Pinkbike Poll: Who is Responsible After the Digging is Done?

May 9, 2013
by Richard Cunningham  
I used to work near one of the larger wooden roller coasters in existence, and I remember that every day, three or four men could be seen crawling among the trusses or walking the rails, tightening bolts or tapping the structure with a hammer to listen for compromised wood. Constructing a coaster is the smallest cost - keeping it safe - maintaining it over time, is the larger commitment. The thought occurred that, outside of bike parks, for as many trails that I have come across in my short stay on Earth, I have only met one man who was out there checking and fixing features he had built years earlier, and that would be Digger. I am sure that there are many more proud builders who regularly walk the zones they have created, but I am equally sure that those diligent ones are the small minority among the throngs of builders, many of whom call Pinkbike home.

changing some stuff for the better. uploading to save me typing.

There are builders - and then, there are builders. If you want to learn how to make a jump line that can last a while - and flows, seek out this guy.


bigquotesRide at your own risk, Look before you leap. Most of us understand the risks of what we do, but there also must be a measure of trust in the builder...

Ride at your own risk, Look before you leap. Most of us understand the risks of what we do, but there also must be a measure of trust in the builder - that the ladder will hold up, or that the ramps were crafted well enough to get you to the transition when you commit to the feature. Nature is a destructive force. Only the best of the best features hold up for any length of time, yet most of us hit features on familiar trails weekly as if there actually were men who regularly walked the zones like the coaster crews. But there aren't, and after a while, lips become kickers, ruts form in the transitions, ladders get rickety and inevitably someone's luck is going to run out.

Roll in work in progress ...12 ft tall... Pallets are just temporarily placed.

Maybe not. Almost everyone will steer clear of a shabby feature, right? When a once-good feature on a well-known trail gets shabby, however, riders are inclined to keep hitting it as if it were new.



Murphy's law says that if something can go wrong, it will go wrong - and at the worst possible moment. The rider who takes the hit won't be one of the local hot shots - it will be your little sister, the girl who has been progressing rapidly and following the local's wheels. The once proud feature claims yet another victim, your cute sister's face is meat, but hey, that's OK, because...?

bigquotesThe pirate code of builders and diggers states clearly that, once a feature is created, only its maker has the right to modify it. Does that imply that the creator also shoulders the task of maintaining it?


Of course there are countless lines pocked with pathetic humps and hacked-in features, but almost any rider can discriminate between a trail and a scar in the earth. It's the popular lines, or the soon-to-be-popular ones, that pose the greatest threat as they deteriorate. Few builders get it right the first time. Most are willing to tune up their lines to get them to flow better, or to drain correctly, but how many builders have pulled down their creations after they passed out of safe service? How many diggers have filled in a jump line that never really worked? Creating is the most rewarding part of the process, but after the digging and building is done, who is responsible for the drudgery? Who walks the line the day before your sister hits it?



Take the Pinkbike Poll

Who is responsible after the digging is done?

Say you have just built in a new zone. Who, if anyone, should be responsible for maintaining your trails and features so they remain relatively safe, or at least consistent, after they have been constructed?






174 Comments

  • + 329
 If a structure is blatantly broken and gets ridden anyway... Darwins theory comes into effect.

If you expect the builder of an "illegal" structure to be responsible for your safety, you need a slap in the face.

He built it for himself to ride, and if you're lucky you get to ride it too.

Bitching that it needs maintenance when you haven't touched a shovel is just rude.
  • + 33
 Well said!!!
  • + 11
 how about the one's that change your track,with out think,most trail guy made it that way for a purpose so ask before you change it.like i'll make three corner's i come back now its a strait line for a 30foot gap,if you can't gap it don't try.any one can ride easy stuff,
  • + 1
 agree...
The builder is one who knowh how should the trail stand an if anything's not in the way it should be, builder should know..
but if riders respect the builder they should (at least )help builder to repair trail they're riding, cause they didn't do enything else for the existence of trail where they now have fun.
That depends also on whether trail is:
-private (on someone's backyard): the builders and probable owners are bosses.. as said before you are lucky thah you can ride there
-somewhere everybody just ride and dont care much about trail: in that case i think riders are only ones that are dealing with trail and it it their ''response'' to keep it ''safe''
  • + 4
 There is some grey area in that ride at your own risk. Specially in wooden features. I've seen alot of wood obsticals fall appart over the years, thankfully nobody hurt that I know of. They always look great the first year and second. Then they start getting old and people still want that rush they used to getting off the fearure. I think after three years wood features should be revisited, fixed, and cleared for safety. Dirt jumps are different and always changing. You need to check them out every day to inspect for problems before you launch. I learned the hard way long time ago, look before you leap.
  • - 24
flag gserrato (May 9, 2013 at 9:05) (Below Threshold)
 yeah. most times the builder of a trail doesnt want other people touching their trail!

Clarkeh, what you said is like saying you shouldnt drive on roads that have cracked pavement nor should you complain about those roads unless you have built/tried to maintain those roads.
  • + 8
 the trail which i ride was built a long time ago and the guy who built it has since moved on. but i regularly ride there and if i see something wrong or broken i will fix it. i recently spent 3 days repairing bit of the trail. i think that unless the original builder still rides there then it is the people who use the trail's responsibility to ment and look after it. i personaly walk up the trail before riding to make sure everything is okay to hit
  • + 3
 plain and simple, you ride it and you see somthing wrong fix it everyone pitches in and everyones happy...
  • + 5
 I love how RC uses the imagery of a little sisters busted face to generate some guilty feelings.
  • + 10
 gserrato, your road analogy only works if you're trail builder is being paid by your tax dollars.
  • + 3
 on any trail or for that matter anywhere 24/7, common sense, respect, responsibility and accountability should be on your brain.
  • + 4
 If the trail is on private property owned by the builder with clearly marked "no trespassing" signs, then the builder has limited liability. For no liability, you need building permits, and engineered plans, ans well as maintenance schedules.

Regardless of what people think, there are laws that state the injury or death of someone resulting from another breaking the law (such as a death in a robbery, or illegal trail building) can result in prosecution of the individual who originally broke the law. The legal system does not accept "common sense" as a defense. A broken structure will result in questions regarding the structural integrity of the structure, and will look into the engineering of the structure. Since most of these are not engineered, or built by engineers, there is another liability. This is why the government officials tear down structures. Being aware of them implies acceptance of the safety of the structures. Since they haven't been engineered, are built illegally, and pose liability risks, they are destroyed. The adult world isn't a fair place, and the consequences are high.
  • + 1
 i shouldn't have written common sense. it's a theory..at best. so, yeah..not a defense by any means.
  • + 12
 Only builders can drastically alter. Everyone should do maintenance. For the grey area in between just use common sense and be courteous.
  • - 12
flag housem8d (May 9, 2013 at 10:40) (Below Threshold)
 They totally robbed the trail idea from the trek session.
  • + 0
 If someone changed my zone I'd wait there in a tent until they came back so I could kick the crap out of em. If something was damaged or eroded and they put in some good work I'd almost give em money. Respect where you ride and maintain it as much as you use it if not more
  • + 0
 Theres always teritorial beef and people getting tight about trail changes. I relate it to surfing, some people actually think they own a beach like get off my wave man. Thats the purest form of ignorance and goes against everything trail building is about. If some damage or tearing down jumps its different. Just remember if its not your property go easy. Nobdoy owns any trail I dont care how many hours you spent on it. If not your land its not yours. Make it official and buy the land then you go Chuck Norris on offenders lol.
  • + 6
 As a builder and a rider, I will maintain trails that I built and ride. If someone else were to maintain a feature I built by rebuilding it exactly the same way, that is ok with me. If they were to change something I built while I am maintaining that trail, I would be pissed. I think it is obvious when work is being done regularly to a trail. However, it is equally obvious that some of my local trails have been abandoned by their builders. In this case, it is on the people who ride those trails to maintain them. That's it, that's all. You can close the comments on this issue.
  • + 3
 Biggups, totally get the surfing relation. Steamer lane is proof of that. But if you build a zone from the ground up and spend over two years on it,it's safe to call it yours. Not ur land but ur jumps/trails. I don't mind people riding but people messing with things that I've worked years to perfect is not something I'm too keen on.
  • + 2
 If the builder actually gives a shit about his craft, he will maintain them while he is still using them. If not, he is a hack builder. That said, if the builder abandons it, the phrase no dig no ride comes to mind. Pick up a shovel, not a keyboard.
  • + 3
 neg props to heyburn. now.
  • + 55
 Checking lines are safe before you ride is your responsibility... Once something is built in the wild, the builder will normally be local, and normally ride their own work 'regularly' enough to notice if it's degrading - triggering a bit of rework... This is not always the case, see first line. Then there are the hacks who build shit lines and unsafe jumps and structures straight out of the box - it's normally obvious as hell which ones these are. But then there is natural selection... If the above doesn't apply, then it's legit to do some maint... Turning a 30ft gap into a tabo because you can't make it - prolly not cool. Fixing a lip so it's no longer a donkey kicker - prolly ok. Use our brains.
  • + 16
 I build trails and clearly feel I should maintain them, however if any one wishes to volunteer to help please ask. I always try to walk the trail before I ride to make sure everything is in good order or that no one has come along and changed a feature. Definitely agree with all who have said you ride at your own risk, so check all is good if you are going to ride it and don't tear it down just because you don't feel comfortable riding it, learn to ride something intermediate and then come back when you have the necessary skills.
  • + 11
 @TTTT- I do the same thing at my park. I build it and maintain it, but if people want to help me out and make sure the park looks good and is safe, all the better! I hate though, when little punk kids come out with their shovels and change things! This is unsafe and disrespectful.

I love your comment- Learn to ride something....Thats the most fun about riding!
  • + 0
 i think all trail builder have pride in there art,so they keep it up to par,but you have free rider with kit's and no pride for other's that help them have there photo kit fun witch is why trail builder do care but they do share,here in so cali there no water so if you ride a trail bring water and fix after photo kit is done so other's can have the same fun
  • + 20
 The digging is never done. New lines can always be made and old lines made better. No dig no ride.
  • - 3
 This matter only applies to people hitting jumps. I dont want to see and 29errrrrr spandorks on here voicing their contempt over the jumps they cant hit. Everyone rides at own risk. We had sooooooooooo many spots plowed because one idiot xc, probably a 29er tried hitting a jump and broke his azz then sued everyone. Those are the riders we dont need to hear from. Thats why they say no dig no ride. If your diggin and part of the build, more likely to learn how to hit or the vision behind its creation. Riders that dont get dirty, show up off hours and get hurt, thats your own fault. Ride and dig as a crew. If someone gets hurt the crew help him out, thats it. If a 29errr rides by say hi!!!! Ya theres the exit over there buyyeee!!
  • + 2
 BUILD IT ONCE BUILD IT RIGHT
  • + 1
 to guigui333 if you dont like something on the trail or you cant do something on the trail but other people like it and can do it then you leave it alone. Trails always need work espiccaly the ones with wood and trees around it. The wood can rot, the trees can fall onto the trail, and the snow can break alot of the features. There are trails around where I live that the winter season has made trees fall and break things on the trail so we have to re build it. if something isnt right then fix it. look at the whistler bike park they have to maintain theyre trails all year so that you can ride them while the park is open. your rule is for a road.
  • - 2
 T-roz- I think he meant build it right the first time.....(not a pile of pallets). And I agree. A jump line or stunt line can be built to last, but it usually takes a lot longer (more material/reinforcement).

Jumping and FR trails have come a long way......evolved from that dusty parking lot of jumps that we hacked in as kids.......This is one of those grey areas though......because if you've found some "secret line" and ride it, you're assuming it's built right (look before you leap clause), and YOU are responsible for your own ass. WHEREAS, if you built the line it is YOUR line and the proper tweeking of a lip/landing should be conducted by you as you put in all the time to get it to that point (and know what it needs).

Then there's things like: Wood features need to be CEDAR if possible so they don't rot in one year. Scrape away all the organic material before building a berm or jump so it's not on a shitty foundation, etc.

Build it, ride it.
  • + 33
 I agree with the term "No dig no ride!" but this backfires at my local spot because there are lots of groms who think they know how to build/maintain jumps but they really don't.
  • + 3
 Agreed. I've started putting in proper retaining on portal. Dont get many groms up there that i know of, and have never seen rogue lines up there, but have definitely seen some dodgy structure whilst riding around Wellington. Great to see some of our work as your profile feature pic! For all the effort, 22 feet isn't my cup of tea haha!
  • + 4
 but it would be the work of the builder to teach them how to build... that's the way it would be perfect! here in switzerland, it's more the problem that on a trail that 200 people ride per day, 10 people show up to dig...
  • + 2
 Manuesi I agree with you there but I'm sure we all know those groms that want to build a new line and ride it the same day,i.e. they don't have much patients.
  • + 1
 when i was a kid the older kid would park your bike and say you see that dirt move it over there then pack that jump,and when your done come back the next day and do the same,when they saw you help then they would let you ride,like a weak later,if you said no its ghost ride time,its a different world we live in now can't make any one do anything,you either got it or you do not respect>.
  • + 2
 patience is the quality that makes you a good builder or a crap builder build it once build it right .... THE ONLY RULE
  • + 0
 to guigui333 if you dont like something on the trail or you cant do something on the trail but other people like it and can do it then you leave it alone. Trails always need work espiccaly the ones with wood and trees around it. The wood can rot, the trees can fall onto the trail, and the snow can break alot of the features. There are trails around where I live that the winter season has made trees fall and break things on the trail so we have to re build it. if something isnt right then fix it. look at the whistler bike park they have to maintain theyre trails all year so that you can ride them while the park is open. your rule is for a road.
  • + 3
 Gotta start somewhere Lloyd. I'm not saying ruining someone's trail is right but people gotta learn how to build features somewhere. The best thing about dirt is that it's able to be reshaped. Wood is a bit more tricky.
  • + 4
 I hate it when a unknown people make your bigger jumps small and exactly the same as other tables around the area...it's like, they want to deny progression Frown , the worst part is when they alter the whole line so it is more 'do-able' for them...those lines are big and fast for a reason.
  • - 2
 to all that say do it once right i call b.s.,thats right you,every thing brake's just like you,nothing last for ever,just aska the ROMAN'S,so if it brakes fix or go home,don't cry cause your toy you did not make brakes,and speaking of brakes take your f,,,k fingers off them,f...king my turn and don't stop on my lip thats were air is lost or gain,so if you need time to look,do it on the start of take off,cause if you have to stop to think just go home.
  • - 1
 phaujarider i feel you,you got more years of that,people suck they can't see,that you made it that way for good reason,i seen it since 1976-2013,you think by now poeple would know,thats why i make gaps not table's for tea party's,sorry p-rider for that last part,you know these laim riders suck.
  • + 20
 If you build it you maintain it, its your responsibility to make sure structures are safe and trails are maintain. Trails should be 'maintained' buy riders and changed buy the original builder. Not the other way round.
  • + 1
 Totally agree dude !
  • + 4
 Right there, builders alter, riders fix a lip or rut or some drainage
  • + 2
 The poll was missing the option I would've chosen, actually the opposite of "Nobody", I reckon "Everybody", both those who build and those who ride have a responsibility to maintain trails. You have no right to bitch about shitty trails if you're not willing to help maintain them.

Also, sorry to be a grammar nazi, but it's "by" not "buy".
  • + 14
 Wow, i cant believe they used my picture to talk about sketchy features! haha it wasn't even finished yet! But i guess you could consider it on the slight ghetto side...
  • + 9
 Yeah its a little sketch, but on the bright side you have been recognized by Pinkbike!
  • + 6
 Sorry man, it looked so ghetto, it made me laugh. I was actually searching for a pic of some dilapidated stunt in BC or Bellingham (much to choose from there). You just got lucky.
RC
  • + 2
 No problem, you can have all of the ghetto ramp photos you want haha!
  • + 3
 Well, in our defense ; (1) we are building on a very limited budget, thus the use of free materials (recycling). (2) we have no terrain in our area ; it's mostly flat. (3) the soil in our area is mainly sand ; not the best for building dirt jumps . (4) the builders are the only ones who ride and maintain these features.
  • + 1
 I can see it now, explaining to the judge why little Bobby is a quadrapalegic: We had a limitted budget, we weren't done yet, and needed to use recycled materials. We didn't think anyone else would ride it. Anyone over 12 years old knows that isn't going to fly.
  • + 5
 Except were the only 4 riders in our area that are crazy enough to ride that.. The only other bikers around here are on beach cruisers. so I don't think little Bobby is an issue. Plus our ramps may look super ghetto but they are actually pretty strong. Pallets make for a good base to build off of... Like Panda said that roll in isn't finished we still have to lay it in plywood, build a way up, and add supports.. But hey its awesome our freeride park made it on a Pinkbike article, even if its for sketchiness!
  • + 1
 Send video, please!
  • + 0
 What is a 49 year old guy doing playing in the woods with 17 year olds? Am I the only one who has alarm bells going off?
  • + 2
 Really Willie1? He just happens to be my dad, along with my two brothers... You shouldn't speak on what you don't know...
  • + 12
 Awkward subject , some peoples ' unsafe/un- ridable ' is another persons tech or gnarly or sketchy.

Regarding wood work , if its rotten and unstable then yeah it needs fixing , with the original builders knowledge/say so if possible.

The problem I find is people obsess about rough sections of track ( people on DH bikes that is ) .

Depending on the style of track i'm building , whether it's meant to be a smooth bermed flow line or a rough , natural DH line , is whether or not it should buff all the time.

People see breaking bumps and off cambers as a negative thing and take it upon them selves to smooth out those bumps / dig out the roots / remove the off cambers , thats when it's wrong and going to far.

Sure if you knock a lip off a jump , fix it , but it's gotta be back to how it was originaly , same angles , height and such , nothing worse than riding a line of yours to find out that some one has made a lip bigger or smaller to suit thier own needs after you have hit it full speed and been thrown over the bars/ cased the shit out of a landing due to altered jumps.

Had the 1st rain in ages here spent 3 hours reshaping/packing lips yesterday ,been so dry and dusty that shit is just falling apart ! can't wait to ht them on saturday Smile
  • + 8
 Fix what you f@#k, if you didn't build it don't change it....... maintain but don't mess with the angles.
On our local jumps we made them so you would have to have some skill to get the right pace to clear (hours spent to get the shape right), but we have had people re-shape because they can't jump them.
  • + 5
 cant believe this has to be asked if the trail feature looks sketchy and built badly dont ride it . Other people are not responsible for you being an idiot and putting yourself in hospital on a badly built/maintained trail. The day people start trying to sue trail builders and attach blame to them is the day mountain biking will die imo.
  • + 5
 Invalid question, digging is never done. Smile

I would answer with: everyone may tune a trail up, but let the builder have a say in major changes. But, if you don't know what you're doing, stick to minor work or dig with someone that does.
  • + 4
 1. Everything I build, I maintain. I feel it is my duty of care as the builder.
But....

There is nothing more annoying than building that nice 30ft gap jump on your own track, that you care for, maintain, take all the rubbish home from etc. and there is a chicken line, then some person who wants to ride the big line deems the jump dangerous... aka... they cant ride it and they think they are he dogs danglies and nobody can ride anything they cant ride. Then they take the jump down, building a smaller jump, even if the original jump you had on the track in its place.

If the builder(s) of a track, zone, area are still active in that area, dont touch it, it is not yours to touch, modify, simplify, build straight lines on Grrrrr
If something is clearly falling down, and nobody maintains that trail and you dont even feel safe walking on it, then you may make it safe (btw, woodwork is for lazy builders, use dirt and rock, it is natural, utilize fallen trees, but ladders just aint natural and belong in old school bike parks lol).

Most of all, walk before you ride, get your lines sorted in your head then smash it flat out.
Blind riding is fun on certain trails, but on the tech stuff, walking it first or riding with an experienced rider of that trail adds to the fun of going flat out.
  • + 1
 Im no world cup pro but i have been riding a while. Iv made the mistake of over estimating my skill by trying to smash blindly down a trail as rough as fort bill and limited sight range. broken bones and concussion came later. ALWAYS walk the trails to sort lines if its tech and you have never been there.
  • + 4
 Unfortunately from the perspective of the courts, its going to be the builder, or possibly the land owner, that will bear the brunt of liability for a hazardous or deteriorated feature. This is counter productive though, as it leads those who build to do so in secret, as to avoid liability, and discourages proper maintenance (again, to avoid being an identifiable party).

However this post, and and more importantly the poll results, are heartening. Everyone needs to take responsibility for their own actions. Furthermore, an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. Thus, the more people pick up shovels and help, the less likely they will be to pick up the phone and call an attorney (and this is coming from an attorney!).
  • + 2
 I think this only applies to the good ole' USA................peeps in canada can go build without a fear of a felony trail building ticket with jail and big fines.............
  • + 1
 Exactly, well said.
  • + 1
 idafreerida

While I can't speak to Canadian law, what I was referring to was the fear of civil rather than criminal liability. At least in the United States, and I would presume in Canada as well, the penalties incurred from lawsuits (large judgments or settlements) far outstrip any possible criminal repercussions from building a trail.

Moreover because building a trail is an intentional, and possibly (minor) criminal, act, even if you have some form of broad insurance coverage they likely will not indemnify you.
  • + 1
 @idafreerida We have very similar laws as you guys do when it comes to this stuff. Major fines.
  • + 4
 The builders who created the trail or line should be notified from users, if there are any outside of them, of any problem so they can fix it. Many riders are no trailbuilders, so they do not fix things right. I would have answered number 2, but with out the "fix it" part, especially if you never build..!
  • + 4
 Well said. The answer "...fix it (with builder's permission)..." will make more sense.
  • + 7
 everyone should be responsible
  • + 1
 i agree, but it rarely happens really, lets face it.
  • + 3
 here you can definately see who is a builder and who isn´t
I´ve never ridden a trail that is further than 10 km away from where I live and hasn´t been build by my own hands...
i always try to hide them, because features that once have been build in perfect shape and were big and now they are small and shaby because someone thought : ohh thats to big for me... hmm lets try to build it in another way....
they always faild or left it undone...
I also experienced that i was reapiring some structures, jumps or berms and suddenly someone told me to get off his trail (that I was building for months) and he got pretty angry Big Grin
So in other words I don´t like people to overwork my trails
But of course if a trail isn´t used anymore or destroyed everybody should feel free to rebuild it or to change it
  • + 3
 I believe if it's a simple fix that the builders will always appreciate you fixing it. You know what they say, leave a place better looking than it was when you got there. But I know that some builders might cringe if some kooky riders try and fix something in a sketchy way or in a way that veers off of the builders' vision of the feature.
  • + 2
 As the sole builder, unless my friends are there to help, of my local dirt jump course I make it a point to shake the hand of any rider I see fixing what he just broke...... I've shaken one hand. Consequently I spend most of my time digging, not jumping
  • + 5
 Builders should alter, add and maintain. Riders should maintain only. Minor maintenence at that, - Burm and lip manicure.
  • + 2
 All riders are responsible. Big up yourselves people, form a goddamned riding association, take responsibility for doing as much as you can to maintain the trail system, connect yourselves with local land managers, build bridges with local businesses and get them to sponsor organized volunteer maintenance days. Start with the obvious most used trails, expand your influence, start taking on and removing the obvious stupid stuff, and develop a comprehensive system for maintaining a range of trails that cater to all types of rider. For fricks sake, it's a collective task, but lots of communities have figured it out (Sorca, Torca, Worca, NSMBA, FVMBA, and the list goes on and on). If you don't have a local riding association, start clubbing up with people with good social skills and trail knowledge, find people that understand basic of non-profit and building social capital, come up with a name and a logo, consult with other groups, draft terms of reference, make trail maintenance a key term, get your club started. Get people in your club trained up, attend courses, visit other communities, network with others, BE A LEADER IN YOUR OWN TOWN. This is the fundamental primordial ooze for enriching riding and protecting trails, and helping reduce the chance that crappy unmaintained rat-trails will become the death of the sport you love. I'm out.
  • + 1
 I agree with the "big up yourselves" part, but the problem is always the bad apple, and it only takes one.
we live in a world of law suits now, its just how it is. It is fortunate that for the most part these types wont go near nature Smile
But sooner of later, it will happen.

I suggest builders maintain, riders assist, use your common sense and don't hit something you don't know and all pretend you never did anything but ride it.

Aliens must have made it.........

Put up a sign or two on your trails too, something that says this is not a place for novices with in in-appropriate ability and equipment.
  • + 2
 i always maintain the trails & features i build especially wood structures. when i build wood structures though, i use new wood & screws & they last years of hash elements. i'd rather not have someone else who wasn't involved in the trails build interpretation of what needs fixing or repairs. my experience with this is the builders trail has a bunch of lame new lines or structures destroyed as the result of trail side mental retardation. if it looks sketchy, then don't hit it until the improvements have been made by the builder & show some respect for their work. otherwise, if it's been a really long time, claim jump it, become the new trail boss yourself & pimp it out to your creation.
  • + 2
 As a user, fix whats broke. If u add, do it correctly so you work flows and lasts with little maintenance required, after consulting a few other users.
Dont be a bust. Many trails need hidden entry/exit points where u carry ur bike into/out of.
Dont show up with tools during prime hiker hours for certain areas..stash em night before.
  • + 2
 I wish I could pick two choices; one and two.
It's both no one's and everyone's responsibility to maintain the trails you ride. It's pretty much a given that if a trail exists, someone put effort into building it. If you're going to enjoy the fruits of their effort, you owe it to pay some dues for that privilege. The back side of that is that no one owes you that trail. You ride it at your own risk.
IOW
If you see a trail, ride it. If you see a problem, fix it.
  • + 2
 For regular trail features I think users should fix issues as they notice them, especially basic stuff like clearing blowdown and making sure rocks stay in postion. But for elaborate well-built structures I think the original trailbuilder should continue to maintain them. Basically the more complicated the structure the more it remains the trailbuilder's responsibility. If users want to repair or significantly modify complicated structures they should seek the approval of the original builder. After all it could be that the builder is done with that structure and wants to pass the responsibility to someone else.
  • + 2
 NO DIG NO RIDE! The rule stands, and pirate builder code, dont add features to other peoples vision, its an expression of that person - you wouldn't look at somebody's tattoo and then scribble your fave pic of Mickey Mouse on it..
  • + 2
 I agree that you don't add or change someone else's trail but that doesn't mean you shouldn't ride it and it sure doesn't mean you shouldn't help maintain it. If you see something falling apart on a trail, any trail, it IS common courtesy to do something about it.
  • + 1
 couldnt agree more
  • + 2
 To me it's pretty obvious that the people who use the trail are the ones who will notice when thing need fixed. Tracking down "the builder" to make changes is a bit harder. Some trails have a current builder that regularly rides the trail. They obviously get final say on what happens to the trail. But finding "the builder" on a lot of trails can be much harder. Is the builder the guy who scouted the line 10 years ago, then moved away? Is it the guy who found the line 4 years ago and added all those poorly made pallet stunts? Is it the group who rides it twice a week and clears all the blow-down and clears the drains every year? I think all of those people have some ownership of the trail. I also think that well used trails have a certain responsibility to their average user. If 100 people a weekend ride a blue trail with table tops, even the original builder should not change it to a double-black trail of doom. Just like they shouldn't neuter a double black to a blue. It's just rude. Once a trail is discovered and popular the people who do maintenance have a certain responsibility to the users. And the users have a responsibility to help maintain.
  • + 2
 the poll is a loaded question...........if you build your trail in your new zone most likely it was made for you by you and nobody else. most trails are built in secret....... until the word gets out that there is some sweet trail out there, and the masses start coming to your lil piece of heaven. do they have the right to change what you made for you? do they have the right to complain?
  • + 2
 Personally I think it is a mix of users and builders, as part of the volunteer group at Glentress Forest In Scotland that helps maintain the trails there and also at Innerleithen, I quite often go out myself to fix a puddle here and there or if I find a major problem I Report it to the local warden who Runs the Trail Fairies, But ultimately, if the user does not think the line is safe, do not ride it. I think users should maintain, but not change a line someone has built, so fix a rut or chuck a drainage ditch in, but leaving the line and features the same. I feel a lot of people who call themselves builders pretty much build a line not caring about longevity, not thinking about drainage being the main one so puddles form making massive holes and a lot of mud sometimes making it unsafe and suck a lot of the time I'm currently 20, been building since i was 12 or 13 so I'd like to think I know a reasonable amount about building! haha
  • + 3
 ^This. I think this article is targeting trails built by small groups, individuals, and non-affiliates. I'd like to think that most clubs, associations, and other official groups strive to maintain the trails they are affiliated with. Personally, I'm an Assistant Trail Steward at one of my local tracks and I'm out there at least once a week, not to ride, but to walk the trails and lines. We regularly assess the condition of all TTF's and features on a yearly basis minimum. While I wasn't the original builder of 95% of the trails I work on, it's a responsibility that's been passed down to me and I take pride in maintaining that.
  • + 2
 Seems straight forward to me as a dedicated builder. If you ride somewhere on a regular basis you should make all the effort possible to get to know the builders, help out to maintain and create lines. As for visiting places my opinion is that its rude to turn up somewhere and ride without the locals being there. If locals are there they can advise on trail features that are sketchy or need work. Simple.
  • + 2
 You need a club of individuals which take responsibility for maintaining a trail network who are known by everyone and easily contacted. Then if there are issues with the trails a rider will know who to contact to get the problem sorted rather than either leaving it or trying to fix it themselves. This is how our spot works. Checking the trails before use is just common sense- even the best builders in the world can't possibly second guess falling trees and vandalism.
  • + 3
 At Glentress/Innerleithen in the Scottish borders we have exactly that, the Glentress Trailfairies, which is run by the forestry, a lot of folk hate on the forestry, but they let us legally ride on their land, and pay to maintain, why hatin'?
  • + 1
 Im riding there next week, heard great things about the trails, thanks in advance to the fairies
  • + 2
 There WAS (it might still be there, I haven't gone in 9 years though so I don't know) a sorta freeride trails area near Cornwall, Ontario called the Charlottesburgh Forest Conservation Area that was nestled in a forest between farm fields, on a former quarry, and north of the regional landfill. Lots of wooden structures, fairly well built, except for a giant teeter build using a fallen trees (lengthwise) with runners screwed to them. It was rideable enough except sometime along the way the teeter developed a twist in it, and the teeter as it came down, moved SIDEWAYS several feet at the end. I rode it several times successfully one day when I brought a friend of mine who'd NEVER ridden any built stunts before. She rode it once and I got a picture of her on it...

yoda.densan.ca/kmr/jenny/jennybeast.jpg

Then I handed her the camera and went to ride it again, that time when it did its dance and twist... it pitched me off balance and I used the side of my face to stop my fall against the ONE tree near it that still had bark on it (apparently everyone else who came off it, hit the other tree on the left side) which is on the right side of it, and is seen in the photo above ahead of her as she rides down the teeter.

This is what was the result...

yoda.densan.ca/kmr/mypics/beast1.jpg
yoda.densan.ca/kmr/mypics/beast2.jpg
yoda.densan.ca/kmr/mypics/beast3.jpg
yoda.densan.ca/kmr/mypics/beast4.jpg

Note the duct tape holding my glasses together, and my ripped up face next to my eye, and my ear. My helmet completely MISSED the tree trunk, and my friend's first words of concern were... "Kristan, I can't drive stick..."

I haven't been back since and due to politics between the original builders, the township that provided the land grant/funding, and another rider association the place fell into a state of disuse/disrepair and I haven't heard anything about it in years.
  • + 1
 No dig. No ride. Easy. Maintain what you hit and inspect unfamiliar zones before you try to be a hero. It's common sense that a lot of people don't understand. Trail maintenance is key where ever and who ever you are. Do something to contribute to the cause. Don't just ride. Dig and maintain. Clean out branches, rocks and other debris that's waiting to screw up your day. Fix a lip or two and session your own work to see and feel the difference. And if you screw up and build something stupid. Don't leave it! Return it to earth, so someone does not hurt themselves.
  • + 1
 diggers should limit themselves to the amount of trails that they are able to stay "ranger rick" on. If they build it and leave it - it will ultimately turn into "the little sister" disaster mentioned. if you build it, you have to maintain it, or at least organize a list of confidants willing to keep it safe...
  • + 1
 if it's a spot that is obviously still maintained regularly the builder probably wants to do it as far as shaping or rebuilding. but if its something like broken wood users should help fix without changing. everywhere is different tho.try and get to know the original builder and more often they will be more than happy to have some help
  • + 1
 I think once a path is made, it should be a collaborative effort to keep it maintained. I think if the rider finds little things they can fix they should try but the builder should also keep an eye out for their path. Mountain biking is a community made up of everyone from the builder, to the rider and if you can help you should.
  • + 1
 That's a tough one. Usually I don't invite anyone to ride my trails, unless it's someone I know is capable to ride it, and all the features are in a good shape.
I try to keep my trails rideable, but for the old ones that I don't ride anymore? I guess the best way to keep them safe is to... destroy them. Or re-use the materials to create something new.
  • + 1
 Builders should aim for an extremely high standard. It's more work at the beginning, but less maintenance in the long run. They should also maintain their work, especially woodwork. Or they should find some other "trail boss" that will keep up on the maintenance of the trail and features. Riders/users should clear small trees and branches that come down during storms, foot tamp blowouts they cause, and help with drainage. Riders should not be modifying features w/out the builder's approval.
  • + 1
 Everyone who uses the trails has a resposibility as land managers. Ride at your own risk unfortunately doesn't mean anything to anyone who gets hurt and plan to sue. The lawyers can go after the land owner, the city, the county, the state where the feature is built. Build it right, build it well, and maintain it.
  • + 1
 Builders are responsible for maintaining the trails they make. Anybody but a 2-bit hack would have that level of pride in what they build. While I like the community spirit of "no dig no ride", or at least people having the common sense to not ride something unsafe, in reality there are few people actually willing to help maintain trails. Even the few well intentioned people who want to help usually just ending up taking a big shit on your trail. And people doing dumb unsafe things is a major driver of the US economy.
  • + 1
 What about the "everybody" option?

I thought a lot of the etiquette was pretty straight forward.

1. You f*ck it, you fix it.
2. Don't modify the trail or it's features unless you built it OR unless it is decrepit and hasn't been maintained. In this scenario it is quite obvious when a track has been abandoned or needs work.
3. No one is going to give you stick for general maintenance on a trail that you didn't build. Like has been mentioned, if there's a rut, or a berm blown out or a squashed kicker - go right ahead and touch her up.
  • + 1
 The fact that this conversation has even been proposed shows how stupid you all are. If you ride bikes, you build. If you ride bikes and you dont build, fuck you. If you are the boss, or one of the bosses, you shape. If you arent one of these said bosses, you listen to the boss and do your part. If there is confusion over who should fix something, there obviously isnt a boss, you're all lazy asses, and someone better step up or your trails are going to go to shit.
  • + 1
 Common sense says we should all be responsible for what we ride on.
But that's where it ends.
in reality the builder is legally responsible.
He/she created it to ride on, and took no steps to prevent it from being used by all, in fact the sport is considered open and riders are encouraged to try it out right?
So one day someone gets hurt, and the builder is now liable, and open to law suit.
That is a fact, take for instance a club builds a trail, its cool, its open, we love it.
Now some idiot brings their kid into it with their pink my little pony bike and watches as they careen into a tree.
The entire bike club is on the hook now, the term is jointly and liable and in short it means the person with the deepest pockets gets moved to the front of the line.
We here on Vancouver island are now faced with the loss of our mountain bike park, and left only with local build trails to use.
some peeps are talking about getting together and making a big park out on crown land, bad idea, they need some kind of insurance to protect themselves, and the cost of that is what closed Mt Washington to bikes.
The only other way is to create a closed 'no trespassing' location that only those that have signed waivers can ride. Anything else will eventually destroy someone's life financially.
  • + 1
 Ideally the builder should maintain it, but after time and due to life circumstances they often can't. At that point it's up to the users or local group to get involved to either maintain or remove it. Last thing you want is for it to become an issue with the land owners so they have to get ore involved.... So ideally, if you are going to build a trail, don't build a structure unless you are going to maintain it, or remove it when it starts falling apart.
  • + 1
 I have to say that if you build a trail and allow everyone to ride it, and it is on your land, you put yourself in a legal position to take care of it. As well, how are you gonna sort out who is making changes and who is actually repairing. The two are totally different but appear alike. From what I have been reading here on PB, trail-builders don't want people messing with their trails. What is fixing it and what is changing it. I personally hate the upkeep of trails because, here in North Carolina, they are smoothed over and all but paved. It sucks, but I deal with it knowing it is a cycle that will eventually lead back to a a busted up trail--one that I like. Having written all this, I realize the case is different elsewhere and might have a different view elsewhere.
  • + 1
 Who would want to fix up anything when they risk breaking the rule that if it isn't theirs, don't touch it? I think everyone's right that each rider has to be responsible for themselves and through in a hand, but the reality of how people react to that is far from what they say.

"If you ride the trail, you need to help maintain it. Actually, make sure you don't do anything the builder wouldn't like. Actually, don't do anything if I'm not there to watch you. Actually, just give me the shovel and praise me as I do all the work and bitch about how nobody helps out trail builders." And I know it's not the trail builders doing that, it's their histrionic, self appointed entourage.

If trail work is ever expected to be done by all riders, trail building culture needs to change big time. I won't touch a trail unless it's volunteering with an advocacy group.
  • + 1
 if it's a spot that is obviously still maintained regularly the builder probably wants to do it as far as shaping or rebuilding. but if its something like broken wood users should help fix without changing. everywhere is different tho.try and get to know the original builder and more often they will be more than happy to have some help
  • + 1
 ATTENTION RIDERS! me and a couple buddies have made a sick freeride park, and we maintain it 4-5 days/ week, no exaggeration. yesterday i built and rode all day, cleaned up ruts and sticks etc. and went back today to ride. in the time I was gone someone had taken boards out of our wooden structures and jeapordized the integrity of 3 main features. this was nothing I (the builder) could have prevented or fixed any quicker. it took only 12 hours for large jumps to be tampered, and even though I go there almost every day I still cant guarantee that features will be structurally sound. PLEASE scope all features before riding, it could save your season or your life. -413ride crew
  • + 1
 The riders need to look after the trails but repair them to the same standard not alter them to make them 'easier' which can make it more dangerous. But the builder should do at least monthly checks on the trail to make sure its in good quality, a builder should take pride in his work.
  • + 1
 I've been digging for over 10yrs and I basically won't build something that I don't plan to continue to maintain. I liken it to having a child. You don't have a kid and expect others to care for it - it's your responsibility once you bring it into the world. Users should clear things obstructing trails, but should leave the maintenance of features to the builder(s). If they DO feel something needs attention, contacting/helping the builder(s) is the proper channel. Other than that, keep the bikes to the side if you're checking a feature - don't park your bike in the middle of the trail. Believe it or not, other users ride that trail. And, of course, RIDE DON'T SLIDE!! Skidding is not cool when it's done just for the sake of skidding.
  • + 1
 I think there should be a rule that you must construct the trail with ORGANIC material gathered from the area of the trail building. NO nails,plastics,metal, treated lumber, pagan shrines. Call me old school but that stuff is ugly to look at and frigg'in dangerous
  • + 1
 In case nobody has pointed it out, here's all you need to know: a href="http://theteamrobot.blogspot.com/2013/03/you-know-surest-way-to-get-downhill.html">http://theteamrobot.blogspot.com/2013/03/you-know-surest-way-to-get-downhill.html/a>
  • + 1
 If you ride it you should definitely help maintain the jumps, it's not even a debatable topic... but don't do anything that would alter peoples jumps that they worked their asses off to build unless they give you permission to do so...
  • + 1
 I live in a small town of about 35,000. We have 4 local bike st9re all doing well. However, we can't seem to even keep a dirt jump around. It's like there is a secret team paid by the city that goes around tearing shit Dow regardless of how well its built. I don't understand why people have such a hate out for us bikers. Yet we have 4 bike shops. Not to mention they just decided to close our bike park down for this summer. Wtf
  • + 1
 me and 3 other guys dig a local city park, have spent the last three years digging there, maintaining them and keeping them rideable. and you get all the kids who ride park day in and day out come ride the park, wreck the park and claim credit for the jumps in the videos/photos they take, such a piss off. no respect. should be a code no dig no ride, or they should go build somthing of their own and we will come ride it and take credit
  • + 1
 A lot of this seems to be focused on the bigger features of a trail, and there I agree that if you don't have the ability to fix it correctly, you should leave it to someone who does. But there is plenty of trail maintenance that everyone can do: if a tree fell across the trail, move it if you can; if there is a massive puddle, take a second to kick a small drainage path into it; and everyone can take a day to clear to overgrowth from the trail side.
  • + 1
 When I build a trail it's for my buddies and I to ride. I probably hid the entrance and you probably have to hike into what could only seem like nowhere to find it. If you do, good work but I take zero responsibility for your safety. My job is not to be your personal trail crew. Maybe I haven't been there in a while or there's some weird sketchy quirk up there right now that I haven't had a chance to take care of. Plus, while I feel you can safely trust me on my building decisions, you should never blindly trust me on things like that unless you know me. It's stupid. Maybe I built an impossible 80 foot creek gap. I wouldn't, but you have no way of knowing. Trailbuilders should always have the safety of trail users in mind, and some are better at that than others. At the end of the day though, we can't be responsible for the safety of our creations forever and ever and ever. If I hear some kid got taken out by a fallen tree on my DH track that I didn't know about I'll feel sorry for him, but never responsible. The ideal service you should expect from a builder is a well constructed initial concept and build. After that if they also happen to stick around and ride and maintain, so much the better. But it can't be expected. Take some personal responsibility and look out for yourself, otherwise the people that build your trails won't be able to do it any more. The finger pointing, responsibility and liability of making someone else responsible for your mistakes is enough to make it worthwhile for the builder to just kick you right the fuck out or leave entirely.
  • + 1
 RIDE AT YOUR OWN RISK when peeps out there are building on park or private land not at some resort where someone is paying a fee to ride the property --- always, doesn't matter if you ask me --- this stuff is dangerous, get over it.

as far as building and grooming --- we use the 70/30 rule ---

70% play, 30% pay ---

doesn't mean if you go out on any given you gotta spend 30% of your time grooming or building, riders should just put out an effort once in a while not just ride.

look before you leap is a good general rule too ---

walk up the trail you're about to blast down if you haven't been on it in a while.
  • + 1
 and for sure --- you're out there riding and you see something broken --- if you can't fix it -- block it in a way people will know not to hit it.
  • + 1
 my honest opinion is no matter how much work the builder dedicates he should be the main person to maintain it, but I mean if u do see a fucked up jump, I would put up a cross or do something to show other people that it isn't safe, because I don't think a whole lot of riders ride with a hammer and a shovel in their backpack... but as people say, if you fuck up a a feature it is your and your fault you shouldn't start to give bullshit about the previous condition, thats when the user needs to signal a fucked up jump and at some ppoint come and fix it. It isn't bloody rocket science
  • + 1
 This: www.drtwrx.com/membership.html + £10 million in insurance coverage (costs me £450 a year) lets me sleep at night. Anyone not agreeing to the terms laid out is trespassing and will get chucked off the land quicker than Gwin with a rocket up his ass.

I'm happy to build and approve others to build if they run it by me (or the entrusted minions), but I can't be on hand at all times to regulate the use of the land. The onus is on the riders to decide if the track is safe on the day and, if not, close down a section and notify me of the problem. As soon as I know of a problem, it will be fixed. To date, all issues have been dealt with before it even gets to me.

Common sense is, at times, the least common of all senses. Cover your ass if you are a builder or landowner.
  • + 1
 f*ck me with a blunt stick !! ...I don't believe we're still debating this shit. If you wanna ride on something that someone else built on land that isn't their's and it falls apart who you gonna blame ? You'd have to be silly as a sheep if you thought you could blame someone else for the chances that you decided to take. ...
  • + 2
 your absolutely right, someone would have to be silly as a sheep, a dumb sheep at that. But these peeps do exist, and they have lawyers..... Mindboggling stupid humans are not a myth, they are real, and they are out there.......
  • + 5
 There needs to be an all of the above option.
  • + 1
 Both, if you ride it you are responsible. But there is a difference. You are responsible for your own safety on a bike.

If you DID NOT BUILD the trail you can MAINTAIN IT but NOT CHANGE IT
If you DID BUILD IT, you can do whatever you want.

You may change a trail if;
1. you have spoken to the original builders
2. the original builder have abandoned the trail or no longer use it.

Ultimately every time you ride its like checking the water before you jump, you should check everything is in check before you go smash a trail only to get hurt then try blame someone else.

You cannot assume a trail is kept maintained if its not on private land, even than you cant be certain.
Bottom line, if you are damaging it and contributing to wear and tear you contribute to fixing it back up

I'll put my hand up and say I don't do this enough, I really don't fix up trails or maintain them at all. Legitimately the most iv done is some quick fix up after I'v ridden it but never really put a proper days work in. Seems I have a Hypocritical reply.
On the plus though I don't expect trails to be maintained, nor would I blame someone else if I were to get hurt if something broke. I still walk the trail before hand and check out structures. I'll do minor fixes to make tracks ride-able for the day but no overhauls.
  • + 1
 not just if you see something wrong fix it, it's because ut's often the riders that cause the problems, particularly if it's a popular line with lots of riders experienced or new, that's where problems happen. The person(s) that put in all the hard work creating it shouldn't have to clear up the mess left after kids and inexperienced riders tearing through it. Nothing against these riders, just saying that that's often the cause of damaged trails.
  • + 1
 Its great every time a rider wants to fix/maintain a trail. If you can, ask the original builders for input on how to do work that will best suit the trail.
Lets face almost all trails are on public land. This means that any one can work on (or f..ck up) a trail. Have courtesy towards the original builder please.
  • + 1
 check it out before u ride it. fix it if u can, if you cant, close it your self, mark it with X. any good trail builder should be walking or atleast riding the trail every month.
  • + 2
 the builder should be responsible for major repairs. the last thing id want is somebody messing with my trail, and changing stuff around on me
  • + 0
 Everything outside bikeparks/shuttle areas, commercial riding in general, is about riding at your own risk. You got into it, face the consequences - that other way of looking at it finished when you were 5.

And to angry parents of kids hurting themselves: let the kid play and be prepared to face the consequences. Otherwise lock him up untill he's 18. If you allow your child to get into an activity you can't monitor, bevause for instance: you don't practise it yourself, and you provide your kid with no guidance in that matter, you better find someone responsible, who can do that. So your kid can get an idea what is good and what's bad to ride on. You have the right to be sad and express frustration, when something happens, but leave builders alone. Watch Finding Nemo frequently!

To people's building: it's down to your own conscience to build it as well as you can. If you screwed up: be prepared to take shit for it.
  • + 7
 Better that the kids come home with scrapes/bruises in their teens than getting to 40 realise they have never done anything exciting and buying a super bike and becoming an organ donor Smile
  • + 0
 If i ever had a kid and they fell over, I'd just my like . . .MTFU
  • + 2
 In most cases that's the only reasonable way to look at it.

It's the rider's responsibility to take a look first: isn't the track too difficult for me? Are there rocks or sticks on the trail? Are the lips in good shape? All of which are clearly visible so the rider has all the information to make a good decision to ride the track or not. In case he still messes up it's either a case of overestimating his skills or just bad luck - neither of which is the builder's responsibility.

I do think in some specific cases this might be a little different. Let's say you abandon a north shore you know will be ridden by others. To me it would be reasonable to either demolish it or somehow warn the others you stopped maintaining it. This is because I think it can't be expected from riders to perform a complete check up on the structural integrity. Having said that, you could argue that all of this is true but that would mean a reasonable person wouldn't ride it..

Also, props for Pinkbike and RC for including articles like this, MTB really seems to mature in the last few years which can only be a good thing.
  • + 3
 I always walk my trails to see if anything has changed or check for damage before I ride. Common sense?!
  • + 1
 if its wooden just ride it and when it breaks fix it or block it off so know one gets hurt if its dirt thats potholed and rutted just ride it as part of the trail if u want to fix it u can but if not leave it
  • + 1
 I always ride with a small folding shovel in my back pack. When anything starts to look a little shabby i add some dirt for the good of any one who wants to ride it. Builder and Users, we're all responsible.
  • + 1
 I'm tired of all the complaining I'm tired of all the opinions on here. all the time you wasted on here should have been building, riding instead you accomplish nothing bla bla bla.
  • + 1
 its most annoying when you build an epic feature, only to have some 'lesser-abled' riders tone it down to suit there skill level. Why can they make their own stuff, or even just ask? :L
  • + 1
 I had a tree bridge break a few years ago. I was about 8 feet up. I was sort of ok after but now i have a mental block when it comes to just about all man made features.
  • + 1
 I built my own jumps( not downhill) and one day I saw my jumps and they were destroyed by the people who didn't rebuild the jumps that they jumps.
  • + 1
 This should not even be a poll. It should simply be a public service announcement and reminder to those of us who rarely touch a shovel.
  • + 3
 Is Digging ever really done?
  • + 1
 To be honest, who even uses north shores these days? everyone chip in when you see the lips warn down ect and its no problem. Simples
  • + 1
 There is not doubt at all, if you see something wrong, fix it, or get help from somebody too, but at all cases, do not leave it as it, broken, being dangerous for others.
  • + 4
 Digger Dan eh?
  • + 3
 If you see something wrong, fix it!
  • + 1
 If a wood feature is fresh looking dont touch it. If its old looking inspect it to make sure it's okay to ride on it. I don't care who you are if it looks like its been there for 8 years and you don't take cAre of it, it's getting chAnged.
  • + 3
 THE USERS OF THE TRAILS, unless its a bike park...
  • + 1
 i build at my locals its always a big load off my shoulders when riders come to my jumps and fix them up even if they didnt do it. so yeah users
  • + 2
 dont touch my trails, dont ride my trails, dont even look at them!!! if you do have to look, look gently. ha!
  • + 1
 hahaha!
  • + 3
 Respect is the only word that needs to be used.
  • + 1
 Ive rode those dirtjumps in the first photo. among all, those were the most well built trails and ladders ive ever encountered.
  • + 1
 if someone sees something unsafe he should either fix it or tell the builder but not make big changes without asking the builder or the ones who ride there.
  • + 1
 It is every rider that takes the chance to ride these man made trails. To check them out before you ride and fix them. After all we all ride to be safe and have fun.
  • + 1
 i think its everyones if your a rider and see its you responsabilty not to ride it and tell the diggers. and its the diggers job to mend it
  • + 1
 I think its fine for users too fix up the trail, but they should never modify it. Builders hate that!
  • + 1
 It is the first three. Its our own risk, dont ride if it looks bad, and if its your feature, keep it up or tear it down.
  • + 1
 so sick that the first picture is one of our spots, so glad that dave (dazem) got the respect that he deserves.
  • + 1
 The users should fix it, but not change it. They should fix it to the way it was when the builder created it.
  • + 1
 The people who choose the builders are the people who ride other peoples trails with out working on them.
  • + 1
 Whoever gives a shit. If you care enough, keep it up. If not, rip it up. Either way, shut the fuck up.
  • + 1
 By Digger Dan are you referring to Todd 'Digger' Fiander, Dangerous Dan Cowan or someone else?
  • + 2
 Hey man. Stop trying to steal Digger Dan's thunder! Didn't you hear what Richard Cunningham said? He's the ONLY BUILDER IN THE WORLD WHO MAINTAINS HIS WORK. Thank you Digger Dan (fictional though you are) and F U to all those other lazy builders who don't do any maintenance...

Seriously RC that was probably the most brutal statement I've ever read.
  • + 3
 Dry your tears man! Met Digger. Met Dan. Like both men. pretty sure they'd forgive a late night mistake. sniff sniff.
  • + 1
 No dig, no ride. You ride it, you retain it. You break it, you fix it. See the cycle? Everyone is responsible.
  • - 1
 Build an illegal structure you Fuc our sport up. Selfish Fucs. U build it u Fukin maintain it or ill be the first to rip it down.
  • + 0
 You break it , you fix it
  • + 0
 Both, the builder and the users are responsible to maintain the features.
  • + 0
 it's fucking easy, if you use it!!! you fix it!!!
  • + 2
 Exactly, one of the skinny low bridges over a mud flat on the trails here in the South March Highlands area of Ottawa had developed a twist/drop/split in it that I noticed on a hike a few weeks ago. On sunday I ride over it and sure enough its broken several boards and dropped. I took 5 mins out of my ride to grab a couple large rocks to place under it to support it so it wouldn't drop any further, breaking apart more. Did I ask the trail group that officially maintains the network for the City (OMBA) for permission first? Nope. I just did it. Same goes for various members/local riders who went in on their own time with their own chainsaws a week ago to clear all the winter deadfall logs/trees/branches that had come down on trails. I often ride with a folding saw in my pack to take out dropped trees/branches for the benefit of other riders/hikers. If I don't do it then, there's every possibility it will still be there the next time I ride that trail. And I'll have to dismount and walk/carry my bike around it then instead. So might as well take care of the problem when I find it.
  • + 2
 EXACTLY!
If all the bikers can cooperate with the cause it will be much easyer, and also you can learn about trail design and how to shape jumps, it's a win/win situation i think.
i guarantee that you only gonna lose like 10 to 30 minutes and you gonna win experience and a nice and clean ride.

thanks DEEEIGHT for the comment, and keep up the good work!!
  • - 1
 ..

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