FOX Racing Shox - Interbike 2011

Sep 15, 2011 at 13:55
by Tyler Maine  
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FOX IRD (Intelligent Ride Dynamics) - Smart Suspension Set up Pump Concept - Garmin and Ant+

FOX Racing Shox unveiled this concept pump and software that will ease bike suspension set up. Watch and learn about what could be coming to a shop near you.

Views: 12,154    Faves: 27    Comments: 7


Fox IRD engineer Ryan Baretta

Ryan Baretta is the FOX Engineer/Software designer who headed up this concept to make bike set up easier.


Fox IRD

The magic pump.


Fox IRD with Android phone.

Currently works with Android, iPhones (Smart Phones) and Garmin Edge 800


Fox IRD with Garmin

Fox IRD broadcast to TV from Android.

QR codes are scanned with your smart phone and broadcast to this TV for viewing ease.


This concept will allow shops /consumers the ability to set up their bikes accurately which leads to a better ride experience.

There is no ETA as this is currently in the concept stage only.

Please visit FOX Racing Shox to learn about all their products.

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130 Comments

  • 66 34
 Wow, I am almost lost for words.... Is this really the most interesting product from Fox?
What a load of nonsense
  • 16 29
flag zmcycle (Sep 15, 2011 at 16:12) (Below Threshold)
 Cool concept.... For a noob that is.
  • 72 11
 I don't understand why everyone is hating..I think it is really cool. It's amazing to see the advancement of cycling and all this new technology that is being developed. Unnecessary? How so? They weren't trying to market it to the average consumer, they were just showing off some cool toys and that I actually enjoyed learning about. Maybe we'll see computers being integrated into cycling more and more over the next few years!
  • 49 4
 Thanks Drood for having an open mind to a CONCEPT - as for IIIestT you need to think outside the box here as that is what FOX is doing. They have created a concept that could help shops set up bikes easier and in an efficient, consistent manner and we think it's cool.
  • 8 3
 hmmmm seems to me to be a great way to keep track of suspension setups, and like the video said have that info for the lbs to do the same if necessary...

seems pretty painless, unless you cant read, see or hear... in which case what are you riding a bike for? or maybe its because you still own a nokia? is that the source of the frustration? lol idiots i swear, cant shoot em, but they can just get more ignorant.
  • 44 0
 App needs a kashima coating skin option..... Big Grin
  • 10 0
 The concept is cool, But is it so hard to figure out the suspension settings for yourself? I Mean, I think this would be helpful for people who are new to the sport, but for people who have already been doing it for a while, it seems kinda useless. But the Idea is Interesting to say the least.
  • 8 14
flag jtnord (Sep 15, 2011 at 17:04) (Below Threshold)
 Im surprised it took this long for such a pathetic use of technology. This could have been done years ago... and you dont need a scanable barcode to have a fork and shock database. very primitive... Then again the incompetent bring their 5k bike into the shop to get a tube changed. Im sure those same people would love to have and be willing to pay for this toy...
  • 1 1
 So much technology!
  • 21 4
 You people are missing the point, I don't want computers on my bike, all i need is a pair of petals under my feet and handle bars under my hands. If your a real Mountain Biker from heart.
  • 2 7
flag neallynberg (Sep 15, 2011 at 18:19) (Below Threshold)
 I could just see someone with that app changing there friends shocks settings while in like mid hair and then they land on a fully pumped up shock haha
  • 14 7
 everyone here is so anti progress if it were up to you we would be riding penny farthings
  • 7 0
 SMASH THE SPINNING JENNY!!
  • 11 0
 It would be kick ass for a shop. Especially for the rear shock, as so many of the shocks are custom valved for that bike. Everyone at the shop has an Iphone, as it is. Now you just scan it, and there is no guess work, rounding. I scan it, it says 154psi, done. When you have 50 different models of bikes, this would be pretty handy.
  • 8 2
 reccommended pressures are often miles off. i asked my bike shop how to set my suspension up properly when i started. they sagged my bike to 30% both ends, then told me how much rebound is a good start point. the rest is up to rider/bike/terrain. we don't need this

and most people ride bikes to get away from their computers!
  • 7 2
 the scanable bar code is super lame..! the whole thing takes a riders intimate connection with their bike outta the equation... this will not help newer riders learn to feel how their suspension feels and performs best for them... i prefer the connection with nature that MTB brings, this takes away from that... i'm not gonna say it's stupid or useless, but it's definitely not for me...
  • 9 2
 Says the buttonpusher...
  • 7 0
 says the ritchierich...
  • 3 0
 yeah you are all right you can do it by yourself but with this you can do it in next to no time at all and you dont have to remember what setting you need. this is great technology, maybe next it will change the settings automatically for you allowing you to change it from your gps to change rebound/compression before you enter the incline/downihill section.
  • 2 1
 this is somewhat disappointing!
  • 4 1
 this is something a shop could take advantage of, but having this for an everyday person is completely pointless. Thats my two cents anyway.
  • 2 0
 Although some people might not need it, I think this is def a cool concept. What theyre doing is basic but now integrate hi/low speed compression and rebound. plus make that all custom to predefined riding style. Id definitely use that!
  • 1 0
 not thinking about the smart phonen are you ,.. ?
  • 8 0
 I like how it takes 3 guys to take the reading...
  • 3 0
 im not too sure about this, its a waste of time for people who are experienced so that takes out the majority as generally more experienced riders have a fox racing shox setup as its more high spec/performance. in my mind a waste of time and research, fox could have come up with something better than this. I would still have done it but not as the main advance in Fox's fork technology..this is nothing special
  • 1 0
 Does it make setting up suspension, something that is traditionally beyond the average rider, easier? yes. Is it the coolest thing ever? no. Is it still a good idea, and useful for shops to have? absolutely.
  • 1 3
 "fox racing shox....more high spec/performance" yeah right... and the earth is flat... and the pope sings in a boyband...
  • 23 0
 Somewhere inside Fox Headquarters"
"Hey Boss, we were thinking of putting sag measurements on the sliders just like Rock Shox stuff, to make it easy for our consumers to set up their suspension?"
Boss: "No don't do that!, develope something really expensive that only works with my new iphone or Garmin"

For a product developed for Shops, I would imagine if your shop employee needs one of these to help you set up your bike, you might want to look for a new shop.
  • 1 0
 I am sure that Rock Shox probably has patented the idea of printing sag measurements onto the stanchions... That's why no other company can do it as well...
  • 2 0
 If you can patent measurement markings then there should only be one measuring tape company. SOmetimes I hate the patent law. Infact most of the time.
  • 1 2
 Asian based companies pee at any patent law, lately I noticed that UMF bikes use VPP buahaha. I'm pretty sure one day BP, Exxon, Credit Suisse, Wal-Mart and Monsanto will join and form - WeFkUrealHard super corporation and patent the use of wheel
  • 1 0
 That's ok, Niner bikes stole their CVA suspension pivot geometry from a taiwan bike maker anyway. Then filed for and were granted a US Patent on the thing.
  • 2 0
 yea, it's disgusting these days, but it's really about patents a thing first, rather than who actualy invented it. Puuuke
  • 10 1
 I set up my shock and fork to the feel i like it....shouldn't have a computer to tell me otherwise. Its a cool idea for shops, i definetly can see them there, but for consumers, ill save myself the money and learn how to do it myself
  • 3 0
 I know what you mean, I don't understand the point of this, shock/fork setup is a personal thing, how can a computer decide if the rebound is 'too fast' for a particular rider? Can it also read the mind of the rider and know where it's going to be ridden and the conditions? The same goes for sag, it doesn't know if the rider prefers a softer ride or something a bit firmer or what the conditions are like. I'm pretty sure i can set the sag on a fork/shock in less time than that as well, it's not rocket science. And one last point, how is it easier for bike shops? The majority of shops won't have a mechanic standing around with no work to do, they'll take a bike in and do the work later as they'll have other things to get to first. This technology seems to make it necessary for the customer to actually be there while the work is done. That's just making things harder for everyone surely?
  • 2 0
 it is for renters picking up a bike at a shop away from home. It gets them in the ball park and people can fine tune on the trail. I demoed a spesh enduro last year and the shock set up sucked and I didn't have a pump to fix the pressure. The ride was still alright but it would have been a lot better with a good set up.
  • 9 0
 No offense Brule but I see you making a lot of defensive posts, clearly you like fox but good journalism should remain neutral. If people do not understand the content that is an issue with the article and/or video, not something to be debated because you feel they are wrong.
  • 1 0
 Fair statement Matt, but having worked in high end shops this would be a beneficial aid in setting up bikes easily. That is how I look at it, the fact that Fox made it is fine either way, but I see that as a benefit that we could have used in shops.
  • 1 0
 ^^ i agree 100%
  • 4 0
 I remain unsure how many dealers or tuning specialists will purchase one of these kits purley for setting up one brand of suspension for their customers, given the rising amount on online purchases of bikes. I'm not doubting its usefulness for a niche area; I like your atricles and would like the quality to remain high.
  • 2 0
 I agree with Matt-W. Pinkbike has a serious credibility issue as they scan these boards and are super sensitive to anything that doesn't support companies. I would prefer to see Pinkbike readers make up their own minds about the content shown here.
  • 1 0
 @dwdw - making up your own mind is ideal - my job is to provide as much feedback as I can on something that I have written about in hopes of sharing with our viewers. Like it or not I am trying to provide information about something that stoked me out. Sensitive only because I want to help.
  • 1 0
 I think any new tech. like this can only be helpful to bike shops who sell high end products, as it actually provides digital calibration and saved setups rather than twiddling adjusters until it feels "right"

I'd like to have a Fox smartpump in my shop that I can plug into my HTC smartphone and use to aid customer's setups of Fox suspension, make a record and be able to access these records for making adjustments to customers bikes

hell, I'd like to use this tech. on my own bike's 36 Float RC2 and RP23 BV suspension

thanks to PB for bringing us news like this Smile
  • 1 0
 I'm still not sold on the idea, its not like it takes long to look in the owners manual to read the suspensions initial set up for rider wieght, this looks like it would take a while to set up. For me personally there are alot more areas Fox could have focused their R&D budget then on this. And like you say Brule, this is for Initial set up only, and I think you'll agree that almost every rider will change their initial set up based on personal preference, so whats so wrong with ball parking it in the first place, using the already supplied set up table with every new bike?? And HampsteadBandit, this is for initial set up, even after using this, you will still fiddle untill it feel right.
  • 13 1
 Is it that hard to use a normal shock pump?
  • 3 0
 No but it is tough to consistently set up bikes for consumers and this could make it all easier.
  • 1 0
 Brule has it right on the money. Looks slick, works well, and on a busy day, with so many bikes on the move would be super nice to have the factory suggested settings.
  • 3 1
 Great, more useless guff....people can't figure out their sag, preload, shock settings, their spring rates are all over the shop, don't even know how many air chambers they have or what they do, manufacturers "recommended" shock settings (e.g. Rockshox air pressures for Boxxer WC and most other "stock" recommended settings) are a total nonsense, people don't know how to set their rebound/compression circuits........and now Fox want them to plug an app in and let the app tell them what to do...people seriously need to figure out how their shit works so they can learn how to optimize their ride. Relying on technology and mumbo jumbo nonsense is our collective downfall. Stop being dumb consumer sheeple, buying an endless conveyor belt of (made in China/Outer Mongolia) useless crap and get your head around how your bicycle actually works. It'll make you a better rider, and your bike will stop gritting its teeth every time you ride it. Educate yourselves.

Or maybe Fox could spend R&D time and budget making products that actually work properly first time to market, instead of using gullible consumers as beta testers for crap that is a fail (various 40's, Floats, that are shoddy etc).
  • 3 0
 Brule, "consistently set bikes up for consumers"? You show me two consumers with the same shock setup needs and I will personally make a system. I do realize this was an Interbike concept, rather than an immediate consumer product.

I think the real issue is the lack of training with bike shop staff. Companies like Fox and Rock Shox need to do more PK sessions - I remember my first Rock Shox seminar. I think I learned more there than from setting up 100 bikes the wrong way in store. To get a good bike setup for a client, you need to take in to account a number of factors - not the least of which include local trail types, bike type, rider skill/experience/preference. Unfortunately, there isn't an app for that.
  • 2 0
 @Hustler - As a general rule 90% + of the media camps I've attended plus bikes we've tested start with a 25% sag front and rear no matter what your weight. Then going to base settings for damping and fine tuning from there - while DH bikes are a little different, the principle remains of getting to those consistent base lines for everyone. You hit the mail on the head though with PKs and the lack of them in the market today. Having worked in shops with staff numbers ranging from 2 to 50+ employees it would be devices like this that would have ensured a more consistent set up for most riders when they left the shop. Ya there is lots to argue against it, but it is a concept that I see merritt in at this time.
  • 1 0
 i could see it being the most useful for rental shop at bike parks...
  • 8 0
 Man you guys are missing the possibilities of this system. Think F-1 or Moto gp. This is just a starting point. Being able to make precise changes for different temperatures or even riders. The data you could save and have at a moments notice is amazing. Or for the team mechanic who has a rider who can only tell you if its fast or slow. I bet that most of you would gain time and feel from a system like this. This is a step in the right direction. Change is good.
  • 4 0
 "I bet that most of you would gain time and feel from a system like this."

I'll place 5 grand on the contrary.
  • 1 0
 Just remember that most of the biking public are not savvy with suspension. So maybe not all the guys on this site,but the general public yes. And I am also thinking of the future. This is the first version. If its ever released it will probably do more for you . Like setting changes based on your core settings.
  • 2 0
 most of the biking public probably couldn't afford a fancy system like this.
  • 6 0
 Crazy stuff that doesn't make much sense.
Once you have the fork set like they did, changing any air pressure in the shock would affect the sag on the fork meaning you would have to reset it again, ahahahahhahhahahhahha

Just use your intuitive instinct and a measuring tape if you want the exact sag requirements.

For compression and Rebound the simple rule is too fast is no good ( the suspension bounces back jolting the bike )
and too slow is no good ( you can see the shock or fork rebounding or it feels hard and sluggish while riding) .

Plus if this is for beginners who can afford it?
  • 3 1
 Niko - it is best suited to shops that need to be able to take a bike to its general base settings in a consistent manner for a variety of riders. It works fast and everyone that watched it in action was impressed - it is useful.
  • 4 0
 I dunno about that, I don't think there is a definitive 'too' fast or slow, I think it depends entirely on your riding style and personal preference. But you're right, it's about personal intuition. I definitely run my rebound on the fast side because I've done what everyone else does and tried different settings and come to a conclusion as to what I like best and what I think helps me get from the top to the bottom fastest. I don't doubt that a computer like that would tell me to run it slower, but I'm not going to change it based on that.
  • 1 0
 Sorry Brule, was responding to Niko but was too slow...
  • 5 0
 I can see where shops could use it to help sort out the settings for someone as a general baseline, but it's not that hard to figure out without the help of a computer. Good job to Fox for pushing the aid of suspension one step further. It is a good thing for riders and shops who don't have the common comprehension to set up a bike for a riders needs. I do have lots of friends who ride their suspension set up totally wrong but don't know the difference. Seeing as the world is becoming more and more reliant on computers and machines than actual professional opinions, I see how this works, hahhahahhahhahaha RideOn boys!
  • 6 1
 Complete overkill. We sell Trek bikes at the shop. They have a suspension calculator for all of their bikes that they sell. Select the bike, input rider weight, done. The PSI front/rear recommendations are damn close to perfect. It just seems like a lot of extra spending.
  • 7 0
 I would have been much faster on the descent if my smart phone was charged........dangit
  • 5 0
 my bike is computer free and it will stay that way. i think it must be the only part of my life free from some kind of electronics. tech on bikes, YES; elec on bikes, NO THANK YOU
  • 6 0
 Electronics and mountain bikes- oxymoronic.
  • 2 0
 very oxymoronic, there is nothing digital about suspension. rideOn!
  • 2 0
 I think this is the start of a really cool idea. Imagine if you could have a small computer sensor installed somewhere in/near your fork/shock; not only for setup purposes though. If the system could store a history of the suspension dynamics you could theoretically dial the suspension characteristics for any trail that you have ridden in the past. Give yourself a little more spring for the times where you hit hard, or a little softer ride on trails where you are not using the full travel potential.
  • 2 0
 haters gonna hate. they hate on the techno frontier while enjoying the fruits of the labor of others who've paved the way to what we currently have. I suppose they are riding down mountains with rigid bikes and coaster brakes. oops, I mean riding up mountains both ways.
  • 2 0
 Interesting. It is good to see that there are people at Fox that think outside of the box. If they are able to measure the rebound rate from the air pressure then they could likely also get compression rate. If they can run an air connector to the fork and or shock while a rider is on a trail then they can datalog. If they can datalog then riders can examine their suspension performance and make the appropriate changes to their setups. Pretty cool if you ask me.
  • 2 0
 I am loving it FOX, everyday technology progresses at an alarming rate.Look at Dura ace stuff for instance, Brule states we need to think outside the box.I say lets embrace new technology with open arms, however. At the end of riding,our bikes still need that 1 man/woman power machine to keep it moving.With out it, its just a fancy object that is stuck in the corner of your garage or workshop. All we need now is a heads up display pair of Oakleys???.
  • 1 0
 what happens when you need to tune for say riding dh vs free ride, i ride much different tunes for that. my rebound is way different as are my psi levels(with an air fork). good to see the tech there, but this in its self, not what i was expecting from fox... lets see some shots of those inverted 40's they were testing. come on Fox, we are hungry!
  • 1 0
 This isn't a product that would be targeted at you then. Maybe you when you started riding and the shop where you went for your first bike, before you knew a lot more about your likes and settings.
  • 1 0
 Even so, it's not exactly rocket science to do, most forks/shocks come with sag tables so you know what pressure to fill it to for certain weights of riders, and there's usually a fairly standard setting for rebound as well, surely it's easier to just have a sag table handy and memorise a couple of rebound settings than to have to do this for every bike? And to do it, you would have to actually have the customer there, they couldn't just drop the bike off to have the suspension tuned, sounds like more hassle than it's worth?
  • 1 0
 IMHO Using this tool could work as a selling point with Fox Suspension. Just like the Auto-Sag button on the Specialized, this can be used to eliminate the user or mechanics error in properly setting up suspension. We're in the generation that every one seems to have a smart phone on them, now the customer can be interactive and have a hands on approach on getting the most out of their new bike. Like anything Fox, this tool wont be a given...
  • 1 0
 combining 2 of my favourite things. Bikes + Tech = winnar.

Although... I don't really see the point in this application, as rebound/compression settings surely comes down to individual rider preference on the specific trails they are riding on?

Like any good tech idea, it is was comes next that is an exciting concept.
  • 1 0
 This is a pretty interesting concept. I think it would be especially helpful to high end shops who wish to offer an increasingly educated or mis-educated customer a base shock/fork setting based on something other than a shop guy just sort of taking a shot in the dark as to what initial setup should be. It would be really cool if they took all this one step further as far as simplification and made it so a shop could input bike model, rider weight, and ride style and the app spit out a set of numbers to get people to a good starting point.
  • 1 0
 This looks really good and extremely useful to me. Obviously, if you are an avid rider and you have developed personal preferences for how your suspension set-up should feel then an I phone app is not going to be of any use to you. You set it up how you prefer it to feel, for the way you like to ride. HOWEVER, for people who are knew to riding ( or maybe even just new to having a suspension bike,) suspension set up can be confusing. I work at a shop and I am constantly dealing with people who are confused and sometimes completely oblivious to how their suspension should feel. What is wrong with a product that can not only benefit riders by helping them find a neutral point to begin with on their new bikes, but also can give them a piece of mind knowing that there bike is totally ready to roll? Looks rad to me!
  • 1 0
 Looks like this feature is being aimed at bike shops as I doubt the pump mech is free ( the thing actually hanging off the shock ). I wouldn't say it's the most amazing feature, but it's far from being lame, and I imagine this is just the first phase. I could see Fox releasing future versions of this that would have more diagnostic tools etc. I could see something like this being very handy with the Cane Creek shock and it's high level of tunability.
  • 1 0
 I wish fox would just take out their pro-pedal out of my dhx RC 4 shock 2011. Even though you supposedly have the low speed and high speed adjustments, I can never get my shock to feel as plush as I want, there is always that little bit of pro-pedal that is factory built in. Fox should back off the compression tune and give the end user more adjust-ability and range. I do not want Fox telling me that I need a down hill shock that pedals well...I don't want my down hill shock to pedal...I just want to make my rig as plush as possible so it feels gooey going down the trail. Fox, please make a more plush rc4 shock!!!! Lose the pro-pedal!!!!!
  • 1 0
 OK. As a concept it might be cool & helpful as well since we are living in the 'digital era'. But as the 'saying' goes: less is more.
I mean that the bike is a plain device provides you the opportunity to escape from daily routine, computer screens at work, professional phone calls to get outside the house, enjoy the nature or bike park & have pure fun.
Yes a modern mtb has suspensions & hydraulic brakes since it's moving on dusty gravel but application such as this is not 'think outside the box' it is more like 'think as a fashion victim' or simply as a 'geek'.
Someone commented: 'like f1 & motogp'. Yes maybe we are heading to that direction since there are so much carbon frames & components, but are you that fast or rich to need all these stuff?
So much digital help that within a few years we will getting an antivirus software for the 'programming' I mean setting of our bike.
  • 1 0
 I did not read all the comments or questions here above but, I did read and watch this brief article. The smart pump/phone concept is interesting to say the least. In viewing and reading this I am left with a question. If at the very start, the front or rear "shox" is seriously out of faze (i.e.) too low or too high in air pressure, when analyzing these configurations, would the front or rear bias of the simple seated calculations falsify the measurements when analyzing one extremity at a time? How does one go about compensating for this potential issue. Perhaps, you could measure both at the same time with a pump that applies air pressure simultaneously to both extremities. Maybe, you could even enter the topographic features to apply a more front or rear bias for climbing or Downhilling? Do you have any thoughts on this?
  • 2 0
 Yes, your 100% correct.
That was the first thing I though too.
Once you change the air pressure in one end the computer reading would be falsified on the other.

For it to work succeed you must preset your suspension first hand getting is in your range and then go from there.

I think this technology would be better suited for the consumer if Fox used this data to give accurate air pressure settings to follow on each complete bike suited with a Fox front or rear acclimating the bikes geometry, riders weight and riding style.

RidEOn!
  • 1 0
 Duhhh! Everyone knows that rebound is going to be faster with no weight on the bike versus your ass being on it and the fork or shock having to push back your weight. What a stupid piece of electronics. And how dumb of fox to not really know how to setup a suspension. Just another gimmick to sell to the masses!
  • 1 0
 Plus rebound setting is independent of the type of terrain you are riding. Am I doing some jumping in the dry or am I blasting through wet rock and root infested trails looking for the most traction? All these things change the rebound game plus other parameters. These guys seem to not know ( or care ) about proper suspension setup or just "look at me and what I can do with my geek electronics".
  • 1 0
 i feel people arnt seeing the point of this, i would say this is aimed at the bike shop and not the public. Its a modern way to get a bike setup when someone purchases a new bike, it gives the rider a basic setting to start from. I wouldnt buy this product but I would use it if i went into my bike shop.
  • 1 0
 The fact that YOU know how to set up your suspension correctly doesn't mean that everyone knows how to do that. Sometimes you need to show to the customer what are you doing with his expensive bike's suspension and this software will come in handy. Numbers are abstracts, but graphs and diagrams are clear to almost everyone.
  • 1 0
 it's great for a bike shop and it's making advances in bicycling technology. what's not cool about it? who cares if you can set the sag on your own..it useful in so many ways and also creates a whole other area of bike invention.
  • 1 0
 Anyone who thinks this is a shit idea is niaive at best. Telemetry is used to collect suspension data in every form of motorsport. Vouilloz won ten (10) DH world championships and he used it extensively. The MotoGP guys, WRC, F1, everything. They all use telemetry to help with suspension setup. If you think you're as good as a computer at knowing how your suspension is working, think again. The sensors can measure everything the suspension is doing, hundreds or thousands of times a second. Why wouldn't you want a program that could tell you exactly what to do to your settings to become faster?
  • 5 1
 what happens when i bail and scratch the little code?
  • 1 0
 Get a new sticker with the code on it?
  • 1 0
 It is for initial set up and to learn your base settings - write em down.
  • 2 0
 This came to mind immediately. You would have to remove them for safe keeping...
  • 2 0
 I think its a smart idea for the initial set up, in a shop. But for private ownership its just unnecesary.
  • 1 1
 my main problem with this is that once you spend all that money on it and get everything dialed in, when is the next time you're going to use it? It makes things easier but I think its not worth all that money. also what if you don't have a the right phone, you're not going to get a new phone to setup your suspention.
  • 2 0
 Think of it as a product that your shop would have to help you and others who are purchasing a new bike to get set up with.
  • 2 0
 putting the whole good/bad idea aside, I thought to properly set up the sag the rider is supposed to be in an attack position (off the seat) no?
  • 2 0
 using ANT+ makes it less appealing to me since the market on compatible devices are limited.
everything else is great for shops that dont know what theyre doing
  • 1 0
 If this goes mainstream Im outa the bike industry. Buncha over funded fatass lameos takin over just get out and ride. All the tech in the world can never replace a talented mech
  • 1 0
 I think it will be pretty unusful if your a rider who rides just for fun but this is fox racing shocks so I think this would help a racer to set up hes bike without carryng a guy that do it for him (less weight).
  • 5 2
 Cool, i guess. But seems a bit unnecessary.
  • 3 0
 Hmmm... it's no Rob Warner app, that's for sure.
  • 3 0
 That would be an awesome app. A sound board dedicated to Rob Warner. Eek
  • 3 0
 There already is an app with a Rob Warner soundboard. For iOS (iPhone/iTouch) only. Go to the app store and type "Freecaster" in search, and then download the app. Boom. A soundboard with about 30 of Rob's most famous lines.
  • 5 1
 so unnecessary...
  • 5 1
 sounds like a lot of bullshit to me, why the f@k would you want the smart thingy to tell you if your rebound is too slow or too fast ?
  • 1 0
 I for one think this is an awesome product that is just trying to help riders and mechanics at bike shops make the setup easier and to fine tuning will be remarkablt easier now, dont hat its a concept for gods sake.
  • 1 0
 If this was one of the secret bits of technology in the Fox Truck when it was stolen a few months ago then the thieves can keep it.
  • 1 0
 Awesome that technology is expanding more and more into the biking world. I can only see benefits. Accurate pro level suspension setting available also to non-pro.
  • 1 0
 I ride cell phone free. I set my sag to 25 - 30 %. my bike is not 2012 carbon fiber! I have a great time riding. No need for battereies on ANYTHING.
  • 2 0
 i like it, too many people turn kbobs and dont know what they doooo
  • 1 0
 If a shop needs this to set up your suspension they won't be in business very long.
  • 1 1
 With the exception to all you factory team mechanics that commented above, most people don't know crap about "properly" setting up suspension. This is a good thing
  • 2 0
 when all else fails try reading the instructions!!!
  • 1 0
 While this is definitly NOT foxes best idea It is still a good one, Dont hate
  • 2 0
 smart phones dumb people....
  • 2 0
 A how to setup your bikes for Dummies!
  • 1 0
 Great concept if your riding professionally but as far as your average trail junkie it has no value.
  • 1 0
 Coolest thing i saw in this video was the telescoping seat post in the background XD
  • 1 0
 OMG this is the worst product for 2012 by far. Setup for Dummies! a product for the mass...NOT
  • 1 0
 What a complete load of bollocks! What wrong with the gauge on the shock pump? Complete waste of time and r&d...
  • 1 0
 Where┬┤s the news??this pump?
  • 1 0
 that's a sick measuring device!
  • 1 0
 is this interbike or android market in las vegas?
  • 1 0
 wow ,how much is the nightrider version,robo bike wack
  • 1 0
 A COMPUTER DID YOUR BIKE!!!!!
  • 1 0
 Ha I use my sag ring and a ruler way faster!
  • 1 0
 that shock is ugly as hell
  • 1 0
 Mountain Bike - simplicity, durability, reliability. IMHO
  • 1 1
 faget^^^^ i could masterbate to those shocks
  • 2 3
 LAAAAAME
  • 2 0
 Singlespeed-Seb: Actually, the apostrophe on Americans is not necessary since it is being used to pluralize American. lol!





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