First Look: Felt 2014

Aug 7, 2013 at 16:33
by Richard Cunningham  

Felt 2014 hero pic
  (Clockwise) Felt's Edict Nine FRD frame uses TeXtreme carbon, which places double the fibers in the same space as a conventional unidirectional layup. Felt uses SRAM products extensively throughout its range, including XX1 and X01 drivetrains and RockShox suspension. Felt wisely retains its 160-millimeter-travel Compulsion as its only elite-level 26-inch-wheel bike. A look at the new ball-bearing pivot and Felt's post-mount caliper design. Felt uses X-12 type through axles throughout the range.



Scott Sharples is now the product manager for Felt's mountain bike range.
Felt rolled out its 2014 bike range at its headquarters in Irvine, California, where we were treated to good food and had access to Felt's entire staff, which was on hand to answer questions. The big story was 'less equals more.' Felt pared much weight from its 2014 bikes - between 120 and 250 grams from its frames alone - and also dropped all of the redundant models from its mountain bike lineup in order to focus its attention on the bikes that Felt's riders and employees have a passion for. Felt also brought on Scott Sharples, an Aussie legend, who is the mountain bike product manager there - and his influence was evident in every new bike. The result was an impressive range of 29ers that tick all the boxes. Felt's show opener was the stunning, carbon fiber Edict Nine FRD (Felt Racing Development), a 100-millimeter-travel XC racing bike that weighs somewhere near 22 pounds. The bike for us, however, was Felt's 130-millimeter-travel Virtue Nine 1. The Nine 1's carbon chassis weighs only five pounds including its shock and it has both the numbers and the component selection to be a ripper on trail. Felt's aluminum models will hit the shops late Summer and early Fall, while its elite-level carbon bikes are expected in late December.


Edict Nine FRD

Felt 2014 Edict FRD
  Felt's first 29er was an XC racer with a carbon frame, so there is history here. The Edict Nine FRD shows off the checkerboard pattern created by its TeXtreme carbon construction. The frame weighs 120 grams less than the 2013 model with ten percent more stiffness. Edict Nines are offered in three carbon models.


Edict Nine FRD Construction

Felt makes no apologies for the Edict being a quick handling, purpose-built machine for pro-level XC racers. The head angle is 71.5 degrees and the chainstays are short for a 29er, at 450-millimeters. Its chassis is designed with larger tube profiles for greater stiffness and less weight, and its rear suspension uses Felt's 'FAST' (Fantastic Acronym for Simple Technology?) flex-type rear stays, which eliminate the dropout pivot. With 100 millimeters of rear suspension backed by a equal-travel RockShox SID World Cup fork, the Edict Nine FRO has enough cushion for trail riding, considering its 29-inch wheels. The derailleur cables are internal and that means wires only to save weight, but removable caps at the housing entries make it easy work to thread the wires through the frame. Extensive use of TeXtreme carbon material and a lot of history in carbon manufacturing has brought the weight of the frame down 120 grams, 900 grams total, they tell us. Pivots run on dual-row ball bearings, with 15-millimeter tubular axles and titanium hardware. Out back, the axle is a 142/12-millimeter X-12 type, and the post-type brake caliper is tucked inboard, well out of harm's way. FRO modes use a single-chainring SRAM XX1 drivetrain, but a direct-mount front changer boss is built into the swingarm, should you need a derailleur in the future. Frame sizes are small, medium, large and X-large.

Felt 2014 Edict FRD details II
  (Clockwise) Internal routing for the derailleirs keeps the Edict Nine FRD looking smooth and simple. two-row angular-contact bearings keep the suspension running smoothly, while large cross-section fame members provide lateral stiffness throughout the chassis. An extension of the right-side swingarm forms the front derailleur mount. The advantage is that the derailleur follows the chain for better shifting. The Edict's rear caliper is tucked inboard of the stays.


Key Components

Felt says that they worked closely with SRAM, especially RockShox, to customize the components of its elite level bikes. The Edict Nine FRD's Monarch shock and SID WC fork are linked with a Full-Sprint dual-remote lockout lever. One push on the hydraulic button locks out the entire system. The drivetrain and brakes are SRAM XX1 with 160-millimeter rear and 180-millimeter front rotors. Wheels are Easton EC90 carbon and the entire cockpit is outfitted with Easton EC-70 Carbon items, including the stem. Tires are Schwalbe Racing Ralph Evos and the wheels and tires are tubeless ready. Felt's MSRP for the Edict Nine FRD is $8899.

Felt 2014 Edict FRD details
  Edict Nine FRD models sport RockShox's Full Sprint Remote lockout system. Both hydraulic hoses are are actuated by one large button near the left-side grip.



Virtue Nine 1

Felt 2014 Vitue Nine 1
  The Virtue will only be available as a 29er, and its chassis is all new for 2014, with 130 millimeters of wheel travel and Felt's sharp-pedaling Equilink suspension design in the rear, and with a 140-millimeter-stroke RockShox Revelation RLT fork up front. The 29-inch Virtue is the enduro rider's trailbike.


Felt's Virtue is now exclusively a 29er, and it is available in both carbon and aluminum models from $6199 to $2199 USD. The Nine 1 offers a RockShox Reverb Stealth dropper post and internal routing. Its frame numbers are good, with a 69-degree head angle, short, 450-millimeter chainstays and generous top tube lengths. Scott Sharples chose dirt-worthy stem lengths and handlebar widths, so the Virtue is ready to rock right off the dealer's floor. The Virtue's front derailleur features a high-type direct front derailleur mount, although the the SRAM X01 drivetrain does not need it. Like the Edict, all the pivot locations rock on dual-row ball bearings and light, 15-millimeter aluminum axles. Felt's Equilink rear suspension is tuned to provide a firm pedaling platform without stealing the suspension's bump-smoothing performance. Sizes are small. medium, large and X-large. Three carbon models, Virtue Nine 1, 2 and 3, as well as three aluminum models, Virtue nine 20, 50 and 60 are available.

Felt 2014 Virtue Nine 1 details
  Felt's Virtue Nine 1 is dressed for success in the mid-travel market.(Clockwise) A big boxy section at the head tube area keeps the Virtue rigid and strong where a trailbike needs it most. X-12 through axles and post-mount brake calipers are welcome features. Like the new Pike, RockShox's Revelation is receiving good reviews among the sport's better riders. A profile of the Virtue Nine 1's Equilink rear suspension shows its pivotless carbon rear triangle and the Equilink strut that tunes the ratio of pedal firmness and suspension action.



Virtue Nine 20

Felt 2014 Virtue Nine 20 aluminum
  Felt's aluminum version of the Virtue Nine mimics the geometry, and features the same rear suspension metrics as the carbon version. Weight of the frame has been reduced 250 grams. Frame weight is stated at five pounds for the frame and shock.


Those who want a look at Felt's aluminum version of the Virtue Nine can feast on the Virtue Nine 20 - a special-issue design that is stuffed to the brim with elite level features, yet sells at a very competitive, $3799 USD. The Nine 20 reportedly weighs a bit under 30 pounds (13.56kg) and duplicates the geometry, suspension and technical features of its carbon brethren. Felt's aluminum suspension requires a dropout pivot, so the Virtue Nine 20 gets the new double-row ball bearings and rigid, clevis-type system. Like all of Felt's 2014 trailbikes, the '20 is sold with a dropper seatpost - a KS LEV - and if you need it, internal cable routing is included for a Stealth-type dropper. Drivetrain is all Shimano XT, with a 2 x 10 crankset, while brakes are Deore with 160-rear and 180-millimeter-front rotors. Suspension is all RockShox, but in the case of the Niner 20, the fork is a Revelatio RL with a Push-loc remote lockout system, and the shock is a Monarch RT. Suspension travel remains 130 rear and 140-millimeters up front. Wheels are DT Swiss 530D rims on Shimano XT hubs rolling on hard-wearing and super-grippy, 2.4 inch Continental X-King tires.

Felt 2014 virtue Nine 20 details
  Felt redesigned its rocker with a more rigid through-shaft on the main-central pivot that presses onto the arms. The KS dropper-post's low actuator works well with the cable routing of the Virtue Nine. We are not sure why the RockShox Revelation's fork lockout would be a plus on a mid-travel trailbike, but it's there on the handlebar if you need it. No internal cable routing on the tapered aluminum head tube. A closeup of the forged rear dropout and its inboard brake-caliper setup.


Compulsion LT 3

Felt 2014 Compulsion 26-inch wheels
  Twenty six-inch wheels, sharp-pedaling Equilink suspension, 160-millimeters of wheel travel, and a strong following among Felt's hard core riders are reasons enough for the Compulsion LT3. It is the only elite level mountain bike in Felt's range with 26-inch wheels.


Felt kept its best 26-inch trailbike in its range and we'd agree that it was a good decision. The Compulsion LT3 has Felt's high-modulus,UCH carbon frame, with a trail-tuned Equilink rear suspension that can be configured with either 150 or 16-millimeters of rear wheel travel. The Rear suspension is alumninum, and essentially, is the same system as the 2013 model. Like its cousins, the Compulsion is suspended by a RockShox Monarch RT damper, but it gets the pearl of the new RockShox lineup up front: the new 160-millimeter-stroke Pike RC Solo Air fork. Geometry is in the sweet spot for a good AM/trail bike with a 67.5 degree head angle and a 73-5 degree seat angle. Wheels are WTB's tubeless ready Speed Disc i23 and tires are Schwalbe's grippy Hans Dampf. The drivetrain is a SRAM X7/X9 arrangement with a two-by crankset equipped with a generous bash ring. If you want to switch to a more bomb-proof single-ring drivetrain, ISCG-05 chainguide mounts are waiting on the frame. Compulsions are sold in two price points: The carbon LT3 at $3999 and the aluminum LT 50 at $2999 USD.

Felt 2014 Compulsion details
  (Clockwise) A flip-chip on the upper shock mount switches the Compulsion from 150 to 160 millimeters of suspension travel. Magura MT2 brakes clamp a 18--millimeter rear and a 200-millimeter front rotor. The LT3's KS eTen dropper post has a 100-millimeter stroke and old-school cable routing. Last year's chassis is upgraded to the double-bearing dropout and a better X-12 type through axle.



Q 24 Youth MTB

Felt 2014 Q24 youth shredder
  Felt's Q 24 is one of the better youth mountain bikes. Anyone who has shopped for such an item can tell your that disappointment is the name of the game. The $449 Q 24 is a bit pricey for the genre, but within the realm of reality if you truly want to ride the dirt with your kids


Felt wanted to make a quality mountain bike for the youth rider that was still inexpensive enough for a family budget. The $449 Q 24 is just that, with a Suntour hybrid spring/elastomer fork, 24-inch wheels, and Tektro mechanical disc brakes. It looks the part and has truly functional components. There is nothing glamorous about the Shimano Tourney/Altus drivetrain, or any other component, but the Q 24 is well put together, so its rider can hit the dirt without holding back and the rider's parents can be proud that he or she is riding the real deal - or a very close version of it.
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Felt 2014 Q24 details
  We'll bet most of you nave never seen these components on a mountain bike before. Shimano's Altus rear derailleur is powered by a twist shifter that fits small hands. Note the large low gear, which is a granny for 24-inch-diameter. wheels. The 50-millimeter stroke Suntour 3020 fork would have been high tech in 1989, with its spring/elastomer hybrid technology.


Felt Bicycles
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128 Comments

  • + 101
 "the enduro rider's trailbike." = Kill me now!
  • + 20
 I'm with you on this one. RC, what does that statement even mean, it's nonsensical Smile
  • + 31
 How about a post that doesn't include the "E" word?
  • + 21
 "What an awesome looking 1x11 group! Where can I buy that?? Oh, what? I can't? I have to buy the ENTIRE BIKE to go with it to save money with the new (actually affordable version of the) X01 group? Man, that totally sucks ass, I better sell my current bike so I can buy one of these to "save money" with the new X01 group! Thanks SRAM!" - said no mountain biker ever.
  • + 22
 The rear brake caliper mount = Kill every mechanic now! (including me)
  • + 11
 Such a terrible place to put it from a mechanics point of view. Also no Fox stuff. Finally a company that uses RS front AND rear on their bikes.
  • + 3
 Yeah you're right, wtf are they thinking with that brake mount
  • - 2
 less brake jack
  • + 5
 Yeah haha, that's like saying "the DH rider's DH bike".... um, yeah for DH you ride a DH bike......
  • + 1
 sorry, not jack exactly, but by mounting the caliper on the same stay as the axle it does prevent a minor effect on the suspension performance while braking. Think about it: that seat stay is going to be pulling away from the rotor. If the caliper is on it that will resist the smooth travel of the axle along its path.
  • + 2
 1st comment, I was about to quote the same thang. Dang, so this is whats its come to? Hype, hype, hype(nothing more)...
  • + 1
 Another phrase you really want to hear: "hybrid spring/elastomer fork"
  • + 2
 oh wow look at all the treks
  • + 2
 did you see the comment for the kids bike lool ''Anyone who has shopped for such an item can tell your that disappointment is the name of the game''
  • + 2
 HAHA! Soooo Serious Wallheater. It's OK if one sentence in a story doesn't relate to the meaning of life.
  • + 6
 Still the worst line of copy I've ever read on Pinkbike Richard.
  • + 0
 "thanks sram" - said no one ever
  • + 2
 Thank god. Now I can ride trail when I am not riding enduro. The mountain biking industry sure knows me!
  • + 2
 Tyical RC bullshit... Go back to ruining magazines I don't read anymore and leave your crap "articles" off this site.
  • + 28
 Thank you felt for not jumping on the ridiculous 650b bandwagon. My respect for felt just went up a lot.
  • - 4
flag Chuckbike (Aug 7, 2013 at 16:58) (Below Threshold)
 Just neg. u meant to prop u on that tip
  • + 19
 I'll bet you a dollar their whole line is 650b for 2015.
  • + 24
 you are real sure about that one huh....1 whole dollar?.....Wink
  • + 5
 Could not make new rear triangle mold in time.
  • + 5
 All you 26" diehards will surely purchase a Felt now, right? Oh wait no because wheels don't really matter that much. Brake Caliper placement does, though.
  • + 1
 Not really
  • + 21
 71.5 deg for 120mm 29r? What is it, 2008?
  • + 12
 "Ain't nobody got time for that!"
  • + 4
 "I went downstairs to go get me a cold pop, and I thought somebody was barbecuing"
Nothing like some sweet brown to get the morning going..
www.youtube.com/watch?v=udS-OcNtSWo
  • + 1
 Says in the same paragraph after mentioning the 71.5 deg HA that the Edict Nine is a 100mm travel bike, not 120. It's an XC race bike.
  • + 19
 That is some niiiiice looking checkerboard carbon! Wouldn't mind having one of those
  • + 19
 The Compulsion LT 3 looks like a sweet ride!! Good work Felt!
  • - 39
flag rosenbaum-j (Aug 7, 2013 at 16:46) (Below Threshold)
 would be a bigger fan if it was a 27.5er instead...
  • - 22
flag Lilshredman (Aug 7, 2013 at 18:52) (Below Threshold)
 They just need to use fox...
  • + 17
 @lilshredman rock shox is just as good
  • + 5
 i like the red one
  • - 12
flag Lilshredman (Aug 7, 2013 at 19:55) (Below Threshold)
 my neighbor was a tester for both...she said that fox was way better then rockshox, and i agree
  • + 13
 what ever floats yer goat
  • + 1
 @corywilliam yea i agree sr suntour shreddin the hills Razz
  • + 2
 the new pike is the way forwards, pike vs fox 34 is no contest at the moment, i'd rather not have to take my expensive fox fork apart straight out of the box and put spacers in because the spring rate is stupidly linear..
  • + 1
 disregard new fox.. buy cheap second hand old fox.. without ctd BS and so on.,. disregard 10sp.. buy 9 sp very cheap now second hand and so on..
  • + 1
 The new Pike uses what is essentially a FIT damper. Sooooo.... really they are just as good as one another and pretty much the exact same.
  • + 1
 "just as good " that needs to be proven first..

so if all the fox haters could just stop now neg propping lilshredman... since the technique is now similar to fox... (which RS took their time for)
  • + 2
 Rockshox is far better than fox for enduro and trail forks. The 34 is a complete pos.
  • + 2
 RS is now better than fox. Can't tell u how many guys i talk to that are constantly sending their overpriced fox forks in for warranty issues
  • + 1
 funny you say "is now" but try to replace RS fork bushings.. you cant.. they are still a step behind... or in front marketing wise,..
  • + 1
 @leftCoastBurn I can't tell you how many Boxxer's I've seen blow up on one cased jump.....
  • + 2
 fox 40s!!!
  • + 2
 I had 09 40's and they worked perfectly all the way until I sold my DH bike 2 months ago. Serviced yearly by Mojo and new seals every 6 months. Mates Boxxer's however didn't make it 6 months for the seal change...
  • + 1
 @RyanWensley i dont really care which forks but i will have to admit to ur comment as i blew my boxxers about 1 month ago from casing a jump such a fail.
  • + 1
 There's something about the Boxxer's skinny stanchions that just don't make sense in the DH world IMO but yeah I guess you're right, if the suspension works for you then go for it and enjoy it.
  • + 1
 Skinny stanchions?? They are 36s!
  • + 1
 When you've ridden 40's and Zocchi's 36 is skinny for a Dual Crown Fork. IMO
  • + 0
 Bos>Rockshox>Marzocchi>Fox
  • - 3
 I think you'll find it is

Manitou>Fox>Bos>Marzocchi>Suntour>RST>Rockshox
  • + 1
 You must be joking. Manitou are well known for making the worst piles of rancid dogshit forks ever. The only manitou fork I would even consider riding is the dorado, and they are ridiculously overpriced (Plus they snap). Fox forks are plush, But the service intervals are ridiculous, they forks are overpriced, and if you don't spend all your money maintaining them they fall to bits.
  • + 1
 Of course I'm joking could you not tell that by the fact that I put RST before RS........ I've had my 36 Floats for a while now and ridden in pretty shit conditions and havent needed to service once. Will be servicing next month though for the sake of it. Maybe I don't ride hard enough?
  • + 1
 djzombie : show me a snapped dorado ! preferred not polish Wink
  • + 2
 As someone who has seen the insides of ALLOT of forks (anything from 10 year old prototype boxxers that never made it to production to 2013 fox 40s) i have to say that Fox produces the highest quality forks consistently year after year. sure rockshox makes a good fork but as far as long term durability and performance i would have to say Fox would win. I see 10+ year old Fox forks that perform just as good as the day they came out of the box allot more often than i see 10+year old rockshox forks.
  • + 1
 the fox forks are very nice but they are extremely expensive, Marzocchi forks are great especially for a dh-er on a budget
also a fork will last forever if properly maintained but if i were a pro racer i would definatly chose a fox fork. i do under stand were your coming from though
a used fox triple crown can be $1000 were as a Marzocchi can be $200. i got my 04 Marzocchi Jr t for $150 and i haven't had a single problem
  • + 1
 Lol I got a set of 09 40's with cosmetic damage but perfectly working internals for £250.
  • + 1
 If you want quality you have to pay for it. and just cuz new fox stuff is expensive doesn't mean you can find used fox stuff for a good deal. worse case you will have to get new seals and oil in a used fork but that is a small price to pay for a fork that is going to work very good.....RyanWensley you know whats up.
  • + 1
 I'd rather have a £1000 fork and spend £40 every six months than buy a £450 fork and it not last 6 months.
  • + 4
 you guys all have very good points but it still does depends on your skill level. my forks work for me because Im not a crazy good rider by any means
  • + 0
 my forks just suck
  • + 10
 Felt's doin it right! No more suspension lock up, sweet pedaling platform, nice spec out, and the best dropper post to boot!
  • + 8
 Pretty bikes but alas I won't support a brand that steals and patents design ideas away from other bike designers after telling them they're not "interested" in their suspension design.
  • + 5
 Please, tell me more~ Haven't heard of this.
  • + 2
 Tell us more
  • - 2
 Isnt it a rip off of the split pivot design? That or the dw link, cant remember...
  • + 18
 Middle of this page you see the prototype done by Kavik bikes...

www.kavikdesigns.com/kavikbicycles/hidden.htm

It was publically shown at Interbike in 2003, people from Felt saw it there, approached Kavik to possibly license it, then when they realized he hadn't filed for a patent yet they told him they weren't really interested. They then promptly went and filed a patent for the design of their own cutting out the guy who actually came up with the idea.
  • + 6
 Thats a dick move right there..
  • + 12
 Holy crap, talking about digging shit from the grave.....
  • + 5
 Wow!! That is shady! was never really into Felt bikes before hearing about this now I will NEVER be riding a Felt bike(rip off Kavik bike) :-)will be burned into my memory
  • + 1
 And he's not very smart to post slander on a public forum. lol
  • + 5
 Not slander - libel. Slander is spoken, libel is written.
  • + 3
 Not libel either. Its old news over on mtbr and was discussed at length SIX years ago including info from the kavik guy himself.

forums.mtbr.com/felt/felt-equilink-revealed-266643-2.html
  • + 6
 Patents were instantiated around the idea of encouraging bright people to push the engineering envelope while fearing not for others profiting from their inventions and ideas. While, in my opinion, it was beyond stupid to display a un-patented suspension design freely at a large event such as inter bike without the protection of a patent, people should have enough respect for the inventor and ideals on which the idea of a patent are based upon to not pirate. If it was a poor business owner who was on the brink of the starvation of his family and stole the idea to get his business going, that would be one thing (even then the ethics are highly questionable). When a large value company, like FELT, goes and exploits this window they are once again showing that greed triumphs over respect and that the name of Capitalism shall be further slandered…Shame really…
  • - 7
flag cherouvim (Aug 7, 2013 at 22:53) (Below Threshold)
 It happens from time to time. Some men act womanly.
  • + 3
 Patents need a relatively short life span or they serve the opposite of their intention by stifling any innovation that can be made on top of the original design. 6 years is more than long enough to profit if the inventor was serious and his design was good.
Look at it this way. There is no app you could invent that wouldn't infringe on a patent. That means you can no longer innovate without paying large sums of money to the inventors of every piece of hardware and software process you might use to make your app work. It is BS. A dude sued a half dozen companies recently for offering cloud backup because he says he invented it before if was possible! Apple sued samsung for making their tablets a rectangle with rounded corners!
This isn't about poor inventors getting ripped off by big companies. it is about lawyers making lots of money and keeping anyone else from creating anything new that incorporates older designs. MR DW did something awesome a long timr ago. In my opinion, if you found a way to incorporate his design into an even better linkage you should be able to do it without paying him a ton, but you can't, so that is a dozen frames that might have been better that we will never have. And don't forget, a large piece of price is covering the licensing rights. Thinks bikes cost too much? Help little companies compete by taking away the requirement to pay the guy who thought up a design a decade ago.
Rant over. Let the angry villagers begin the lynching.
  • + 3
 The hell of it is... their mtb bikes aren't good.

I worked at a Felt dealer for a few years, and while I loved their road bikes, and even their tri bikes (minus the always creaking forks); I felt their mountain bikes left something to be desired, mainly because of their suspension design.
  • + 2
 @taletotell you are absolutely correct, however, I was commenting on the morality of large, financially stable company ripping off a small inventor in a very particular case. Financially it is a different story, and it worked (although I don't know how well seeing as not many people, myself included, are fans of FELT bikes). I feel that you are talking about patent trolls such as those within large tech giants, which is unfortunately too common. And yes that is 100% about people making money. I agree that patents can infringe upon creativity just the same as they worked to foster and encourage it (especially in the tech world); the system is not perfect and I am not here to try and solve the problems of inventors and companies. Currently the life of a patent is 20 years meaning that companies will be paying Mr.DW lots of money well into my late 30's, so yes some designs are going to never come to fruition because of inventors and companies not wanting to license from Weagle so yes a patents life should be shortened by a count of years and that would maybe return some of the equilibrium you are hoping for.Also take into consideration, say if FELT had licensed the design from Kavik, could he have had the financial backing to develop a new or improved linkage that now may never come to be? I would wager this subject could be written about extensively, so for the sake of brevity and to keep in consideration that we are here for bikes not for legal discussions, I'll say that large companies such as FELT ripping of small inventors is immoral but financially sound and that the patent system is flawed but seems to function well enough to usually not cause turmoil when used properly (i.e excluding patent trolls).
  • + 8
 something about that lt3 works really nicely. and $4k for a carbon complete with that spec is pretty unheard of. i'm intrigued.
  • + 1
 Seems like the number is wrong to me. Last years compulsion with Fox and an XT build is listed over to $6k.
  • + 1
 Remember Fox are priced higher than RS, mainly because they aren't built in huge batches (like some RS forks and shocks) so they need to charge more. It's also a blend of X7 and X9 so not really of full XT Standard.
  • + 1
 And because Felt knows it's not keeping with the trend so it'll need a steep discount in order to sell bikes with the wrong....tire size.
  • + 1
 Did my comment really get neg prop for stating the truth? I'm not saying RS are bad just that they areas produced.
  • + 1
 Was meant to be mass produced. Stupid phone.
  • + 10
 Compulsion LT3 : O

My tires are compatible! Yeeii !
  • + 4
 Im a huge fan of riding up a hill to ride the technical downhill on the other side, its far more rewarding than using a shuttle, but calling every ride which involves a slight uphill an enduro run, and every bike with single clamp forks and an air shock an "enduro bike" is just stupid.
  • + 1
 Getting driven up hill is its own reward
  • + 4
 Since when is a 450mm chainstay "short"? Looking at the current crop of 29ers, that's pretty much average. Short should be well, shorter than that?
  • + 4
 How can you say 450mm chainstays are short? That's 17.5 inches! Just because it's cool to have short stays doesn't mean all stays are short.
  • + 4
 I dont think Gwin feels short chainstays are cool...
  • + 2
 I would say 17" is the cutoff, above that they are long, below that they are short. But then again i am a short guy
  • + 2
 As an employee of a shop that carries Felt, I have a few things to say. 1) Their road bikes are really damn good, but who cares about those, this is pinkbike. 2) Their mountain bikes ride well, and are generally priced well through the midrange stuff. 3) And this is the biggest thing, Although their suspension system is very smooth, active, and has a decent pedaling platform...It MUST be serviced annually (at least), and the replacement bearings, bushings, and whatnot, cost upwards of $80. Bummer. Hopefully that's changed with these new bikes.
  • + 1
 Nice looking line up, specially that 26" 160mm bike for "hardcore" fans. I one of those so keep the 26ers coming and my employee discount should workout pretty nice this time. Iscg tabs, Felt is really making some fans now. I thinking that bike could be in the 27lbs range after my upgrades.
  • + 3
 Is there any dealers in Calgary, AB. Canada. Have never seen a Felt MTB in any shops in AB. I've never seen one on a trail in 15 years of mountain biking... Wondering.
  • + 1
 Lifesport in Kensington is a dealer I believe.
  • + 1
 Eek. They saw that dreaded container full of bikes with the wrong wheelsize finally wash up at the shore. 29ers sell like crap. 4k is still to steep. Those things are worth nothing. Especially with those steep angles.
  • + 4
 yeah yeah yeah.....Wheres the DH bike ?!?!?!?!
  • + 3
 I got to demo last year's Compulsion for a week and it's a killer bike. Pedals amazingly efficient and descends even better
  • + 1
 Expect to be taking your kids to the hospital with shredded legs on that Q24 , those rings need a chain guard my daughter is forever slipping her pedals
  • + 1
 650B IS FOR THOSE WHO DENIED THE EXISTENCE OF ANYTHING OTHER THAN 26, AND THEN REALIZED THEY F#%/ED UP. And yes even felt will have a 650b option for next year.
  • + 3
 Is he throwing up a gang sign in that pic? Sh!ts getting real in Irvine
  • + 3
 Compulsion looks good- perhaps a good alternative to the Stumpjumper Evo.
  • + 2
 Makes me Laugh that there using TeXtreme carbon which they use to make hockey sticks now
  • + 2
 the carbon layup looks like the blades of bauer sticks!
  • + 1
 12k weaves have been used in bikes for a long time now.
  • + 1
 At first look I thought what the hell the brake mount will snap when the pivit moves .very nice bike that
  • + 1
 I ride a 2013 Compulsion LT50. It's fricken sweet. I love it. Suck it all you Felt haters!! And I love Rock Shox too!!
  • + 1
 felt... keeping at it. =]
  • + 1
 yupp felts still suck as, they dont make bikes, they're toys...
  • + 1
 That equicrazylink is crazy. Should work good on climbs
  • - 1
 Yes but we are not getting away from the underlying problem that 29ers are gay.
  • - 1
 Equilink is meh. Always has been.
  • - 1
 Yet again.....not a FOX fork in sight!!! Why to go RS
  • + 9
 Guess they want something durable?
  • + 7
 Fox has really went downhill over the last couple of years... Not the happiest with my 2013 34 Talas.....Will have to say, I still like my Fox 40.
  • - 1
 Sorry meant to say " WAY to go RS!" They are killin it this year.....even me always being a FOX fan even ordered myself the new RS PIKE....so take that FOX!!!!
  • - 3
 what? O_O no 650B?
  • - 3
 But dat q24 tho
  • - 1
 Its blah....
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