2012 Norco Truax

Jan 27, 2011 at 12:08
Jan 27, 2011
by Mike Levy  
 
You must login to Pinkbike.
Don't have an account? Sign up

Join Pinkbike  Login

Norco has just uploaded photos of their new 2012 Truax, a burly and slack 7" travel freeride bike, to their Pinkbike account. Looks like things on the Shore are evolving!



Norco Truax

Hoots and his 2012 Norco Truax<br><br>Pictured above is the new Norco Truax 1, a 7 inch travel freeride oriented machine that looks as fun as a barrel of monkeys. The gist straight from Norco: <I>The TRUAX is designed for those riders that are just as likely to pedal up to the trailhead as they are to take a shuttle or chairlift to the top of the mountain before they dive in and revel in their descent. Seven inches of travel and a slack headtube angle make this bike right at home on the way down. Ride it everywhere, every day: jumps, ladders, berms, steep descents, park, shore... wherever you need a fast, versatile and incredibly fun bicycle.</I>
Hoots and his 2012 Norco Truax

Pictured above is the new Norco Truax 1, a 7 inch travel freeride oriented machine that looks as fun as a barrel of monkeys. The gist straight from Norco: The TRUAX is designed for those riders that are just as likely to pedal up to the trailhead as they are to take a shuttle or chairlift to the top of the mountain before they dive in and revel in their descent. Seven inches of travel and a slack headtube angle make this bike right at home on the way down. Ride it everywhere, every day: jumps, ladders, berms, steep descents, park, shore... wherever you need a fast, versatile and incredibly fun bicycle.
The new Truax makes use of a one piece link (<I>top left</I>) in the never ending fight to make the final product lighter, stiffer, and stronger. Norco is another company that is using the much debated 12 x 142 mm rear axle sizing, making use of the Syntace X12 design (<I>bottom left</I>). The Truax could see everything from a triple ring, to a Hammerschmidt, to a single ring and guide combo bolted up by it's owners, so Norco wisely spec'd the bike with both ISCG tabs and a place for a direct mount front derailleur (<I>bottom right</I>). As you'd expect to see, the front of the bike sports a big 'ol tapered headtube (<I>top right<I/>).
The new Truax makes use of a one piece link (top left) in the never ending fight to make the final product lighter, stiffer, and stronger. Norco is another company that is using the much debated 12 x 142 mm rear axle sizing, making use of the Syntace X12 design (bottom left). The Truax could see everything from a triple ring, to a Hammerschmidt, to a single ring and guide combo bolted up by it's owners, so Norco wisely spec'd the bike with both ISCG tabs and a place for a direct mount front derailleur (bottom right). As you'd expect to see, the front of the bike sports a big 'ol tapered headtube (top right).
The Truax's 7
The Truax's 7" of travel is enough to have fun anywhere, but not so much to totally eliminate the option of getting to the top under your own power. Likewise, it's geometry also strikes a middle ground between full-on DH slackness and steeper All-Mountain numbers. Climbers out there should take note of the bike's full length seat tube.

From Norco:
bigquotesThe TRUAX is an evolution of the iconic Shore bicycles that Norco pioneered. The original Shores were built for and named after the fabled North Shore mountains near Vancouver, BC. This fairytale dreamland is filled with ladder bridges and skinny beams suspended perilously high above the forest floor. To add to these harrowing stunts were drops, jumps and steep rock faces; the Shore is a place of great experimentation and pioneering which spawned new bicycles and riding styles. As this style of riding has evolved and diversified, so too have the demands and needs of shore-style riders on their equipment. The shore style has grown to include long and fast descents, flowing trails, and drops, gaps and jumps with smooth transitions; most now term this riding in general as "freeride." And this is where the new TRUAX steps in. The TRUAX rides the line between a traditional shore bicycle, a freeride bike and a downhill bike, pulling the best from each world and essentially creating a new style of bicycle design and intended use. Just as at home on Vancouver's renowned North Shore as it is leading a pack of friends through the downhill park, the TRUAX makes short work of the climb up for those who chase self-access thrills as well. Lightweight, fast, nimble and adaptable, it is the one-for-all bike for those who tread on the side of steep, technical, good times over spandex-clad climbs.



Check out the new Truax on their website.
Must Read This Week









127 Comments

  • + 15
 Sexy! Now lets see the 2012 DH bike Wink
  • + 2
 That actually looks so sick! Do we really have to wait until 2012? Frown
  • + 4
 that is sick. complete with built in fork bumpers. i think that should be standard
  • + 1
 What's with the massive shock collars?
  • + 2
 @heavymetal45 - Norco was using the Horst Link long before Specialized bought it and renamed it to FSR.

Another misinformed over opinionated Pinkbike user...
  • + 1
 truax is comin out in june, no info on the team dh. in my neck of the woods not until 2012. if the frame doesnt snap, it could be a perfect bike...
  • - 10
 oh look ma, its a trek scratch! and soon a new session 88! gone are the days of unique design, now its all perfected engineering that will render simliar design bikes.
[Reply]
  • + 9
 "The TRUAX rides the line between a traditional shore bicycle, a freeride bike and a downhill bike, pulling the best from each world and essentially creating a new style of bicycle design and intended use"

Seriously?
OK, call it what you want, but don't make the same mistake the auto industry manufactures do every time they come up with a new car - it some how belongs into a new category (SUVs,SAVs, Coupe SUVs, and so it goes on...)

What was wrong with "All Mountain" to start with?
  • + 6
 This is not an AM bike though at 7 inches. Norco was a long time maker of the FR/Shore style bike. As the trails have evolved, so has this style of bike. I agree with all the names, but it is tough to name niche markets.
  • + 1
 not so much as a mini dh bike, but i could put em all in the same pot
  • + 3
 it appeals to me as i cant justify having a pure DH bike. with this and a hard hitting 5in trail bike i can get away with 2 bikes to comfortably cover all the riding styles i enjoy.
  • + 2
 I like the geo. Freeride/Super D. That bike will own at a place like Sea Otter.
  • + 1
 still waiting to see the price, and compare it to supreme 6, tr 250, makulu, and other.
  • + 3
 The TR250 is a contender to be sure.
  • + 1
 I am actually debating to buy either this truax or the tr250 for next year, pretty similar specs but a big price difference :\
[Reply]
  • + 7
 "Climbers out there should take note of the bike's full length seat tube" - not true, the seat tube bends, so not at all full length (check the Norco link to see a better pic). Long enough for decent adjustment, but don't call it 'full length'.
  • + 2
 I know. Rediculous. I can't understand why they would make such an effort to emphasis that fact when it's not even true. E
[Reply]
  • + 6
 I wish PB would start including the full size version of the thumbnail image associated with the article. I clicked on this link hoping to see the full bike shot somewhere. Frown
  • + 1
 check the Norco web link - full bike and frame pics.
  • + 3
 Every time you have to click a link, you lose 50% of your user audience.
[Reply]
  • + 4
 Why such a need for something new? Sure someone could come up with something new, Cannondale does with a dual pull shock, head shock etc. If you are one of those people looking for something different, I wonder what you ride. Is it fancy and different and hard to get parts for, or is it a tried and true design that delivers.

This bike looks like a direct conteder with the Scratch and SX Trail, a good place to be for Norco, and a good looking bike. I recently was looking for a Free-ride bike, and it got narrowed down to SX Trail and Scratch because of the seat tube, looks like Norco is banking on the fact that I am not the only sale they were missing out on, and went with something that has proven to be selling better.
[Reply]
  • + 5
 "Climbers out there should take note of the bike's full length seat tube"

??

seat tube is clearly bent where the rocker pivot mounts...limiting seat post depth insertion - certainly not full length
[Reply]
  • + 3
 Awesome looking bike!! The design looks similar to a lot of bikes out there, but it seems like Norco cleaned it up and smoothed it out to make the whole bike flow in a sexy way!! Whats up with the picture of Hoots?? Looks like he just took a big bong rip right before the photo....cough, cough, cough,....................Nooooooorrrrrrrccccoooooo!!!!
[Reply]
  • + 11
 Ha! just another bike in the norco fleet.
  • + 22
 Vast improvement from the fuck ugly design produced over the last 2 or so years.
  • + 5
 Jay Hoots what a trail builder, that is a sweet looking bike. bet it will ride good as all norco's do
  • + 3
 That downtube makes the bike look like it should have come stock with old 30mm stanchion forks!
  • + 4
 Is anyone else getting tired of seeing so many bike companies coming out with basically the same bike?

Giant: www.cheapmtb.com/images/2010/11/2010-giant-faith.jpg
Trek: mountain.bike198.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/07/session-88-silver.jpg
Kona: www.nobodybuy.com/2010/03/12/megajayasports/400x400_p1058741/supply-kona-stinky-air-2009-mountain-bik.jpg
This ones a stretch, but the linkage is still basicly the same,
Specialized: cdn.mos.bikeradar.com/images/bikes-and-gear/bikes/mountain/1242051213262-d874p69q35h8-500-90-500-70.jpg

Why do I get the feeling this is gonna' get me a ton of negative props....
  • + 19
 ^ Details matter.
  • + 11
 The linkage look similar on all of them, but the suspension systems are almost all different.
  • + 0
 One thing I don't understand is how norco can be claiming they have a full length seat tube. I see that there is a tube there, but since it is bent and last I checked you can't stick a seat post down a bent seat tube, I fail to see how as a tall rider I'm supposed to be excited about it.
  • + 3
 mcsession, no offence but this shit is so generic it kills me. !! its rediculous.
  • + 2
 In the new norco's the bolt holding the derailleur hanger is designed to be the break point in lieu of a hanger that breaks. Isn't that the bolt that clamps the axle? So if you hang your derailleur and snap the hanger, your wheel comes unclamped too? Seems like a good design.

E.
  • + 1
 @mountain maniac,
because it works
  • - 2
 I am going to agree with you an that, it does work, and it works good, and thats fine for most people. But there are people who prefer the feel and ride (not to mention the look) of different linkage and suspension designs.
Simply put, I would like to see manufactures pushing their engineers to create something new. I just think that the companies manufacturing bikes should try to be more unique!
  • + 1
 i see your point, but its not that simple. all those suspension designs are patented, so you see specialized bikes all have the 4-bar linkage going on, because they have the patent for it. other companies like kona and trek use it too, but you don't see one company with their bike using all different suspension designs because of all the patents and things like that. now, a company could possibly come up with a totally new suspension design, but that's WAY easier and cheaper said than done...by the way, most of these companies didn't even invent the concept of the way the suspension works, most of the suspension designs are taken from ideas that originated from different industries.
  • + 1
 thats why i like companies like Knolly, Mondraker and lappierre with their fancy exclusive suspension designs.
  • + 4
 Pretty ignorant to call all the bikes the same. They are not, end of story. I could go on rants about how every single one of those bikes is different in almost every way, from tube thickness, to wheel paths to geometry. The Norco is a 4-Bar design yes, but thats about all it shares in common with those other rigs save for the tapered headtube.
  • + 1
 ^^ yeah. i agree with you. but more than anything.... its just business, everyone's in it to make more money - that's always the goal, and if that's what sells, youd be stupid not to make it. regardless of how similar or different they are.
  • + 2
 there are only so many forms of LIGHT AND STRONG AND LOW every one of those bikes are different and offer different ride characteristics. Look beyond the shape and you'll discover many great innovations from all the companies listed above. I boggles my mind that after the first picture on the internet, every one is an expert on the subject.
  • + 1
 any body that is complaining about companies creating linkage systems that look somewhat similar is retarded. They do this because it is the best way to create the proper curve desired in the shock progression, the best wheel path, negates pedal bob, and brake jacking does not effect these systems. That being said they are still all slightly different. And if you are whining about look variety over superior function then you probably need to go ride more.
  • + 3
 Guess what, before suspension technology started all the bikes looked EXACTLY the same. Was this because copy-cating was cool or maybe was it because the triangle design just was the smartest. Now it seems clear that most manufacturers find that rocker link to be a good way to gain stiffness while limiting weight, the fact they all do it is because it works. The other reason all the bikes you listed look similar is because they all use the same tube manufacturing technology. Unfortunately looks are the end of the similarity for most of them. You said the big hit was the least similar when really its the most similar. The small details of the linkage and geometry are what define the bike, not what it looks like.
  • + 1
 This bike looks like a vast improvement over the previous Shore configurations up to this point. I am a big fan of an overall larger area rear triangle. Looking at a lot of the bikes on the market today the trend to extremely compact rear triangles (Devinci Wilson is a good example of what I'm talking about) is somewhat suspect. A basic concept of engineering is called tolerance stacking, the more pivots you have, the closer together they are, and the further away from the object they are articulating (the wheel) the more resultant flex they produce for a given level of strain. This bike keeps those pivots as far away from each other as possible and braced against the solid structure of the front triangle rather than having floating linkages.

I like this bike personally.
  • + 2
 People complain when companies stick to "tried-and-true" designs. Other people complain when companies try new, unproven designs. Some people complain when companies use the same old parts and standards that have been around forever, because they are not suitable for modern day mountain biking (like 9mm QR axles for instance). Then still others complain about the new standards that come out to address these issues.

Basically what I'm trying to say is that no matter what gets released, someone will be happy, and others will not. It's a good thing we have this thing called "Free Market" and allow our dollar to dictate what gets produced in the future.
  • + 1
 @cueTIP: while I agree with you about tolerance stacking, I'm not sure your example of the Wilson is a good one. It's an extremely compact rear triangle, yes, but it's also essentially a single pivot design. The swingarm is also extremely stout. And while I don't doubt that the Truax's rear triangle is stiff, I would be willing to bet that the Wilson's is stiffer. Even though 4-bar and horst-link bikes are not virtual pivots, per se, they still have far more pivots than a single pivot.
  • + 2
 I agree with you, I was just using the Wilson as an illustration for what I meant by a "compact" rear triangle. A better example would be one of the old Norco bikes (aka a Shore or Six) where the linkage directly attached to the shock is mounted to the front triangle by pivots at one end and the shock mounting point in the center as opposed to the much stronger rocker link used here. A lot of the short linkage bikes like Giants I suspect will not last as long without significantly larger pivot hardware to deal with the stresses placed on a bunch of small parts by a large weight at the end of a long stiff assembly.

Not saying these bikes don't ride well, I'm just saying that from a durability standpoint the rocker link is a more elegant solution which is what Norco has done with this bike.
  • + 1
 I think it looks rad!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I love it. I was so sick of seeing flashy colors. The lines are sick and the build is beautiful. Cheers! And the more tapered head tubes on the market the easier it will be to upgrade my bike with a tapered steerer fork when the time comes.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 at 65.5 angle, this is a pretty slack head tube angle. the giant glory has 65 HTA. but i guess it makes up for the 72 seat tube angle for climbing. but i dont know how it would actually feel. these bike manufacturers keep coming up with these new geometries every now and then. but if it was me, i'd put a fork with travel adjust like a fox talas probably an adjustable height seat post so this bike can be legit when it comes to climbing and descending. and i wish they made the head tube shorter so you can keep the front end pretty low but that's just me.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Why did you delete my comment, pinkbike? All I had said was that the bike resembled my faith in looks, and also looked nice and clean.
  • + 2
 mine too ;-)
[Reply]
  • + 3
 No gusset on the head tube?
[Reply]
  • + 1
 undoubtedly its a good bike but im not so sure i like all the new curvy designs on all the '11 and '12 bikes that are coming out
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Trux? Trax? True-axe? How do you say that?

Good job Norco. Nice looking ride. And at 2 lbs heavier and $400 less than a Reign X1. Should sell well.
  • + 1
 it is in the market of the faith smart one.
  • + 0
 Really? Odd how the geo is a lot closer to the RX then...
  • + 2
 It's intended market is, like I said MARKET is freeride. The Faith is Freeride, I mean I could be wrong. The reign is AM, The same intended market as the the Norco Range.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 MMMMMMM This could put my back on a Norco.. If only they still made them in Canada.
  • + 1
 made them in ca ? pretty sure they never have been built in ca just designed. and yes you do want to ride the sickest new bike on the block. get one as soon as they are released. limited numbers, save yourself the regret. enjoy I know i am gona love mine. cheers
  • + 1
 Could swear my 2005 (and 2004) Six frame had a made in Canada sticker on it.. Could easily be wrong tho. It has happened a few times in the past... could have been a cheesy built (aka assembled) in canada sticker... I am going to google this.. not that it matters.
  • + 1
 Googled.. I was wrong.. sad day... ah well.
  • + 1
 I have an 05 six , an 04 fluid 1 and sold my 01 team trials a few years ago. I am pretty sure none of them were made in Canada.
The only big bike company still welding in Canada is Devinci, everything else is small builders. All you have to do is E-mail a SOLIDWORKS file to Taiwan and they start up production and ship yer crap to your door. Its so cheap its no even worth it to try to make anything in house. I work in aviation and the only reason we still make stuff in Canada is delivery time and quality issues. otherwise they are 60-80% cheaper than canadian product.
  • + 1
 Not made in Canada, assembled in Canada.

Norco assembled a good portion of their bikes in Canada (not all) over the last 30+ years in Burnaby and then Langley up until 3 years ago.
  • + 1
 There made in Canada After the year 05
  • + 1
 Norco's Canadian assembly plant closed in 2009.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 what is up with this new 12x142. we don't need another standard! don't they get it!
AGGGGGHHHHHH! Dead Horse
  • + 4
 It is not a 142 hub. same 135mm hub with slightly longer cones. Most hub companies have have the really inexpensive hub cones for this system. and it wont be long until it is THE through axle standard. educate yourself. Norco is not the only company doing this. It is lighter and stiffer which is what most riders want in a bike
[Reply]
  • + 2
 internal cable routing is hot!
  • + 1
 It doesn't have it
  • + 1
 r u blind? look at the headtube
[Reply]
  • + 2
 thats an animal lookin bike
[Reply]
  • + 1
 looks nice, hope they have the same design for the dh bikes too
[Reply]
  • - 1
 One of the first Norco's I actually like the look of, but as people have said, is very similar to many many other frames out there! Good try Norco but need some new ideas!
[Reply]
  • - 1
 i do like the looks but more on the rear sus - otherwise looks like their frame design team moonlights for Giant - bin there dun that.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Yeah Hoots! looks like a pretty dope bike man
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Definitely is not the most beautiful cycle of NORCO
[Reply]
  • + 2
 looks like a good bike.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 i do like the looks kinda looks like the trek fuel same geometry
[Reply]
  • + 1
 i do like the looks kinda looks like the trek fuel same geometry
[Reply]
  • + 2
 that bike looks so sweet
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Norco pulling out a sick looking bike, good job boys!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 2012? Jeeze there eager! 2011 has barely started!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Finally a sick looking Norco tup I like
[Reply]
  • + 1
 same suspension design as my bike. good stuff!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 more bikes like this please.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Man that is mad sexy i can't wait to get one
[Reply]
  • + 1
 great! that's the kind of bike i really desire.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Like the internal cable routing
[Reply]
  • + 1
 sweet looking bike!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 bit to swoopy for me.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Looks breakable.
  • + 2
 yea, you can tell that from a photo, right.
  • + 1
 Just looks weak at the head tube junction.
[Reply]
  • + 0
 looks like my Iron Horse 7 Point...its sexy
[Reply]
  • - 1
 each year getting worse and worse ;(
I'm glad that i've had shore 07
[Reply]
  • - 1
 kinda looks like the trek fuel same geometry
[Reply]
  • - 1
 norco is going downhill now Frown
  • + 3
 good pun [ downhill ? ] are you from 'pun'jab :-)
[Reply]
  • - 3
 thats a cool trek..i mean norco
[Reply]
  • - 3
 Sorta like a Giant Reign X ? I wonder what it will cost? I like the thought!!!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 everything Norco builds is hella strong especially there hardtails
[Reply]
  • + 4
 ^debatable, but their warranty is ridiculously good
[Reply]
Below threshold threads are hidden

Post a Comment



Copyright © 2000 - 2014. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv15 0.039809
Mobile Version of Website