Video: Jeff Kendall-Weed Rides Durango, Colorado on a 1995 Ibis Mojo Ti

Dec 19, 2018
by Jeff Kendall-Weed  



bigquotesPeople see you, and they are like ‘how are you doing that?!’  Dude, it’s all the same thing. Whether you’re on your totally sick pimped out new bike, or your old POS, it’s all mountain biking.  You get loose in a corner, and you’re like ‘Oh! That’s what it’s all about right there!Brendan Shafer

I didn’t give them much intro, I just said bring your old bike and be yourself.  That was my own plan, at least, so it seemed prudent to invite the locals to do the same.  Vintage bikes have always been cool in my book, and particularly so if they can still somewhat shred by modern day standards.  Now, when I write “vintage bikes”, I think of early 1990s bikes, with their finicky cantilever brakes, skinny tires, and nervous geometry.  

Photo by Ben Gavelda
My vintage bike of choice, a 1995 Ibis Mojo Ti, built with a “restomod” mix of old school parts along with some more modern parts. The cantilever brakes kept it sketchy, but modern contact points kept it safe. Big thanks to David at Pedal the Peaks, right in the center of Durango, CO, for loaning us some shop space to build the bikes.

My own fond memories of obsolete technology mixed with fluorescent colors also make me think of Durango, CO.  The small mountain town is known for its steam-powered locomotive and formidably strong Fort Lewis College cycling team, and once upon a time, the town hosted massive races and was the ultimate training grounds for the sports elite.  Now, other Southwestern meccas have crowded the spotlight: Moab, Sedona, Park City, Crested Butte, Vail, Grand Junction, Fruita, Summit County, Winter Park. With Durango a bit forgotten by much of today’s mountain bike culture, I too have been guilty of not considering a trip to Durango for over a decade.  

I grew up during Durango’s heyday, hearing about the 1990 World Champs and hometown to brands such as Yeti Cycles.  I finally got to visit Durango in 2004 for the NORBA Nationals at Purgatory resort. A buddy and I took a week off work with no plans beyond a tent, a dozen boxes of Clif bars, four bikes, and that race.  I got pretty sick of those Clif bars, but I ended up winning the National Mountain Cross title that weekend.

The original Ibis Handjob cable hanger.

Photo by Ben Gavelda
Hogsback Ridge, overlooking the small town on the edge of the Rockies. Our first item on the agenda was to session this historic trail.

Fast forward nearly 15 years, and it’s early spring 2018. I went for a ride with a local guy where I live here in Bellingham, WA, who showed up with a late-1990s hardtail, sporting v-brakes, narrow tires, and a killer upgrade: an open dropout Marzocchi fork with nearly *gasp* 100mm of travel.  The bike would have been a solid ride for the late 90s, but compared to my plush carbon machine, it was clearly from a different era. Not one to shun anyone without the latest piece of gadgetry, I led him on a lap of our local mountain. And he did awesome, not once complaining about the pouring rain and soupy mud.  He was sending jumps and making it through some slick root sections, and even nailed a few tough skinny lines. I was so inspired! His bike wasn’t modern, but it was a lot more bike than I had for a good portion of my early riding career. With this experience in mind, I set out to build a dream vintage bike.

It was right at this moment, fully puckered and fully clenched, that I remembered that this was supposed to be fun. Ah yes, the old days- back when neon made its first appearance, and bicycles were simpler.

After nearly 6 months of internet scouring, I found what to me is a complete unicorn bedazzled in rainbows of rad: a 1995 Ibis Mojo Titanium.  This old Mojo Ti was so right, and the fellow I bought it from was totally cool as well. He knew about my videos and was super supportive, and gave me a great deal on the bike, though my wife is still perplexed as to why I would spend so much money on a bike old enough to purchase a six pack.

Photo by Ben Gavelda
My 1995 Ibis Mojo Ti, built with a Marzocchi Z2 fork, Paul Components cantilever brakes, WTB SST Ti saddle, and a modern Shimano XT M8000 drivetrain. Ibis sourced this tubing from a mill in Detroit called Ancotech. As a kid, I never imagined I’d end up with a bike this sweet, but sometimes dreams come true!

As I built the old bike up and took it on its maiden voyage, the feel of the steep, old school geometry reminded me of a time when cross country ruled the mountain bike roost.  Then I finally connected the dots: Durango, CO, would be a perfect destination to shred the cantilever equipped piece of wheeled nostalgia! I realized that not only had I completely forgotten about Durango, but with the town’s rich MTB history, I should really experience the trails with both a vintage AND a modern bike.  This would be such a cool way to connect a bike to a community!

Photo by Ben Gavelda
This left hand corner requires full concentration! Going off the edge of the trail at 30mph was not an option. By this point, the arm pump was real. I had just put fresh bushings and seals into my Marzocchi Z2, and changed the fork oil from 20 year old 5 wt oil to fresh 7.5wt, but still, that damper, after about 20 seconds of 30mph impacts, chattered harder than my teeth on a day of ice fishing. And this was as plush as it got in the ‘90s!

This idea had all the pieces to be a cool story, so I called Logan Nelson, who’s been traveling and filming quite a bit for me over the past year, and contacted some Durango residents.

First and foremost, I wanted to ride the trails that John Tomac absolutely shredded in Bill Snider’s film “Retread.”  I gave Snider a call, who still lives in Colorado today, and got to chat with him about making that film.

bigquotesWe filmed the whole thing in about two hours or so. My wife and I worked together. She ran the second camera. Probably the hardest part of that day was hiking along the hillside as John came down the ridge line there.Snider

Snider also explained another detail that I had been wondering about, “The boy narrating the intro,” Snider told me, “is John’s stepson, Greg.”


Photo by Ben Gavelda
Photo by Ben Gavelda
After we shot for the day, we reviewed Retread to see if we had hit many of the same spots, and we also noticed that Tomac had been riding Magura Hydro brakes!

Photo by Ben Gavelda
Modern day bikes grow the gaps substantially. Today, our bikes are about 25% heavier, cost about 25% more, and are capable of things that we couldn’t even dream of during the 1990s. If you ever want to appreciate your own mountain bike, grab one that’s over 20 years older. It’ll be guaranteed to give you a fresh perspective!

Photo by Ben Gavelda

As I began to research key figures in the Durango mountain bike scene, I realized no trip to the town, especially one with vintage bikes and historical inspirations, would be complete without meeting one of the greatest authorities on all things using narrow knobbies and biopace chainrings: Mike Wilk.  Wilk is very well known throughout the vintage community, has run websites documenting the restorations of old bikes, and he’s a US national cross country champion. The host of the Cycle Squawk podcast, Wilk has lived in Durango since 1999. When we landed in Durango, our plans were to meet with him ASAP!

Photo by Ben Gavelda

bigquotesHere in Durango, we shred plenty of modern bikes, but I’ll always have a special place in my heart for the vintage experience. I do have a collection of vintage bikes, but what really gets me excited is when I find an actual ex-pro’s bike, especially one that’s won something important.  That’s really cool.Wilk


Wilk welcomed us into his garage, which has a few of his favorite vintage bikes proudly hanging alongside modern bikes, all of which are ready to ride.  Some of his most prized possessions are featured elsewhere, such as the museum at The Pro’s Closet in Boulder, CO.  A couple of those rare bikes on display in Boulder include Missy Giove’s 1993 Yeti ARC ASLT that she used to finish 3rd in the UCI DH World Champs, as well as Juli Furtado’s 1990 Yeti FRO that she used to win the 1990 UCI XC World Champs.  The bikes that Wilk planned to ride during my visit were pretty dang special as well. As his 4 year old daughter utilized my visit as an excuse to delay the ominous bedtime ritual, she pedaled circles around us, and got us all stoked to do our own pedaling the next day.  

bigquotesI ride old bikes because I grew up drooling over these bikes in Mountain Bike Action, and now that we get a little older, a little more financially stable, we can get our hands on them for a little less money.  A lot of people just put them on the wall. You know what, I say that’s silly, these bikes were made to be ridden hard. And as long as you back it off a little bit, there’s nothing this bike can’t do.Wilk

Photo by Ben Gavelda
Photo by Ben Gavelda
Engineer Mountain is one of the most accessible high country trails. About 45 minutes north of town, riders find an easy climb up to some of the most amazing views around. The descent down is super fun, too, with only one substantial rock garden to navigate.

We planned for a full day of riding a typical Durango high-country trail, and even recorded a podcast episode in the car on the way to the trailhead.  The summit of our ride would be at 12,176 feet above sea level, more than two miles high in the sky. With Wilk guiding us, we sampled Engineer Mountain Trail.  This is a great trail for vintage bikes, as it’s never too gnarly, but at the same time, it’s no gravel path through the park.

bigquotesThere are definitely trails that suit themselves more to vintage bikes, and there are definitely trails that suits themselves more to bigger, enduro bikes, and we’re gonna ride both.Wilk

Photo by Ben Gavelda

As we saw more than a handful of riders all on modern bikes, it’s quite clear the older bikes provide just as much fun as the newer ones, albeit with a couple caveats. For one, the speeds will inherently be a bit lower. No, or minimal, suspension can get sketchy. However, the reliability of these older bikes isn’t what we are accustomed to on modern rigs. These parts are old, have been ridden a lot, and are often designed for riding styles from a different era. When Mike shredded a tension strand in his Tioga disc rear wheel, he had to open his brakes up to keep the bike rolling.

Photo by Ben Gavelda
Are ‘90s bikes not supposed to have fun? This old bike is capable of so much, and every time I throw a leg over it, I keep progressing in new, weird ways. Long live old bikes!

Photo by Ben Gavelda
Photo by Ben Gavelda

I was thrilled to ride with Wilk.  I had heard he was a good rider, and while he definitely was, his riding style really surprised me.  He showed a surprising amount of BMX influence for someone with such a big background in the endurance side of the sport.  But I guess anyone who’s able to smoothly pilot a fully rigid bike down Engineer Mountain with a smile on their face will mandatorily have ample handling skills.

bigquotesYou gotta have that fine line of knowing that yeah, I can push it, but I gotta back it off just that little bit because with cantilever brakes, you’re not gonna be able to bail out if something goes wrong.Wilk


Photo by Ben Gavelda

Photo by Ben Gavelda

Photo by Ben Gavelda

Mike Wilk describes his Yeti: My 1991 Yeti Ultimate was handmade in Durango, Colorado. MTB pioneer Richard Cunningham of Mantis Bikes and now Pinkbike, designed an elevated chainstay bike, and via Zapata Espinoza, the concept made its way to Yeti drawn on a napkin. Chief engineer Chris Herting knew the bike wouldn’t handle very well, but the project was backed 100% by Mountain Bike Action, so after many design tweaks, the Yeti Ultimate was born! This is bike is almost 100% period correct with Bullseye hubs and cranks, a super rare FTW stem, IRD seatpost, and full Shimano XT 7 speed components.

Photo by Ben Gavelda

Photo by Ben Gavelda
Mike Wilk left, myself in the center, and Brendan Shafer on the right.

Another famous old school spot is Raider’s Ridge, just above Horse Gulch. Wilk and I rode Raider’s along with a fellow vintage connoisseur, Brendan Shafer.  Shafer embodies a true mountain town local, and he has the stories to back it up. “I moved to Durango as a teenager in 2004,” Shafer told me. “The saying goes in mountain towns, when the times are good, you don’t wanna leave, and when times are bad, you can’t!  We have our own way of doing things here.”

Photo by Ben Gavelda
Shafer didn’t let his lack of suspension slow him down through the rocks.

Durango has a long list of top-level names that have called the town home-- such as Myles Rockwell, Kirt Voreis, Greg Herbold, John Tomac, Missy Giove, Ruthie Matthes, Travis Brown, Todd Wells, Troy Wells, and even Bob Roll.  

Shafer is also new to the #raddad club- congrats to him and his family! I’d heard quite a bit about his unique style on the older bikes, and his Fat Chance was- and still is- a coveted vintage ride. While not a born and raised Durango local, Shafer is a great example of the type of passion-filled individual who finds an ideal home in the town of Durango.

Photo by Ben Gavelda
Photo by Ben Gavelda
Brendan has a timeless style on any bike, new or old.

Brendan’s Fat Chance: My Fat is, of course, the Buck Shaver model. It was named after Fat City employee Pat Eagan. The color of my bike is "Arrest me Red". I thought it was a New York frame for a while, but I get a lot of knowledgeable people who look at the welds and think it’s a Somerville, MA, frame. I like to believe it's a Somerville frame because that factory represents the true magic of Fat City to me. I wish that I would've been able to adhere to a more strict period correct build, but I had to compromise on some things due to safety/availability/comfort. Nevertheless, it has some standout parts, including fully intact and functioning Nuke Proof hubs and Matix (pre-Trek buyout) 176mm cranks. In the name of safety, I had the segmented fork custom built by Walt Works. The original Buck Shaver would have come with Tenge strut forks, which had curved legs, in contrast to the Yo Eddy Big One Inch segmented fork that had straight legs, like the fork on my bike.

Photo by Ben Gavelda

Another long time Durango resident, Ned Overend is known for being an amazing athlete, though he isn’t particularly known for his jumping prowess.  However, during an Iron Horse Classic in 1991, photographer Malcolm Fearon captured an absolutely classic image of Overend off the ground and crossing it up over a black dirt section of the course.  We made sure to spend a few minutes sessioning this same jump, though none of us were deserving of a number one plate like Ned.

bigquotesHorse Gulch is fun. You can hit sendy type stuff if you want, or you can just noodle. I like to do both. There are lots of great climbs here. I’m an XC type guy, and I like to push it on the climbs up a classic Durango type trail.Wilk

Photo by Ben Gavelda
Photo by Ben Gavelda

Descending from the classic ridge line, the modern trail “Snake Charmer” was purposely built as a mountain bike trail.  Extensive rock work punctuated by berms and rock drops hammer home the point of the route. Watching Shafer and Wilk smoothly weave their vintage bikes down this trail was a real treat, a visual display of handling prowess.  

I couldn’t help but notice our bikes were many times older than the machines of any rider who rode by us, and definitely quite different from the type of mountain bike that the trail builders would have had in mind. However, with age, a bicycle accumulates character, and these older bikes were indeed storied. And descending modern trails like this would only add to the story. “I have a couple other vintage bikes. The situation is more like I have enough parts and random stuff to put together ten bikes, but there’s only one rideable at any given time. Bikes come and go. You’re always trading, buying stuff, collecting,” says Shafer.

Wilk is a well known vintage connoisseur, and leads monthly vintage rides.  Mike’s style is really unique. He’s ready to lay down the pedal power, but he finesses the bike around or over obstacles rather than simply smashing them.  Shafer also has a unique style, and appears to be surfing or skating the bike, using the short wheelbase to his advantage. I came away from my time with both Wilk and Shafer just plain stoked on the vibe: old bikes, good trails, and a goal to simply enjoy our time in the woods.  

bigquotesEveryone has some cool vintage bike here, which I think is pretty special. You might not see them out the trails, but everyone has a story, which is unique, especially for a small, isolated place.Shafer

Photo by Ben Gavelda
Photo by Ben Gavelda
Mike is not afraid to get aggressive and show some skills on his vintage bikes.

Mike Wilk Describes his 3D: My 1994 3D Racing Rover was built by Chris Herting for a team rider whose name he cannot remember. The little black book with handwritten notes documenting the serial number has been lost. The bike is exactly as it would have appeared at a NORBA National that season with Rock Shox Mag fork, Topline crankset, custom modified Answer ATAC stem, Ringle seatpost, and the first generation XTR Shimano M900 components that still shift and brake amazingly. The bike is just under 24lbs, which was pretty incredible for the time.

Photo by Ben Gavelda

For years, a key aspect to the Durango scene has been Fort Lewis College.  The school introduces a healthy number of youngsters to mountain culture, and many of these alumni, such as Wilk, end up calling Durango their permanent home.  We were lucky enough to catch a modern day shred down a rough and proper Durango descent of Haflin Creek Trail with current Fort Lewis College coach Lucas Lemaire. In order to get in touch with Lemaire, I had been communicating with Chad Cheeney, another head coach, but Cheeney was not going to be able to meet with us.  The modern bike was a necessity on the terrain, which shifted from traditional high country aspens to bright red Moab-esque rock.

bigquotesHaflin’s a great one. It’s like an in-town high country ride.  It’s got all aspects of trail riding- rocky steep, super flowy, technical.Lemaire

Photo by Ben Gavelda

Durango has gnar, though it’s not fall line, freeride type gnar.  It’s more of a traditional mountain bike experience, where covering some mileage will be required.  You work hard to play hard. I loved Haflin’s high speed singletrack, and a series of tighter switchbacks were fun to carve through with the tacky dirt after a recent rain.  Pounding through Southwest style rock gardens with my 130mm travel bike reminded me what arm pump is like. It was a fun departure to simply monster truck through rocks rather than the “hold on and pray” technique the vintage bikes often require.  

Photo by Ben Gavelda.

Photo by Ben Gavelda

Photo by Ben Gavelda
Photo by Ben Gavelda

Lemaire’s specialties are slalom and downhill, and we had just one morning available to ride with Lemaire before he had to depart to Snowmass, in Aspen, with 84 students in tow, for a race that weekend.  “Fort Lewis brings in a lot of riders.  The trails here are so amazing, and the college does volunteer days with Trails 2000, the local advocacy group,” Lemaire told me.

bigquotesThe college brought me here; I graduated in 2013.  I wanted to bring back to the community and help coach, so they brought me aboard.  The riding is phenomenal. You can ride tons of trails out of your backdoor. Downhill is my passion, and one of my favorite bikes, so I just ride it everywhere.

Photo by Ben Gavelda

Photo by Ben Gavelda
Photo by Ben Gavelda

The rainy ride back home in Bellingham with my friend who showed up on the green hardtail with the v-brakes really opened my eyes to the “why” behind our reasons for riding.  That feeling of inspiration was strong enough to kick me into gear, to buy that vintage bike, and sample a simpler version of this same sport. And I’m so glad to have ventured into this world.

The coolest vintage bikes have a story behind them.  Whether it’s a brand’s marketing, or personal significance for the bike in question, there’s something almost spiritual about bikes.  And when we find a bike that aligns our personal stars, we can’t help but feel stoked. As Shafer put it:

bigquotesYou don’t need to have the look to have the spirit.  That to me is a mountain biker— kind of rough around the edges. You might show up hungover, and not be able to ride that good, but you’re a mountain biker, man. That’s what Yo Eddy was all about to me as a kid.  And I’ve always thought that that kind of attitude was what it’s all about.

Photo by Ben Gavelda

Durango has a unique position with a mix of desert and high country trails, just like it has a unique mix of old school heroes and current students of the sport.  Modern style trail development has been slow to be accepted, though I’m optimistic that this will change with time. Youngsters are finding new lines and shredding it up.  Durango has its own unique culture, and will always blend desert dirt with alpine colors.  What really sets Durango up as an iconic destination is a mix of the people in town along with the general town attitude of just get out and ride. And regardless of the bike being ridden, this attitude will keep anyone’s lens on the best aspect of the local trails anywhere: having fun in the woods.  

bigquotesIf you can get out on your old bike, it’s a great way to remind yourself just how to have fun.  I think when you can remind yourself that you can have fun on any bike, it’s almost more fun. You can still ride a bike that’s 25 years old. You can still get ride, get rad, and get gnarly on an old bikes, and it’s actually just as fun.  The feeling is the same.Shafer


Durango mountain biking trails

Old Bike Psyche

Produced and written by: Jeff Kendall-Weed @jeffweed.
Filming and editing: Logan Patrick Nelson@loganpnelson.
Photography: Ben Gavelda @bengavelda.

Follow Mike Wilk @ridevintagemtb.
Follow Brendan Shafer
Follow Brendan Shafer @ brendanoshafer.
Follow Lucas Lemaire @ downhillinbasta.

Supported by:
Camelbak
Ibis Cycles
Kitsbow Cycling Apparel
Kali Protectives

Photo by Ben Gavelda
Follow Jeff on his Instagram, subscribe to his YouTube, or follow him on Facebook. Hope you enjoyed this video!


MENTIONS: @JeffWeed



131 Comments

  • + 32
 That hand holding the brake cable is awesome!
  • + 19
 That's the Ibis handjob. It made a re-appearance on the modern Hakkalugi as well.
  • + 4
 @JeffWeed: Great article! I have an O.G. handjob bottle opener......sits next to my toolbox and gets used often.

Was in Durango in Septmeber and was drooling over the late 80s/early 90s race bikes hanging in Mountain Bike Specialists. Saw so many of those on old covers of MBA.
  • + 3
 @Steelies4ever: Thank you! MBS was a cool shop, and Pedal the Peaks has a rad vintage collection too. So much MTB history in Durango! Jealous of your handjob bottle opener, those are hard to find!
  • + 4
 Check out Durango Cyclery also. Hanging in the shop, they have a home made mountain bike from the 70’s that is a remarkable piece of garage innovation. They also have a large cache of vintage parts to keep your old rig rolling.
  • + 3
 @Speeder01: Rad, thanks for the tip! It's pretty cool how much MTB history is in Durango.
  • + 3
 @JeffWeed: any chance you can talk Ibis into making a repro of the handjob bottle opener??? Big Grin
  • + 1
 @ssip: unfortunately that's not going to happen. You'll have to ask Scot about why.
  • + 1
 @JeffWeed: Less common yet just as cool is the ToeJam pump peg on the really old stuff

www.wallywerner.com/ebaypics/cousinit/P1000974.jpg
  • + 20
 Probably my favorite article yet on pinkbike. You show a great appreciation for our history and culture. The 90s were a great time for mountain bikes. We wouldn't be here now without that passion for riding off road singletrack in amazing locations.

I remember you raced expert at Purg right?
  • + 4
 Thank you! Yeah, I raced Expert Men 19-29.
  • + 1
 @JeffWeed: I have a weird photographic memory and you have a unique name. Again thanks and reach out if you want more adventures in Colorado.
  • + 3
 Agreed! Love to see Durango get some homage. I live here now and it seems like a dream come true when I think how I was a dorky kid back in the 80s on the east coast reading in the mags about the all the adventures and mtb heros here. It did not disappoint.
  • + 1
 @Sycip69er: Hahaha cool! That was a fun weekend, and it turned into a rad roadtrip as well. I hope to get back to Durango next summer- will let ya know!
  • + 1
 @CarlMega: You live in a rad spot, Carl! Enjoy it!!!
  • + 14
 This dude has a zest for life and can ride the shit out of a bike. Great video
  • + 3
 Thanks Cky!
  • + 1
 @JeffWeed: You've become one of my favorite riders for the same reason, I always look forward to your installments. Ride on, dude!
  • + 13
 Cantilever brakes were invented by Satan...
  • + 8
 True story.
  • + 5
 What was worse though? Using them or tuning them? I'm honestly not sure which was worse.
  • + 2
 @big-red: Hahaha! These brakes are really easy to work on, they are modern units made by Paul Components. The v-brake style threaded pad posts help a ton to dial in toe. As long as conditions aren't too wet they have really good power (for a cantilever).
  • + 8
 That's about what I started out with a million years ago. Actually my first fork was a RS Quadra 5, then I got the Z2 - a big improvement. But to be honest I much prefer watching folks ride the old stuff and keep them in fond memory. For me back then it was try to ride agressively and by the slightest mistake those bikes would try to kill you. Now you blunder and the bike says - not too bad but you can do better - no I have absolutely no desire to ride the old stuff.
  • + 4
 Fair enough! Old stuff can be a bit of an, uhm, acquired taste. I LOVE it when I can get a fresh take on an old trail, and the retro bike is an easy way to do that! Cheers NoriDori!
  • + 1
 I'm stuck on the idea of keeping an old Iron Horse Team Issue bike I have in my basement vs letting it go. I know I'll never ride it for exactly the reason you mentioned, but something is keeping me from getting rid of it.
  • + 2
 @NRZ: Perhaps when you're a little bored of your local trails one day, just take it out for a rip? Or if you're riding with someone who's just beginning (or just plain slow) try taking the old bike out to spice it up? It works for me!
  • + 1
 @JeffWeed: I will side with @NoriDori on this one. I have been riding long enough to remember the day when I upgraded my Nishiki's unicrown fork to a set of Tange switchblades! The memories of the "good old days" are indeed fond ones, but modern bikes are just so much more fun to ride. Of course, my riding skills are miniscule compared to yours (love your vids, BTW), so I guess I have to go way higher on the learning curve before I need to ride a way less capable bike in order to keep thing fresh!
  • + 1
 @JeffWeed: Hy Jeff. I make a point of riding trails I NEVER get bored of. Akward trails and sections the keep me on my toes and working (for years sometimes) to figure them out. OK if I had as much talent as you - maybe the stuff I ride now could be boring ;-)
  • + 1
 @NoriDori: Ha! Thanks, for me as I'm often riding the same stuff day in and out, well, it can be a welcome change to try something new! Cheers!
  • + 5
 As a fellow Fort Leisure grad and Durango resident of 9 years I can honestly say my mind was blown seeing JKH blow down Hogsback with the cantilever brakes! That shite is steeeeeeeeeep! Having tried to ride it many times on a modern enduro rig and never fully cleaned it please tell me Jeff that it took you a couple tries to sack up and send it even on your 30 year old rig??? Mad respect to you, and no disrespect when I say you are the dorkiest dude on video but can shred harder and with more style than any other rider I have watched. Alright, fan boy rant over.
  • + 4
 Thanks for the note! Hahaha I will not disagree with dork status, I'm happy to own that! Honestly, Hogsback was right on the line between fun and scary. What was scary about it was that the speed the bike would pick up was far more than what those brakes could scrub off before the corners, so it was 100% commitment. It was also day 1 of the trip, so getting hurt there would have stopped this whole thing in its tracks! I had to hike back up and re-do it about 5 times.
  • + 5
 Doesn't Jeff seem like the nicest dam guy? Awesome article. Really love the retrospective stuff. I never paid attention to racing or industry trends when I started riding in the late 90s, so this stuff really fascinates me!
  • + 1
 Possibly the nicest guy in the whole industry.
  • + 5
 Mad respect to the older guys on here sending it on these (amazing) deathtraps before I was born
  • + 4
 Thanks Medieval, deathtraps can, at times, be a fitting description for the older bikes. But that's half of the fun, as well!
  • + 2
 I remember lusting over a Bridgestone MB 0
Could only find a MB2 . Built up to about 24 pounds.
This was before (powerful?) v brakes.
Jeff that Ti hard tail what a score!
Thank you so much for bringing back memories of vintage bikes we drooled over.
If your on two wheels your having fun.
Next can you cover the 50 pound vintage free ride bikes from early 2000? Smile
  • + 1
 Thanks Sshredder! I have a Bridgestone road bike, a 3000 series, but it's set up with a coaster brake. That MB2 sounds sweet! V-brakes are great, but they work just a little too well for that true "retro" feel!
  • + 1
 @JeffWeed: had to google your Bridgestone 3000 road bike.
What a beautiful steel frame with investment cast lugs.
Same aesthetics as the MB series.
Cool that you have a place in your heart for vintage bikes.
BTW the burnt orange Marz Z one and the red Zed two were game changers when it came to reliability and performance.
I put a four inch travel Z one one my Norco Rampage added V brakes. I worked at Race Face . They all thought I was either crazy or hard core .
It was the beginning of the Free Ride Era.
  • + 1
 @Sshredder: Orange Z1 forks were so sick!!! Yeah I love the older stuff. Don't get me wrong, new bikes are AWESOME, but I have a very real appreciation for the earlier days of the sport. Rad you worked at Race Face- supplier gigs in the bike industry are tough, but so rewarding! Living one's passion is a key for happiness.
  • + 1
 @JeffWeed: in that case you one very happy manSmile
  • + 2
 I rode with a few pro riders on Haflin last year. That trail is amazing! Towards the bottom, instead of the rock chute on the right, they just drop/gap off that big rock on the left back onto the trail. Scared me to watch haha.
  • + 1
 That's a sweet line! Nice!
  • + 3
 I built the trail that Jeff hits right before the credits, glad to see it still gets some use. Sweet vid, love to see the old stomping grounds get shredded again!
  • + 1
 Very humbling perspective on bikes and how we ride! I love the idea of just enjoying the trail no matter of what you are riding, its as if this ideology has been lost from the mainstream! So much goodness in this article, I love it!
  • + 1
 My first real bike (1995 Univega Alpina 606s) had the same Mag 21 fork as that 3D. I'd hate to be maintaining that one though. Those forks didn't have dust seals and instead relied on fork boots to keep them clean. Running that fork without boots is just begging for rebuilds after each ride. That being said, the fork didn't really do much anyway. 48mm travel and you either had enough air in it to support you, in which case it only moved at all on the biggest hits, or you had less air in it so it would actually help on rough terrain (if it could break past the insane initial static friction), but would bottom out on any moderate impact.
  • + 3
 Mike has quite the pile of old Rock Shox bits in his bike stash. It sounds like the Mag 21 was ahead of the Manitou at the time, though. So stoked to have this sweet old Z2 on the Mojo TI! In 1998, I was stuck with a Judy XC for my 1" steerer bike. At one point, a large bottom out sent both fork springs shooting straight up and out of the stanchions. One hit me in the chin!
  • + 1
 I think the next video should end with the same sponsorship gear spread out, except that the Kitsbow should be included in that spread and the very end of the video should pan to a naked (but tastefully so) JKW.

Jokes aside, I love all JKW videos. That dude rips.
  • + 2
 LOL great idea! *kids, shield your eyes!*
  • + 1
 Such a great video! Growing up in New Mexico I made the trek to Durango a few times a year to ride their legendary trails. I have such good memories from many of the spots you filmed at for this video. Awesome to see you riding at that level on a sweet piece of MTB history! Love the stoke!
  • + 1
 Thanks mtb505! New Mexico has great riding too. Say hello to my buddies at Fat Tire in ALBQ!
  • + 1
 1991: When the best in the world were riding toe clips :-) Love this article and the humble rad vibe with genuine stoke. Thanks for putting it together, and reminding us it's all about the challenge, the community, and getting out into them there hills!
  • + 1
 The speed and vert Jeff gets on those jumps is impressive. But I'm not surprised. I remember riding with Jeff in 2007, I was on full sus, disc brakes, 3x9. He was on full rigid, v-brakes, singlespeed - a black/red/green bike he called "The Rasta Ripper." He rode circles around me, up and down the trail. Had enough time to ride ahead, pull his SLR out of his pack, snap pics of me, then catch up and pass me. Rinse and repeat.

Jeff, I watched your build video. Did the rear wheel you cut up come from the Rasta Ripper?
  • + 3
 I love Jeff's videos. He always looks like he's having so much fun. Except he makes riding look too damn easy. Pisses me off a little actually...
  • + 1
 LOL thank you!
  • + 1
 You can get most of that original feeling back on a new bike by just going hardtail. A well-built hardtail is a true joy to ride and you can get parts to fix it if you break it. I think of hardtails the same way I think about manual transmissions off-road. It's fun, you probably won't go as fast, but your bills will probably be lower also.
  • + 2
 Hardtails: most underrated bikes of 2018! I had a modern hardtail for a week this fall and really enjoyed it! Cheers!
  • + 1
 @JeffWeed: Yeah...I love my hardtail, but my wife surprised me on my birthday with a pimped out Ripmo. Unfortunately, I separated my shoulder right before she gave it to me and now I have a brand new kick-ass bike I can't even ride. Getting old is kinda rough.

That said, things haven't changed THAT much in 20 years. My hardtail from 20 years ago(still in the garage) is a Trek 8500 frame with Chris King hubs and headset, marzocchi front fork, race face cranks and bb and shimano drivetrain. My current hardtail is a Salsa Timberjack frame with chris king hubs and headset, marzocchi front fork, race face cranks and bb, and shimano drivetrain. It's easy to forget how long brands have been around and making good stuff. Yeah, the brakes are different, and the wheels are different sizes, and the geometry is different, but the lineage is there.
  • + 2
 @Explodo: Ouch! Sorry to hear about your shoulder, I also separated my shoulder back on June's scapula breaking Costa Rica visit.

Totally agree with ya that things haven't really changed that much! Heck, even drivetrains are still using many of the same standards (BB, rear derailleur, chainline haven't changed much). The Mojo Ti was extra fun with the tubeless tire, shadow plus rear derailleur, and splined crank spindle.
  • + 1
 @Explodo: I agree with you on riding hardtails. Although my full suspension DH bike is fun to ride lift trails, it's not the same as spending all day conquering singletrack on a hardtail.
  • + 1
 @pikebait2013: flatter trails are also nice on the hardtail. Santos and Alafia in Florida, for example, are super fun on a modern hardtail with dropper post.
  • + 1
 Thanks for the reminder of where we came from, Jeff! As fondly as I remember when I started riding a mountain bike, I never have the desire to throw a leg over anything like my dad's '88 Raleigh that started this whole thing for me. Or even the frequently-discussed now-vintage DH bikes from 1997-2003...

"Never forget your roots" does offer some great perspective.
  • + 2
 Haha thanks teagues!
  • + 1
 That's what I'm talkin' about. The good ol' days. When skill mattered. Now any brodouche goes out and buys the longest, lowest, slackest, and most sprung ride they can squeeze onto their credit card and call themselves dank. LoL GTFO.
  • + 7
 Nothing wrong with modern bikes, they totally rip! At the end of the day, as Brendan said, it's all about the spirit!
  • + 3
 @JeffWeed: The only thing wrong with 'modern' bikes is the pricing, and the subsequent attitudes that it brings.
  • + 3
 All you have to do is look at that Tomac clip to see that the "good ol' days" weren't so good after all. Give me a modern bike ANY DAY.
  • + 2
 @gtill9000: Ha! New bikes are rad, and old bikes are, well, an acquired taste. I will definitely say that riding an old bike is a nice way to get a new appreciation for just how good the modern bikes are. And it's just plain fun, too, though slightly slower speed!
  • + 1
 @gtill9000: I watched the Tomac clip when it was first released and many, many times since then. Yes, they were the good ol' days. If it wasn't for the likes of Tomac, Tinker, Overend, etc... I would never have started MTBing.

You can have all the modern bikes your credit card will afford. The only thing stopping you is your credit score. LoL

I have several bikes in my garage ranging from a ~25yr old hand built 4130 cromo rigid, to a modern day carbon HT. I love the HT & rigid the most. Go figure.
  • + 1
 Rad rad rad rad, best sh1t i have seen in a while. I had the pleasure of riding full rigid and cantis and it was awesome . . . . . . . Back then. JKW , ripping hard as usual.
  • + 1
 The old bikes were fun, the only thing I really didn’t like were cantilever and v brakes, the would kill your hands when you are a clyde like me. I love riding my modern equvilant, a Waltworks hardtail with 2.8 tires.
  • + 1
 Yeah the big 'ol Paul levers helped a ton on longer descents, but I agree, the brakes are the toughest thing about the older bikes. That hardtail sounds fun!
  • + 1
 Love it. Brings back some fond memories, I put that same fork on an XC hardtail in high school and people thought I was an idiot.

ep1.pinkbike.org/p5pb16687557/p5pb16687557.jpg
  • + 1
 SWEET! That would have been a rad "freeride hardtail". And in this day and age, a 120-140mm fork on a hardtail is normal. Pretty cool to see how far we've progressed over the years!
  • + 5
 Excellent storytelling.
  • + 2
 Thank you Blatant!
  • + 2
 Listen up everyone. Go to Jeff’s YouTube channel and subscribe. It’ll be good for you, like vitamin C. Without which you could get scurvy.
  • + 2
 Didn’t think it was possible, but now even more respect for Johnny T.

Would like to see Jeff chop 2 inches off each side of his bars and try to ride that again.
  • + 4
 Hahaha look closely, and you'll see that Johnny T was running Magura HS33 hydro rim brakes- way more power than the cantis! I cut those bars down about an inch per side so they'd work better with the long-ish 90mm stem, but it's way wider than what folks would have used back then- and way stiffer with the 31.8 clamp.
  • + 3
 @JeffWeed: Great stuff, Jeff, as usual...
  • + 4
 I lusted over those Fat Chance an original Yeti's back in the day
  • + 1
 Right on Nojzilla! Mike's Yeti Ultimate that he rode with us on Engineer Mtn was hand welded in Durango, CO, back when Yeti was located in Durango, before they ended up in Golden.
  • + 2
 @nojzilla: Way cool! That reminds me of Hans Rey bikes from the mid-90s!
  • + 3
 Jeff rides like he is made of rubber, bouncing everywhere.
  • + 2
 Ha! I wish I were made of rubber, these bones do indeed break! Thanks Dlakusta!
  • + 1
 Totally stoked on that video Jeff. Simply amazing. Glad to see that frame & fork put to good use rather than hanging on the wall. Just don't break it!
  • + 1
 Thank you so much Eric! Hahaha I told you I had big plans for it!!! Glad you saw the article!
  • + 3
 The one guy on the v10 wtf quite a mix of bikes
  • + 1
 Hahaha yeah that was surprising to see Lucas show up with that, but hey, it's his favorite bike, and one of his favorite trails, sweet.
  • + 2
 It really is his favorite bike! I once followed him up a 20-minute climb on that v10.
  • + 2
 What did that Ibis Mojo weigh? I bet it was around 23lbs and went uphill like a rocket!
  • + 1
 Ya know, I don't actually own a scale, but it is darned light! It's the second lightest bike in our garage, right after my daughter's little 12" wheel push bike.
  • + 1
 Had Bryn's edit down for voy but this just took my number one spot... love to watch some good old fashion trail slaying. Well done lads ????
  • + 3
 this is soo good!
  • + 1
 Thank you!
  • + 2
 "Dude, carpal tunnel is real"
  • + 1
 Wait, “Today, our bikes...cost about 25% more”. So, where can I find these bro deals?
  • + 2
 I can't believe those vintage wheels didn't taco more.
  • + 1
 Have to have good line choices on those things!!!
  • + 1
 @NRZ: Yeah, But JeffWeed line choices are brutal.
  • + 3
 Mike's Tioga tension disc did break a strand! My bike is totally a dream come true, especially so re:the wheels. After searching for quite a while, it turned out that the old Stans ZTR355 rims were tubeless compatible and supposedly *unicorn alert* rim brake compatible too. I already had a pair in my shed, and my neighbor gave me an old XTR M950 rear hub. I just adapted the front disc hub to 9mm and re-built the rear. These wheels have been great, surprisingly strong, and way better than actual 1995 era rims.
  • + 3
 @NRZ: Line choice with the high post and canti brakes is definitely different!
  • + 1
 @JeffWeed: After riding with a dropper, I have no idea how anyone goes on a ride without one!
  • + 1
 @NRZ: It takes a few rides to get used to that awkward high posting style, but the traditional 71/73 XC geo works a lot better with the high post than modern steep SA/slack HA works with a high post.
  • + 2
 I watched this on dial-up for a more vintage feel.
  • + 3
 #26aintdead
  • + 4
 LOL nope not quite! But it is VERY hard to find a 26" tubeless and rim brake compatible rim!
  • + 2
 Wake up trails 2000
  • + 1
 bro, these guys can shred.
  • + 1
 Thanks MTbrothers!
  • + 1
 But where are the Bar Ends!? :-)
  • + 4
 LOL right??? Even in the 90s, it was wrong to run riser bars with bar ends!
  • + 1
 I gave up my XTR Cannondale F3000 and haven't looked back.
  • + 1
 URT lyfe! Hahaha! Back then, the FS bikes were so sketchy...
  • + 1
 @JeffWeed: Actually it was a hardtail. The lack of tubeless and 70mm fork were just killers on my butt and hands.
  • + 1
 I think I'll stick to my modern squish...ha!
  • + 1
 Fair enough! I ride them both. N+1 bikes!
  • + 1
 @JeffWeed: We are certainly in agreement there.

Have enjoyed all of your content dude - one of the few "personality" driven guys that can also actually ride a bike (an understatement).

Happy holidays
  • + 1
 @nvranka: Thanks so much! Have a great holiday season as well!
  • + 1
 Damn! JKW has so much fun on his bike! Great video.
  • + 2
 Great video. Thanks PB.
  • + 3
 Thanks for watching, Betsie!
  • + 1
 Well, this man is all smiles, you can say that.
  • + 1
 Hahaha cheers Piotr!
  • + 1
 "Thank god for Bell"
  • + 1
 THE CURE EXTRA GREEN!!!
  • + 1
 Awesome vid!!
  • + 1
 Thanks Elliot!
  • + 1
 neato.
  • + 1
 Thanks Owl!
  • + 1
 The best!

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