Deity Launches the Tyler McCaul Signature TMAC Pedals

Oct 26, 2015 at 13:04
by DEITY Components  
The Deity TMAC Pedals....

The crew at Deity are proud to announce the official launch of the Tyler McCaul signature TMAC pedal! The largest Deity pedal to date that features one of the deepest concave profiles industry-wide, the Deity TMAC pedal has been a labor of love for the rider owned company who have spent nearly 3 years perfecting what they confidently call “Your Dream Pedal”!

On a warpath, the crew at Deity have not been letting up this year! With numerous new product releases, the construction of their new Global headquarters, expanding their pro roster of riders, and more, the launch of the TMAC pedals has been one of the most anticipated Deity products since initial images leaked out at Sea Otter of this year. A true “signature” product, the TMAC was born from the collaboration between Deity and industry icon Tyler McCaul.

The Deity TMAC Pedals....

Known for his impeccable whips, beautiful style, epic lines at events like Rampage, and his ability to tie it all together with speed, the development of the TMAC pedal was patiently crafted with the goal to create the best pedal your foot will ever touch and to address issues and requests top tier riders have had for years. From slipped pedals and the lack of true concave profiles, the Deity TMAC pedals were born not only from the work of Deity and Tyler McCaul, but also the input from riders like Cameron Zink.

The Deity TMAC Pedals....

bigquotesThe TMAC pedal has been quite a while in the making actually. The initial mold we created did not have the ideal profile and after a year of testing the first prototypes, Tyler liked the pedal, but we wanted him to love it. So, we scrapped the first prototype and started from scratch with a new mold that broke away from the standard profiles and body shapes that are common to this industry. - Eric Davies (Deity, Owner)

The Deity TMAC Pedals....

Deity started studying past rider footage from not only their riders but also other riders in this industry. Their goal was to examine every possible pedal slip and missed pedal that they could. It was clear that the lack of back support on the pedal was reducing the purchase a foot could have and these millimeters were the difference between having your foot on the pedal and having it slip off after a trick or dabbed foot on a downhill run. A symmetrical pedal shape is not new, but with the heyday of thick pedals in the 90’s and early 2000’s, offset pedal profiles became the standard because of the foot's need to engage onto the pedal quicker due to the incredibly thick profile pedals used to have. It may be hard to remember for some, but these pedals looked like bricks and were so high off the spindle.

The Deity TMAC Pedals....
Those days are long long gone and thinner profiled pedals benefit a lot less from being offset as the engagement is much quicker due to being closer to the spindle and the fact that the outer trailing edges are not as thick anymore.

bigquotesWe were initially worried about the effect a symmetrical pedal at a 90-degree right angle would have when the foot tried to stomp down and engage back on the platform. Would the foot shift forward or backward more? Would there be a delay on the engagement? To test this, we made a weight driven machine that would apply downward force on the pedal when placed on a 90 degree plain. We could then measure the time it took for the foot to land flat and securely on the pedal and also, where the foot ended up being in relation to the axle when it rotated horizontally. We could then move the foot location forward or backward to then test stability when the foot is not in the ideal position. The results were as we thought they would be. The added surface area behind the spindle allowed the concave profile to really shine. The foot confidently had space to connect to the pedal without worry of lack of foot support or needing to be in the perfect location. - Eric Davies (Deity, Owner)

Overthought? Maybe, but Deity does not have any room to make mistakes, to release an inferior product, to expect their riders to risk themselves on something they do not think is the best in the business, or to let their customers be the testers. The reason they mention the above process is not to kill you with technical mumbo-jumbo, but to show just one small example of the time Deity took to invest their energy as a team into the product development with this pedal. It is easy to say that a pedal is just a pedal, but to feel the difference…you really need to ride a set of the TMACs.

The Deity TMAC Pedals....
The Deity TMAC Pedals....

bigquotesWhy has no one ever made a zero offset pedal?! More surface area, full concave and still thin. Your foot can be anywhere and still have the full grip. T Mac and Deity made the greatest pedal ever! - Cameron Zink

The Deity TMAC Pedals....

bigquotesI will be honest, I have never ridden a pedal that feels as good as the TMAC. In fact, everyone who has ridden a set states the same thing whether they ride for us or not. You can feel the love we all put into the project and the functionality of the pedal is a dream for the foot. It has been a group effort and the people involved in the process are not only ourselves and Tyler, but also Cameron Zink, Greg Watts, and countless other key riders. - Eric Davies (Deity, Owner)

The Deity TMAC Pedals....

bigquotesWhen Eric approached me a few years ago about helping him to design a signature pedal, I was excited because I knew that Deity isn't like most companies out there. They weren't just going to stamp my name onto a current pedal design that they already had, paint it with shiny colors, and call it my "signature" pedal. I knew that this meant I would legitimately be able to design my dream pedal. I knew exactly what I wanted too. I wanted a big platform with a deep concave, that holds my feet in place with its shape, rather than with huge pins that pierce into my shoe. A pedal that prevented me from slipping a foot, but at the same time allowed me to reposition a foot quickly in between jumps or rock sections if needed without having to completely lift it up and re-set it.

Since this whole phase of companies trying to make the thinnest pedals possible, I haven't been able to find a pedal that actually feels like it cups to the natural shape of my foot. We tried a couple different things over the last couple years, and learned a lot from everything that we tried, but ultimately what we found was that we had to open up a new mold to give the actual platform itself a concave shape, rather than just trying to achieve this with unnecessarily long pins on the outside edges like some other companies do.

The fact that Eric was willing to do this and open a new mold for my pedal meant a lot to me, cause being that Deity is a rider-owned company, I knew that this additional cost was coming straight out of their pocket. They've never been one to cut corners, though, and I think that this pedal is a testament to that.

After countless tweaks, changes, and lots of patience from Deity, I'm incredibly proud of this pedal, and I can't wait for people to get their feet on it! It's my dream pedal, and I hope it's yours too...
- Tyler McCaul

The Deity TMAC Pedals....

With the largest platform size in the Deity line up, the TMAC pedal features 110mm x 105mm of functional surface area that allow the deep concave profile to feel comfortable underfoot. Featuring 14 pins per side so you can customize your pin locations and set up, the TMAC pedals feature Deity’s new load distribution system that prevents bearing blowouts from side impacts and they even come in a wide range of colors for those clamoring to match up their bike kit.

The Deity TMAC Pedals....

bigquotesConcave pedals may not be for everyone and that is the reason we released the Bladerunner pedals earlier this year. Our goal with the two new designs was to cover both broad spectrums. From super thin to a pedal that boasts the most concave profile in the pedal shape in this industry, there are options for everyone in our line-up and if one type of pedal does not suit you or if you are looking for a different price point...we probably have an option that will accommodate your needs. From $50 pedals all of the way up to the TMAC, our range has quite the depth. - Sadie Davies (Deity, Co-Owner)


The Deity TMAC Pedals....

Featuring dual sided, wider pins that come pre-applied with Loctite, removing a damaged pin is now easier than ever with the TMAC pedal as you can access the pin from the top or, if it has been damaged, simply back out the mirroring pin on the opposite side and unthread the pin from the back side with an Allen key. Each pair even comes with a set of backup pins with pre-applied Loctite for you to keep in your tool box.

There are many flat pedals on the market, some that are convex, some that are concave, but the depth in the TMAC concave profile is rare. Unlike many pedals that simulate this feeling with pin profiles or a subtle concave profile to the body, the pedal shape is the key to a true concave profile and the Deity TMAC pedal boasts a full 2.5mm of concave depth in the machining of the forged pedal body. Able to execute this profile due to the large size of the TMAC pedals, the pedal cradles your foot and sinks the pins into your sole for superior traction that does not hinder you from being able to make micro adjustments to your foot position during a ride.

The Deity TMAC Pedals....

bigquotesI got to ride on some of the updated prototype TMAC pedals back in June. As I am getting older, I have noticed a lot of pressure on my Achilles' tendon on both of my ankles when riding my DH bike. With these pedals, I noticed the platform of the pedal is bigger than others I have; therefore, I'm able to move my foot more forward on the pedal and still be comfortable in my riding position, taking the pressure off my Achilles' tendon. So stoked on the pedals. Thanks, Tyler and Eric for designing such an awesome pedal! - Mike Redding (Fox Head Marketing Director and Punk Rocker)

CNC machined from Deity’s own forged extrusion, the TMAC goes through a laborious machining process that ends up creating a product that is a work of art. With each pedal hand polished to a mirror shine, the TMAC pedals are an example of the level of work Deity has become known to produce.

The Deity TMAC Pedals....

bigquotesTyler has been incredible to work with on this project. We take our signature line seriously and it is our way of incorporating our riders into what we are designing, so they can have a voice, experience the product design process, and create a product based around their experiences. Tyler never settles for anything and we love that about him. It made the development of his pedal take time, but we knew that we would do anything to make the pedal perfect and our end goal was to blow him away. Tyler would lend a set of pedals to riders for 24 hours, note their feedback, and get as many impressions as possible from Deity to non-Deity athletes. He was active in the process and we thank him for that. - Eric Davies (Deity, Owner)

The Deity TMAC Pedals....

Specs:
-The Tyler McCaul Signature Pedal
-Extruded and Machined from Deity molds and 6061 T6 aluminum
-The largest Deity pedal to date
-110mm x 105mm footprint
-Super concave 2.5mm deep pedal profile per side
-14mm thin at the center
-Symmetrical pedal profile for added foot support and stability
-Dual sided pins with pre-applied Loctite
-Includes extra set of backup pins
-Load distribution system to prevent bearing blowout
-Multi micro sealed bearings and Deity DU Bushing internals
-Heat treated Cr-Mo Spindle that is compatible with a standard 15mm wrench or 8mm allen
-Available in 5 high polished ano colors and also white Powdercoat
-409 grams
-MSRP of $168.99 USD

The Deity TMAC Pedals....

bigquotesIt has been an evolution for us and it is not easy to operate our company via the philosophies and business model that we have. We are patient as a brand, we do not bow to anyone in this industry, we do not have any investors, and we are probably the most underrated component company in this industry. We do not beg for OEM spec, we actually have relationships with our riders, we do not worry about quarterly numbers, we still uphold the values we founded this company on in 2004, and our product line continues to epitomize detail and quality with a customer service reputation that is tough to beat. We have huge plans for the next two years and we expect to make our fans proud of what we have cooking here! This is just the start of our signature line and you can expect to see some projects come to fruition with the likes of Brendan Fairclough and Neko Mullaly as well. Exciting times indeed and we are stoked to have everyone along for the ride! - Eric Davies (Deity, Owner)

The Deity TMAC Pedals....

Stay tuned later this week for the release of Deity’s latest edit by Clay Porter that features Tyler McCaul destroying berms on board his new pedals! Make sure to also follow Deity to stay updated on their massive waves of 2015 product releases, rider developments and a ton of contests as they set their sights on the giants of this industry and showcase the power of a true rider owned, operated, and funded company!

www.deitycomponents.com / @deityusa / @TMcCaul

Must Read This Week

174 Comments

  • + 172
 I'm sure this pedal is a good product but all this marketing BS makes me want to go away rather than buying it.
  • + 89
 My thought too! That is one long ass article for a pair of pedals!!!
  • + 70
 hype factor: 17 out of 10
  • + 21
 seriously... was this article sponsored by deity?
  • + 13
 advertorial. the "orial" part just barely made it
  • + 13
 @lyophilization It was. If you look who created the article deity components is written.
  • + 39
 Nah. It sounds like they really did their homework--sweating the details to make a perfect product. I'd love to ride a bike where every single component had this much thought put into it. Let my bikes evolve toward perfection!!
  • - 3
 I think Ford created the new GT in less than three years.
Taking that long in product development speaks to inefficiency in the design/development process. Unless there was some fatigue testing protocol that demanded, oh, I don't know, 50 million cycles over 30 months, there's no excuse for a hunk of metal with a spindle and bearings to take that long.
  • + 115
 @twozerosix That tends to be what separates Deity from many other companies in the bike industry. We do not just rely on machine and computer testing with a mix of brief real world testing. The bulk of time is spent on real world abuse and we do not release any product until it has lived in a real world environment for at least 12 to 24 months. Many companies think this is excessive, but it is one of the reason why our customers are not our testers.
  • + 14
 It's a company that's super proud of their products...Why put up a shoddy sales pitch?
  • + 21
 Some of these comments are crazy. Car companies have teams dedicated to meeting production deadlines on car models. Deity obviously had other things going on over the last few years and designed a new pedal in that time. they didn't dedicate 3 years straight to creating a new pedal. They collaborated over the course of a few years and waited til they had designed what they were happy with. How is that not a positive?
  • - 25
flag VTwintips (Oct 27, 2015 at 9:53) (Below Threshold)
 They did a bad job in engineering. It costs >150 bucks, and its aluminum. Manufacturing is about making a high quality product for cheapest. Maybe they win by selling them for 140 more than it cost to make, but good luck selling any.
  • - 26
flag VTwintips (Oct 27, 2015 at 9:55) (Below Threshold)
 They are also making it appear concave while the inner part is clearly convex.
  • + 2
 @deityusa thanks for the reply. I appreciate the 'real world abuse' element. Doesn't that make it hard to capitalize on a changing market though - relying on two years of testing? For every one model of pedal that 'makes the cut' are there six others that don't?
  • + 32
 @twozerosix We have always felt that it is more important to not keep up with the rat race and just focus on what we are doing. Our priority was to hit the needs Tyler had in the design. Nevertheless, throughout the real world testing process, we make multiple changes to a product. That is the magic of being a maneuverable brand that is not locked into OE specs, deadlines, and inability to make quick changes. The worst thing we could do is to focus on capitalizing on market changes as we need to march to our own beat. Our business model is foreign to most in this industry, but is one of the reasons we have the following we do.
  • + 11
 Eric and Sadie are some of the most legit people in the bike industry. They are not the kind of people to blow smoke up your ass. When they are this excited about something, it tells me that it is a seriously rad product. I can't wait to get my hands on some. Awesome work!
  • - 12
flag shaowin (Oct 27, 2015 at 11:35) (Below Threshold)
 Dumbest comment ever. Good luck finding new and great products with out marketing. Go buy your next anything based on a lack of marketing.... I dare you! Have fun on eBay with your knock off China shit.
  • + 6
 @shaowin that escalated quickly.

@deityusa appreciate the response. room for all kinds of approaches in this passion-driven industry.
  • - 9
flag shaowin (Oct 27, 2015 at 13:03) (Below Threshold)
 Lol pink bike rants. Meant it though.
  • + 17
 @deityusa Keep on making the good stuff baby. I love it. Don't worry about all the haters on here. Pinkbike is a shit talkers paradise. Spray some air freshener and keep on walking.
  • + 5
 ^ this guy gets it.
  • + 2
 I don't know about any of that but personally, I like the be able to adjust my pins from both sides in case of a break off.
  • + 2
 It's not just about cutting a shape and throwing in on a spindle and riding. Anybody who has ridden a crappy pedal knows small changes here and there can make or break a design. There's nothing wrong with a company taking its time and making sure a product is 100% perfect before releasing it. Deity does it right and it shows with their products and the people who stand behind them and ride for them.
  • + 2
 It's an article about a product launch not test. Of course it's going to read like an advertisement, because it is. No different than any one of the 100's of others I've read on pinkbike over the years. That said I've always found deity products to be very good quality and their customer service has been top notch even in the case of a f*cked up part that was 100% due to my improper installation.
  • + 104
 There is no way on earth that i could fit one of those pedals in my mouth.
  • + 10
 ok then
  • + 14
 I'm wondering how you Brits ride bikes ? Mouth biting a pedal, feets on handlebar and trying to grab the saddle like a rugbyman ? You savage brutes Big Grin
  • + 9
 They look like some serious shin bangers, attach a pole to one of these and u got a modern day mase to fend off bike thiefs and crazy environmentalists (nothing against tree huggers, just the wacko booby trap setting ones).
  • + 0
 Want a mouthful of pedals; here is your chance
  • + 51
 That has to be the longest article of a pedal in the history of the universe. Tl;dr.
  • + 14
 Definitely a bit too lengthy of a press release, but we wanted to convey some of the process that went into the pedal design and development. Surprisingly, the TMAC pedals venture away from what has become the norm for flat pedals lately and instead of expecting the readers to come up with their own conclusions as to why we did something, we wanted to elaborate on it a bit.
  • + 24
 Perhaps next time maybe instead of fourteen (14!) studio photos of the pedal in varying colors to convey your message of pedal design and development, you could surely show some of the prototype stages, CNC machining, iterations and product design stages instead? Even if it is made in Taichung there's still an iterative design process stateside, 3D printed prototypes and CEN/JIS testing stuff. Having the readers come up to their own conclusions is great, but as it stands, I think this article fails to present your message.
  • + 9
 Thanks for the feedback @Terrafire !
  • - 12
flag VTwintips (Oct 27, 2015 at 9:58) (Below Threshold)
 Are you guys going to release a more price competitive model in aluminum? I've got your plastics, and they decent but they don't have enough pins or a great shape for all mountain riding because without more pins and concavity, they are kind of slippy, despite the large area.
  • + 8
 @VTwintips We currently offer 4 different pedal designs that cover a wide range of price points. From $50 all of the way to the TMACs...
  • - 11
flag VTwintips (Oct 27, 2015 at 18:03) (Below Threshold)
 You sell a piece of plastic for 50 bucks though. Isn't that the most expensive in the industry? Don't get me wrong. They are sturdy pedals despite being plastic. Mine are still going... with the limited grip that they have. That being said, I feel like my next set of pedals will be v12's since they are aluminum and comperable to the pedals you are putting out for 100 dollars more, or 3x the price. They cost the same as your plastic pedal, all while probably being slightly heavier than your extremely expensive aluminum pedal *like very slightly, were talking 20 grams*, but offering a nice concave shape that just grips your foot better than yours will. Admittedly, yours is more complicated, but it doesn't seem to be more complicated in any area that makes a difference or is worth the price difference. Areas such as machining that only saves weight and doesn't increase grip, or with fancier colors.

Can you justify this? Is there something that makes your product better than the v12 that I am overlooking?

You have people saying things like:

"I found the convex shape of the Compounds kinda strange and I sold them pretty quick but I never considered that it could be really good once I got used to it. If Diety made a concave version, I'd give that a go."

" Funny you said that, I was running the Deity Compound prior to the DMR V12. Loved the looks and price of that pedal but when it came to grip from pedal design and the pins, I'd take the V12s any day of the week. (And note I rode both with five ten freerider vxi's and noticed a difference) I'm not slamming the compound though, fine pedal for the buck. But if your willing to put in a bit more cash for a better product go V12."

So why not go concave?
  • + 1
 hey if you don't want to read the press release, don't! I really enjoyed reading the article. I like that it was written so that if you wanted more information, you could keep reading on, or you could just read the first part and go on with your day. Deity is one of the few companies that truly puts a concerted effort into quality products for customers, and not just monetary success. Im happy to see that they are currently excelling at both.
  • + 1
 FYI, im propably the last person to post any of this "too long, didn't read" stuff. I like reading long and detailed articles, photo epics etc. But i literally think i've read shorter bike reviews. Just couldn't make it to the end, a pedal is one of the least interesting bike parts, its basically just a chunk of metal with a bearing and a few pins...

No hate, just a humble opinion. Of course you have to try and justify such a hefty price tag on a simple component. Wink
  • - 1
 That anodizing tho haha.
  • + 0
 terrafire is STILL in denial. Spew all the jargon you want, but these pedals don't need shims to spin lmao
  • + 1
 What the hell are you talking about? I'm not in denial of anything. Not to mention I never mentioned shims. Just because the jargon is above your head doesn't mean I'm incorrect.
  • + 1
 Lmao... over a year later and you are just as easy to bait
  • + 1
 I wanted your advice on a RF crank. Wanna unblock me so I can pm you, Terrafire?
  • + 1
 And FYI nothing you said was over my head... I said "jargon", not "gobbledygook"
  • + 1
 I no longer work for Raceface, you're on your own bud.
  • + 1
 Shitty. Hope your new gig is as cool as your last one
  • + 34
 Literally everything Deity makes is just absolutely sick, i have never had any issues with their products, and they still look good after years of thrashing
  • + 11
 If your pedals look good after years of thrashing, you're not trying hard enough.
  • + 7
 Or maybe he rides so good that he barely scrapes the pedals?
  • + 22
 They look awesome and seem to work great too. Only problem is: I would never pay 170 bucks for a pedal, doesn't matter how good it is
  • + 3
 I remember saying that to myself at more than one point in my life. Then having spindles break, pedal bodies popping off the spindle due to some design SNAFU (Situation Normal, All F'd Up), pins that wouldn't stay put for more than one ride, and some scarred shins and abbreviated rides had me looking for some sweet and durable pedals. I'll consider these when my current pedals (from another manufacturer) are retired... or maybe even before.
  • + 16
 But is it super extra Iong so you engage your biomechanics?

Also there aren't enough #scientificquotes #science #marketingwords in this article, looks dubious.
  • + 2
 but maybe that's what makes it #extralegit
  • + 9
 Look lovely but TLDR. Over-self-hyped. Love a bit of background & tech but feel this is over the top. Bit of a turn-off. 1st-world problems tho' eh...
  • + 6
 I would want to see these come with the pins that come with Decoy LT pedals.

Hey Deity with your short-lived distribution in Canada are you back to a more customer-direct sales model or any plans for a new distributor?
  • + 8
 @north-shor-bike-shop Unfortunately, Trident Sports moved away from distribution in the bike industry all together, but we are currently on the hunt for a new distributor with strong roots. If you are in need of picking up some product in the interim, hit us up directly as we are more than happy to get you dialed in. Thanks for the support!
  • + 3
 Cycles Lambert.
  • + 2
 At the shop I'm in we sell a lot of NRG ans raceface pedals because they have a huge selling feature: the replaceable pins come in the box! Seems like a minor thing but a lot of other manufacturers' pins are nearly impossible to get replacements for.
  • + 16
 @j-t-g Props to NRG and Race Face! We agree and include a full set of extra pins in each box as well (with pre-applied Loctite).
  • + 1
 @deityusa Any chance we'll see a compound platform in this design? I have the current ones and they are amazing, would like to try something like this to, cheers!
  • + 1
 UK availability please!
  • + 5
 There sure are a lot of haters on here. The parts that connect you to your bike (grips, handlebar shapes, pedal shapes) are great products to develop with some of the most talented riders in the biz. I've been an exclusive flat pedal rider for 11 years and having tried many of the premium level flats out there....I'd say this one is sure worth a try.

What if....Deity was out to make a sweet pedal, and not so much to make the most creative marketing collateral you've ever seen.

I say keep developing better products and let the sand slowly filter out of all the whiny pu$$ies in this place. If you don't like the variety of photos and such in these articles, why don't you tell you're mom.
  • + 9
 So many haters!! Props to @deityusa for stepping up to some tough critics.
  • + 8
 These are actually sick af
  • + 2
 Nice looking Pedal! But this zero offset thing has only one purpose: to make the production cost of this pedal cheaper, left and right pedal body are the same, so just one production line and no attention to seperate left and right pedal body in production. Also all pin-threads and bore can be done from one side of the pedal, no need to turn it around for drilling and taping the other side. Just one goal, faster easier and cheaper production.
  • + 2
 "Open a new mold for my pedal"? Maybe they mean a different extrusion die? They do have a nice finish, but I don't see anything special to justify the price difference to other pedals HT is making. Not like flat pedals are rocket science.
  • + 4
 What direction do you think the extrusion die is oriented in, to create these pedals? Is the die in the shape of the top view, and they slice off 1" thick chunks for further machining? Or from the end view, so they create a cavity for the spindle?

Probably a rather complex die with several mandrels either way, but its the machining and finishing labor time that put it into the $160-range.
  • + 1
 The extrusion is in view of the concave shape, so nothing special. Machining is done from top view. This pedal is around 20$, for a complete set of pedals from the vendor. The finishing and machining time is standart, nothing too complex.
  • + 2
 YES! I dreamed about zero offset pedals! Good job deity! Don't have any deity products yet but pedals are probably going to be first one to get as my octane one pedals are failing me. Keep it up with new ideas and think outside the box!
  • + 2
 I appropriate nice components and even own quite a few Deity components but this article is overwhelming. The article has so many large pictures in it I find it hard to read about the development and design. The article gives me no understanding of what is coming next because there are so many full size picture of the pedal. To find the specs list I had to keep scrolling, usually Pinkbike articles have headings, and insightful pictures but not these are just the same blown up picture of the same pedal just in another color.
  • + 2
 Despite reading all the above thread. Good and bad... And the impressive Deity responses... Can you Diety... Tell us EU / UK riders if and when who will be the distributors... We clearly want these.... Like now. Cheers.
  • + 2
 Please incorporate pins that screw in from the reverse side. Obviously cannot be done with this design though. I already have some of your pedals with pin design like these and will not be purchasing pedals like this again.
  • + 2
 Shape looks great. Loving the thin profile! But I'm sick of ripped out threads of grub screws with no possibility to get a new one in... so sorry Deity... No love from my side.
  • + 1
 Same here. I'd prefer a "screw-through-the-body-from-the-back-side" type of pin-design. But maybe this will be a bit complicated, regarding the zero-offset if you want to acheive a 100% symmetrical pedal. Grub screws never seem to stay in the desired height, no matter how much threadlocker you put on them, unless you use high-strengh locker, but then you'll never get them out of the pedal again.
  • + 4
 i want to like these, but i cant stand that style pin, from the back only, no homo
  • + 1
 I was going to comment exactly the same thing. Running MG-1 mag pedals with grub screws I've consistently had them pull out and damage the body while they do that (not sure if Al instead of Mg is better). Now running VP Vices on my bikes with a couple of pins removed and some spacer washers under the pins which screw from the back and working really well. Thin, light and cheap too and come in a few colors.
  • + 1
 I like how thorough the article was. I like all the hi-res pics. When I can't see something in person, I want to know exactly what im getting........That being said the price is still TOO HIGH....I have a pair of Deity skyscrappers 1. The allen screws they used in the pedals were too narrow and half of them ended up snapping with in 1 season while none of them were replaceable with out stripping out the allen head even after soaking them in anti seize overnight. I was NOT able to get a replacement or refund from Deity. The next year they upgraded to the V2 with a heavier screw that was stronger and easier to replace...I sure hope they didnt spend three years developing the pedals I have.
  • + 2
 Flats keep getting better and better...stoked on companies like Deity and Canfield taking a different approach to pedal design. However at this time my feet are addicted to my Spanks, and they just wont die!
  • + 4
 Pinkbike is a shit talkers paradise. Good job on the pedal guys. I can't wait to give it a go. I'm excited Smile
  • + 1
 Deity does make awesome products. Seriously they are damn durable, solid and proven.

Getting a pro riders feedback is a good thing but regardless Deity makes great products with or without. I doubt most people could tell the difference between these pedals and similar size pedals from other brands. The only thing people care about are durability, look/design/style and for some weight.
  • + 3
 Uk availability please?? want these... Might last longer then the great grip but terrible reliiabiltly of e 13. Price reasonable if they survive a uk winter... Or two.
  • + 2
 Love me some Deity! Deity Mohawk carbon bars (uncut) + 160 van here = current cockpit on my '11 5pot. Terrain in this part of TX is flat-ish but also flows well +++ plenty of tech spots.
  • + 1
 These pedals are seriously huge, would people run them for stuff other than shuttles and freeride? I like the look of these but not sure 110x105 is gonna be practical on rocky climbs!
  • + 1
 I think I'm going to implode, massive grats to Deity even gettin in to replying on this thread. But... As you have.... Plz plz... Is there a UK / EU distribution??? Christ... I'll even do myself at this rate..
  • + 4
 14 pins a side, gonna need shin pads !
  • + 4
 Nah. Man up. Eventually you don't even notice when you're bleeding until you're done riding and your sock is red.
  • + 1
 Just remove half of them and add them back until you're happy, no need for 14. My current pedals came stock with 8 pin screws and 4 grub screws, took them down to 6 screws and 2 grubs, still work just fine and way less bite potential.
  • + 4
 Thank you for being RAD, DEITY!
  • + 3
 Didn't read ALL of the whinny comments, but if you haven't tried Deity's Decoy or Bladerunner... you are CLUELESS!!
  • + 1
 The bladerunners are better, specially with the slopped fronts to defect strikes.
  • + 1
 Where do the reflectors go? Just kidding. They look good but I don't think i'd pay $200+ AUD for a flat pedal. Overall though it's good to see some innovation in the flat pedal market
  • + 0
 To much money for a pedal---

I bought a pair of Nukeproof Nuetrons last year and they have held up to all kinds of abuse from DH to AM. They were only $65 +shipping.

Pretty much every company is using the same materials, spindle design and bearing and bushing placement. Also, looking at the flat sides with raised edges of the pedal, I can only see these hooking on things too easily. I don't think I'd use these pedals around rocks everywhere mountains!

So what is it about these pedals that justify the cost?
  • + 1
 How can a pedal make that much of a difference. I'll admit I just bought some canfields and they stick to my feet better than my HT or spanks. But can there be this much of a difference with these deity pedals?
  • + 2
 Deity stuff is sick! My favorite part is the fact that I couldn't find the word "efficiency" anywhere in that article. #flatsforever
  • - 1
 These pedals look great for sure, and after such a long article, how could you have any doubts about their efficiency ? ^^ But what percentage of us "pinkbikers" can really afford them, or would like to spend this much for pedals ?! Don't want to blame Deity cuz their components are quality and Pinkbike is probably the best place for product placement and advertising, but do all these products really fit the average rider's purse ? Guess the polls are the best way to know us then, cuz for me the answer is no...
  • + 2
 So what does the average rider's purse look like? I'm ordering a new pair of pedals soon and I plan on spending $150+ for a new set. You get what you pay for.
  • - 1
 Mtn bike is come to political. After reading that I wouldn't even buy those pedals. The last month has not been right from seminuk is a winning bitch at rampage. Then the other 4 riders that are u can't ride.my lines and now this article for pedals that should of been these are tmacs new pedal here u go
  • + 1
 Holy fuck that was a lot of marketing BS. Just show us a video of TMac riding the pedals, tell us how big they are, how much they weigh, and how much they cost. Done deal.
  • + 3
 Is this the advertising section?
  • + 2
 They going to look great till that first pedal strike.... Whoop whoop.. I'll take an orange ano pair please
  • + 1
 i remember the beartrap pedals i had on my bmx....now and again you found yourself standing on the edge because they was flat.....offsets dont do that :-).....just saying
  • + 2
 I'm confused about what the "offset" means here, since Zink says this is the first pedal with zero offset?
  • + 3
 I think what he meant is that most pedals look like a "parallelogram" more than a "square when you look them from the side. Hope you get the idea. Wink
  • + 6
 don't know but zero offset MUST be better. you buy now
  • + 1
 If it really means that it's not a paralellogram shaped pedal, then off the top of my head Tioga D-Spyder did that years ago. Not a great pedal otherwise, but yeah, "zero offset".
  • + 4
 @Pedro404 The pedal shape is symmetrical, so unlike offset pedal shapes that have more depth of the platform in the front of the spindle and less in the back end...the TMAC has the same depth on the front and also the back side of the spindle.
  • + 2
 Again... UK availabity guys?? to you deityusa cheers.
  • + 1
 @deityusa so coming off a "standard" offset pedal then placing my feet on this one, I'm going to have the ball of my foot much close to the spindle and the force of my rotation. I wonder why so many (read:most) flat pedals are offset....
  • + 2
 I was wondering that too. Am I the only one that remembers Atomlab Pimplite pedals?
  • + 2
 @dave-f Or maybe a bashed, ridden hard and still functioning pedal is the epitome of good looks!
  • + 2
 That was crazy long for just a pedal launch. They look nice though, but man that was a long press release.
  • + 0
 Way too expensive for the weight... with Shimano Saints at $50, who the hell is going to spend almost $200 with tax for something that weighs about the same and is probably less bulletproof.
  • + 7
 If you've ever ridden saint pedals you should know what a pile of rubbish they are! I typically prefer my pedals to remain intact for more than a month..
  • + 0
 Wouldn't bother with these then, those pins are a fail waiting to happen.
  • + 2
 You'd be surprised. I've smashed my bladerunner pedals into tons of rocks in every way imaginable and still have all of my pins after about 6 months of riding almost everyday
  • + 1
 I will, no tax though.
  • + 1
 @bboutin - you either ride like a complete hack or got unlucky... either way Shimano will get you a new pair for free if they only lasted a month.

I've had pedal strikes that literally made my leg go numb and my Saints are still ticking two years later.
  • + 4
 Shimano Saint pedals suck ass. You couldn't even pay me to put those on my bike. Just based on your comparison alone it is obvious you don't know what you are talking about. Don't be ignorant when you have no clue.
  • + 1
 Burgtec pedals. Enough said. Yes they weigh about as much as a small house, but the durability makes it worth it I think.
  • + 1
 @ustemuf - tell me how/why the suck?
  • + 1
 @Alias530 The grip sucks, durability sucks, they just suck as a pedal.
  • + 3
 @Alias530 I've owned and tried pedals from Kona, Point 1, Race Face, HT, Shimano, Canfield, Chromag, Straitline, Speedplay, Crankbrothers...

Needless to say I've sampled a lot. The Saint's have shit grip. I'd be inclined to say the grip on the Saint is equivalent to that of a plastic Wal-Mart pedal.
  • + 0
 In stock form the grip is shit... remove the washers under the pins and they're very grippy. With my 240lb self and more pedal strikes than I can count and they're barely even scratched.
  • + 2
 OT Alias? In any form the grip is shit when you compare it to a better pedal.
  • + 3
 nice
  • + 2
 UK availability? when where?
  • + 1
 I was on the $$$ thin flat pedal bandwagon for years until I saw the light and went clipless 3 years ago.
  • + 1
 i love deity and buy them when i can but i wont be buying them at $170??!?!
  • + 1
 Gonna have to be a good pedal to take me off my burgtecs.Tried & tested!
  • + 2
 haha tmac is the nickname my friends gave me.
  • + 1
 Too bad, I ride clipless :-)
  • + 1
 i think grub screws are a bad choice for pedals.
  • + 1
 It largely depends on the trail, I used a couple of superstar nanos with grub screws with no issue for two years. Then I started training for an enduro race on really really rocky technical terrain and stripped four pin holes in 2 weeks.
  • + 1
 168.99 USD?? I will look elsewhere ...
  • + 1
 Nice pedals. But I would cringe at a pedal strike!
  • - 1
 Probably the longest article I've ever seen about a flat pedal.. It's a flat pedal, not much on the way of innovation here, don't hype it up so much.
  • + 1
 Noce ones, i take brendogs or lacondeguys vaults tho...
  • - 2
 3 years to develop a flat pedal ? I call bullshit, maybe they took that long in total but there is no chance in hell you could spend that long on a flat pedal with no redeeming feautres
  • + 2
 Looks very nice
  • + 1
 Looks like.... a pedal
  • + 0
 Is Tyler McCaul reeaaaallly an "industry icon" though?
  • - 1
 no. they reupped on the hype juice
  • + 0
 need even more closer and closer pics, what about the atoms?
  • - 1
 Ya I'm not buying them 170 is to much for a pedal and I'm not much of a fan of the design of them
  • - 1
 Jake Kinney sig. pedal anyday soon?
  • - 1
 Oh... a pedal... super excited.
  • - 2
 They're only pedals FFS. Anyone would think they've cured feckin cancer the way they're going on.
  • - 1
 All that R&D lol, those pins are a fail, back to the drawing board!
  • + 5
 Curious if you're ridden the pedal before.
  • - 3
 PB please no more of this. A couple pictures and paragraph would have sufficed.
  • + 4
 Then when they don't have enough you'd be here complaining about lack of information and wanting more photos.
  • + 0
 honestly i don't come here to post negative comments. I was genuinely interested in the product and I generally like deity. Just seemed a bit overboard. But I get it. Opinions are like assholes. Everybody has one and they all stink.
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