Scott Announces 'Future Pro' Ransom Youth Bikes with 26" & 24” Wheels

Nov 16, 2020
by SCOTT Sports  

PRESS RELEASE: Scott Sports

The all-new Future Pro Ransom's balanced geometry paired with long-travel, custom-tuned suspension and dropper seatpost, the adjustability to run 24" or 26" wheels and tailored components means no rider is too young to show the trail what they're made of!

The kid-tuned 140/130mm suspension of the Future Pro Ransom is paired with a custom frame and geometry that provides a very low standover height and promotes a stable, balanced, and safe position. This allows kids to tackle descents with confidence and gives parents peace of mind.

When they're ready to pedal back up for more, the 80mm Syncros Ducan Dropper keeps the transitions quick. The Future Pro Ransom comes in two models: the Ransom 600 with 26" wheels and the Ransom 400 with 24" wheels. Both bikes can be fitted with 24” or 26” wheels with our simple flip-chip system on the linkage allowing this bike to last because we know kids grow fast. The wait for the next generation is over, the Ransom family is complete.


Geometry & Suspension

The Ransom 600 features kid-specific geometry that enables little shredders to ride like champions. Designed and engineered specifically for kids, this bike is the ticket toward new heights.

To meet the unique needs of kids, the Ransom features suspension specifically tuned for them. The compression and rebound is adjusted to suit kids' weights and to function at full capacity without compromise.


Adjustability

Kids grow fast! We want their favorite bike to last. That's why the Ransom 600 can be fitted with 24" or 26" wheels thanks to a simple flip-chip system allowing adjustability as they grow. All you have to do is flip a chip on the shock mount when going from one size to the next and you're good to go.


The Ransom bikes come with X-Fusion's Slant RC 26 140mm fork and X-Fusion 02ProR Trunnion Shock, both with kids' tunes. There's a Shimano Deore shifter and derailleur, Shimano MT-500 Deore brakes, and Proweheel CHARM 32t 140mm crankset. Syncros provides the handlebar, stem, and dropper post. Both bikes sell for $1,699.99 USD.

For more information, visit scott-sports.com






134 Comments

  • 137 0
 Dads on the Front Range are losing their f*cking minds.
  • 4 0
 Shit. Too true.
  • 5 0
 Comment of the day!
  • 18 1
 I've got no idea what the "front range" is, but as a Squamish dad, I'm still losing my mind.
  • 5 0
 @paulwatt: 'Front Range' is the Eastern Edge of the Rocky Mountains and includes cities /areas in Colorado such as Denver, Boulder, Colorado Springs, Ft. Collins.
  • 2 0
 I'm a front range uncle and its got the gears turning, lol.
  • 3 0
 I need to wait at least 5years! that's the hardest!!!!!
  • 1 0
 @jean-germain: to move there in order to become a Front Edge dad ?

Im moving to Northern East side of the Rockies ( Calgary AB ) so I’ll become a North East Side Front Edge dad.Yet I’m loosing it over here
  • 1 1
 @paulwatt: "Front range" is the Squamish of Colorado
  • 4 0
 @dover1: If only the trails were as good as Squamish's Big Grin
  • 2 0
 Highly underrated comment!! F$%king hysterical. I'm a "mountain dad" and I know plenty of others here who would also lose their minds.

Rossignol, believe it or not, make some awesome kids bikes. I bought a used, ex demo, full sus for my 6 year old at a bargain. I think they retail in the 1600 ish mark. Its not a bike brand, but at a 5 year expense for 2 kids I couldn't give a flying fu$k
  • 1 0
 @enis: If you ride in the porte du soleil, particularly around Morzine and les Gets, you see those everywhere....
  • 60 0
 Dropper, Full sus, 12 spd, and ability to accomodate 24" and 26" wheels @ $1,700. Talk about value!
  • 5 0
 That's what I thought too. Comparable kid-friendly geo and spec'd hardtails go for about this, if not more. Solid build IMO
  • 2 1
 For sure. This is a super cool bike, and close to what I am looking for, but not quite. My 9 year old son is outgrowing his Transition Ripcord and I am struggling to find the next step. This Scott really wouldn't get me much. Does anyone have any suggestions for an XS 27.5? The only bike that seems to fit the bill for the next step that I can find is the Marin Rift Zone 27.5 (was the Hawk Hill) in XS but I can't seem to find one in stock. Any others anyone can think of that would be a good option?
  • 1 1
 @n8dawg82: I had the same problem, went with the YT 26. It’s a long 26 almost the same as an XS and almost an inch longer the the reaper.
  • 1 1
 @n8dawg82: Not sure if the YT Capra comes in XS but i tried the medium and found it to be sized on the small side (at 5'8 i'm usually straight-down-the-middle medium for most brands). So the small may be a possible fit if no XS option.

I also absolutely loved it. Only demo'd it for an hour in a skills park but it felt super fun.
  • 3 1
 @n8dawg82: Try looking at woman's bikes, the xs might be slightly smaller, which might be a good in between
  • 5 1
 @n8dawg82:
Rocky Mountain Reaper 27.5
  • 1 1
 @n8dawg82: Giant Trance / Liv Intrigue
  • 2 1
 @n8dawg82: My youngest (a sparrow 9yo) outgrew his mulleted ripcord this year and moved to a 26 Vpace Moritz. We have a Ransom 600 on order for the extra 20mm for bike park duties.
There's no way he could have gone from his ripcord to anything 27.5. that's a jump too far.
His 10yo bro is on an xs BMC (395mm reach) and he filled that ripcord gap with that vpace also.
  • 2 1
 @n8dawg82: commencal clash jr. 160mm travel, 380mm reach 27.5 wheel.
  • 2 1
 @n8dawg82: kona process 134
  • 2 1
 @n8dawg82: polygon Siskiu D7. My son just turned 10 and got it for his bday. Great spec for the price in my opinion.
  • 2 1
 Xtra-small or small women's bikes work well for kids. Picked up a black Embolden for the 10 year boy for $1550.
www.liv-cycling.com/us/bikes/mountain-bikes/full-suspension
  • 2 1
 @in2falling: Giant and Liv frames are no different except for color schemes.
  • 1 1
 @n8dawg82: Canyon Neuron al Young Hero, 27.5, 12sp, 130 travel. Not the lightest bike in town but pretty nice setup for a kid imo.

www.canyon.com/en-us/mountain-bikes/trail-bikes/neuron/neuron-young-hero/2624.html?dwvar_2624_pv_rahmenfarbe=GY%2FRD

Got one for my 10y/o when he was min height 140cm and his riding went through the roof immediately.
  • 2 1
 @n8dawg82: Norco Youth Sight 27.5. Finding stock might be tough. My son's 9 and has been on it for 6 months. It's heavy but otherwise awesome.
  • 2 1
 @n8dawg82: check out the xs norco sight
  • 1 1
 @jonny-no-h: xs Specialized Rhyme or any xs Liv. My kids went from 24" to xs Trance (Giant no longer seen to make xs trance).
  • 2 1
 @n8dawg82: how tall is your 9-year-old? We used to ride 26” as adults. Shouldn’t he be on a bike he can handle. My 13 year old is on a kids Orbea and still it looks a bit large.
  • 2 1
 Clearly It would be impossible to build this at this price with 27.5/29 wheels.
  • 1 1
 Thanks everyone for the replies. I will check these out.
  • 1 0
 @n8dawg82: check out the Norco Sight Youth. I know a couple of kids that made the jump from the Ripcord to that bike. That said, good luck finding any bike right now!! www.norco.com/bikes/2021/youth/youth-all-mountain/sight-youth-27-5/sight-275
  • 1 0
 @n8dawg82: norco sight jr. It is super sick.
  • 39 1
 I'll take a 26 inch in size kids XXL please. You know, so "my kids" can grow into it
  • 9 0
 My girlfriends 26 inch Jeffsy is super fun.
  • 5 0
 @Adamrideshisbike: so stoked my Mrs rides the same size bike as me. I'm such a nice guy, always getting her upgrades
  • 8 0
 @Snugs: "Babe, if I upgrade to xyz it's probably for the best since we can put you on my old bike. The one you're riding now really isn't right for you, I'm sorry we didn't get to this sooner."
  • 2 0
 Won't somebody please think of the children!
  • 1 0
 @sspiff: we are so thoughtful!
  • 1 0
 Would work better with adjustable top tube length?
  • 37 0
 and to think, when we were kids we had to make do with a stick and a hoop.
  • 54 0
 You got a hoop? Lucky, I only had a stick.
  • 8 0
 @mikekazimer: Damn, all I had was a hoop. Missed opportunity there...
  • 14 0
 [Reminces in Yorkshire] "Aye, but we were happy then"
  • 10 0
 @DidNotSendIt: I didn't have time to ride a bike after working down the mine for 20 hours a day for tuppence a week.
  • 3 0
 Damn kids and their nowadays damn fancy bicycles with those damn moving bits and pieces everywhere.
  • 3 0
 If we all had those bikes as kids, we would be pros.
  • 2 0
 @hornedreaper33: 20 hours a day? You were lucky lad.

I had to get up at half past ten at night in the morning, half hour before i went to sleep. Eat a pile of hot steaming poisonous magma. Go to work at t'mill for 28 hours a day AND pay t'mill owner for privilege of letting us work there. And when we got home at night, father would murder us in cold blood, bury us and dance on our graves singing "Yes Sir, i can boogie"*


*courtesy of Vic Reeves on the Four Yorkshiremen sketch
  • 1 2
 @tacklingdummy: Cant all be pro, but get your point?
Can we get kids bikes in xl length, as smaller wheel are more fun, but are just like small bikes from 10 years ago?
  • 3 0
 My kids will never know the joys of no brake cables and using your foot to stomp on the rear tire behind the seat to come to complete stop.
"We just stared into the sun until our eyes burst into flames...and we ran around screaming as our heads caught fire. Like a bunch of IDIOTS! And we LIKED IT! Cause we didn't know any better" ....ballpark quote from Grumpy Old Man-SNL
  • 1 0
 @aljoburr: It was just a joke. I should probably put a #sarcasm at the end.
  • 1 0
 @DidNotSendIt: "Even though we were poor."
  • 2 0
 @jaame: Alan Rickman one-upping (or is it one-downing in this context?) the others who were fortunate enough to have a cup of tea in the morning by declaring "...we had to suck on a damp rat" is absolutely brilliant.

Could only be bettered by saying it in Hans Gruber's voice:

"Now i have a damp rat. Ho...ho...ho"
  • 10 0
 I would think, to a certain extent, a rider must be a certain weight before the advantages of a full suspension frame “outweigh” (see what I did there?) the additional weight vs a hardtail. I know from building bikes for my son over the years, bike weight plays a huge role in their performance (and fun). We built up a 19lb 26” front suspension bike that he ripped on. Amazing what shaving 7-10 pounds off a typically bike can do for a 80-90 lb kid...
  • 2 0
 I'd think it depends on the terrain, skill and strength of the rider. A kid who could actually use the Ransom Junior to its full potential will not mind the weight so much. Would a carbon full suspension be more ideal? Probably. A kid who is still learning skills and getting comfortable on bikes might find a lighter bike more manageable. If your kids is frequenting bikes parks and can ride some of the gnarliest trails in the world on a daily basis, they will be probably benefit from the increased control of this bike vs a lightweight hardtail, likewise a kid shredding trails in flyover states or most XC/TR oriented terrain will probably do far better on a lightweight bike.
  • 4 1
 Am still waiting for kids e-bikes, the lil feller always struggles on the climbs, especially as the bike weighs more than most adult ones to keep the price point low. If you could buy an e-bike that allowed your kid to keep up with the adults on the climbs then you would have a product that understands its target audience
  • 1 0
 Agreed. I think there is good potential in that segment, but only if they can get keep weights reasonable. Which is difficult because motors/drives/batteries are heavy, and there is very little ability to make them smaller without sacrificing their purpose. A 45lbs kids full suspension ebike is just a dirt bike with pedals, and I can't tell if that'd help kids learn skills anymore quickly than a 20lbs pedal bike.
  • 1 0
 @ctd07: I hear you! I have the same problem with my boy. The thing is, Scott makes a kids e-mtb but they are not bringing it to Australia.
  • 1 0
 was gonna, curious what the weight is.
  • 1 0
 @ctd07: We use tow-whee for longer climbs. I am on a light(ish) 20.2kg e-bike which makes it easier to shuttle them up as much as needed. Kids on light, quality bikes shine on descents and happy to do short techie climbs.
Even 15kg kids e-bike will be too heavy for a 20-35kg person. Plough through is all you can learn on it.
  • 2 0
 One of my kids was on a very capable 24" hardtail... was a great bike and he was having tons of fun. We did a trip to our local bike park and he did a day on his bike. The next day I decided to rent him one of the 24" Rocky Mountain Reapers they had for rent. he instantly went twice as fast as he did on his other bike. It was heavier... but people forget the grip, braking traction, comfort and control you gain from a FS bike. After that weekend, I found him a used 24" Norco Fluid FS bike that I added a dropper, better tires and a wider range Sunrace cassette... and again he was instantly so much faster and confident on our local trails.

He's a smaller, weaker and light (60 lb) 9 year old... and a FS made a huge difference for him.

My other son, who is his twin, but taller, stronger and heavier, but still only 70 lbs... is no question a faster ripper on a FS bike. But he's scary good already... sending big hits and ripping down rough trails. He's on a modified XS Marin Hawk Hill with 26" wheels, shorter cranks, a smaller chain ring, dropper, smaller seat and an angle-set.
  • 5 1
 @ctd07: One of my sons has DCD, so struggles with fitness on the climbs... loses all his energy and doesn't have much left for the descents which he loves. I just started towing him up with two old tubes tied together then looped around my seatpost and his headtube. He still pedals but it's twice as easy when it needs to be. We can go higher, father and he has way more energy for longer descents. Plus I get a good workout that I don't usually get when riding with the kids.

I also don't like the idea of the kids not learning how to earn their turns. Give them an ebike now... then what? At least with the the tow-up method... I can adjust my speed to ensure he's still pedaling and giving some effort. I can make it as hard as I want or not for him and only use it when I feel it's necessary (long steep fire roads and/or climb trails). Anything lower incline or shorter and it comes off and he fully pedals. I fully expect to wean him off of it as he gets bigger and stronger. And it's really only there because of his DCD so it puts him on a more even level with his twin brother. His brother that doesn't have DCD, doesn't get towed... that little f*cker can pedal his own ass up.

Also... they are 9 now... but it's been years in the making to get them to accept climbing, to learn to climb, to build endurance and fitness and learn that to get up to the goods means you have to work first. It doesn't happen overnight and involves lots of patience, blow-ups, tantrums, tons of annoying whining etc, etc... but I feel it's worth it in the end because I'm building proper mountain bikers. And it was really just this summer that they've started to really, really love mountain biking... like so much that they don't mind climbing anymore because they know how fun the descents are. Which took time as well... they didn't get fast and capable overnight.
  • 1 0
 @islandforlife: 100% agree. I must say though that an e-bike for me was the golden ticket. I do have two groms to tow and one on a Macride though. We do 20 plus mile rides and 3k feet of climbing. They work, I work and we all have a ton of fun.
  • 1 0
 @ctd07: Commencal do a 24" hardtail, and yes, they sell it in Aus.
  • 1 0
 Waiting for Commencal to do a Meta 24 Power full suspension.
  • 13 0
 Should have called it the kidnap
  • 11 0
 Why only an 80mm dropper. These kids need at least a 210mm dropper.
  • 3 0
 If you look at the kid riding it I know he is standing with pedal level but 80mm does seem small. I bet 125mm One Up would fit the average kid rider of this bike pretty well.
  • 2 0
 @JoshMatta: I put a 125 OneUp on my daughter's Hawk Hill Jr. even though it was listed as a 100mm max. It was a game changer. Took half a day to get used to and doubled her confidence.
  • 12 0
 do they come in XXXL?
  • 11 5
 Geez, do you really need 12 speed for kids ?? you want it as light and as hassle free as possible
  • 12 1
 No, but at the price point and reliability of Deore, why would you opt for anything less? This is the 11 speed variant of the new Deore.
  • 10 0
 GoFlowz, Yes. Having the bailout 50 or 51 tooth cog is crucial for a kid to have fun during steep climbs. My 11 year has a 42 tooth on his Norco Fluid and he has trouble pushing that on the steep climbs in the PNW. I personally would rather take the weight penalty of a 12 speed set up compared to smaller capacity for the rear cassette.
  • 6 1
 Meh, I'd find the lightest cassette possible and a small front ring. Kids aren't gonna push 32/9.
  • 1 1
 @PHeller: This is the route I went. 11-36 out back and 24 up front. However, on flat ground paired with 20" wheels, it is pretty easy to pedal out on 24x11 on the flats, even for kids. This is apparent on most single speed walmart kids bikes that are sporting a 36-38 up front and a 15 tooth S.S. rear......kids can handle it easily on the flats.
  • 3 0
 Do you need a 12 speed ? It’s no different for them... my kids ride where I do, therefore need the same tools...
  • 2 1
 @Maestroman87: No it's not reliable because it's 12spd, which is sooooo finnicky. For example a 9spd groupset would have been much better, because a 9spd groupset installs and adjusts itself, and it will work perfectly even if the derailleur hanger is bent at 90 degrees.
  • 1 0
 @HollyBoni: It's 11 speed, as mentioned, but 12 speed is perfectly reliable. I bet when 9 speed came out, there were people with the same opinion you have now. Oh well, 7 speed is more reliable, spacing blah blah blah. We havent reached a magical threshold at 12 all of the sudden.
Do we need 12 speeds> In my opinion, no. I nice 6-8 cog selection with wide range would do me just fine, it doesnt mean I'm going to sh%t all over it because its new.
  • 1 0
 @Maestroman87: Don't worry it was all sarcasm. Big Grin
  • 1 0
 @HollyBoni: Haha. I gotta turn up the ol' sarcaso-meter.
  • 1 0
 @Maestroman87: Nailed it. For good quality groups that can be reliably sourced for OEMs, 11 or 12 speed is the way to go. The S companies aren't making the mid-to-high-end 8, 9 , or 10 speed parts anymore, and though Microshift and Box have their new and seemingly pretty good 8, 9, and 10 speed stuff, they likely can't offer the same OEM pricing or quantities, especially to a big brand like Scott that already has OEM deals with Shimano and/or SRAM. The new Deore is an amazing value in the aftermarket, probably even more so at OEM wholesale lot pricing, so it's a no-brainer to go with it.
  • 1 0
 @HollyBoni: You seem to be forgetting how iffy both 9 and 10 speed were in the beginning. 10 speed particularly was relative garbage in the first couple iterations. Chains were so fragile I know people who carried a spare all the time, and the slightest dirt on a cable caused mis-shifts. They didn't really improve on actual longevity and shift-quality over 7/8 speed until 11 speed. So, even though the chains have gotten skinnier, they've also gotten immensely stronger because the materials science has evolved.
  • 2 0
 @just6979: Nah, 11spd sucks too, although the magical threshold where everything became super unreliable is 12spd. That's why I run 6 speed with friction shifters. Going back to single speed soon tho because it's pretty finicky and unreliable.
  • 3 0
 This is awesome. Love the 2 wheel size idea, and looks really clean. I also like its understated so its not an obvious superbike.
  • 1 0
 What do you love about the 2 wheel size idea?

It's not like adult bikes are sized by using the same frame for multiple sizes and just changing wheel size for difference rider heights. Why would that be a good thing just for kids?
  • 4 0
 @just6979: Fair point. Also buying an extra wheelset in not cheap. I was more thinking its nice to have a 24" option for young/small riders, not that they would eventually get bigger wheels to get another year out of it.
  • 2 0
 @kelownamike: yeah, good bikes with smaller wheels are awesome, but it's still kinda silly to use the same frame for both wheel sizes. Takes a bit of the awesomeness of the 24s away since the frame is a compromise because it has to fit the 26s as well.
  • 2 0
 @kelownamike: used 26 inch wheels are a dime a dozen. I could prob get a free set if I asked around.
  • 2 0
 @bulletbassman: on a 148mm hub??
  • 1 0
 @sargey2003: adapter sets are available but even 148. I know plenty of guys who realized they could fit 27.5 in their later 26” frames
  • 1 0
 @bulletbassman: With what kind of tire clearance? When 27.5 was new, there was lots of talk about jamming 27" rims into 26" frames, but with caveats of only being able to fit pretty small tires. However, putting on tiny tires ruins any benefit of the big wheels, since the overall diameter is just about the same.
  • 1 0
 @bulletbassman: relying on the used market is not sustainable. What happens when all the old 26ers in peoples' attics are finally gone, then where do you get your free 26" wheels? And, how many of those cheap or free sets are actually in decent condition?
  • 1 0
 @just6979: dude we’re talking stretching a growing kids bike a year or two. This is marketed for 8-11 year olds that weigh maybe 80 lbs and haven’t hit puberty yet.

There are definitely kids talented enough to have a bike like this at a young age and I think it’s cool Scott made something ur average guy can fanagle into a better investment.
  • 1 0
 @bulletbassman: buying a whole new wheelset and tires is a "finagle"? Having an extra set of 24" wheels that will never get used again is a good investment?

You made my point, this is a bike for kids that, no matter how good they are, are going to grow out of it very soon. Better off just getting a 24" that fits well, without a compromise of a frame (to fit 2 wheel sizes, compromises must be made for one or both sizes), selling it or handing it down (since they're such awesome bikes, resale should be decent), and then getting a 26" that really fits (instead of a 26" that makes compromises to fit smaller riders and wheels).
  • 1 0
 @just6979: dude in what world do you live in replacing a whole bike makes more sense than a second wheel set.

There are way cheaper options than a full suspension mtb for a 8-9 year old. But if you are going to go that route this makes more sense than a lot of the other options on market as they can ride it till they are a teen
  • 1 0
 @bulletbassman: where are you going to sell those 24 inch wheels when you replace them with 26s? You can sell or hand-me-down the whole 24 inch bike much more easily than just wheels.

In what world is a frame that fits an 8 year old ideal for a teen?
  • 4 3
 Not a fan of convertible bikes for little guys because it means they are riding a bike that doesn't fit at one point. The frame size doesnt change like a Flow bike...it just gets bigger wheels. Best to put kids on a proper fitting frame (within reason). When compared to a YT Primus 24", this is kind if weak. You get pretty low end adult suspension...but the YT gets custom kid tuned pretty highend Manitou JUnit suspension, sick Duroc wheels, sick tires and a sweet cockpit. And the Geo is damn near perfect with the short rear end (proper) rather than something long in the back. The YT does have improperly long cranks tho, need a 100$ to swap those...but they can be reused on next bike. YT Primus 26" is nice, tho they wildly nice JUnit stuff only comes in 24" so it's a step backward there. If you are going 24"...you'd be crazy to by the Scott over the Primus. Happy to see another kids bike. Norco, Commencal and YT are doing things better tho.
  • 8 1
 Mmmm, but... when you have to buy the bikes for them... you don't give a f*ck if the frame they're riding is a little long one year and then a little short the next... they can suck it up because the other option is that they don't have a bike. This shit's expensive yo and I'm not made of money!

Case in point... my 9 year old was too big for his 24" bike... so I was on the hunt and trying to get creative... ended up finding a new year old adult sized XS Marin Hawk Hill 27.5 on sale for half price. As it was it was too big... a long reach bike he could deal with but the standover was still too high, BB too high, cranks too long and 27.5 wheels just made the bike big and tall. So I found some second-hand 26" wheels, bought a smaller seat, bought some smaller cranks and chain ring, cut down the handlebar and put an angle-set on it.

It was probably still a little too long/big, but he killed it this year anyway. Next year it will fit him much better. and the following year I'll put the 27.5 wheels and longer cranks back on and it should be good for at least another year... if just starting to get a little short.

Kids grow fast and I'm not buying him a new FS bike every f*cking year. I think it worked out really well that I'll have a bike that with a few mods will work for him for at least 3, maybe 4 years.

Convertible bikes are what allow a kid to actually be on a better fitting bike for longer. Otherwise they're stuck with a non-convertible bike for the same amount of time because I can't afford a new one. Yes, you can sell and buy again, but that still costs way more than converting.
  • 1 2
 @islandforlife: No kid outgrows his bike in 1 yr typically. Regardless if kids can ride it or not (some kids can slay on a wheelbarrow), its not the right geometry for half its life.. Convertible bikes like Flow made, were legit. This is just a 26" frame with a flip chip to account for bigger wheels & BB height. If a kid is ready for 26" wheels, then get him a 26" bike or do like you did and convert a 27.5 down. This frame is weird in that the backend is a 27.5 length...but the frontend is only a 24" bikes length. Its screwy. If say a kid has outgrown a 24" frame, like a 24" Ripcord with 365mm of reach...then he's not going to fit this Scott which only has 360mm of reach in the 26". It doesn't make sense to go up in wheelsize and shrink the frontend does it?? My 2nd grader rides some smaller freeride stuff all day (www.youtube.com/watch?v=CwnohpCG3EM&feature=youtu.be) but even that stuff requires a lot of precision and handling the bike. Saddling him with a bunch of wonky geometry would be going backwards and reduce his margin of error (geo/fit matter most). Just increasing the wheelsize and shrinking the reach (when moving this from 24" to 26") in no way means that it suddenly fits better...if not the opposite.
  • 1 0
 Looks like a good quality build but I would still go with a Trailcraft for my grom. Their custom builds allow for better component and legit suspension by fox or rockshox. Scott's website list this bike at 30+ pounds. That is a lot of weight for a little kid. My sons hardtail trailcraft comes in sub 22 pounds and they have some full suspension (26" wheels) sub 23 pounds. Unless we are riding a chair lift up, which we never do, I can tell you what bike my son would want to be on riding up hill. The better your kid's bike is, the more time you get to spend with them riding and that is worth every penny spent.
  • 1 0
 I don't get the reason for the ability to use different wheel sizes. It doesn't make the bike any larger for a growing kid. Am I missing.something? Does the top tube somehow get longer with a bigger wheel?
  • 1 0
 I just picked up a Transition Ripcord for my nephew today. This will be a sweet option for my own kid when he's big enough.
Nice to see more and more companies making good kid sized bikes. #26aintdead
  • 3 0
 The Fastest Kid running mullet 24" back 26" front
  • 5 0
 Late to the party, was known 19 years ago as a Specialized Big Hit.
  • 1 0
 @benlouisc: It's like clothes fashion, using 90's Bike Mullet
  • 2 1
 Ah yes because you can only become a professional in the future with one of these bikes
  • 2 0
 Why couldn't they create a seat tube that low for the adult ransom?
  • 1 0
 Leverage from longer tubes. And also, it's not really that low. Think about where you would actually stand over the top tube... most of the flat section is taken up by the seat: when someone is actually standing over this bike they'd be hitting about 1/3 to 1/2 way up the sloped section, so the actual stand-over height is probably closer to the level of the dropper collar.
  • 3 1
 The new marketing for the unsold 26In bikes, brilliant!
  • 1 0
 Comes stocked with an 80mm dropper. All photos of the bike show seatpost clamped halfway out of the frame. LOL
  • 1 0
 Not everyone needs to go full slam. Too low of a seat means it hits your knees instead of your thighs when moving the bike around, and no one really wants that. Plus, you have to be able to easily stand up from the lowest position after dropping it, you might not want to be doing deep squats for every single full drop of the post.
  • 2 0
 Is that just a slack slope bike?
  • 1 0
 Man, back in my day we had to break our ankles hucking bmx bikes with 100psi in the tires down stair sets
  • 1 0
 Would love to find those cranks aftermarket for my son. Even finding good 20" tires is challenging
  • 1 0
 Check out Trailcraft Cycles, they sell awesome cranks for small riders.
  • 1 0
 Call me old fashioned, but I don't think items aimed at kids should ever cost anything like this much.
  • 1 0
 These look mint. What's the maximum rider size?
  • 1 0
 Blimey. I want one. Oh, I can't afford it
  • 3 1
 Pay to win
  • 1 0
 I expected it to be 170mm travel.
  • 2 0
 slopestyle anyone?
  • 1 0
 Time for a kids bike field test???
  • 1 0
 26 ain't it dead! It's only for kids these days though. Sigh.
  • 1 0
 Actually it was mike K and Mike L who said 26 was dead, many, many times.
  • 1 0
 i dont even have kids and i want one. these are sick.
  • 1 0
 Will it be available before Christmas??
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