Norglide Bearings Teams up With Thomson Elite Dropper Post

Jul 19, 2013 at 18:17
by Richard Cunningham  
Norglide Bushings and Thomson Elite Dropper

Various Norglide bushings surround Thomson's Elite Dropper seatpost. Norglide composite bushings use a hard metal backing, impregnated with a slippery plastic compound. The nature of the design enables the bushings to be custom-designed to fit specific applications.



When Thomson decided to make its first dropper seatpost, long-term reliability was their number one concern. The following promo video documents the decision making process that brought the two companies together on the project. Thomson's Elite dropper uses Norglide composite bushings in the internal, nitrogen-charged cartridge, as well as for the sliding surfaces between the body and stanchion tube (seat post extension). Norglide is part of Saint Gobain Performance Plastics, who are suppliers to Thomson and other key players in the bike industry who use the self-lubricated composite bushings inside shocks, for dual-suspension pivots and for other highly-stressed rotating components.

The following video, produced in cooperation with Norglide and Thomson, underscores the importance of industry partnerships that begin at the initial concept stage and continue through final production, in order to optimize the performance of a particular bearing application:

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Thomson's dropper post uses an internal cartridge, which introduces additional sliding surfaces. Norglide's ability to maintain close tolerances helps to keep the post wiggle free, while providing smooth action for both of the post's telescoping components.



As the bicycle industry gains more experience with modern composite bushing technology, such as those manufactured by Norglide/Saint Gobain, we expect to see them appear in many applications that presently use ball bearings. The fact that bushings take up very little space increases the potential strength of critical suspension pivots and the weight reduction benefits are substantial. Industry partnerships, as the relationship between Norglide and Thomson demonstrate, will be key to the success of the concept.

Visit Thomson for a closer look at the Elite Dropper seatpost.

Visit Norglide/Saint Gobain for the inside on bushings vs ball bearings

About Saint-Gobain Performance Plastics Bearings and Tolerance Rings SBU

Saint-Gobain is a global leader in the design, production and distribution of innovative, high performance materials for industry and employs around 195,000 people. With 15 sites and six R&D centres globally, the Bearings and Tolerance Rings Group, a division of Saint-Gobain Performance Plastics, provides ‘engineer-to-engineer solutions-in-motion’ to high volume international OEMs in the automotive, leisure, energy, industrial, and other markets. Backed by a heritage of product innovation, technology, advanced materials and market leadership, they are dedicated to working with customers using their extensive engineering expertise to deliver standard and custom solutions in NORGLIDE® bearings, RENCOL® tolerance rings, SOLGLIDE® bearings, JOINSHIM® rings, and NORSLIDE® cable liners that meet the most demanding applications.


124 Comments

  • + 63
 $450? Go home Thompson, you're drunk...
  • + 5
 Same retail price as the Reverb though, no? £299 to us here.
  • + 45
 Ah Thomson, design a product that works better than the competition, build it to proper tolerances in the United States, charge accordingly... have some dingus tell you it's too expensive while they buy far eastern shite instead, living the dream!
  • + 6
 It is a lot of money however the product is designed for reliability and durability. If it lives up to it's claim then that is where the money is going - ie. the materials, engineering, manufacturing, quality control research and development. I'm pretty sure they can produce a much cheaper dropper post which is of poorer quality however they have chosen not to. Whether or not the product commercially does well will depend on Thomson's belief in it's own market place relevance.
  • + 5
 300 for my gravity dropper turbo 2 years ago, and still dropping like a bossssss...
  • + 6
 Its pretty first gen, not having it Stealth style. Please do something with the housing.
  • + 8
 Until you own one....the comments are fairly moot. I own one and can tell you it's 1000x better than any other post out there. For those of you complaining about the price, so the Elite and Masterpiece prices are "acceptable" but the dropper post that's the same price as a MUCH LESSER quality dropper isn't? Typical.......
  • + 5
 @Fix-the-Spade

I don't see any claims that Thomson makes this new post in the U.S. They partnered with a company in Taiwan "basically helping manufacturers from other countries to produce things in Taiwan." It's in the vid.
  • + 11
 Wait so $450 for a high end dropper post is news to people... odd....
  • + 1
 Its about the same price as the KS Lev, or the Reverb, the only two mostly reliable posts out there. I have a couple of the KS i series posts, and a joplin, and they are easy to keep working with a little TLC. I could understand the frustration of sending it in for service repeatedly if you couldn't service it yourself (its actually really easy.)
  • + 0
 Same price as a reverb stealth, so why would you get this over that. Pretty sure the reverb is still the king of droppers. I'd rather spend $150 less and get the standard reverb. Also, I'd rather have USA made Profile Racing products over Thompson.
  • - 2
 Prices should have "dropped" by now... Although I used to have a Reverb. I didn't really need it. I sold it. It is luxury, it is ease. You pay for that. Yeah you pay for that. Not because you need it. Just because that laziness is catching your brain. That, or because you are a hipster sheep following the marketeers. You cannot disagree with this. You can neg prop me to hell, but that will only show I am right. Give them your money and press the button, you know you want to.
  • + 2
 Trolling, don't feed the trolls!!!!
  • + 2
 it would seem that these are actually made to last so one could be a good investment for people that must have a dropper post

@rbriers +1 about the laziness, neg props are coming from the guilty
  • + 1
 First generation gravity dropper here... $250 about 3 years ago...still works without flaws...
  • + 3
 @robbybeirs ..... are you trying to say dropper posts are for lazy people? Why would anyone wanna stop and lower and raise seat posts all the time? It's not lazy it's just a good idea. I neg propped you cuz that was kinda dumb not because your right.
  • + 2
 agreed my trails are long climbs to flat runs then STEEP drops going back to up again... to then drop back down steep again...
  • - 5
flag RobbyBriers (Jul 22, 2013 at 0:48) (Below Threshold)
 Yes, Nismo. They are for lazy people AND for people who are not technical. Have you seen how incredibly technical the WC XC trails are? Do the riders rock dropper posts? Nope... Do they get off the bike to lower the post? Nope... They are clicked in and get their asses as far back as they can when they ride a steep section down. A rigid post never kept anyone back. It gives more room, it makes the ride easier. Plus it weighs a ton. Not that it REALLY matters, but saving 300 grams is pretty easy there. Saving 300 euros too. I'm not trolling. A dropper post can get you that little bit of safety feeling you didn't have when riding the extreme perhaps, but at what level are we riding?
  • + 2
 I sometimes ride a bike uphill and downhill, it has'nt any dropper post, and since I know dropper pos exist, I really miss one!
  • + 0
 @Robby, not sure about you but were not world cup xc races and honestly with your logic we should all be riding rigid steel frames with rib brakes. That sure sounds like fun... This whole sport is about having fun and yes xr raceers are racing an xc course where bike weight and a whole bunch of other factors that i don't even have a clue about play in. But me a guy who'd love to get a dropper just 'upgraded' to a much heavier wheelset and fork combo on my bike. Because thats what i wanted and felt would help me ride better... This is a demand based industry....

and as far as the extra security... i'd take it i notice a huge difference in my descending ability with a 1" drop, and a 4" drop it's like it's not even there and i'm not even super great so noobs like droppers too....
  • + 2
 That is not at all my logic. My logic is: you have fun with what you have or can afford. If you can't, don't nagg. I went from a Santa Cruz Nomad carbon (see my photos, please do so you have an idea) to an aluminum HT 29er. I am still having fun, in fact more fun. There were no dropper posts before, and I'm pretty sure people had fun before, did they not? It is luxury, it is to make your ride easier. When something is easier, you get lazier. Don't go make up excuses for a better living. It is what it is, and you pay for that. Nobody NEEDS it, people just WANT it. There's nothing wrong with that, because it motivates you more to ride your bike, but that's what it is.
  • + 5
 You actually can have fun with a dropper post. The first time I saw a dropper post, I played an hour long lifting and dropping the saddle. That was fun.

People don't NEED motorbikes, smartphone, or others gadget, but a lot of them have it. Are they lazy too? Or did they just bought something for the pleasure?
  • + 2
 I didn't NEED a FS Am bike but i have one... i don't NEED 2 pairs of ski's but i have them no one is saying they're necessary were just saying they'd be damn nice to have just like it's damn nice to have 6 inches of travel and some nice big rotors with nice hydro's. this whole sport is a luxury. Idk why you're soo against dropper posts. And yes you went to a simpler bike but tell me you don't have some nice brakes or a nice and adjustable fork? It's all a luxury as you say.
  • + 1
 I miss my dropper post (Reverb) way more than my full suspension bike (Devinci Dixon)

now I am back riding a hardtail (Stumpjumper Expert Carbon 29er) with a Thomson Elite fixed seat post. I find my hardtail way more fun to ride, but still miss the dropper post because it changed my riding in a beneficial way

my Stumpy uses 27.2mm seat tube so cannot run Reverb. I believe Thomson are producing a 27.2 dropper, have not seen it in the UK yet?
  • + 2
 I'm not sure if you can get gravitydroppers in the uk but they have a 27.2 offering... Probally not to the same spec or close to the tompson/reverb but it's a dropper...

gravitydropper.com
  • + 4
 Not just a dropper, mechanically the best dropper out there to date. That thing is meant to work, a it does. It pays for the lack of looks it's got, lol everybody asks me if I got suspension on my saddle.
  • + 1
 @rclugnut @tjet

yeah I am aware of the G.D. its been available in the UK many years. the guys I used to work with swore by those posts

crude looking, but very effective and once a year service at home
  • + 1
 Hampsteadbandid: KS makes a 27.2 in the high end models.
  • + 27
 When I saw this at Interbike last year I got super excited and decided Thomson will be my first dropper post - finally someone will get it right. Almost a year later I took a look at the price tag, the moving cable mount and the long waiting period (never in stock) and decided enough is enough - a beautifully smooth Reverb for less than half the price will be doing me just fine.
Sorry Thomson - you missed a big opportunity by coming out so late and with a dated design IMO.
  • + 3
 this is going to work like a dropper should work and will last alot longer than the average dropper
  • + 10
 The Reverb is flawless in operation, great durability and has Stealth routing. karaknic is spot on.
  • + 2
 Well I'm in the market for a new post as my reverb self destructed a couple weeks ago… can't be arsed spending a fortune to get it fixed…
Am torn between the LEV and this. But so far the LEV is winning, but only because of its cable routing.
I'm staggered that a company like Thomson would have such a vulnerable design. At least it will be simple to replace though Wink
  • + 2
 Stealth routing Thomson is on the way.
  • + 1
 On the way..? does that mean its going to be out in like, 3 years then? Wink
  • + 1
 Whole lot of guessing and not a lot of facts. Welcome to the PB comments.
  • + 9
 I'm sure it will be top notch... but the LEV and Reverb have got the stealth and zero cable movement.
  • + 14
 Exactly. Who cares about the bushing, Thompson should team up with someone who designs the cable to mount at the bottom. A day late and a dollar short.
  • + 1
 I could care less if the cable actuator is routed from the top or the bottom. The question is 'Does it work reliably?' or will I be returning this, like my Reverb, in 5 weeks 'cause it crapped out? Why does cable movement matter? Cause it's a 'cleaner' look? That's just fashion over function not necessarily technological advancement. If you ride in crap conditions, you have to maintain it.
  • + 7
 Rich middle aged men gonna buy these, industry's gonna think the pricing is acceptable to consumers, expect to see more expensive posts. Can't believe this shit costs more than a good pair of dh brakes.
  • + 2
 I beg to differ. If it's ultra reliable, it'll be worth it's weight in gold. I said the same thing about carbon hoops and frames breaking, but so far they're super reliable.
  • + 2
 It's exactly the same with Chris King, my mate has had a CK headset for 10 years, been moved around bikes and still has the original bearings. It is literally bomb-proof, it is also stupidly expensive when you can get a Hope one for £80 compared to £125 for the CK.
  • + 2
 Cane Creeks last for quite long as well, and they're cheap.

Anyway, for a "luxury" item, imo it shouldn't cost as much as a good pair of brakes, rear shock, wheelset, etc nomsaiyin? ._.
  • - 1
 I've had CC as well as Hope but the CC never really lasted as long as others have said they should, in British conditions I probably got through 3 CC's in 4 months of pure riding.
  • + 2
 I'd consider buying a Chris King headset now that they're using the recently expired Cane Creek split compression ring design.

www.bikeradar.com/news/article/eurobike-2010-chris-king-tweaks-headset-design-for-2011-27701
  • + 1
 @dbaser, hey kid, do you really think Thomson's gonna make a bargain basement post at a price that reflects that quality? Why would they when that end of the spectrum is covered by nearly everyone else? If your name is synonymous with high quality products, you do not risk making garbage. A brand's reputation can be lost in a second and take years to get back... and no one forgets your screw ups.

Light, 'strong', cheap: pick two, 'cause you can't have all three.
  • + 0
 Sure you can have all three. Good design, made in taiwan. Price does not always need to reflect quality, its the consumers that allow that.

Name: captainsnappy
Age: 18
Life: All figured out.
  • + 0
 dbaser, hey kid, you have a point but you are also mistaken. Taiwan does make good products and price is not solely reflective of consumer demand. A Bugatti Veyron is $1.2M, not because 4 billion people want one, but because of the engineering, materials and specific requirements of the manufacturer: they wanted the fastest production car in existence.

What kind of bushings does Thomson want for their post? The best available (in the video). What brand are those? Norglide bushings. Are they relatively more expensive to manufacture than others? Yes. So the fixed costs to manufacture the post are higher than other posts... then Thomson also has to recoup their R&D costs as well and they have the right to make a profit off what they sell.

And then it comes back to my original point about brand recognition. Thomson ain't gonna risk making a crap product when their stated company values revolve around high quality engineering and products, manufactured in the US. To manufacture sub-par products (in or out of Taiwan) would be branding suicide. Why would they risk that?

As for my age, thank you for the compliment.
  • + 1
 Comparing a bugatti veyron to a seatpost that slides up and down. Fox reduced the price of theirs by $100 because it wasn't selling well.

Good luck with your hyperbole goals of 2013.
  • + 5
 Thomson make great products, but I think they have been left in the gates here. I've used their rigid seat posts and stems on all my bikes, with no drama's. When the dropper post came to market I pounced on the KS LEV. I have 3 of them and can't fault them, in particular the cable routing set up. When I heard the Thomson were releasing their own I though that they were going to hit the market with some innovative design, but unfortunately not, and looking at the price they need to get with the market.
  • + 1
 LEVs have side-side saddle play, you can feel it when you're riding. You don't feel/get that in a Thomson. Who cares about the cable routing when it works.
  • + 9
 Dude on bike lookin like Ronald McDonald.
  • + 0
 Easy on the Olde English... rots your brain.
  • + 5
 The orientation of the actuation cable is similar to Fox DOSS and that means nice collector of mud, wanter and everything else that will clutter the housing. It is so simple to see that gravity and contaminants are best friends. This happened to the DOSS I have, in one wet ride in the Pacific North West, Solution? Gravity Dropper!
  • + 4
 Hit the button 2 years later and it will still be running . That's a big claim to make don't you think . If these company's I believe in a product so much then why not say right money back guarantee if the post breaks down in anyway . Sick of being a tester for new products that simply don't do as stated .
  • + 4
 I'm sure they will. They stand behind their product!

Here is my experience with Thomson: I ran a Masterpiece on a frame with a seat tube tolerance issue. It took me a while to diagnose the issue was the seat tube outer diameter and thickness being out of tolerance. Because I rode the post for a full season on that frame, it got damaged. The post got crushed where the clamp held it in place. When I sent the frame to the manufacturer, I told them about the seat post being damaged and even though they replaced the frame they told me they would not take responsibility for the seat post because it wasn't their fault in their opinion. I contacted Thomson about it wondering if the seat tube problem could have caused such damage. Dave Parrett answered back, his answer was simple : "Yes an out of tolerance seat tube can cause such damage. Send us the post back and we will replace it." And they did, they didn't ask for proof of purchase (it was a legit post), they simply took the responsibility for the frame builder and sent me a brand new post.

Guess what now... I only buy Thomson seatposts and stems (if they have the right angle and length combo). Thumbs up to Dave and his team. I'm well aware that I pay an extra for the name but I'm fine with it because they stand behind their product and have amazing CS. I feel I owe them one and I'm a loyal customer.
  • + 6
 On minute 1:30 appears a Reverb!!!!
  • + 2
 Two things I want to see out of new dropper post technology - substantially lower weight than the reverb, and a lower profile seat mounting bracket. The current Reverb adds two full inches of mounting post to the top of the seat post tube. On some of my more aggressive AM/DH riding that means the difference between my ass clearing the seat or having to slide over it. That really bugs me. Has anyone measured the Thompson's mounting post height-above-seat-tube? I would be really curious about that.
  • + 2
 Seems to be a good dropper post. At that price it needs to be good, it is taking on some really stiff competition. And it's almost too late to the party:
KS is developing carbon models, in addition to the trusty LEV.
Rock shock is running stealth now.
Specialized have fixed their bugs in their early posts .
And Fox is even entered in the market.
  • + 3
 I'd love to try this, just based on past experience with Thomson. Expensive, but a step above most in quality. Funny ride footage though. Slow, seated riding down a flat dirt road with no need for a dropper post!
  • + 2
 My clunky rustic Gravity Dropper (stuck with a 27.2 frame...) cable mounting system makes THIS look clunky and rustic. I think I'd rather buy 3 Gravity Droppers (when they inevitably do fail) than the probable price in £ this would be when it hits the UK.

Thomson parts are beautifully engineered and manufactured but whilst this design like the Fox DOSS may well be beautifully engineered and functioning with the highest technology doodah bushings in, the fact still stands the bandwagon left over a year ago and is on its return trip now.
  • + 4
 Fail? My 2007 GD Turbo is still trucking along, it's had a new boot, a bushing and some cables in that time, but still going. Two tubes and a spring, the aK47 of dropper posts.
  • + 2
 I love Thomson, but they are so late to the game, and this design proves it. Actually surprised they still released this cable design. They should have scrapped this design in favor of something "just as" nice as a Reverb Stealth or LEV. .No wait...being Thomson, they should have released something BETTER than those. And at the asking price? Sorry, but I just don't see this flying of the shelves.
  • + 2
 You can pick up a LEV for $100 less, and depending on whether the vendor offers a discount code, even less. Until Thompsons have been out in the field for a year or so, I'm not going to assume they are better than the KS LEV just because it is a Thompson. I'm glad Thompson threw their hat into the ring. I might not buy their seat post and decide that it is too expensive, but they may push the other adjustable seat post makers to make products that last.
  • + 2
 Sorry to see the vertical cable, that will allow mud & grime to go right down the cable as in my KS i950.
The post itself works well, but the cable demands a lot of attention.
  • + 1
 So they weren't very clear in explaining the question, where is the post actually made? I undertsand they got the bushings and design concepts from a Taiwanese company, but what about the rest if it? Is it actually assemblled there?
  • + 3
 Change the cable system and you have my money! The moving cable is outclassed!!
  • + 0
 You want true perfornace, reliablity and incredibly easy to maintain great sercive awesome web site parts list you cannot beat A GRAVITY DROPPER Better price Great function Better everything i have had mine for 4 years fixed a few things and it works flawless And it is the only company with interchangable parts i like a couple different seats and have had it on a few bikes and i can go from an I-beam setup to rail in just a few min. Just beacuse other products are coming out doesnt mean they are superior. Buy A Gravity Dropper........
  • + 0
 I remember when shock bushes were like that and wore out so quickly with the added disadvantage or when they do the metal part wears out the spacer too. I wonder why fork and shock bushes are not like that anymore.... I think they call it development. A little like their stems and seatposts, Thomson are falling behind the competition due to lack of innovation.
  • + 2
 Actually their MasterPiece and Elite seatposts are still awesome
  • + 0
 I have 3 elites, but the lighter offerings from kcnc and the reverb live on my bike now.
  • + 1
 Difference is I trust the Masterpiece and don't trust the kcnc
  • + 0
 I use my kcnc loads, kcnc and slr is just heavier than the elite. No issues so far in a couple of years.
  • + 0
 What's the point of the kcnc then? It's heavier the. The elite,
I have found the lightest DH worthy seat and seatpost is the SLR and Masterpiece
  • + 0
 The kcnc and the slr weighs not much more than the elite alone, before you add the saddle and there is a lighter carbon post out there than the kcnc too.
  • + 2
 Ive got a KS LEV and its been ridden hard for 6-months and has never skipped a beat. It works flawlessly, never developed any play and is incredibly smooth. After forgetting how much it cost I havent looked back. Simply perfect IMHO
  • + 1
 KS LEV FTW
  • + 0
 Its odd that stealth cabled posts are so popular. Maintenance is a pain in the ass with stealth designs. Crash and damage a stealth reverb cable and it is way more agro than the easy access non stealth design. Form should not come before function.The Thompson seems top notch and I suspect it will prove very good to live with. If I didn't already have a very reliable spesh post id be right on this one, I still may some point as I like Thompson gear so much.
  • + 4
 Gravity Dropper Turbo LP.
  • + 3
 I am NOT gonna flip the switch to drop $450 on this, youre outta your mind!
  • + 1
 Thomson is known for awesome quality so if they put out a crappy product they're in for hurting that reputation. Hopefully they don't disappoint, although droppers aren't easy task to make it reliable.
  • + 2
 WOW! I totally want one now, as long as I will be able to ride through puddles like this guyWink
  • + 1
 really looking forward to Thomson's version but not feeling the exposed cable, I'm afraid... gotta' be stealth or lever for me. .02
  • + 2
 2013 and we still have an ugly bollock-tearing cable and lever design !!! Boo !
  • + 1
 Bushings dont matter with a moving cable. If this post had a stationary cable like the LEV it would be a contender. Until then it is nothing more than mediocre at best.
  • + 1
 mediocre at 6 sigma
  • - 1
 I have one and it works very well. No noise, slop or issues. 2 criticisms: cable and housing was a bit short for my bike (large chilcotin) and I think the lever end needs to be more bulbous or curled so that a puncture becomes an impossibility. It's not sharp but a high speed impact could be interesting.

Yes it costs a lot but remember, Thompson is the post everyone uses and therefore they have the most to lose, and therefore the biggest incentive to get it right.

I think they nailed it with this one. I would have no reservations at this juncture recommending it.
  • + 2
 "Yes it costs a lot but remember, Thompson is the post everyone uses and therefore they have the most to lose, and therefore the biggest incentive to get it right."

And in what parallel universe does this give them the right to charge almost $500 for a dropper post? You clearly do not understand the simple economic functions of pricing.
  • + 1
 What a company charges for their product doesn't fall under the concept of a right. They charge what they can and what they have to to stay in business.

Your condescending remark about my understanding of pricing is laughable. Are you 15? You don't even know what a "right" is and obviously don't know the proper context for a sentence. So why is your concept if pricing superior to the guys that make a product, market it and provide the warranty?

If you can't afford something that doesn't make it bad or overpriced but rather an aspiration.
  • + 1
 Please cite your references for "Thompson is the post everyone uses" and while you're at it please tell me why, because after all this is a subjective remark, "they have the most to lose, and therefore the biggest incentive to get it right."

And yes, by economists standards there is a "right" price or at least a range of prices that is "right", its the supply demand function. This market and product is clearly demand driven and not supply driven, thus consumers ultimately set the price via the quantity they demand. What comparable products are offered within this market? Comprable by price: KS Lev Carbon ($450) added benefits, recessed cable that stays out of the way with no exposed lever, carbon, weight savings and more travel. Comparable by style and function: Rcokshox Reverb ($299) - same functions, same weight, same adjustments, same travel, $150 cheaper. The thompson seat post is way outside the supply demand equilibrium considering its price and features and thus only irrational buyers will purchase.

The ONLY possible added benefit I see to this thompson seatpost is the norglide bearings and that is NOT worth 50% more than a rockshox. And the added value of the KS over the thompson requires the buyer to overpay for a product which means it is priced incorrectly, not the "right" price.

You're welcome.
  • + 1
 Just got mine, replaced my Reverb which requires regular bleeding, here's hoping it's built better!
  • + 1
 Paid 10 Euro for my FSA seat post 4 years ago. Still works like a BOSS! Not even a scratch on the dude!
  • + 1
 413$ on eBay,not cheap but you dont get crap whit Thomson they always do great products
  • + 2
 "riding seatpost feels very good"
Try a saddle Wink
  • + 2
 that video was some tasty kool aid
  • + 2
 It's just a du bushing. Been on bikes for ages!
  • + 3
 HAHAHA It's got a cable!
  • + 1
 Cable is good. Easy to work on and doesn't piss fluid dropping your post if you crash.
  • + 2
 Somebody thinks their sh!t don't sink....
  • + 2
 That video is boring as sin.
  • + 10
 SIn is exciting, more like boring as not sinning.
  • + 4
 Boooooo! That video is more tragic than spandex on an old man! And that seatpost is marklar! Thompson stems and seatposts are still too legit!
  • + 1
 So boring. Why so expensive if no budget for marketing hype?
  • + 1
 I use a blackx dropper seatpost that cost half of that and after 2 years is still working like the 1st day
  • - 1
 LEV > KRONOLOG > REVERB > ELITE

Out of the 4 the Reverb will fail on you sooner or later. I own all 3 except the Elite which is old tech.
  • + 1
 And the Kronolog won't?
  • + 3
 reverb>kronolog
  • + 1
 Djcrossmax. Your talking Sh!t mate. A reverb is the best post on the market. Read mountain bike magazine or any other magazine and they'll say there by far the best you can buy for reliability. I've never had a problem with mine.
  • + 1
 I'm not arguing about which is the best dropper post (I've just bought a cheapo X-Fusion one....after all it's just a post that moves up and down and doesn't NEED to be anything special), but the last place you should get an informed opinion is from a magazine 'review'!!
  • + 2
 I wont argue that the LEV is one of the best, but the Kronolog is a p.o.s. - it's heavy, klunky, weird looking square profile, and shaky after a few rides. reverb is at least #2 if not tied for #1.
  • + 2
 Fellas I'm just telling it how it is! The LEV has zero issues works flawlessly every single time. I also own 2 reverbs the stealth and the older version. Both Reverbs have failed and require more service intervals than the other brands. The Kronolog works just as well as the LEV the only issue is that the design causes marks on the seatpost during use which have not caused any performance issues whatsoever. Having a reverb fail on the trail is not only embarassing it's a pain in the ass to service. When you have owned all 3 droppers then your allowed to critic. Until then enjoy reading your mountain bike mag. I'll be out riding.
  • + 1
 Ok fair enough but you admit you haven't tried the Elite and are already criticising it. I have a Reverb (newer version) and have been very happy with it. I haven't had a chance to try a Lev but it looks promising and have heard nothing but good things about it. I ride with a guy who has a Kronolog and he's not super impressed. He said it's finicky to set up and in less than a year it's already wearing quite a bit where the 2 hardened steel plates basically 'dig' into the alum post. It doesn't seem like a design that going to have a lot of longevity. I guess that's fine for people who can afford a new post every year but not all of us are in that boat, and for those prices, they should last considerably longer.
  • + 0
 Because bushings have worked so well in the past in place of bearings in the back of full suspension bikes. [/sarc]
  • + 8
 This is a COMPLETELY different application. No suspension can work without bushings (look inside your fork lowers or the air can of your shock), and a dropper post is very much like suspension in many ways. For the kind of movement and wear that these bushings will see, this is actually the best thing you could use.

As for rear suspension designs, bearings are great but also not without their drawbacks.
  • + 3
 [Quote=article]As the bicycle industry gains more experience with modern composite bushing technology, such as those manufactured by Norglide/Saint Gobain, we expect to see them appear in many applications that presently use ball bearings. The fact that bushings take up very little space increases the potential strength of critical suspension pivots and the weight reduction benefits are substantial. Industry partnerships, as the relationship between Norglide and Thomson demonstrate, will be key to the success of the concept. [/quote]

Of course bushings are used in almost every suspension fork or shock or suspension seatpost, no one questions that. It's questionable to assert that bushings can take the place of bearings in other areas of bike design though.
  • + 2
 Delrin bushing are very common in the off-road industry in the suspension components. Cost effective and more durable than the heim mounts for A-arms and J-arms in front suspension designs.
  • + 2
 $450...
  • + 2
 Finally!!!!!!!
  • + 5
 its going to be like 600$
  • + 1
 600 bucks? how many good seatpost can you buy out of that...
  • + 4
 I want one. And that is where it will probably stop.
  • + 0
 Can I get that red head and he has!
  • + 1
 wow

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