Bontrager Line Pro Pedals - Review

Jul 14, 2017
by Vernon Felton  
Bontrager Line Pro Pedals by Vernon Felton


Bontrager has been quietly building up a deep line of bike components and apparel. Jerseys? Check. Carbon wheelsets? Check. Helmets? Check. Lighting systems? You know the drill. As the house brand for one of the biggest bike companies in the world, Bontrager gets a lot of investment from Trek. No surprise, then, they also produce flat pedals. The Line Pros take over where the brand’s long-deceased King Earl and Big Earl flat pedals left off. Like their predecessors, the Line Pros feature a decidedly burly aluminum platform. But, since this is 2017 and not 2007, the Line Pros are slimmer and lighter than their forebears.

Bontrager Line Pro Details
• 6061-T6 aluminum pedal body
• Durable chromoly axle/sealed cartridge bearings
• 10 pins per side
• 102mm x 99mm platform size
• Weight 420 grams
• Available in orange and black (tested)
• MSRP: $99.99 USD
www.trekbikes.com

On Trail

The Line Pro features a 6061-T6 aluminum pedal body that measures 102mm x 99mm. Comparatively speaking, it’s not the biggest pedal body out there, but it still offers plenty of real estate for most riders. It’s certainly not undersized. Plenty of pedals are making a bid to be the lightest, thinnest things on the market. The Line Pros are not those pedals. At 420 grams, Bontrager's Line Pro is no lightweight (though, again, there are still heavier models out there). Similarly, it measures 17 millimeters, top-to-bottom, at the spindle….and about 19 millimeters at the leading and trailing edges. So, nope, these aren't paper-thin either.

So, why should you give a damn about these pedals? Well, if you must own the lightest, thinnest pedals out there, I guess you shouldn’t. That said, the Line Pros are still a solid choice for someone looking for a set of bomber flats with good traction. The Line Pros feature a chromoly axle and a set of cartridge bearings that haven’t gone griftty after more than a year of muddy rides.

Bontrager Line Pro Pedals by Vernon Felton
Bontrager Line Pro Pedals by Vernon Felton
The Line Pros feature a fairly uniform distribution of traction pins and a very open design that sheds mud like a champ.


Speaking of mud, the Line Pros offer outstanding traction when it’s sloppy outside. Some of the credit goes to the 10 traction pins, which have a fairly even distribution on the pedal’s perimeter. You can remove the washers on the pedal and make these things truly bite (a la a Meathook or similarly-scary pedal), but the mushroom-shaped pins are plenty grabby, even at the lower height.

Much of the pedal’s outstanding grip in goopy conditions, however, has to be credited to the pedal body’s very open architecture—mud simply has nowhere to collect. Nice. Of course, the pedal’s layout doesn’t provide room for traction pins on the center of the body, but I still found grip to be excellent without them and, again, if I was angling for even more traction, I could remove the pin washers. For the record, I wear FiveTen shoes, which also help when it comes to getting the most grip from any plat pedal.

Bontrager Line Pro Pedals by Vernon Felton

The pins are easy to access. Amazingly, I haven’t broken or mangled any of them,…which is sorta surprising because the thicker pedal body does equal more pedal strikes out there on the trail. No way around that. The thicker pedal body also means that the Line Pros are a bit more prone to flipping than thinner pedals. That tendency to roll underfoot is not as pronounced as on some chunky pedals, but after spending a lot of time on thinner models, such as the Canfield Crampon Mountain, Race Face Atlas and Specialized Boomslang, it’s something I have definitely noticed.

The pedal gets bonus points from me for having both 15-mm pedal-wrench flats and a six-millimeter hex fitting and for not growing gritty, sloppy or measurably-shitty over the course of a year’s riding. If you’re a fan of durability, the Line Pros are worth taking a look at.




Pinkbike's Take

bigquotesIf you harbor a grudge against DU bushings, can’t stand pedals with that big hump at the crankarm (the one that houses inboard bearings on skinnier pedals) or simply want a pedal that will last year after year with zero attention, Bontrager's Line Pros should be on your list. If you want the thinnest, widest and lightest pedals on the market, look elsewhere. Vernon Felton


Must Read This Week

95 Comments

  • + 44
 No bearing slop after a year of riding.
Ball bearings.
Pins that screw in from the bottom and are easy to replace.
420 grams.
100$.
Every thing i like about a pedal.
Nice to see a long term testing.
  • + 13
 More like 100$ US = 12 005 340$ CAD
  • + 6
 @QuebecPoulin: With the rate increase by the BoC, the CAD went up some compared to the USD. So really, now you're only looking at about $1,005,867 CAD
  • + 1
 @QuebecPoulin: I just bought these for $120 CAD. I picked them specifically for their cheap price, knowing nothing else about them. Quite happy with them.
  • + 19
 light, strong, cheap; pick none. Or maybe one.
These are thick, heavy and I can get better pedals from xpedo for half the price (without having to go to a Trek store).

My usual rant here: why the hell do flats cost so much more than clips. I can get Shimano M530s for $30; I know clips aren't for everyone, I just don't get why something that's more complicated and [I assume] expensive to make costs 1/3 as much as these no-frills flats.
  • + 1
 There are a lot of new clips that are quite expensive.
And there are a lot of flats that are cheap.

If you want the latest and fanciest stuff you often have to pay for it. Is that sth. new?
  • + 3
 Quantity most likely. I bet Shimano sell 5x of that pedal what Bontrager will of these.
  • + 6
 @Brightside: His point is that M530s are great clips and they work very well. There aren't a lot of $30 flat pedals that work really well, if any.
  • + 1
 @seraph: I ride these and LOVE them.... Lixada flat pedals for $32/306g even cheaper on ebay www.amazon.com/dp/B01DLKOW5O/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_uhzAzbBPQ5DK6
  • + 1
 @seraph: Ummm ever hear of Odyssey?
  • + 1
 Probably because Shimano have been making SPD's in one form or another (virtually unchanged) for decades.
  • + 2
 Not sure which Xpedos you are riding but I have tried 2 sets of Xpedos and they are trash compared to these. Was especially disappointed with the Xpedo Spry pedals
  • + 18
 thicc
  • + 21
 like your mother
  • + 43
 @adrennan:

My Mom is skinny af. This is inaccurate.
  • + 2
 as a sniccers, lookin like a SNACC
  • + 18
 it protecc from slipping, also lets you attacc the trail, but most importantly, SMACC those shins
  • + 5
 Designed and tested by Ethan Bradberry
  • + 5
 @ICAS: say hi to your mother for me (Mark Whalberg voice)
  • + 7
 ...or buy DMR's who have been doing this for over 20 years at every price point (Vaults for the car-park points and dentists v12's for the die-hards) and have a fair bit more than 1 year proof of durability.
Ask anyone who has been biking since mid-90's.
  • + 6
 Yep, essentially this is in DMR territory, I am yet to find a pedal I prefer over the Vault. Doesnt look like a bad product, though they may be a tough sell in shops - will probably shift them via Trek etc.
  • + 3
 I've been riding clipless since 2002 and recently picked up a pair of these and some 5.10 Freeriders to switch things up a bit. Not sure I'll go back to my clipless setup anytime soon.
  • + 4
 DMR Vaults FTW! been on em since 2014, absolutely no service needed and only had to replace 2 pins in 3 years. which they send you by the way...
  • + 2
 Nylon body and aluminum cage with pedal straps and clips are always cheap and reliable.

Remember to twist your strap between the holes in the pedal body so the strap doesn't move around. You'll thank me once you try it. Plus, shops have a million of these kicking around, so if you're nice you can get a pair for $5.

More money in pocket for Monster energy or Redbull.
  • + 7
 CHROMAG!
  • + 1
 i mean ya the scarabs are great but for a different market i would say
  • + 1
 Agreed @SK250 I have the Contact pedals and they're in the same price range and have the perfect concavity and I'm on year two with no bearing slop.

I saw these at the Trek store and they're chunky monkeys. A little too chunky for my taste. What can I say? I'm shallow.
  • + 1
 The only think I dislike about my Scarabs are the murderous pins. They have no mercy (I can't find other pins that fit).
  • + 2
 These Bontragers have the exact same pins and washers as my Scarabs... same manufacturer maybe?
  • + 1
 @mrosie: Was about to mention that!
  • + 2
 These look really good! I will take durability at a "regular" height anyday.

However, the price is still a barrier for most.

Flat pedals should be about having fun; $70-80 bucks max would be way more fun for more people.
  • + 6
 I'll take the extra height for a proper concave with out that horrible axle bulge in the middle, makes pedals feel convex with that lump there.
  • + 6
 Im not sure 'having fun' is what a business has in mind when they are focussing on 'making profit' Aaaah its OK guys, sell these at a loss because flats are all about fun bro!
  • + 3
 Just buy some Wellgo pedals. Plenty to chose from and at every price point.
  • + 5
 Nukeproof Horizons
  • + 1
 Just got a set of those in the composite/plastic, such a comfortable pedal, seems to have the perfect concave and platform size to me, super light and cheap too.
  • + 1
 @bigburd: I have had a set for about 2 years and they are brilliant ,they take a real beating too
  • + 2
 Kona Wah Wah ticks all the boxes for me- thin enough, comes with replacement pins that load from the bottom and rebuild kits available. Cheaper than these too.
  • + 2
 Just you wait to see the newest version coming out. They are beautiful.
  • + 2
 The Wah Wah is essentially the same as the older Nukeproof, many Deity, Superstar (though they have since directly copied the design in house, even down to the name! - The taiwanese axles etc are all interchangable) etc etc

They are great pedals made by the guys at HT components - It seems HT over the last few years went a bit price mad though - the simple models are best and last forever.
  • + 1
 @2bigwheels: Oooooh! Can't wait!
  • + 1
 @Racer951: I promise you the new pedal is not a copy of anything.
  • + 1
 @2bigwheels: good stuff, didn't say the new one would be, just that the current / old one isn't so much a copy as just a direct rebrand. Though I think Kona brought it to the mass market first?
  • + 1
 @Racer951: I believe you are correct. My guess is kona had the pedal made and there was a deal where after a year or two the pedal manufacturer was Allowed to sell the design to others. This happens often in the pedal world.
  • + 3
 1999 called, it wants its pedals back.
  • - 1
 Another expensive generic pedal from one the big guys. Atleast Spesh made an honest effort in making a modern pedal. Giant just slapped their name on some VP Harriers (they probably make them to begin with).
  • + 2
 vp is actually the manufacturer if i understand correctly. you can also buy azonics that are the same body as the harrier.
  • + 1
 100$ for 400+ gram pedal? Wtf? I'll choose neylon or plastic for 20$ that will last for couple of years with no issues
  • + 1
 Fire eye broil. Half the price, More pins and still fine after nearly two years.
  • + 2
 So what are the go to flat pedals of choice that don't cost the earth?
  • + 5
 at the sub $50 pricepoint, everybody seems to go with the Race Face Chesters.
  • + 1
 Nylon pedals
  • + 1
 @groghunter: Chesters are a bushing at one end.
  • + 2
 Wellgo MG1. Light, strong, cheap, ball bearings.
  • + 4
 @capnronrides: He didn't specify caring about bushing, just that they be cheap.

Besides, the bushing hate is misplaced. you want thin pedals, bushings take up far less space than bearings. bushings in my E13s have been flawless. any drag you might notice when you spin them by hand is unnoticeable when you're actually riding.
  • + 6
 superstar Nanos
  • + 2
 @groghunter: Tried that. New England rocks won. Chesters died. Now on Deity TMACs. 3x the price, better than 3x the durability
  • + 1
 @newenglandrocks: Not everybody can afford to spend that much. getting new pedals bodies for chesters is dirt cheap.

I mean, don't get me wrong, I use aluminum bodied pedals, but when I'm looking for a cheap set for a second bike or something, the value proposition of composite pedals can't be beat.
  • - 1
 @groghunter: Nope, placed the bushing "hate" right where it belongs. Tried 2 different brands of bushed pedals, not Chesters, both of them made clanking noise and felt loose; which of course they were a little bit or the didn't spin! And then the MG 1(?) not titanium and broke the axle, so I bought Profile Racings first generation 2002 Gas (BMX) Pedals.
Still on the bike after multiple (9) seasons at Whistler and Galbraith and a few years racing. Yep, HEAVY as an anchor but haven't broken a spindle or body, except my own, 3 sealed bearing per pedal do occasionally freeze up but it's the Pacific North West! The lack of inboard seal doesn't help.
  • + 4
 @capnronrides: Well, I'm sure we all agree that your individual experience on 2 models, out of literally hundreds of pedals that use bushings, is definitive that the entire concept of bushings in pedals is flawed. Truly, yours is a staggering intellect.
  • + 1
 @mgolder: They're excellent vfm, thin, fairly light, but there's a hidden cost - they will chew your soles to bits in a few months' time! At least that has been my experience. Of course I'm a cheapskate and I ride flats with... cheap skate shoes.
  • + 1
 Race Face Chester are so overrated. Fireeye Candy costs $34 on CRC and shape is almost the same. There's cheaper rebranded versions.
  • + 1
 @mgolder: Yup. Get steel axles for a 20g weight penalty and have them be half the cost, or pay the same as the Bontragers, get Ti axles and save 50g.
  • + 2
 @cosmicheretic: I agree. I have been riding them for 4 years straight, without ANY problems whatsoever. I never understood these flat pedal discussions....
  • + 1
 @passwordpinkbike: FWIW, the last set of nylons I bought were the the Fireeyes. I was speaking more to what people in general are using, & what you can find at the LBS.
  • + 2
 they should make a 26" one
  • + 1
 Just buy some spanks on sale and call it tits
  • + 1
 Best pedals since my old Rubens.
  • + 1
 The old aluminium version? If you have the old al version of the Fly Bikes Ruben and you also own these and think these feel and grip just as well then I will buy a set of these tomorrow.
  • + 2
 @iamamodel: yea and they grip better, similar feel.
  • + 1
 People still buy pedals this thick?
  • + 1
 No-one mention DMR Vaults yet? These look similar but a bit smaller. I'll stick with the Vaults though thanks.
  • + 1
 Exactly. I'll take HT or similar thin pedals any day over these.
  • + 2
 Thick as Fuuuuuu#%
  • + 0
 Almost 2.5X thicker than my oneups ????
  • + 5
 Not quite - oneups are 12mm, these are 17mm.
  • + 0
 @slumgullion: 8mm at the edges compared to 19mm, 2.375X difference
  • + 4
 @src248: Why would you only measure leading edge width instead of pedal profile? Rocks don't care where they hit your pedal - leading edge or axle.
  • + 2
 Eww your pedal is thicker in the middle than the edge ?
  • + 1
 @bigburd: yes and they feel better than any concave pedal I've used.
  • + 1
 @src248: Do you stand with the ball of your foot on the pedal or more under your arch ?
Genuine question
  • + 1
 @bigburd: kinda between, but more arch
  • + 1
 @bigburd: Canfield Crampons are somewhat popular and are convex. I've never had an issue of concave vs. convex. Either way in my experience I'll place a large & thin pedal above all.
  • + 0
 basically a watered down DMR vault haha
  • + 18
 Looks like a pedal?
  • + 1
 Looks like a Vault.
  • + 1
 Still $100, made in?
  • + 10
 A factory. Other than that the country is irrelevant as it is no guarantee of any extra quality or anything like that.
  • + 2
 @mgolder: spot on chap!
  • - 1
 The pins are kinda short
  • + 10
 You can ditch the washers and get more height out of the pins.
  • + 1
 @vernonfelton: and seeing pins placed inboard near the crankarm are a welcome sight!
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