Inside ODI: Keeping It In The US

Apr 29, 2014
by Jordan Carr  

ODI story header
Grips may be one of the least talked about components on a bike, but often times are one of the most critical. As a vital point of contact that, for many athletes, can mean the difference between a good day of shredding or a trip to the hospital. But these small cylinders of rubber actually take some pretty extensive manufacturing with some high tech machinery. We spent a morning at ODI in Riverside, CA, to get an idea of what goes into the brand's widely respected grip designs. As the brand's manufacturing, sales, and marketing headquarters, the new facility proves just what is possible with the right mindset and resources.

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   All of ODI's grip manufacturing and moulds are made in-house giving the brand the ability to watch quality and efficiency closely.

Not Just Grips
Though grips for bikes and motorcycles are a big portion of ODI's manufacturing there is a lot more taking place in the company's huge facility in Riverside. ODI's parent company, Edge Plastics, manufactures everything from POP promotional systems to pool filtration systems and airline meal trays. Many companies choose to work with Edge Plastics after having issues with overseas production or to help speed up lead times and quality. Edge prides itself on very stringent manufacturing standards which can be especially important in many safety items, like pool drains, the facility produces. A new state of the art facility has helped to improve these quality standards by creating an extremely efficient system.

As we toured the facility production was in full swing. A 100-meter long aisle was filled with plastic production machines popping out an amazing number of various products with a multitude of uses. One station was producing pool drains, another plastic pieces to protect a horse's hooves, while another was stamping out meal trays for Alaskan Airlines. Edge Plastics really understands the benefits of diversification and it is an amazing sight.

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   Grips may seem like an inexpensive accessory, but producing them is not. Each grip mould costs upwards of $10,000 some even more than $20k. ODI has no shortage of moulds with their extensive selection of grip options.

Made in the USA
Opening in the early 80's under the name Ornate Design Incorporated, the brand began with the original mushroom BMX grips and Boogey Boards. ODI was the first brand to introduce a lock-on style grip in late 1998 because of safety concerns with unexpected grip slippage and time constraints with grip installation. As technology has progressed, so have the brand's grips. Creating high quality grips is not an easy task despite all development being done in-house, but ODI is able to keep a close eye on quality and production.

Most steps of ODI's production process are done in-house. Tooling for each grip design is machined in the company's tooling room where each grip cavity is CNC'd with extreme precision. Subtle intricacies are of the utmost importance when it comes to these cavities, as little flaws will resonate through an entire grip line. Given just how intricate some of the grip designs are it's amazing watching as machinists meticulously craft a grip's unique contours.

We pride ourselves on doing everything in-house from mold construction to packaging. Our facility focuses on keeping manufacturing and production all in the US which allows us to keep quality standards high and make important changes as needed. That is something most companies these days can't do. - Colby Young, Bike Brand Manager at ODI

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   With ODI's commitment to producing products in the US, they need to look for creative ways to cut costs. Here, Colby Young explains how rubber scraps from the manufacturing process are used to make packaging.

Rider Integration
Working with top level riders and a variety of athlete influenced brands allows ODI to continue to improve their products with a good amount of rider input. With their California based manufacturing they are able to work closely through prototyping, development and production. During our visit, World Cup DH racer, Aaron Gwin was in house working with product managers on his signature grip. Gwin has been working closely with ODI to develop a grip that will actually be his own. Rather than just taking a random grip design and slapping Gwin's name on it, ODI has made a huge investment in his knowledge and podium based race career.

ODI has developed a huge array of grips, with many brand signature options, but very few athlete signature models. The Gwin grip (yet to be named) is the brand's first since the John Tomac signature attack grip in the mid-90's. This dedication to Gwin and US racing is a very meaningful relationship that stems deeply in ODI's commitment patriotism. "We feel Gwin is a great asset to us as a brand and we want to help him succeed as a US rider." explains Colby Young "He has had such a strong showing on the World Cup, we want to help him succeed and we are behind him 100%".

I was really excited about this project, because ODI wanted me to actually give a lot of input in the grip's design and construction. I really want to design something that I will race and train on all the time. I want it to be my personal grip that other riders can purchase. - Aaron Gwin, ODI sponsored Downhill Racer

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   During our visit, we were lucky enough to run into Aaron Gwin, who was deeply immersed in the development of his own ODI signature grip.
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   With many fine pores, each grip is artfully crafted to near perfection. Gwin's signature grip will be one of the more intricate with a varying ridges and valleys and a combination of rubber durometers.
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   Troy Lee Designs, Vans, and Pabst Blue Ribbon are all branded grips that ODI has produced over the years. A museum of grip moulds houses an array of artful creations.


bigquotes With a huge custom US manufacturing facility, ODI is devoted to immense product quality produced in a quality work environment right in the US. After spending a significant amount of time on ODI's industry changing lock-on grips, it is apparent the brand's stringent quality standards and development work. Supporting a brand like ODI is easy, since we all need grips, but understanding the greater implications of the brand's philosophy is what makes their products even more unique. In an age based around cheap production, even cheaper labor and diminishing quality, all in the name of business, ODI understands the value of quality. - J. Carr



Must Read This Week

151 Comments

  • + 246
 That article was gripping!
  • + 86
 I really locked on to this information. I feel like I have a firm grasp on understanding the odi factory now!
  • - 16
flag nouser (Apr 28, 2014 at 22:45) (Below Threshold)
 Better brace ourselves... because here come the puns Big Grin
  • - 69
flag Pdownful (Apr 28, 2014 at 22:51) (Below Threshold)
 This will Rebound right back at you...
  • + 29
 That's a lot of machinery to handle on that compuond.
  • + 4
 Those grips gives you the feeling of mom and pops. Touches and Blessings of parents.
  • + 24
 Mom's spaghetti.
  • + 20
 ODI'er, I thought this would get silly!
  • + 14
 ODI = awesome company with legendary heritage in mountain biking and bmx going back years, and then the leap forward with their "Lock-On" grip forever banishing slipping grips, tie-wire and wrestling with grips during installation.

will only ever run ODI lock-on grips on my mountain bikes, have tried other a number of other brands, but quickly gone back to ODI Wink
  • - 2
 I see what you did there.
  • + 1
 I have a good handle on the issues in the article now
  • + 53
 Anyone else want grips made of just the pressed colored bits??
  • + 2
 Yes! Exactly what I thought
  • + 1
 I'm gonna need some dual-ply toilet paper after seeing how much those molds cost
  • + 1
 Gripping tale
  • - 3
 @wakaba

you really need to get a grip on yourself...
  • + 3
 ODI's puns are getting out of control.
  • + 9
 Yeah, we really should steer in another direction.
  • + 1
 you guys need to get a grip on reality
  • + 1
 Little late to the grip pun party bud.
  • + 73
 Its always great to see a company who can keep manufacturing on home soil and not outsource overseas. Props ODI
  • + 0
 I bet you wouldn't say that if Giant decided to take all it's outsourced jobs back to home soil in Taiwan Wink . "Made in _______" isn't all it seems either these days: www.slate.com/articles/business/the_edgy_optimist/2014/03/u_s_china_trade_deficit_it_s_not_what_you_think_it_is.html
  • + 12
 Home for one... overseas for another.
  • + 3
 general-lee: you just posted an economic article to a thread on Pinkbike. Can you smile? Raise both hands above your head? I ask because I think you may have had a stroke. Wink Speaking from personal experience, this "transformative action" stuff can get really annoying if you're employed by the government, and have to buy things that are "TAA compliant" (read: made in america.) I have two servers that I manage that I need to add a new processor inside of. I was able to get the processor upgrade kits, because they're fabbed at an intel factory in the US. I can't get the copper heatsinks because they aren't made in the US. The servers already have one of these heatsinks in them, because assembling the server happened in the US, therefore "transformative action." But if I need to add a new one? no way, jose. Apparently I'm the one who's had a stroke, since I went into way more detail than you did. Razz
  • + 17
 ODI, please make us some nice THICK grips please Smile
  • - 8
flag game (Apr 28, 2014 at 23:00) (Below Threshold)
 ruffians......
  • + 13
 Rogues are thicker
  • + 4
 Lexi Belle would be a downhiller if they made it.
  • + 5
 shit i meant the Rogues, good call
  • + 2
 Ruffian too thin, Rogue too massive. CrossTrainer is where it's at. Thick, but spongy. Comfortable and grippy.
  • + 4
 Rogues are defo my grip of choice, really helped me with hand fatigue
  • + 6
 That is what she asked.
  • + 11
 The ODI Oury grips must be the thickest.
  • + 3
 I love my Rogues too. Not only are they thicker, they also provide a good amount of damping - without loosing grip-ability.
  • + 4
 Oury all day yo
  • + 1
 ^I agree. Im an easy XXL-XXXL in most gloves from most companies.
  • + 1
 Try the Race Face Strafe, made by ODI. They're thicker than Oury and still quite firm like the Rogues.
  • - 1
 What's up with all the dildo discussion?
  • + 2
 Oury Lock-ons are where it's at!
  • - 3
 Thicker grips = more arm pump. Fact.
  • + 3
 @scott- i disagree. the sunline thick logo grips i had were perfect (aside from the garbage clamping cyctem). the thicker material would absorb a lot of vibrations on the trail. never had arm pump issues.

they were awesome.
  • + 3
 Thicker grips equals a more relaxed grip, and less arm pump. At least for me. I play drums, build houses, wrench on bikes(professionally) and dig a lot. I have found that utilizing a pinching grip with my thumb/index finger (similar to how you would control a drum stick) have enabled me to ride arm pump free for years, but is only possible with thick grips. I ride a lot of dh, do a lot of guiding and xc riding, and have put a lot of thought and effort into grips.. Thicker grips let me relax my hands and focus on my lines, not my hands. Might not work for everyone, but Oury grips work well for me and are on every bike I own.
  • + 2
 I rock/gym climbed for a long time (haven't in recent years) but when I did, I had so much grip and forearm strength that it didn't matter. In my experience (specifically, many trips to Whistler) running larger grips resulted in more arm pump. Running thin grips wasn't much better either, but I just never found big grips to help alleviate it. I have big hands, so maybe the grips weren't big enough, but regardless of comfort and everything else, I just never found big grips to do anything but increase arm pump. I'm talking about railing a bike park for 5 days straight, not a casual ride down the local trails. It's probably a personal preference thing. There is this though: hanging from a pull up bar, trying to grip a fatter bar is tougher than one that you can wrap your hands around tighter. My comment above was dumb, nothing is that black and white. I went down the fat grip road at one point and it didn't work for me, but ODI does make rad grips.
  • + 1
 It doesn't work for everyone, but it has worked incredibly for me. I've had seasons passes for Whistler, lived on the north shore, and have had season passes for snowshoe for the past four years. I typically get in 14/15 laps a day when I can get up there and live for races like the Chumolungma (20 straight laps, 30k elevation). My hands aren't that big, so maybe that's why it works so well?
  • + 1
 snowshoe and chomolungma! nice kid, nice!
  • + 2
 I agree with scottrallye. I tried switching to thicker grips (sunline) to alleviate forearm pump and it did the opposite for me. I couldn't even get down one run at Whislter without stopping to rest. Totally pumped me out and started cramping too. In rock climbing terms: slopers pump more than crimps.
  • + 2
 Slopers do not really pump more, they just not as secure. Optimal diameter for pull is what barbell uses, around an inch. By grips are loaded in the opposite direction. I have XL sized hands, not too big, and still go to rock climbing gym regularly, but I do prefer thin grips and avoid gloves when I can. Easier to lock thumb around, and still reach brake levers. I guess it is all personal preference in the end.
  • + 1
 I'd be interested to see an article on the correlation between grip thickness and arm pump.

You would think a thinner grip is easier to hold on to. Powerlifters use fat handles on dumbells and barbells when training because is makes them a hell of a lot harder to hold onto and forces your grip strength to increase. Fatter grips on bikes will probably transfer less vibrations through to your hand though - which may mean you suffer less from fatique/arm pump?
  • + 1
 thicker diameter will not help you with arm pump unless you have xxl+ hands, its the extra rubber filtering out vibrations that helps. This is why i run non lock on moto grips, I cant go back now.
  • + 2
 Bollocks. Fat handle on barbells and kettlebells do not make it harder to hold onto. There is an optimal diameter, and that is what they use, and it is fatter than MTB grips. ESI race grips FTW.
  • - 2
 kettle bells have a large diameter to resist torsion, not because its the ideal diameter for the strongest grip.
  • + 1
 I don't have particularly large hands and the rubber on the Rogues isn't especially soft, but after breaking a finger I couldn't ride more than 3 downhill runs in a day before my hand cramped up in agony, moving from the Ruffian to the Rogue felt more comfortable, I didn't need gloves anymore and after, any skinny grips just feel like the bar is rattling around inside and pummelling the palm of my hand now. There is a natural diameter your hand grips, you have to use your finger muscles to tighten onto a too small grip as much as you do to hold onto a too large grip. I don't think you can blanketly state: "Smaller is better" etc. The ergonomics of your main contact points [bar, grips, levers, pedals and seat] are all very much preferential and depend on rider size, weight, riding style, duration and type of terrain as well as heaps of other things. - My first suggestion to anyone suffering hand cramp on repeated park/dh runs would be to try a bigger grip... at least 'try'!
  • + 1
 Bull. You do not know what you are talking about. Kettlebells do not need to resist torsion, they need to be gripped. Maybe you are using 10lb ones.
  • + 1
 haha okay meathead
  • + 1
 Everyone is different with different diameters, wants and needs. END OF FUC*ING DISCUSSION!!!
  • + 2
 Solution to thin grips: www.odigrips.com/ODICoozy.aspx
  • + 1
 ^Sick!
  • + 1
 @axxe I'm talking about these things. You fit them onto your dumbells, barbells, pull up bar or whatever.

My powerlifting buddies use them. One of my friends can do a one arm pull up hanging from one.
  • + 8
 Thanks for all of the comments and your support of ODI. We are proud to be able to control the production process from the initial design to final production which allows us to innovate at every step in the process. We are also pleased to be able to provide jobs to our local community. I noticed a lot of you are interested in getting more information on how the grips and tooling are actually produced. I can assure you that the process is intricate and can take a considerable amount of time depending on the intricacies of the part design. If any of you are in the Riverside, CA area and would like to stop by for a tour of our facility, please feel free to drop us an email and we will be happy to show you most of how we do it (we do have some trade secrets).
  • + 1
 I just wanted to say Thanks for your great products!
  • + 1
 yes thanks for keeping production where it should be
  • + 8
 Any further insight into how the mould is actually made? Is a mandrel CNC machined out of some material then a mold cast around it? or is there just a very clever CNC machine and some tiny tool bits that can machine at 90 degrees in a very tiny pocket such as a grip's diameter? Always wondered how its done and why it costs so much!?!?

So good to see a company supporting it's own country's economy and not outsourcing too, ODI's lock on grips are the best mtb invention since the wheel!
  • + 2
 *mold
  • + 4
 Yea, most of the time it's just tiny machining bits, a clever CNC, and lots of time. Molds can take days of nonstop machining to make. Otherwise when you're dealing with super fine detail and internal corners, the mold shop will machine a matching 'negative' part out of copper and use it as and EDM tip, roughly CNC the cavity and then finish it via EDM plunge cutting.
  • + 3
 You also need to account to the fact that this part (mold) makes money, so that boosts its price up.
  • + 3
 Thanks 'sixkdollars', interesting to know, after some thought a mandrel cast wouldnt be removable for a complex pattern would it lol. seems like it would be easier if they could make the mold in 4 parts with more conventional tooling, hopefully advances in 3d printing will make molding easier
  • + 2
 Six thousand dollar man is right. We've got a ram EDM at work, and it can make some pretty fancy things. Slow process though....

If ODI had the money, they could buy up one of those $500k 5 axis metal deposition printers and just print the molds out out of any metal they see fit.
  • + 1
 I say stick with the 5 axis machining. 3d printers are amazing but there's still some finish work on the back end. Id like to see what CNC's they use.
  • + 1
 Some tricky molds with lots of undercuts.. The TLD's are my favorites with the pattern like roof tiles all the way around. amazing grip. Tricky to make the mold.

I was told they cast the metal mold around a positive, then cut the mold in 2 with an EDM wire to get the positive out of the mold. Not sure if what I heard was correct, but sounds cool. Does anyone know about that process? I'm curious what the positive would be made out of.
  • + 2
 You wont EDM burn the block first and wire cut them after you would loose 0.1-0.2 mm of your diameter in the middle and so your geometry is not round anymore after putting those two halfs together and also your electrode wont fit inside the block. The diameters of the biggest geomerty is way bigger than the entry hole diameter. Way to go it pre machine the 2 mold insert halfs and then finish edm burn them. For a detailed electrode like this one needed you will go on a hsm 5axis and cut either a copper or graphite electrode (most common is graphite for milling or copper but here you will have disadventages for the cutting peocess) after the electrodes are done (of course you need 2 sets of electrodes each for one insert (and for each set you probably go with 2-3 electroded for rough and finish edm burn the inserts) the burning process will be quite tricky because you cant just burn vertical you also need to go side ways and be careful not to burn geometry away by accident. Just to prepare the pre machines block with cooling lines and so on needed will take 1-2 days plus heat treating. Electrode programming and milling will take 1-2 days as well plus the burning process. ( most of those mld get edm finished because you can see a surface finish you wont get from a milling machine as well sharp corners are quit impossible to machine withous leaving a radius in the corner) ... Bilding molds is fun Smile cheers
  • + 1
 Wow, Foerstar. Thanks for the detailed reply! Some cool stuff there. I need to learn more about mold making and tooling so I can learn where I have design flexibility. I've been using standard 2 piece molds and avoiding any undercuts or slides for years.. seems that the tooling complexity is much more advanced now, and with not as much cost penalty as there used to be. Thanks again.
  • + 1
 Thanks 'foerstar' excellent insight I was looking for - so basically they're bloody complex and require specialist knowledge and expensive 5 axis machines to make...
  • + 8
 To all your machining Q's: I'm a sales engineer for DMG MORI SEIKI the worlds largest and highest end CNC machines, and of course avid ripper.
99% of ALL MOLDS are definitely milled on a CNC Vertical Machining Center (VMC) or as we all know "a mill". This would need a 5 axis VMC or a multitasking machine with a B axis contouring head. Since ODI has USA Pride and needing to cut cost, I'd bet their using a Haas (made in USA) VF2ss with a trunnion table, which the trunnion makes it a 5 axis. Any VMC making molds is a good quality CNC. But,these grips don't require a high surface finish quality I can even see that it's a surface finish no greater than 12-14, unlike ie; Audi headlight molds (which Audi uses DMG machines) need to be Very smooth. So you can get away with a lower quality CNC to make these because the machine won't need to have as high as a precision or tolerance. A mint used Haas VF2ss with Trunnion would be btwn $70-100k, new $130-140k. Audi uses mills that run $700k-1mm. A VF2 is 30" in the X axis and 16" in the Y" and about 16" in the Z. The trunnion is a add on that sits on top of the table and gives it the 4th & 5th axis.
  • + 1
 I'm probably the only other guy here that knows what you're talking about haha.
  • + 2
 Myself as well.
  • + 3
 more than you think dude
  • + 2
 Good to see the industry is alive and well on this side of the pond
  • + 1
 Is a trunnion the same as a tombstone mount.? Race Face uses a Leblond CNC milling machine with a tombstone to make it a fith axis to carve out crank arms.
I think the moulds need to be machined out of tool steel. Expensive and time consuming.
  • + 2
 No think of it like a Hammock. It's a table that 'swings' between two axis points and has a rotary table mounted on it. This enables a 3 axis machine to have 5 axis as the trunnion itself is one axis and the rotating table on it is the second.
  • + 1
 sweet. Lots of technically skilled riders out there! Thanks for the info!
  • + 2
 Tmackstab - it's usually a mistake to think that you're the only one that knows something Wink
  • + 1
 You lost me at the Qs! Lol
  • + 1
 "99% of ALL MOLDS are definitely milled on a CNC Vertical Machining Center (VMC) or as we all know "a mill"." Sorry but this simply is not true. Wire EDM and EDM are HUGE, especially in really accurate, hard to machine places. Are a high percentage made from CNC milling machines still? Yes. But certainly not 99%.
  • + 5
 I've been rockin' ODI since the Mushrooms on my Hutch Trick Star back in the day. Just bought a pair of ODI Vans grips. Look cool and are sticky as heck.
  • + 2
 Same on the mushrooms! I still remember when they did the autograph series of the mushrooms, Ron Wilkerson, RL Osborn, etc. Crazy how long they've been around.
  • + 2
 Yes, I had a set of the Ron Wilkerson autographed grips. Still have them -- I took them off before they got too worn down. They're kind of grimy, though.
  • + 1
 Awesome! The only shop in my little town never had 'em, had to just drool at 'em in the pages of BMX Plus and Freestylin
  • + 1
 Ha! I think I ordered mine through Rockville BMX. I wonder if Spike Jonze took my order. I only ever saw the Wilkerson models, though. Maybe a set of RL Osbourns, once. They were supposed to have all these different riders, but I think those are the only two I ever saw. (And I might be imagining that I saw RL's at all.

Those signature grips with their low flange would have made great mountain bike grips. Too bad they don't make an updated Mushroom mtb grip based on those models. I don't need the signatures now, but a good set of Mushrooms would be awesome.
  • + 1
 Yeah, I check 'em on ebay every now and then but then quickly realize I don't need more 'stuff' - though a pair of the RL's would be cool on my old General Osborne Hustler
  • + 1
 That was a cool bike. Always kind of wanted one.
  • + 5
 thanks ODI for keeping it made in the USA! i use them on all my bikes & just recently got the lock on rouges for my YZ250, love them! no more wire!
  • + 2
 Really cool to see the manufacturing side of anything within this whole bike world we live in. The use of flashing scraps in the packaging is a smart move. I'd love to play in that mold room!
  • + 1
 I'm very happy to read these things about ODI my first grips was ODI and this the only brand I won't change on my bike because they love their products and that makes the grips to be the best on the market! Keep pedaling ODI !!!
  • + 1
 its good to hear companies still thriving to manufacture products here in north america, yet with being so competitive with the chinese and india its very tough, extreme efficiency and innoviation is needed to compete with such cheap labour. As a tool and die maker myself we need work like this to stay in our home land so its good to hear what odi is doing and i can say they make some quality stuff. great article! we need more of these to show people where the real skilled trades are now a days to keep manufacturing alive here in canada and the usa. If companies keep outsourcing work overseas our next generation will never know how things are made and there's too few of people like me to do all the work, this country will one day never know how to make things if the government doesn't keep companies like odi still in business in north america, buy theres products people! It'll save our country's economy!
  • + 1
 Interesting article.

I always like seeing well presented factory articles. I've got to say though, I've never really been impressed by ODI's innovation. When I think grips, I always think Ergon.

I have RSI in my wrists and I haven't been able to enjoy a ride with a regular round grip for a long time. So I use the broad palm supports that actually fit the shape of my hand and spread the load. To me, that's innovation.

Producing an endless variation of colors and treads that really don't do anything except rub off after a few months really doesn't scream "innovation" to me. At least not "good" innovation.
  • + 5
 love the troy lee design grips...so good
  • - 3
 Imagine what a mould for a whole carbon frame costs, and they often have even shorter life spans. No wonder carbon frames are expensive.
  • + 1
 The carbon fibre itself isn't that expensive. I have quite a few meters and a variety of epoxies in my shop. It's the mould and r&d that costs the money. This is why the Chinese carbon frames are so cheap. They are using large volume or last years model moulds to defray costs. The carbon itself is fine.
  • + 2
 TLD def my fav ODI rocking Renthal Kev lock ons awesome. Good article on grest company and something different for a change but bike related. Keep these articles coming cheers
  • + 1
 Tombstone tables are 4 sides blocks that you can secure work to each side, and the tombstone bolts down to a table on a horizontal machining center (HMC) that has pallet changers. Typically a hmc machine will come with a 2 pallet changer that you mount the tombstones to. And yes, the trunnion table is someone like a hammock's swing, which would be considered the 4th axis. The 5th or C axis is when the table or work is spining 360 like a merri-go-round.
And yes, 2hrs of actual machining cut time, not 3-5 days like you mentioned. I bet you haven't seen how fast the latest machines are. There's not that much machining to it. Here's a link to Watch the machines I sell in action making a mold for a moto x helmet, it only took 6hrs and it has 100x more detail www.youtube.com/watch?v=RnIvhlKT7SY
  • + 0
 I'm all for getting manufacturing out of Asia. If the goal of manufacturing in China is to reduce costs, then why not pass those cost savings to the consumer? Nope, instead its about maximizing profit, no interest in passing savings to the consumer. I like companies like this because they keep it real. It's almost impossible to avoid not buying something made in China, but every time we do buy something made in China, we're basically providing a communist regime with financial support. So all you guys with I phones are nothing more than commie bastards! lol
  • + 2
 China only gets around 6% of the money made for an IPhone. US, around 12%. Majority of the money goes to Japan. Pretty crazy that the country of assembly gets so little. Pay a little more! Honor labor!
  • + 4
 Whoops! Actually, China only gets around 3.5%! Cheap labor! No wonder the workers are jumping off the roofs of these buildings!
  • + 2
 @Rocky-Urban

domestic manufacturing is the future for high-tech and speciality suppliers, especially once rising fuel (shipping) costs and rising labour (wage) costs are added to the equation; these costs will re-balance the difference between off-shore and domestic manufacturing.

for the "mass market" its still cheaper (and often the only realistic option) to use off-shore, but as companies like ODI (US) and Hope (UK) have shown, there are consumers willing to pay a relative premium for products from a switched-on and competitive domestic manufacturer

unfortunately there are too many companies that are either unwilling to invest in the overheads (risk) of starting a domestic manufacturing plant, or prefer to maximise profits by using off-shore manufacturing - these companies are commonly known as "design / marketeers" because their end involvement is designing the products on a computer, marketing the products and arranging end transfer through a distributor to retailers. This allows maximum profits!

if you step outside the bicycle industry and look at the off-shore "manufacturing" costs of current generation video game system, available information says X Box One costs only $14 in labour assembly (hardware cost $457)
  • + 1
 "If the goal of manufacturing in China is to reduce costs, then why not pass those cost savings to the consumer? Nope"

Sorry, did you really just write that? Tell me something - when you see a $1-500 dollar bike at Walmart or on Amazon, where do you suppose it's made? There is absolutely a relationship between low cost manufacturing and low cost goods for the consumer.
  • + 4
 ODI Longnecks all day long! Run them on every one of my MTB's. Fantastic
  • + 1
 Does ODI produce a grip that doesn't get gummy/sticky as it wears? I wonder if they will ever branch out from the normal Kraton rubber to something like elastomeric polyurethane, silicon or foam.
  • + 1
 I've got ODI Ruffians on all five of my MTB's. I love them, but I would also like to check out Aaron's signature grip for comparison.
  • + 1
 Actually I dont give a hoot where my grips are made as long they are comfy and durable :/
  • + 1
 @ roblatim88

20k is the cost of the complete mold or only the insert? i don't think insert for a mold would cost 20k...
  • + 1
 I said this too, was censored by a mod, cool mod
  • + 1
 Troy Lee Edge Helmet made also by EDGE plastics. bikemarkt-images.mtb-news.net/5/1/1/8/0/1/_/large_DSCF1042.jpg
  • + 1
 ODI LockOn Longneck BMX allday, everyday ! Smile

And the Made In USA is important to me, so keep it there!
  • + 1
 i can't understand why the company doesn't offer two or three size for each model of grip….
  • + 2
 $20,000 a mold and you haven't got any clue?

As it is, you could also look at it like it's $20k per grip model design. If you had 3 sizes of each grip design (need 3 molds now), it's now $60k per grip design & now you'll be splitting the sales of that grip design between 3 models, making it a harder/longer process to cover your overhead for the molds in the first place let alone make profit.
  • + 2
 ^^^^ this is part of why MTBs are more expensive than motos. Motos only come in one size, and one configuration. MTBs come in 3 or 4 sizes, and multiple builds.
  • + 0
 20k is the cost of the complete mold or only the insert? i don't think insert for a mold would cost 20k...
  • + 1
 @willie. the bigger factor than sizing is the popularity. moto is much more popular than mtb... although you do have a (valid) point about sizing.

@thchris- yes. 20k. easy. lotta machine work getting a single mold made.
  • + 1
 It's really annoying that there is no info about grip diameters on their website!
  • + 1
 its okay. they dont make thick grips anyways Frown
  • + 1
 Ran odi grips for years until I discovered ESI chunky grips. Never going back.
  • + 1
 no mention of Sensus? I pretty sure ODI makes them too
  • + 1
 ODI, SDG grips by far the best.
  • + 1
 I need to break into the mould making business
  • + 0
 Please drop those break in the slightest crash end cap things and go back to proper end caps...
  • + 1
 Hey ODI, how about a lock-on mushroom/attack?
  • - 2
 A mold like this would probably take 2hrs or less to actually machine. There's also set up time, and the time it takes to design it on CAM software
  • + 2
 sorry man but mold making takes a lot longer than 2 hrs.
  • + 2
 u high dood.
  • + 1
 Well first you need to programm and cut your electrodes used on the edm process this alone takes a lot of time for the tiny detail. (If you have a hsm 5 axis machine you can cut your electrodes there or use a 4th axis on a refular hsm mill) the inserts you can pre machine but there is no need to run them on a 5 axis cnc and on the end you burn both inserts with the electrodes you made. The burn will be quite tricky because you also have to go side ways and make sure you dont burn the details away by accident. 5-10k$ for both insert halfs are realistic you also need to heat treat those inserts and use a mold steal so there are some extra cost right away ... Looks like a cool job at ODI Wink
  • + 1
 2hrs and how many broken tools? It might take two hours to set up the mold.
  • + 0
 Aaron's smile looks so weird to me...
  • + 7
 That comment was weird to me...
  • + 0
 u just made it even more weird...
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