bigger wheels uglier bikes!
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  • + 9
 I don't like this 27.5" movement.
[Reply]
  • + 9
 anyone else think this is a step backwards ....
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  • + 3
 It would have been pretty dificult to make a Pheonix in carbon with its shock hidden inside the frame. This frame layout lends itself to a carbon version very easily. Dave Weagle has hinted at a Carbon DW link bike in the works so maybe this is just a teaser until we see a carbon version?
  • + 1
 I bet u the turner dhr will be the first carbon dw link DH bike. It has not been updated in 3 years and they just put all there dhr frames on sale. Makes me think they are clearing out all the bikes to make room for the new version of the dhr!
  • + 3
 Turner said he's a small company that cannot spend all the money required for a carbon frame (or a carbon downhill frame). Therefore, it's pretty possible that we never see a carbon DHR with DW-link (which is a total bummer!)... Frown
  • + 1
 Well we will find out soon! Something has to be coming soon! I don't know why else they would lower the msrp price unless they were about to come out with something new.
  • + 1
 But it's not 100% sure it is a carbon newbie. It might be again alu, but a new iteration, a new design (although i find it difficult to think of a better design that the present one - DW-link, slack, low, long, relatively light, extremely good-looking)... Smile
  • + 1
 Only time will tell!
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  • + 6
 That's a pretty long fork.
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  • + 2
 The dropouts are bolted to the rear suspension and the left-side dropout incorporates the brake caliper mount - all suggesting that a 26-inch-wheel option may be available in the form of a different shock and dropout combination I also like this partSmile the wheels choice is yours!
  • + 1
 They talk about a 26"option in the article bro.
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  • + 1
 You buy this bike, your shock will break. Think of how the bolt goes through the shock sideways, where do you think all the pressure goes when it does this? Look at all the Demo's that took out all the shocks that utilized this same design. That is why the new demo's have a remedy for this (Gwin's production version). You buy this bike, you'll be sorry!
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Any chance of this being a 650b on a reasonably priced bike, or are we following the trend of the mountain biking industry thinking we all have deals with the record company to pay for this?
[Reply]
  • + 1
 The idea, mentioned by the writer, that a wheel can get 'hung up' on an obstacle is based on the sound perception that wheel/axle path curvature affects bump absorption in important ways - with more rearward wheel paths allowing square edge obstacles to be handled more effectively. As it happens axle path curvature while related to the position of the IC can be manipulated a lot on bikes with dual short links. On all DW-link bikes axle path curvature is heavily manipulated - the radius of curvature at the beginning and end of travel it is quite short and during mid travel becomes much longer. The varying radius of curvature is said to allow for an effective wheel path capable of handling rough terrain without hanging up on square edged obstacles. I mention this only to point out that it is old hat - there is nothing much that DW could do in this regard that would trump the work he has already done.

DW is moving towards more compact linkages on all of the bikes he designs (see the dramatically reduced size of the rear triangle and the much shorter and heavily raked upper link) because they allow for a more heavy manipulation of the anti-squat profile over the course of travel. With all of DW's newer linkages the activity (or speed) and arc of that upper link is much greater than in the past. At nil travel it points somewhere ahead of the lower link (which has always been the case) and at full travel it points behind it - the latter involves a 'switch' similar in kind to the one that happens on the Yeti SB trail bike linkage. DW is using this like always to achieve very effective control over the anti-squat curve and indications are that a sharper tailing off of AS in the non-pedaling final portion of travel might be achievable allowing a better pedal feedback result without compromising pedaling performance.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 I really like this bike. I thought the old bike looked too sci-fi for me. I like the 650b and DW link. I have an Ibis and know how well that suspension works.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Prefer phenix, it s like this one is missing something. Could someone tell me if x-fusion fork, shock are higher quality than rockshox and fox .?
  • + 2
 No, but they're moving in the right direction.
  • + 1
 Many people state already X Fusion is on par with the like of Fox and RS. Smile
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  • + 3
 Looks pretty Nice, would be sick if the Phoenix would still be aviable when this Bike comes into Shops though...
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  • + 4
 650b Spank Spikes!? Shut up and take my money!
[Reply]
  • + 4
 if 650b is so god damn great, why have we not seen them on the podium
  • + 3
 wait a bit.... We have seen it on podiums in XC and now Air DH. It was ridden to 4th in the most recent EWS in Whistler. Biggest reason in DH is because there is a lack of 650B DH bikes, before this one there was only the KHS i believe. As more become available you will see more on the podium. It is not the wheels that are going to win podiums, its the rider and if he is comfortable on a 650B you can beat your ass he will be fast on it.
  • + 1
 Intense, Scott, and Norco have been running 650B this entire WC and some of last years as well. They are already out there.
  • + 2
 Norco has been running 650B downhill? I know Scott has had 1 rider using it, but not the whole team and I know Intense has a 650B bike available, I forgot about them. But who is using Intense at the highest level? The wheels are not going to make a middle of the pack guy an instant contender. When we see more of the Top level guys using it them and we will see it eventually. That will be a good gauge on how they compete against other top level guys still riding 26's
  • + 2
 They have been on the podium in Enduro, Nino Schurter destroyed the XC World Cup and Championship last year, and Logan Binggeli just took 2nd at the US nationals. Per above, you'll start seeing more wins once better tires are available AND the best riders are on on them. Pretty sure Stevie would have still crushed it last week if on a 27.5 Wilson. Hell, he just crushed Air DH on a freaking 140mm Troy.
  • + 1
 Yes, Norco has been on them. I guess the point is they are out there, and I do not believe they make as much of a difference as some would have you think. As was mentioned by warner in the last round, both 26 and 27.5 have their benefits to certain tracks. I believe you'll see teams switching between the two as the course warrants, as Andorra would have been suited to 26, and St Anne 27.5. Horses for courses, or so they say.
  • + 2
 None of the riders running 650b on the WC were contenders on 26" either. Bingelli is the only rider who is on 650b who is a podium contender. Watch to see what happens next season though.

Smith did pretty good on a "little" bike with 650b in the air DH last week. Definitely not a disadvantage, and there is an advantage.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 does this mean that they are going to change the firebird because the two bikes were almost identical. i am also not a big fan of this new bike i like the phoenix a lot better.
  • + 1
 At a glance they were similar, with the primary difference being the Firebirds lower shock was mounted directly onto the lower linkage arm, while on the Pheonix it was mounted directly to the front triangle (but hidden as it is recessed into the BB area).

Own both frames and both ride very nicely, but they have a slightly different feel to them presumably because of this arrangement. Struggling with the looks of this frame, the Pheonix had such nice lines, this thing may ride really nice, but it ain't too pretty.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 woah didnt see that coming.
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  • + 3
 Love the look of the dw link. sick bike, can't wait for a full review.
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  • + 1
 Is it a carbon or alloy? I'd prefer it in an alloy... like they say "heavy is good, heavy is reliable. If it does not work, you can always hit them with it."
[Reply]
  • + 0
 Its easier to save and buy that bike than it is to buy a used bike or frame from some these people on here that never respond back. Should I post your names. Yes that is plural!
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  • + 4
 not as nice as a phoenix
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  • + 2
 Gotta give em props for trying out new designs..build n test, build n test..and repeat.
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  • + 2
 And i still think the Turner DHR DW-link is by far better than this new Pivot! Razz
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  • + 3
 Hooray for understated (albeit temporary) graphics.
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  • + 2
 26er DH,dead man walking!
[Reply]
  • + 0
 Damn. Too bad MSRP is likely $6500 or higher Frown I really like it. Wonder how it rides. Intense and Pivot both have 650B bikes now. Sweet!
  • + 1
 $6500 is actually a pretty good price for a world-cup capable DH race bike. We're talking pro level here.
  • + 1
 Maybe I havent kept my head in the business long enough, but OEM X-Fusion is considered WC capable?
  • + 2
 I don't see why not. They have been making quite a name for themselves in the past few years, with big names like Brian Lopes riding their stuff.
  • + 4
 This is a team bike, not a production example. X-fusion is their suspension sponsor.
  • - 1
 Yeah, I saw that. But a Rock Shox Judy and Boxxer are from the same company, and certainly one is not a fork worthy of mention. The only experience I have with X-Fusion was on the back of my Big Hit, and let me tell you, that jaded my whole outlook on lower end OEM equipment. And if the fork/shock have all the adjustments then perhaps it is a WC capable component set up, but if it only has rebound adjust (for example, by no means saying it will), then I dont know that a $6500 (or so) base price is warranted. But with inflation and all that, maybe $6500 in 2014 will actually be cheap. lol. Its all speculation. They may introduce the bike at $4999 for all we know at this point. I think its sweet tho.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Now I know why i think it looks good. It's missing all the little curly graphics that Pivot cover their frames with!!!
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  • + 2
 rear triangle and links Smile
front triangle Frown
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  • + 1
 That's one damn ugly seat tube!
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  • + 1
 Makes Me think of the fsr system. I like the old one better.
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  • + 2
 nnnnaaa tr250
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  • + 0
 i'm really not liking 27.5 inch wheels, a downhill bike should stick to 26 wheels.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 First a Sunday lookalike, now a Cove/Knolly DW link driven bike.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Nice color! It screams look at me I'm riding an illegal DH trail. Yipeee!
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  • + 1
 Looks like a Knolly podium! But it's sick
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  • + 1
 I like the Phoenix more. But x fusion is a sweet combo
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  • + 1
 it looks like back to the 80'
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  • + 2
 "Looks like a..." STFU!
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  • + 2
 Carbon please!
[Reply]
  • + 0
 before anyone says "looks like a Turner DHR"
thats because its THE SAME DW-LINK SUSPENSION!
  • + 0
 www.sicklines.com/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/9291 - except the new yoke which seems absolutely pointless and looks like it'll snap the end off the shock after a few rides.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I do like the new bike althought I dont like big wheels...Bike is legit!
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  • + 1
 sweet looking long travel Ibis....
  • + 1
 Ibis? They don't make aluminum bikes anymore.

With the thin wall approach mentioned in the article I would think they are closer to the old intense frames. Although the welding method reminds me of the mountain Cycles San Andreas.

Not sure why you would ever want to use the word thin in a downhill bike though?
[Reply]
  • + 1
 kinda looks like an Intense 951
  • + 1
 That's insulting to my 951
[Reply]
  • + 0
 at a glance it really does look like a tr250/450
[Reply]
  • + 0
 Dropper post on a DH rig?
  • + 1
 Which been happening for the last few years in S. Africa and will be on a lot of the pros bike in a few weeks at the world championship.
  • + 6
 I was thinking the same thing. I'm not sure what "As a nod to the future, the down tube has a port to route a Reverb Stealth-type dropper seatpost" means. I know that certain tracks like PMB for the World Champs will see many guys running a dropper post but I'm not sure what is a nod to the future. Is the future of DH flat sections and pedaling uphill? If that's the case count me out.
  • + 1
 Maybe because bikes are getting lighter and more pedal friendly.
[Reply]
  • - 1
 I don't see the need for the extra long upper shock mount. Seems a little bit overkill. Just added weight in my opinion...
[Reply]
  • + 0
 looks like a knolly.. is that a marzocchi fork copy?
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Is this not a DWLink?
  • + 5
 It does say DW*Link on the chainstays, so one might presume it is.
  • + 1
 It's the "new" dw link. It's featured on the mach 6 as well.
  • + 1
 to be honest, this rear suspension arrangement reminds me of the Intense 951 (bb.nsmb.com/showthread.php?t=126582) but without an alignment rocker to keep the lateral stress off the shock. I don't think this would work at all if the yoke was rotated 90 degrees, which suggests a lot of dependency on the structural strength of the shock. We've already seen the 2012 demos shearing the ends off Cane Creek shocks. I'm Skeptical.
  • + 1
 This will most likely happen with this design too. Buckling and misaligned shockpistons. Probably a rough ride, stiction, breakage. 27er look bad.
  • + 1
 @ esstinkay, I'm struggling to see any similarities other than a horizontally mounted shock and x2 links. The 951 'seat stays' come a lot more forward to articulate the linkage from the top tube, visually to me, this achieves the same thing as what Pivot have done with the shock linkage, but in a much neater (and to someone with absolutely no engineering skills - stronger).

That 951 is a awesome looking bike, even if it is a bit 'older' by todays standards.
  • + 1
 @smuggly: imagine the top link inverted, does that help?
  • + 1
 Yes, it does! not sure how I missed it first time around. Not sure if i have ever seen a DW with an upper link inverted - seems like it would be an effective design - but then it would be visually almost identical to a VPP,
[Reply]
  • - 1
 The old 26" never made it to the podium .
This one does not have a change in hell !
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  • + 0
 I like it cause it looks like a tr450
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  • + 1
 damn that looks sick
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  • + 0
 When I first saw the shape of the frame, looks exacly like a tr250.
[Reply]
  • + 0
 650 marketing for me blablabla......26 forever$$$$$$$$$$$$$
  • + 2
 RIP 26" wheels LOL!!!
[Reply]
  • - 1
 I can see the tire hitting the frame if you bottomed the rear shock
  • + 12
 How did the engineers and test riders miss that? They should hire you.
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