FOX D.O.S.S. Telescoping Post - First Ride

Apr 20, 2012
by Mike Levy  
 
You must login to Pinkbike.
Don't have an account? Sign up

Join Pinkbike  Login


FOX D.O.S.S. Telescoping Seat Post


FOX hasn't hid the fact that they have been working on their first telescoping seat post, even going so far as to both show it at trade shows and put it under their sponsored riders at select events. But they have refrained from letting the media put any time on one - until now. The new post, christened D.O.S.S. for 'Drop On Steep Shit', features either four or five inches of travel (100mm or 125mm) that is controlled mechanically, while a relatively low pressure air spring is employed to raise the post back up. Like many telescoping posts, the D.O.S.S. incorporates a 'Trail' position that sits 40mm down from full extension, often the ideal setting for rolling or technical terrain that still requires some pedal strokes to be thrown down. While that middle setting can come in handy, most who have used a post that offers such an option will admit that it can be tricky to find in the heat of the moment, which is why FOX have designed an interesting remote that employs two levers: pushing the larger lever will allow you to stroke through the post's entire travel (including stopping at the 40mm cruiser position), while pushing the smaller lever will only allow the D.O.S.S. to either drop down 40mm or back up to full height. The three positions are referred to as 'Climb, Trail Descend', or CTD for short, that match up with their new three position CTD suspension that you'll get to read about in an upcoming article.

The 620 gram D.O.S.S post is actuated via a standard shift cable, with the housing anchor point at the post's head. Interestingly, the actuation arm is positioned at the side of the post instead of the more common location at the rear. This setup is not only less likely to be contaminated by spray thrown up from the rear tire, but also makes for smoother cable routing.

FOX D.O.S.S. details:

• FOX's first telescoping seat post
• Mechanical internals
• Air sprung (10 - 25psi to adjust return speed)
• Three postions: full height, 40mm drop, fully dropped (climb, trail, descend)
• 4'' or 5'' drop options (100mm or 125mm)
• 30.9mm or 31.6mm sizes
• 620 grams
• Available in May, 2012
• MSRP $439 USD


Yeti s SB-66 equipped with FOX D.O.S.S. dropper post
  Our steed for the first day was Yeti's 150mm travel SB-66. The turquoise rig was fully kitted out with 2013 FOX suspension, of course.

We spent two days riding both the new D.O.S.S. seat post and suspension offerings from FOX, with our first day in the saddle of Yeti's SB-66. The 150mm travel machine was fully decked out with 2013 goodies, including FOX's new Factory level, CTD equipped 34 Float fork and Float CTD Boost Valve rear shock. The CTD acronym stands for 'Climb, Trail, Descend', which is the new three position damper that allows riders to choose from different levels of compression damping that best suit the terrain. There is plenty to cover on that front, but today we're going to introduce you to FOX's much anticipated D.O.S.S. telescoping seat post.

FOX D.O.S.S. dual lever remote
  The D.O.S.S.'s remote makes use of two levers, one to stroke through its entire travel and one that accesses the 40mm drop 'Trail' position.

Dual Lever Remote

Pushing the large silver lever (above left) allows you to stroke through the post's entire travel, including stopping at the 40mm drop postion that is ideal for fast, rolling terrain where you want a bit of extra clearance, but still need to pedal. Giving the inner black lever a push (above right) will only allow the seat post to drop 40mm, a design that makes searching for the middle postion a thing of the past. Hitting it again will raise it back up to its maximum height. The dual levers are certainly more complicated than a single trigger, but it will be interesting to see if the added complication and size translate to more usability on the trail.

The design allows the same remote to be mounted on either side of the bar, top or bottom, without having to swap out clamps, and it is also features three different fore and aft positions. The remote lever isn't nearly as trim as what some of the competition offers, but its ability to be mounted every which way on the handlebar should allow most riders to find an ergonomic setup they can get along with.

Fox D.O.S.S. telescoping post
  FOX built a testing jig that is designed to put the dual lever remote through hell by way of actuators that press the levers roughly every other second. Word from FOX is that they see the cable fail before either of the actual levers.

FOX D.O.S.S. dropper seat post head
  The post uses a one piece forged head and upper tube, as well as side mounted cable actuation.

Side Mounted Cable actuation

FOX went ahead with the side mounted cable actuation arm that we spotted on the earlier prototype D.O.S.S posts, a location that should be less prone to contamination from spray thrown up from the rear tire. Accessing the cable anchor bolt looks to be infinitely easier than most other layouts, and the post is also reversible, letting the rider mount the cable on either the left or right side of the post depending on what best suits their bike.


Ball Bearing Internals

The D.O.S.S's internals are like nothing currently used within a telescoping post. Eight stainless steel ball bearings are employed, rolling on three different length grooves - one for each of the three height options - that have been machined into the inner wall of the main tube. The eight ball bearings are captured at the bottom of the inner tube (or stanchion), with them being pushed outward by the locking cam (the flanged piece at the far left in the photo above). In the locked positioned, the largest diameter of the cam pushes all of the balls out and locks them into the groove.

When pushing the short lever to move the post to the ''Trail'' position, the cam moves half way in its travel, with the four pockets machined into it allowing four of the ball bearings to come out of the grooves and drop into the pockets. The four remaining bearings sit in a linear groove that correspond with the 'Climb' and 'Trail' position, allowing the post to lower to the 'Descend' position when the lever is pushed. Releasing the lever allows the cam to force all eight of the balls to expand out and lock into groove.

Pushing the larger lever allows all eight of the ball bearings to move inward, letting the post stroke through the entire length of its travel. The post is also still functional if an air seal fails, or you manage to snap a cable, by manually moving the actuation arm.

Fox D.O.S.S. dropper post.
  A look inside the D.O.S.S. reveals a complicated system of cams, keyways, and ball bearings.

Self Adjusting Steel Keys

The exploded view above gives you a look into the inner workings of the D.O.S.S. seat post, with the one piece forged upper tube at the top (unfinished and cut in two), and a cutaway of a fully assembled D.O.S.S. post at the bottom. Four stainless steel keys are forced outward by the keyway cam and four ball bearings, keeping the post's stanchion from rotating. When the post is locked into position the cam forces the bearings outward, pushing the steel keys into four grooves that have been machined into the inner wall of the tube. Pushing the remote lever to move the post up or down also shifts the keyway cam, allowing the keys to relax inwards and the post to go through its travel. This design means that there is very little friction from the keys when the post is going up or down, simply because the keys have retracted when the lever is depressed.

The keyway cam is a different unit from the locking cam, and has been designed to have no free play. The cam will push the keys out slightly further as they or the grooves wear, meaning the the system should be self adjusting.


On The Trail

Our D.O.S.S. post was one of the first to come off of the production line (as opposed to being assembled as a prototype), so we were eager to find out how it functioned in the real world. That real world, unfortunately, consisted of just two days worth of saddle time - not enough for us to comment on the post's reliability, but sufficient time to report back on its general function. Pushing the lever allows the post to cycle up or down, as you'd expect it to, but it was the D.O.S.S.'s smoothness that surprised us. There felt to be next to no resistance throughout the stroke, due in large part to the steel keys retracting as the lever is pressed. The low air pressure, set only between 10psi and 25psi to adjust return speed, also let the saddle lower quickly under our body weight. Unlike some other air sprung designs, the D.O.S.S. doesn't slow its descent as you near the end of the stroke - the force required to lower it feels the same at the end of its travel as it does at the top. It clearly will require more force due to the air chamber shrinking in size as the post lowers, but the low starting pressure makes the change unnoticeable.

Return speed was quick enough that we never found ourselves wanting it to be faster, but it wasn't so fast as to make us worry about causing bodily harm to vital organs. We also appreciated the post's audible 'klunk' when it raises back to either the 'Trail' or 'Climb' position, letting us know that it was exactly where it needs to be. While that may sound trivial, we've often found ourselves second guessing the saddle's position when using a silent telescoping seat post. This isn't going to be an issue with the D.O.S.S.

So, just how handy did we find the remote's second lever? Very much, as it turns out. Hitting the smaller, black lever does just as FOX claims - the post can only drop down 40mm to the 'Trail' postion, or return back up to full height. There was no searching, no having to weight the saddle longer than we wanted to in order to lock it down into the middle setting; just hit the black lever and it quickly lowers to the desired height. Is it worth the added complication? The jury is still out on that point given that we'll need much more time on it before making that call, but we also have to wonder if the D.O.S.S. makes more sense than an infinitely adjustable post.

Fox D.O.S.S. dropper post.
  The D.O.S.S.'s remote isn't like anything currently used to operate a telescoping post.

The D.O.S.S. cycled smoothly through its travel, and we can see a lot of riders being fans of the remote's dual lever that allows you to easily find the 40mm drop setting, but the large presence of said remote is gigantic compared to trimmer offerings from the competition. We also didn't find it terribly ergonomic, although we didn't get to spend as much time setting it up as we would have liked. An under-the-bar setup looks promising to us, although this will only work for riders who don't run a front derailleur, and we didn't get a chance to run such a setup during out short test session. There was also a small but noticeable rattle to the post, although it wasn't the usual side-to-side play that is common (but not noticeable when riding) on many dropper posts. Instead, it was actually a small vertical rattle that could be easily heard when the saddle was jiggled by hand. No, we couldn't feel or hear it while riding, and we realize that there must be a small amount of free play present in order for the post to cycle up and down freely, but its worth noting regardless.


The D.O.S.S. is a very interesting seat post option, one that is different enough from the competition that it just might offer an advantage. On the other hand we can see the post's dual lever remote making or breaking the post in many rider's eyes, especially those who are used to an infinitely adjustable post. Reliability will be key to the D.O.S.S.'s success given that the general consensus is that most telescoping posts fail in that regard. Stay tuned for a longterm review where we'll address this concern.


ridefox.com
Must Read This Week

185 Comments

  • + 137
 $439.00 REALLY? WTF Fox, give a brotha a break!
  • + 42
 From what I saw at Interbike last October, Fox's seatpost is a piece of shit. Go get yourself a Reverb and In n' out burger for the rest of the month with that $439.00!
  • + 15
 Looks over-complicated and over-priced for a mechanical dropper. The second generation reverb is still my go-to choice based on price and features. might be worth the price if it had infinite adjust-ability or something that at least strayed from the norm for a mech dropper. bomb-proof levers are cool to see, but then again I've heard few, if any, complaints about the lever integrity of any current dropper models. internals looks sophisticated but again, over-complicated and like a nightmare to rebuild. I feel like the only thing that could salvage the initial reviews which lean to the negative side for this thing is if its used for 6+ months without a single issue and no play develops.
  • + 14
 Yeah the rest of the article was a blur after I read the $439 USD. Should have probably saved that for the end so people would actually read it. At that pricepoint, it doesn't have Kashima or a diamond/platinum coating already? Yeah sure, here's my money pffffffff..........
  • + 44
 for $439 I think I have time to lower my seat on the trail...sorry I pass...
  • + 45
 $439 for technology which already looks out of date? No infinite adjustment? No static cable exit? No internal cable exit? Massive over-complex chunky lever? Doesn't even look stand-out good either.

A fail for Fox? There is a first for everything in life I guess.
  • + 9
 ^ I completely agree with everything he said.
  • + 6
 CrankBrothers hit the nail on the head with ending the cable on the lower part of their Kronolog seatpost. Anyone who has spent time on an Adjustable seatpost knows the hassle of dealing with not only the routing of the housing, but the movement of the housing as well along the bike. And I'd like to finish with a quote from "Eyon"

"$439 for technology which already looks out of date? No infinite adjustment? No static cable exit? No internal cable exit? Massive over-complex chunky lever?....A Fail for Fox."
  • - 4
 I skipped the entire article cause you guys read it. One question: Does it have NOTICEABLE side-to-side play in it?
  • + 4
 f*ck that for $439 it better be plated in gold
  • + 5
 for $439 it should also be the lightest
  • + 2
 Poke it Fox !! You must think we're all made of money..

And that bar now looks like something off a circus bike ! Cluttered as F*uck !!
  • + 2
 Why can't Fox give us a break and stop pricing stuff as high as effing possible? I know the price is based on production and things like that, but why can't they competitively price their products? If, in theory, this component sells well, they should drop the price to $380. More people would be attracted to it because it's not $439!

Just my 2 cents.
  • + 2
 ^i agree with JamisJammer95. i would love to run fox suspension on my bikes but rockshock is much more competively priced and I get about the same performence out of it. Fox should try and lower their prices just a bit because the average person just cant pay $1600 for a new fork.
  • + 1
 Hahaha!!!!!! Right on bro...
  • + 1
 Way over-complicated
[Reply]
  • + 36
 Too much money for too much weight, another acronym and a cable that moves with the saddle. It's pretty, but is Fox becoming the Apple of the bike world?
  • + 1
 Hit the nail on the head there
[Reply]
  • + 35
 I envision a Kashima-coated version in the near future, if not soon... =P
  • + 7
 The hose and the wire will be Kashimed on the inside as well
  • - 10
 thats what she said
  • + 4
 That's what he said too!
  • + 8
 gonna Kashima my ass....
  • + 8
 got Kashima wallet...
  • + 6
 Kashima one will cost like 700 U$S!
  • + 0
 wrong ,it will be 739$$!!!!!!!!!
  • + 3
 why would a kashima seat post even be remotely necessary? Is the amount of friction you use when you lower your seat really going to improve your riding in anyway shape or form?
  • + 2
 no but it looks really cool
  • + 4
 ^^^ "remotely necessary" hahahahah!
[Reply]
  • + 31
 One crash to the handlebars and that lever is gone.
  • + 3
 Not to mention how easily the cable attachment on the side will be hit.
  • - 3
 just run teflon tape under it like I do on my brakes - the lever will rotate around the bars instead of busting off... hopefully.
  • + 3
 Exactly. It happened to me with my RS Reverb, lesson learned and placed upside down on the left, no problems since then.
[Reply]
  • + 21
 pretty soon these companys are really gonna start outpricing what people can realistically afford.....over 4 hundred dollars for a effin seat post is ludacris scrolling down it looked cool til i saw the price...i honestly thought i read it wrong
  • + 4
 Companies overpricing products ruins the spirit of mtb in my opion it should be a sport for everyone not people earning more in a week than i will in a lifetime.. It has already been said but for $430 i think i might just stick with my £10 seat clamp thanks fox..
  • + 4
 and it looks hideous.
[Reply]
  • + 21
 620g? $440? What looks like another shifter? Come on Fox, I was expecting better.
  • + 5
 I agree, heavier, more expensive, and still has an awesome leg catcher cable!! This might be the first "lemon" from FOX racing shox.
[Reply]
  • + 18
 $439 that is ridiculous.
[Reply]
  • + 13
 too expensive (more then 400$) , to much weight (620g) and the biggest shifter on the market . don't want it
[Reply]
  • + 14
 A 26er Fox 34? Now that's interesting!
  • + 2
 I've been saying that Fox should make a 34 for a long time now. A 32 is a little light on some trails but I wanna be able to ride uphill as well.
[Reply]
  • + 9
 I'm more interested in that 34mm fork. I don't care much for the remote lever. It kinda kills it for me. The price doesn't help much either. I have a Specialized Command Post Blacklite and it has worked pretty good so far and it comes in at a much more competitive price ($275.00 USD).
[Reply]
  • + 10
 I have a reverb and its cool but all manufacturers need to work on two things.... 1. Cable connected at collar not head and 2. Bomb proof levers. Beyond that I can adapt to infinite vs fixed points or hydro vs cable.
[Reply]
  • + 11
 It's just what I expected, Fox decided to make a dropper post and it's the most expensive one out there.
[Reply]
  • + 10
 Mah gawd that lever is a monstrosity!
[Reply]
  • + 6
 Is it just me or are bars getting way too crowded nowadays , just 1 shifter and brake levers on my AM bike , normally I wanna rest after climbing anyway , it's like you need 900mm bars just to fit all the crap on .
[Reply]
  • + 5
 "A look inside the D.O.S.S. reveals a complicated system of cams, keyways, and ball bearings." Plus its ugly, prone to damage, and just a fail of a design. Really after all this hype about this post fox really came up short on this one.
  • + 4
 Have you ridden one for a few months and are reporting back? We only spent two days on it - we're waiting for our longterm test model before making a judgement. It was interesting and certainly shows promise, but we'll see how it pans out.
  • - 2
 damn dude you obviously have an issue with fox. I'll save my judgment for once a long term test has been done. And it looks pretty similar and just as prone to damage as any other design? Not sure where you're getting those points from...
  • + 3
 Look at the remote, stompeinator, that is what is prone to damge as it is so far up off the bar and exposed unlike more compact designs such as the ks remote
  • - 3
 You tell him Mike!
  • + 10
 "We only spent two days on it" Then it had to be sent off for a service.
  • + 1
 "An under-the-bar setup looks promising to us"
In fairness, it looks like you missed this part.

it's out of my price range, but doesn't look all that out of consistency from their fork and shock prices on new stuff.
  • + 2
 "An under-the-bar setup looks promising to us, although this will only work for riders who don't run a front derailleur" unfortunatly the majority of riders that would use a doss DO run a front mech
[Reply]
  • + 8
 Anyone else saw the cable attached to the head and not the base and stopped reading?
  • + 3
 Yeah I am also really disappointed in this! Considering that this post has taken quite some time to design, I wish that they had mounted the hose to the base so it doesn't go all over the place when the post moves! That's the only problem I have with the reverb at the moment.
  • + 2
 Yer its so open that will clogg up with dog egg's and mud in no time. It will probably need servicing ever week like my forks.
  • + 2
 just wait for Thomson's forthcoming dropper post...probably the "Reverb killer" if such a thing is possible?
[Reply]
  • + 7
 Two gear shifter, two brake hose, DOSS shifter, and fox CTD damper remote shifter ...congrats! You just built your self a spaghetti on two wheels...
[Reply]
  • + 9
 The lever is going to last...minutes....
[Reply]
  • + 9
 Do they offer a Kashima option?
  • + 4
 probably soon
  • + 1
 They said at Interbike that producing a Kashima-coated seatpost would be so expensive that no one would be able to afford it.
  • + 5
 What did they say about this one...?
  • + 1
 That one will only be $600
  • + 1
 "only" For a seatpost?! You can buy complete and decent Hardtails for that! 2.5 Reverbs (or 3 online in some places). Worthy forks from both Rocksox and Marzocchi! I could go on....
[Reply]
  • + 8
 D.O.S.S Dropper Overpriced Stupid Shifter
[Reply]
  • + 4
 2013 the year Fox dropped the ball and Rock Shox ran with it.

This post was so late coming to the game, and does not appear to be any better than other offerings. The fact that it is not Kashima coated is another strike. Not that Kashima would make it perform better, but it would make it look better. Then all of their forks loose the adjustments that made them more desirable then the Rock Shox options. This whole CTD idea would be good if they stiff offered people the fully adjustable version.

I think that fox is focusing to much on the booming side by side market, and letting us mountain bikers offset the cost of the other departments. I mean have looked at what we pay for a rear shock? And then what it costs to buy a triple by pass shock for your truck?
[Reply]
  • + 4
 this is totally unrelated, but why do they make all of their shafts/stanchions different colors? the kashima shock is darker than the fork, the 2012 kashima is darker than the 2011, the regular shock shaft is different than the regular fork stanchions and the dropper post is a different colour than all of them. fox y u no colour coordinate?
  • + 3
 different alloys come up differently, as can batch to batch..
  • + 1
 With anodization you never get the exact same color even if its the same metal. Ive had some of my parts from the same batch come out different colors just because of where they were in the tank. Its crazy how they never come out the same but its just what happens.
[Reply]
  • + 4
 Not keen on the side mounted cable on the seat post, why is it in such a stupid position. Why is it not at the rear???. If i get one i reckon my money will be spent on a Rock shox.
  • + 2
 Yeah, i dont get how mounting the cable at the side will keep it out of the wheel spray to be honest... they should at least make a plastic cover or something...
[Reply]
  • + 3
 Based on the price of this post, and the ridiculous complexity inside it, I now understand why Fox forks are so expensive. We've been paying for absurd R&D on this joke of a post.

Their testing fixture is cute and all, but it's a very expensive way to test only ONE TYPE OF PUSH on the two levers. Human hands grip handlebars in all kinds of ways, people will push the levers with different angles and different squareness to the levers. This is poor engineering on Fox's part. No wonder it's such an over-complex, hyper-expensive part.

Fox used to be my favorite fork & shock maker. Not any more.
  • + 1
 The test fixture was about $200. The actual test method can be debated, but it definitely put the levers through the ringer as far as fatigue life and lever force.
  • + 1
 Yeah and a fork is only $75 based on the raw metals it's made from. Right?

So what's the deal? Seems like contrary to the story's implication, you're saying it was a lousy rig-up for a test -- or you're deliberately calling it "about 200" without calculating design/idea time, fabrication time and the efforts related to those things?

I'm glad you have faith that all users will position their thumbs in a way to push perfectly perpendicular to the paddles with a point-force load.

Maybe that's why the paddles are so huge? Or does Fox have some weird ego thing where its DOSS paddles have to be bigger than SRAM's or Shimano's shifter pod paddles? You know, occupy more of the handlebar real estate, be a tycoon... that sort of thing.

Rube Goldberg would be proud. St-Exupery, not.
  • + 1
 Surely you must understand the idea is simply to put the levers through MORE abuse then they would see at the hands of a radical rider possibly like yourself. The machine accomplishes this at economy. Rube's the man and Exy told me he was stoked on it so I guess that is that.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 What's the point when you have a Reverb available???
Fox:
-more expensive
-cable actuated which will eventuelly wear out
-these shifters cannot be mounted upside down as reverb commands can (to hide them in case of crash, as they tend to break easily... been there)
-and finally not black
[Reply]
  • + 8
 Two levers? eh..
[Reply]
  • + 3
 I can't see why it's $439. It's basically half a fork, material wise. Oh yeah, it's Fox... That's still way too much. Fox priced me out of a new Fox fork for my latest build. I could almost afford a Float RL, but for more than half that price, $265 (sale$) versus $595, I went with a Marzzochi RLO 44. Have a 10 year old Vanilla 125r still in use and would have loved a new Fox but.... Oh well, I can find a dropper that will work as good as the Fox and lighter for about half that price, onsale of course....it makes me sadFrown .....
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Has RC patented the hydraulic design? Because is it just me or does cable operated seem a little "old fashion" now, especially when lots of things are changing and have changed like 26" to 29", alloy to carbon etc....

It might be just methinking this, but I think Fox could have come up with something completely unique!
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Personally I think it's so funny that one of the largest fork manufactures is making a cable actuated seat post!!! You would think they would be going the reverb route and making a hydraulically actuated, was expecting something a little more from fox!!! One more thing could of they made the lever any bigger, my daughter's bell on her bike is smaller!!!
[Reply]
  • + 2
 I like the internal design. It is a shame that everything else is wrong. Huge levers. Line routed to the top (if they flipped the internal design it could have gone static). Mechanical (the cable looks like it will pop out and poke you in the thigh). And worst of all the price is so typically fox. DOSS=POS. Looks reliable, but who wants a reliable artifact?
[Reply]
  • + 2
 The remote reminds me of the old Shimano SIS thumbshifters from 1990, you know, the ones without the indexing lol!

And that side mounted actuation lever looks like it could snag your baggies just when you least expect it!

Lycra anyone?
  • + 1
 ^^ ha ha

good memory of those old SIS thumbies Wink
[Reply]
  • + 2
 so now i will have my fox lock out for my fork on one hand along with my shifter and brake also with the fox lock out for my shock on the other hand with brake and shifter and than a two paddle shifter for my seat post. going to have more levers and things than my plane.
  • + 2
 but still less than a scott bike.
  • + 0
 if only they made one to route on the INSIDE of Scotts. it'd be so clean|as clean as my wallet
  • + 1
 nothing wrong with MORE spaghetti on the bars Wink



so glad I run a 1 x 10 bike with just the right shifter pod and 2 brake levers on the bars Smile
[Reply]
  • + 2
 I thought the price was pretty much in line with all the other offerings out there. Yes, it is expensive when you compare it to a standard post, but there's a whole lot going on in there. I was a little disappointed that Fox didn't go the hydraulic route, especially for the acutation. Even though the cable is mounted to the side, I forsee a lot of problems for those of us who ride a lot of the year in the wet and mucky. I like that the post can still be operated with no air pressure or without a cable if need be. And I like that Fox has taken a different approach rather than just following what everyone else has been doing. In my limited experience with adjustable posts, they all fail. It's just a matter of time. It will be interesting to see the long term review, especially a winter review from someone in Vancouver.
[Reply]
  • + 6
 Ummm no thank you. Rather have a reverb
[Reply]
  • + 1
 they can't report on the NC-17 rated features in the regular media. The larger bar lever, when pushed completely back (it'll click), activates an arm from front of the post that reaches up and gives you a hand job. MSRP is quickly forgotten after this feature is tested.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Testing one this morning. Just for the hell of it. Don't intend on buying one though. Price is too steep. And yes it is far more cost and weight efficient to just stop and drop your post manually. Give it 3-5 years though and I'm sure the technology and price will be more favourable. I'm waiting to see what Thomson come up with. And I'm sure many other companies will follow suit when the design/weight/ dependability and material/manufacturing costs are sorted.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Most of your comments are based on the price, or your twelve, and have no relevance to the actual product design. I just bought one. Works great. Its mechanical design has been around for a long time and is proven design that is used by NASA and many others. Its called a quick connect. I use the same tech everyday at work with pressures up to 300psi. It locks at certain positions only because the bearings are released by the switch. Thats why they claim that you can extend it manually if the cable breaks. Can others claim the same???
The Fox didn't wait this long to release it because they lack in the research department. Its the opposite. I believe this will be the best and thats why I waited for it.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Ok...Why should I get this post that has only 3 position instead of a reverb post that is actually activated by hydrolic instead of a shitty cable and has infinite travel adjust ??
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Just got bak from testing it. Awesome bit of kit. Bar Mount is pretty good also. Weight isn't too bad. Positioning is spot on through it's settings. Felt strong and changes were positive. Still put off by the price though. Will have to try and be a good boy and maybe Santa will grace me with one at Xmas.
[Reply]
  • + 5
 I puked in my mouth when I saw the price!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 i've held off my purchase of a dropper post because of this. totally shouldn't have. it mechanical and set positions... y wouldn't i just get something that is already out there for a MUCH better price.
Note to fox: Not all riders tear apart their accessories to admire the insides!
[Reply]
  • + 5
 Instead of two levers, why not two positions on one lever?
[Reply]
  • + 5
 more and more buttens on the bike,feel so sick.
[Reply]
  • + 4
 I know it's weight weenie comment time but 6 2 0 grams! Come on. Leave out the depleted uranium shells already Fox
[Reply]
  • + 3
 I was really looking forward to this seat post, now I've seen the price tag I'll just keep my standard setup and stand up when I need to pedal uphill.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 so basically your telling me if i sell my bike i can get this seatpost and still have enough for a pack of gum. gee thanks fox racing ...
  • + 1
 always wanted a hybrid dropper post from two leading companies:

THOMSON for the physical seat post packaging

FOX for the suspension "guts"

would have been best of both worlds....
[Reply]
  • + 3
 "A look inside the D.O.S.S. reveals a complicated system of cams, keyways, and ball bearings."

yea, nope. Gravity Dropper here I come.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Have been riding one for 6 months now, between 3-5 20mi rides per week using it constantly for every climb and every down. Probably around 12x per ride or more. Plus I drop it to Trail a lot, so not sure just how much, but it is a bunch every ride.. Love it. Very reliable, same cable it came with. No seal issues at all. I clean it after every dusty ride just like my forks and shock. Now that it is November, have done a few -50F rides and it just needed a little more air to spring back all the way up. Absolutely no side to side motion after all the miles of use. Have second one now mounted on my single ring setup where the front shifter would be and it's so comfortable in that position. I really prefer the 3 settings instead of an infinite post for AM use, its either all the way up or down out of the way, or in the trail setting for technical climbing and JRA, To me, anything below the trail setting would be useless anyway. Once you find the perfect setting it's all you need. I am very happy with it, and now that the price has come down I can say I would recommend it. It's amazing to me how many people hated it here without even trying it.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Two cumbersome shifter levers for adjusting travel, cable exposed to the elements under the saddle at a high price with no 150mm version to boot. Doesn't sound inspiring. I will be sticking with my unreliable KS Supernatural 150 post instead Smile
[Reply]
  • + 1
 the levers arnt even small, my cockpit would have that many things in it i might as well be in a plane Facepalm two breaks, two shifters, rockshox poploc/ fox's CTD compression shifters for the fork, posible extra lever for rear shock then adding this on, I would need another set of levers to reach the levers that would pretty much be on my stem at this point lol
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I think it could be a winner if they streamlined the lever and had the cable terminate closer to the seat collar (like the CB Kronolog). I am not a fan of having a huge loop of cable flex out as the seat gets dropped. I will wait until those issues get sorted out before I buy one - although once they knock out my major concerns and make them long lasting, I bet it will be a complete game changer for me.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 They could have at least made some sort of cover / bootie to protect the cable on the post from getting jammed up with dirt / crud! Gravity will just pull all that stuff into the cable housing. Don't get me wrong, I do like Fox products but for that price I will pass, and is the "Factory" Kashima coated version going to come in at the cost of a new fork perhaps?
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I agree with @peelman....after the first crash, the levers will be....GONE!! The idea is great, they just need to re-locate the levers where they're not SO exposed! Not many other options to locate them, but at least they'll stand a better chance of hangin' around a little longer.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Big let down, was really looking forward to this post from Fox. Not so much now, the price tag was expected, but the design is poor. Cable head mounted, and a leaver that clutters the bars, and sticks up ready to be taken by a branch or destroyed in a crash. Come on Fox pick up your game !!!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Levers everywhere that look like they are asking to be snapped off, a cable actuator that fails before the levers (well helloooooo) I could have told you that would happen without a test rig and only 3 positions. Sorry Fox I'm sticking to the Reverb..
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Really ? With the reverb on the market near on two years that's the best fox can do ? This effort can only damage the brand Fox.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 At $440, they definitely need kashima on that thing to outsell the much cheaper and very reliable reverb.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Cable attached at the seat? Come on, that's so 2009! Just go for the Blacx: www.canadian-dirt.com/gear/blacx-seatposts.html been using this one for 8 months now and without any problems.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 freakin; dropper posts... as if we need to add 400 grams and 300 dollars to the posts we have already, I sick of this stuff.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 It's not Kashima coated so it must not be good at all! *sarcasm*
[Reply]
  • + 1
 its almost a pay check for a month here in Mexico, to expensive, so im still gonna doit manual and im gonna save all that money
[Reply]
  • + 1
 $439 that doesn't lead in the industry and probably the most expensive dropper seat post around? i think fox should just stick with making suspension forks and rear shocks.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 With that monstrosity of a lever and the head mounted cable it's a big NO. They've got a lot of catching up to do when it comes to KS and RS
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Definitely a contender for worst bit of kit in 2012. Loving the Avid CPS bolts for that ultra-nostalgic design flare. Too much drinking, not enough thinking?
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Compared to the competition:
- Increased cost & weight.
- Decreased adjustability, durability and look.
- FAIL.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Easily self-serviceable? Does not look that way... Decent sounding post nonetheless.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Its cool fox has a dropper post out now but the lever does seem a little compicated in the spur of the. Moment I don't want to have to think or remember which lever to hit ..
[Reply]
  • + 1
 WOW, what a visual disappointment and some, as a fox fan ive been waiting for this for about a year, oh dear, Rockshox must be shitting themselves.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 To be fair, the lever looks like it would be baddass using a 1X setup and running it under the bar.
[Reply]
  • + 0
 To me its like an Iphone, overpriced douche accessory ,will probably need a lot of maintenance crankbrothers kronolog FTW!!!! fewer parts same function
[Reply]
  • - 1
 Next there will be a bike that pedals for you......oh wait a second, WTF is the point of this fad....dude get off your bike and raise the friggin seat. It takes a entire 3 seconds. Get real. this is just stupid IMO.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 yeaaaaa 439$!! Money well spend! kids in Somalia could get food for a year... just sayin
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Cable at the top - Crap- Giant lever on the top - crap. Price tag - super crap!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 nice , but 400+ come on , when is it going to stop........unbelievable price, down right scary !! ??
[Reply]
  • + 2
 like 2.5 years of hype, I was looking forward to it Anddd......... FAIL
[Reply]
  • + 2
 For that price it should read your mind and drop as needed
[Reply]
  • + 1
 For $439 I could buy TWO xfusion hilos. And the fox is only 50g lighter than a hilo. no sale.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 The price tag is insulting. Really FOX?
[Reply]
  • + 2
 You lost me at MSRP $439 USD. NOT gonna happen.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 this post never going to triumph to expensive heavy and not simple to use to many handles
[Reply]
  • + 2
 for that price i glad i have the reverb!
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Meh not swaying me at that price range
[Reply]
  • + 1
 fox's quality has gone downhill i wouldn't buy it POS
[Reply]
  • - 1
 Not gonna deny it- Fox makes my wallet empty.....WANT IT! I'll pay extra for the 'extra' lever for Trail Mode.....perfect for Enduro racers.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 i'm proud of my ks supernatural..more travel (6"), lower price.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 only 125mm???
620 gr ???
400 bucks???
come on FOX, make it better
[Reply]
  • + 1
 For how often I need to lower my seat. I'll. pass on the 439.00. 3/10
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Oil is not prone to be contaminated by mud sprayed by tires. My 2 cent
  • + 1
 Nope, but the actuation arm or seal around it could be. It's something I've experienced with other posts that use a rear mounted actuator.
  • + 1
 But Mike, I've nothing against Fox since they are really good with their fork. Really good. But even if it put you on a hard place, you have to admit that a cable actuated post (more specifically at the top of it) is exactly what the industry tend to distance itself from.
Maybe seal will wear as well. But dirt on a housing is what it is.
Anyway for the price tag, I'm asking myself what rocket skyed the price that much.
With their knoledge, I was expecting to look at the reverb as the happy second. But not only the RS is still the best bang for your buck, the DOSS is on the top ten by a hairbreadth.

What could you say to convince me to buy one? What's a good sale argument over everything on the market right now?
  • + 5
 It is fun to read between the lines of what all the testers are saying. Everyone so far says the lever sucks, 2 days is not enough time to judge durability, and the rattling head. So in other words it is an expensive heavy contraption that will add complexity and require servicing, while adding noise to the bike. Sounds like a good product to me.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Epic fail Fox! Sign of things to come? Dinosaurs will die.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 I'll wait for DOSS 2
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I think its what everyone expected at least the price anyway
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Should be called the Fox POS
[Reply]
  • + 0
 The Bimba test rig looks so ridiculous hahaha.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 what a load fox
[Reply]
  • + 1
 The SB is looks awesome
[Reply]
  • + 1
 lets make it 500$
[Reply]
  • + 1
 screw that to expensive
[Reply]
  • - 1
 Dule out shitlodes $=D.O.S.S.
[Reply]
  • - 2
 D.O.S.S.....sounds like a Kona or something
  • + 1
 or a Bianchi single speed maybe?
  • + 1
 Who robbed the shifter off the down tube from an old school road bike? Might as well of used a sturmey archer 3 speed off a brown raleigh shopper !!!!!! Would have looked tidier. Not the best fox !!
[Reply]
Below threshold threads are hidden

Post a Comment



Copyright © 2000 - 2014. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv14 0.062124
Mobile Version of Website