Spank Oozy Trail295 Bead Bite Wheelset - Review

Jul 22, 2014
by Mike Levy  
Spank OOZY Trail 295 wheelset review test

Spank's range of Oozy components includes everything from handlebars and pedals to stems, rims, and complete wheelsets, all of which Spank says have been designed with all-mountain and aggressive trail riding in mind. As you might imagine, this means that while weight is obviously a concern, these are parts that are also intended to be ridden hard or even raced in enduro events. And that pretty much sums up the Oozy Trail295 wheelset - relatively light given their intentions at 1680 grams (27.5'' weighs 1,700g, 29'' weighs 1,800g), yet wide enough to run a set of high-volume tires at low pressures without suffering from excessive casing roll. It's not the rim's 29.5mm outer and 24.5mm inner width that makes them interesting, though, as Spank has incorporated a number of notable design points that, while being hidden from view when the tire is mounted, should have a large impact on their performance. This includes an interesting shape to the rim bed that Spank claims boosts rim rigidity and strength without adding much in the way of weight, as well as their ridged 'Bead Bite' rim walls and bed that are said to offer a more secure joint between the tire and rim to prevent burping when running low pressures. The 26" Oozy Trail295 wheelset reviewed here retails for $599 USD.


Oozy Trail295 wheelset

• Intended use: all-mountain / trail
• Sizes: 26" (tested), 27.5'', 29''
• Width: 29.5mm outer, 24.5mm inner
• 28 straight pull spokes, three cross
• Single spoke length for set
• Alloy nipples
• Alloy freehub body
• 15mm / 20 mm thru-axle (incl.)
• 12 x 142 / 135mm QR compatible (incl.)
• Rim weight: 420g (26'')
• Weight: 1680g (26" wheelset)
• MSRP: $599 USD


Not Your Average Aluminum Rim

Carbon rims are getting all the attention these days, aren't they? That's not too surprising given the technology involved in manufacturing them, but it doesn't mean there aren't interesting things going on with aluminum rims, especially when you consider the cost per gram ratio that makes them much more attractive to the large majority of riders out there. The 26" Oozy Trail295 rim is said to weigh a very respectable 420 grams in 26", which is close to par with many carbon options out there, although rim width and hight does vary widely among the competition. To be honest, I'd have a pretty hard time talking myself into a set of carbon rims that cost more than a well used hatchback when I could pick up a two aluminum hoops for a fraction of the cost and spend that extra coin on something I really need, like a pet serval cat or bicep implants. And while the Oozy Trail295 rim flies well under the radar compared to most of those carbon über-hoops, they actually sport a couple of interesting features that sets them apart from run of the mill aluminum rims that get pushed out of the extrusion machine twenty four hours a day.

The most obvious of the two is the rim's strange looking rim bed that, rather than being mostly flat or slightly concave as you're likely used to seeing, sports a ridge that sits in the center of the concave well and that runs completely around its circumference. If you were to slice an Oozy rim open to inspect its shape you'd see that this profile - Spank refers to it as Oohbah - creates more of a 'W' shape than the classic shallow 'U' section that you would otherwise expect to see. The goal is to create a much more rigid rim and the theory behind it is sound: picture taking a thin piece of aluminum that's only a few millimeters thick and flexing it front to back in your hands. Not take that same piece of aluminum but in a corrugated profile and do the same thing. You'll find that the latter is much harder to bend yet weighs only marginally more than the flat piece. A simplified explanation for sure, but those are the basics.

Spank OOZY Trail 295 review test
  Spank says that the rim's 'W' cross section adds rigidity without adding grams. The rim bed isn't sealed, so you'll need to use the some tape and valve stems (not included) if you're going to run them tubeless.


Spank has included a new feature on the Oozy Trail295 hoop, called Bead Bite, that they say has a massive effect on limiting the chance of burping a tire. The simple yet clever design consists of three rows of 0.2mm tall ridges which run along each of the vertical and horizontal faces of the bead seat, meaning along both the rim wall and the rim bed. According to Spank, this feature ''dramatically increases frictional forces on the tire bead, reducing the bead's ability to move vertically or horizontally and thus improving stability and reducing burps.'' If you've been reading about new rims and wheelsets lately you'll likely note that many are employing a hook-less rim wall design that doesn't even feature a bead hook, which is clearly in contrast to what Spank has come up with. To their credit, Spank says that the goal of the Bead Bite design is to improve tire security regardless of what kind of non-tubeless or tubeless rubber you mount up.

Spank OOZY Trail 295 wheelset review test
  Tiny 0.2mm tall ridges run around the circumference of the rim and are said to help hold a tire securely in place.


Spank is obviously quite proud of the Oozy rim design and what they've been able to do with the aluminum extrusion, but does this mean we'll never see a carbon rim from Spank? That's very much the case, although it sounds like it comes down more to where the company believes carbon shouldn't be used rather than being due to their investment in aluminum manufacturing. After all, it would be relatively easy for them to source an economical carbon rim design that's produced in Asia and slap some stickers onto it. Mike Dutton, Spank Brand Manager, explains the company's thoughts on using carbon fiber: Spank has taken a stance in our manufacturing facilities and product range against the use of carbon for components that take a lot of abuse and may require more frequent replacement. We feel that handlebars and rims, for example, are not suitable products for materials which are not recyclable. The abundance of mass produced carbon components in the market lately has also brought down standards, and is starting to pose a safety threat to consumers. Spank has invested heavily into the development of production processes, materials, and product design, with the goal of offering consumers a safe, environmentally responsible affordable solution to carbon without compromises. We aim to offer World Cup level components at a competitive weight and performance compared to carbon ones many times their price.



Hubs and Spokes

Each wheel is hand assembled with twenty eight straight pull Sandvik triple butted spokes in a three-cross layout, and they thread into alloy nipples at the rim in order to keep outer rotating mass at a minimum. Given how aluminum nipples tend to deform much easier than common steel nipples, you're best off using a four-sided spoke wrench and a good amount of care when it comes time to give them a true. A set of clean looking hubs are found at the other end, and Spank has designed both the front and rear hubs' flanges in a way that allows a single spoke length to be used throughout the entire wheelset. That means you'll only need to stock one spoke length in your spare parts bin, and although straight pulls still aren't as common as classic J-bend spokes that you can get from any bike shop, eliminating the most common point of breakage - the bend - should mean that you won't ever need to replace one.

Spank OOZY Trail 295 wheelset review test
  Both the front and rear wheels use twenty eight straight pull spokes, and the entire wheelset employs a single spoke length to keep things simple.

The hubs themselves are all about compatibility, and Spank even includes a number of different axle adapters with the wheelset so as to allow you to fit them to most any frame and fork made in the last few years. This includes 12 x 142mm and 135mm QR rear axles, as well as both 15mm and 20mm front setups, both of which come with the wheelset. You can also purchase adapters for 12 x 135mm rear thru-axles and a QR front setup if you're in need of either of those two less common options. Both hubs spin on sealed bearings, and an alloy freehub body helps to shave some grams. Want to fit one of SRAM's X-Dome cassettes? There is an XD-compatible freehub available for $85 USD.


Spank OOZY Trail 295 wheelset review test
  Drive comes from a classic three pawl freehub, with each pawl depending on its own flat steel spring in order to improve reliability.





On The Trail

We mounted up a set of high-volume Specialized tires, a Butcher and Purgatory, onto our 26" Oozy Trail295 wheelset without any hassle. No levers required, which is always a good thing, and the fit between the rims and tires was snug but not tight enough to bring out any four letter words. Both tires seated up straight right off the bat without needing to go to overly excessive pressures, which isn't something that we can say about all of the rim and tire combinations out there - hands up if you've ever had to work up a sweat pumping until the tire is rock hard for it to seat properly. That wasn't an issue for us. We ran the wheels with the rear setup for a 12 x 142mm axle and the front for a 15mm thru-axle, which is how they come from Spank, but went and did an axle conversion to see how difficult the job is. The answer is not very, although the front hub's adapters were tight enough to require a set of pliers to pull them off. However, we'd much prefer this than having them fall off on their own every time the front wheel is off the bike. The driveside adapter on the rear hub actually threads on, and while it shouldn't really be tight enough to require a big wrench, there are some tool flats if you need a little help, as well as a slot machined into the opposite side of the axle that allows you to use a hex key to keep it from spinning - just be sure not to over-tighten it when you thread it back on. The freehub slides off easily once the driveside adapter has been spun off, giving you access to the pawls and drive ring if you need to give it a wipe down and some fresh lube.

And how do they perform in the dirt? Well, at the risk of sounding a bit boring, the Oozy Trail295s were invisible to us once mounted up and put to use. This is a very, very good thing if you ask us, though, because them not making a single peep or causing one iota of trouble means that Spank has come up with the right balance or weight and reliability for the aggressive trail riding that we do here in British Columbia. Not having to think about the gear under you usually means that something is right, and that was the case with these black wheels. Tire pressures even dipped well into the low 20s without any hint of the bead unseating, despite one of the test riders weighing well over 200lb and not being shy about carrying some good momentum, and it wasn't long before we had absolute confidence in them not giving us any trouble. One thing we were concerned about was removing a tire after it had been mounted for awhile - would the Bead Bite ridges provide so much grip so as to make getting a tire off a pain in the ass? Not at all. We could unseat both beads with our hands, and didn't even require lever to get the first bead up and over the rim wall. It seems like Spank have nailed the fit with the tires that we used during our time on them.

And what about the rims' special Oohbah corrugated profile? To be honest, we didn't really notice a jump in wheel rigidity when we swapped from a set of more run of the mill wheels, although that doesn't mean that it's not there. Keep in mind that the Oozy Trail295s spent a lot of their time on a 5" travel trail bike with high-volume tires that we ran in the mid- to low-20 PSI range, a forgiving setup that likely takes the edge off of any claimed gains in stiffness. And, to be fair, both the front and rear wheels are still as true as the day they came out of the box, which certainly has us thinking that they're more than strong enough for pretty much any heavy hitting rider out there on a burly trail bike. Spoke tension has not dropped away, either. Oohbah at work? Maybe.


Issues

There's nothing to really to take the Oozy Trail295 wheelset to task over, and they gave us zero issues while on the trail. The aluminum bodied freehub didn't want to let go of the ten speed SRAM cassette that we slid on when we first pulled them out of the box, although the slight gouging (pictured above) that held it in place is hardly uncommon with aluminum freehubs and we managed to pop it off after a few minutes of fiddling around. This could also be a non-issue depending on the type of cassette used. The only other thing that a few riders commented on was how plain the wheels look, although this one is entire subjective. The Oozy Trail295 wheelset packs a load of performance and reliability into a very reasonably priced package, and some riders said that they wished the wheels looked flashier to match that. How much that matters to you will come down to how under the radar you like to fly, and Spank is planning on releasing red, blue, silver, and emerald green options in the near future.



Pinkbike's take:
bigquotesHigh-end carbon rim'd wheelsets are interesting to read about, no doubt about that, and we always look forward to riding a set of ultra expensive wheels that turn heads, but it's really hard to argue their case when you can pick up a set of sub-1,700 gram aluminum wheels for $599 USD, and they're reliable to boot. The Oozy Trail295s aren't flashy, and they're probably not going to make your riding buddies oooh and aaah like they would over a wheelset that costs four times as much, but they sure as hell make a lot of sense, don't they?- Mike Levy



www.spank-ind.com

Must Read This Week

90 Comments

  • + 83
 a $600 wheelset that sounds flawless, tough, and light...its good to read a review on something that I might actually want to buy. I know you reviewers get spoiled on the best of the best of the very best, but only a small percentage of riders can actually afford those products. Us "common folk" get nothing out of reviews on products out of our means. thank you for a good review on an obtainable elite level product, lets see more things like this
  • - 19
flag wuzupjosh (Jul 23, 2014 at 1:24) (Below Threshold)
 the hubs suck tho....
  • + 4
 If you look at any reviewer in any business, they usually cover more unattainable stuff than average stuff. It's just a matter of what the people want to see and drool over.
  • + 24
 @ripallday - It's always interesting to read about that ultra expensive stuff, and there are many people out there who lay out the cash for it, but you're right when you say that there should be more content like this. There will be.
  • - 13
flag wuzupjosh (Jul 23, 2014 at 12:31) (Below Threshold)
 3 pawl hubs break pretty quick in my expeirence , the teeth just wear down and find wiggle room in the sides of the driver . neg prop if you want but i would not spend this much on a wheelset ever for just that reason , id rather build my own with a higher class hubs, i categorize hopes as lower class hubs because of the engagment but im pretty sure they have 4 pawl with 56 poi . it puts a lot less stress on it with more pawls . the hubs i have now have instant engagment and im never going back . i like my bikes fairly twitchy , i have formula brakes and run almost 40 psi so the sort of "baller on a budget " mentality can only go so far, this is one of the places i would not want to cheap out on . i do wish more hubs were straight pull tho
  • + 17
 40 psi? That may get you neg-propped right there.
  • + 4
 >Hope
>Low class
Pick one.
  • + 1
 what hubs do you have now?
  • + 6
 40 PSI is pretty much roadie territory... ;P
  • + 1
 @mikelevey - good to hear. I guess it's just hard for me to understand how people can afford to spend so much money on bikes. Although, I still drool over the ultra expensive stuff
  • + 1
 @vtwintips true precision components stealth hubs , they have a roller bearing clutch instead of teeth to engage
  • + 2
 See, but those things cost $415, seems like a high price to stoke ratio to me
  • + 2
 I run 22-25 psi no issues
  • + 35
 Wait a minute, they tested the 26 inch version? Are bike journalists even allowed on 26 inch bikes any more? Wink
  • + 12
 Where did they even find a 26inch bike that wasn't strictly downhill?
  • + 18
 Spank is one of the better companies out there. Ive had a set of their stiffy 40mm rims for2 years and they are without fault. im also running 777 riser bars from them. all the things they sell have a high end look high durability and a reasonable price.....
  • + 12
 I agree. I have been using two wheelsets back to back - Spike Race28 rims on hope hubs, alongside Flow rims (not EX) with Hope hubs, for the past couple of years. What can I say? I wouldn't touch Stan's Flow again. The wheels still fit through the frame, but they are dinged and flatspotted to shit. My Spikes are still almost like new, no shit! Also, the Flows are a bit slacker around the bead and so don't mount up tubeless that easily whereas the Spikes are no hassle. The Spank rims are stronger, they weigh the same but they cost less. It's black and white for me. I can't wait to try out these Oozy ones when the rear Flow inevitably bites the dust.

I'm also running Spike 777 bars and Spike pedals. If you ask me, you can't get better bang-for-buck than Spank. I'm a working man with a family and a mortgage. I love to read about carbon this that and the other, but I can't justify the outlay. Spank is a Godsend for people like me. Cheap and I know it's strong as hell too.
  • + 3
 I ride my Oozy wheelset (the non Trail 295's) on our local DH track all the time(and I know a couple of other local guys that do too) on a regular basis and 6 months in without a problem. And its a proper pacific northwest DH track with rock gardens, jumps, high speed berms, drops, roots and rocks. Haven't had any hub problems either.
  • + 17
 Gwins leogang run would not have happened on carbon rims
  • + 16
 This has been my next wheelset for when I build a bike, and this review confirmed it, thanks pinkbike!
  • + 11
 I was going to buy Splines. Got these bad boys instead. I'm WELL over 200lbs, ride hard in New England, and they're lucking fegit. I didn't buy bicep implants with the money i saved not getting the Splines, but I did manage a Pike! Oohbah brah!
  • + 3
 I can't think of a thing a wheel could do for you that would be more worth the money than getting a Pike. That rules.
  • + 19
 Pike > bicep implants
  • + 3
 What about bicep implants with Pike decals?
  • + 3
 What about a Pike with bicep implants?
  • + 2
 Wait a sec... Bicep + Pike first 2 letters + last 2 letters... BIKE?!?! IT'S ALL A CONSPIRACY!!!! Obviously, this was a nefarious plot by the alien backed illuminati using the CIA & Secret Ser#%#$%#%^&^%&^NO CARRIER
  • + 2
 OH MY GOD
  • + 13
 Thanks Spank; real world wheels at pretty reasonable the prices. That's the MTB world I live in.
  • + 12
 Spank you very much, you're my new hero
  • + 3
 Many people here find that sound matters too. So are they like "tikky" Shimano, "clacky" Hope, or perhaps in the middle like Mavic? Personally, it doesn't make a big difference, but also I don't need everybody looking at me.
  • + 2
 Now that I have a clutch mech I want a silent hub , it's the only thing taking away from the sound of dirt under tyres
  • + 5
 A noisy drive train sounds cheap, but a noisy hub sounds expensive.
  • + 3
 So nice to see a great set of aluminium wheels at a great price and with great performance. Honestly you have to wonder who needs carbon?? Why down spend £2000 on a set of carbon wheels when you can have these that will probably last a lot longer.
  • + 2
 After seeing nothing but good reviews for the older spank oozy wheelset I bought the 29er version. Sadly I have had nothing but trouble with them. Some spokes would come completely loose every 3-4 rides, and they were hard to mount as tubeless unless I used a split tube as air would leak from the valve hole and more worryingly the sleeve joint. Finally after only 3 months riding, the rim split in 2 at the sleeve joint during a slide out. Photo on my profile. Gutted as I had seen nothing but good reviews, so either I got unlucky, or the 29er version is significantly more fragile than the 26er which is typically reviewed here and elsewhere... Eitherway I learned the importance of welded rims...
  • + 1
 Contact Spank, I'm sure they will set things right Wink
  • + 1
 I was looking to buy the 29 version as well. Maybe holding off. I can't find any reviews of the 29er version.
  • + 2
 Once again a great product from spank. Currently running spank spoon 32 on the dh bike and spank spike enduro 28 on the trail bike. Both have held up to a lot of abuse. Spanks wheels are hand tuned and that's what keeps them tight and true over time.
  • + 5
 So, at the same weight, these didn't fail catastrophically like the M70 rims in the SC Nomad review... go carbon!
  • + 2
 Ha ha ha... well remembered!
  • + 1
 How do you tape these rims while setting tubeless? According to the Spank FAQ, the rim tape should go all the way to each sidewall, pretty much covering up the "bead bite" stuff, therefore kind of losing the advantage, isn't it?

I've recently set up my downhill bike with a pair of Tweet 28s and as my first tubeless wheelset, I'm pleasantly surprised how well it's holding up riding the shore and Whistler so far. Also their sidewalls seem stronger than 721+729s they replaced.
  • + 1
 I set my Spike rims up as normal when running tubeless with no problems. Unsure how different the Spikes are to Oozys though.
  • + 1
 Sounds like a decent Flow competitor. I would like to hear how they hold up against denting when bashing through rock gardens. It sounds trivial, but a single spoke size sure is nice when the wheel set has been used for a season or two and needs some love.
  • + 4
 "The abundance of mass produced carbon components in the market lately has also brought down standards"

Amen
  • + 5
 yeah but how loud does the hub buzz?
  • + 3
 Not much at all, they are relatively silent.
  • + 4
 was just joking, looks like a solid wheelset, will probably get a pair for my next build.
  • + 2
 Don't get the joke? Sounded like a perfectly reasonable question.
  • + 8
 Haha it was just kind of like an 'I dont care how they perform its all about the hub sound' kind of joke but no worries
  • + 1
 @sup3rc0w: They are silent but not very strong ;-)
  • + 2
 Pinkbike, you just seriously shocked me...

Calling a wheel set 295 lead me to think: "Oh no, please not another standard again"

April fools all over again.
  • + 1
 Those bite ridges are a great idea. I can also see how the lower ridges give more surface area for sealant to adhere to the tire. And the rim shape looks good for setting tires up easily.
  • + 1
 Its nice seeing Pinkbike Review something that id say the majority of us Can afford! Im definitely considering this wheel set now and it won't break the bank. Thank You Pinkbike!
  • + 1
 Had the Spike 32 with the OohBah and Bead Nip. Built them on Saint hubs. They were awesome. OohBah keeps them really straight, although the lip would dent the rim was always straight.
  • + 3
 Nice review, shame they don't have a sealed rim bed, how many engagement points does the hub have?
  • + 1
 I read in a comment from Mike Dutton on a different website that the hub has 30 teeth, so 12 degrees engagement.
  • + 0
 That's some pretty poor shimano deore quality right there
  • + 2
 Depends on what you mean by quality. Less points of engagement doesn't mean the hub is of lesser quality. Until they released the 36t star ratchet upgrade, DT Swiss had very low POE, and even then the 36t has 10 degrees engagement. High POE has it's drawbacks with regards to maintenance, wear and friction while riding.
  • - 1
 roller bearing clutch is the way too go . stealth hubs from true precision components. not very light tho
  • + 2
 I guess you could get chain reaction to build a set up with Hope pro2 evo hubs for the same or less with 40t pickup. Clutches have huge angle of engagement though
  • + 1
 My set of these came with a rim strip already installed. Just got them last week so maybe it's a change they've made since pinkbike picked up their set? I'm not running mine tubeless yet, but just putting the tubes and tires on, the tires were almost completely sealing anyway.
  • + 1
 I got these wheels on my trailbike in 27,5. They are amazing. Never been that easy to set up tubeless, zero burping even on rowdy dh tracks. Still no dings and perfectly true, but have only used them for a little while.
  • + 0
 Spank has chosen a small overall outside diameter. Makes getting tires on easy. And blowing them off while riding easier too. As many people who ride hard have found out. Once you start denting the incredibly low sidewalls. You'll never keep tires on unless you ride gently. Sorry. Has to be said. Not safe for certain people Quality manufacturing and nice to build despite having no eyelets on the rim though.
  • + 2
 I've got the Spike 28s and they are a right c*nt to get Schwalbe SG tyres on. I read somewhere that the Spank rim bed bit where the spoke heads sit is stronger than the rims they tested against despite not having eyelets, because they went for precision machining rather than a poorly manufactured rim/eyelet interface. In spoke pull through tests, Spank rims are very good performers. Isn't that so?
  • + 0
 That's the schwalbe super gravity tires mostly. But also the hump on the inside of the rim. These are the smallest of of any rim out there. Making it the most likely to let tires blow off. Yes the way they machine where the spoke head sits is nice. But an eyelet generally let's a nipple turn nicer.
  • + 3
 I've got spank spikes with flat spots and I have no problem with loosing tires. Im not exactly easy on them either. Ive been VERY happy with these wheels.
  • - 4
flag xCri (Jul 24, 2014 at 9:02) (Below Threshold)
 Yes like I'd mentioned. It's if you ride hard. Bike parts don't cause trouble if you go easy on them. I'm talking about pro level riding here.
  • + 1
 I've had a set for almost a year with zero issues, only complaint is tires are tougher than other rims to stretch on. running front tubeless around 22-30 and rear with tube a little more firm. Hubs are middle of the road noisy, not quiet by any means. There's no issues with tires pulling off. I've logged close to 100 rides on them, including 4 enduros and a couple dozens days at the bike park. Maybe not pro level but close.
  • - 1
 Lots of people have blown tires off these rims. Lots of people haven't. More haven't than have obviously. But I've done it. I've seen people do it. And I know what I never want happening to me or my friends ever again.
  • + 1
 Are their tires loose fitting and almost too easy to bead?I have had tires fit loose and I end up not running them in fear of burping and losing tire. Conti. Was one that comes to mind
  • + 0
 No it was a bunch of different maxxis tires from new to not new. Everyone has different luck with bike parts... Everyone rides different. But with a smaller od and lower sidewalls than most other rims.
  • + 4
 i run the OOZY rims with Hope hubs ,very light and durable set-up
  • + 2
 I've just finished building my wheelset with Spank Oozy Trail295 Bead Bite rims. The weight of the rim is actually 450g though.
  • + 1
 Just a point of note, steel nipples aren't very common while nickle plated brass is. Basically Nickle plated brass only adds 40-60 grams across two wheels in comparison to Al alloy nipples.
  • + 1
 There's actually a fair bit of great aluminum wheelsets in the 600 dollar range. Most of stans lineup is around there and so are Rf turbines
  • + 1
 The perfect trail wheels

These wheels are hard to find in 27.5" version, although they're been out in 26" for a while now

I wonder how they compare to Ryde trail rims
  • + 2
 This review sealed it for me, a set in blue for my Uzzi please, talk about bang for your buck
  • + 3
 How many POE does the hub have? Important info....
  • + 2
 27-Point, 3-Pawl Engagement
  • + 0
 Likely a Formula hub. Looks very similar to the ones Bontrager uses in their Rhythm Elite wheels.
  • + 3
 I read in a comment from Mike Dutton that the hub has 30 teeth, so 12 degrees engagement. I also heard that they used Novatec hubs (unconfirmed) while they develop their own. I remember reading about a magnetic engagement hub, which is exciting. PS Spank, I'd love to prototype test your stuff!
  • + 2
 I remember reading that about Novatec too. These ones don't say anything on them by the looks of it, so I guess they are also Novatec (which is a good thing if you ask me). I think Spank will hold out on hub manufacture until they have something special to release.
  • + 1
 @Jhou - The hub is made by Chosen. Most notably the manufacturer of Sun-Ringle and Stan's hubs, among many other OEM's.
  • + 1
 Novatec
  • + 2
 Of all the rims I've used to build wheels, Spank were my favorite before I switched to carbon rims. They are damn fine rims.
  • + 1
 Still love the clackity sound of a hub. Are these similar in sound to a hope?
  • + 1
 All thrilla no filla. These are bloody light for the intended purpose. Price is amazing.
  • + 1
 Has much changed between the past oozy rim and this one?
  • + 1
 The addition of the bead bite ridges and a few millimeters wider than the previous oozy's.
  • + 0
 If I wasn't so into Renthal, Hope and Mavic, Spank would easily be my next choice.
  • + 1
 spank

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