Scott Genius LT 10 Review

Jan 3, 2012 at 1:57
by Richard Cunningham  

TESTED
SCOTT
GENIUS
LT 10
WORDS RC

With roots deep in World Cup cross-country racing, it may be hard for all-mountain riders to seriously consider Scott as a player in the long-travel game. Scott believes that the carbon-framed Genius LT 10 will reverse that prejudice, and after spending some quality time on the 30-pound, 185-millimeter-travel machine, we might agree. Reduced to its performance and capabilities, the Genius LT 10 is a nimble-feeling, very capable descender with the potential to meet or exceed the climbing performance of anything in the 180-millimeter-travel club.

There is, however, nothing reductionist about Scott’s showcase all-mountain machine. With adjustable geometry and handlebar-remote functions that offer three shock modes; a simultaneous lockout feature for its fork and shock; and a dropper seatpost button, this is not the blunt instrument of a bike-park skidder. Rather, the Genius LT 10 is a precision tool for the experienced all-mountain rider who wants to squeeze every meter of shred from a trail system. Scott’s all-mountain over achiever retails for about $6499 USD. www.scottsports.com

  Set Scott's 185-millimeter-travel Genius LT 10 as plush as your downhill sled and, with the help of a few buttons and levers, it will efficiently scratch its way up a long section of switchbacks that would challenge many trailbikes.
.
Genius LT 10 Construction

One may ask why Scott, the one brand that has banked its reputation on uber-tech carbon fiber frames, would make its premier long-travel AM chassis half in carbon and half in aluminum? In he-man terms; Scott used carbon fiber to build the front section of the LT 10 because it is the strongest and lightest way to make a frame. A welded-aluminum structure is the most efficient way to weave a rear triangle around tires, chainrings and spinning crank-arms – and the perfect material to house bearings and to support brake calipers. The Genius LT 10 optimizes both materials to produce a chassis with a published weight of 2.6 kilos (5.72 pounds), including its 535-gram Equalizer shock – a figure that pencils out against the complete bike’s verified weight of 30.35 pounds without pedals (13.795 kilos). In theory, the Genius’ carbon front section is protected by its wide-stance fork and rear suspension, so the chassis should survive the relentless beating and scraping that an aggressively ridden AM/trailbike must endure.

Scott Genius LT

Scott Genius LT 10 Details
• Purpose: All/Mountain
• HMX Carbon fiber front section, aluminum rear suspension.
• Remote control rear-wheel travel: 185mm/110mm
• Adjustable geometry
• Tapered head tube
• ISCG-05 chain guide tabs
• Thru-axle - 142/12mm, 135/12mm or 135/10mm options
• Remote lockout Fox 36 TALAS fork (140mm/180mm)
• Twinloc Handlebar Remote: simultaneous fork and shock lockout, 110mm or full travel
• DT Swiss-Made Equalizer 3 pull shock
• Weight: 30.35 pounds (13,795g)
• MSRP: $6499 USD


HMX - NET carbon: Scott is one of those brands that manufactures as many catchy names as it does products. (Something to do with companies starting with ‘S’?) HMX refers to a special high-modulus carbon with a custom resin system that Scott uses to reinforce key areas of the LT 10’s front section. The NET part (Naked External Tube) reminds us that Scott was among the first carbon fiber bike makers to abandon the cute looking woven cosmetic outer layer and to leave the frame’s unidirectional carbon construction exposed – a strategy that saves weight and remains honest to the material. HMX material is said to be 20-percent stiffer, and thus adds rigidity and can reduce weight in the areas where it is employed.

One-piece molded front section: There are many strategies used to make carbon parts, the best method to make a strong hollow shape, like a front triangle, is to lay up the many layers of carbon material and the various bearing and shock mounts into one complete piece and then use internal pressure, evenly distributed, to compress the carbon within the mold as the part is heated to set the resin. A one-time cure produces the strongest bond between the carbon layers. This is the method used to produce the best of the best carbon frames, including the Genius LT 10.

geometry chart

The LT 10’s composite front section is intelligently designed to optimize the material’s unique properties, which explains why it doesn’t look like a slightly sculpted rendition of a generic welded-aluminum-tube frame. Its tri-oval top and down tubes bear a hint of convention, but its tapered head tube area, its massively oversized seat tube and the rear-set bottom bracket are voluminous monocoque constructions integrated into the design to double as suspension pick up points and to encircle its three-chambered pull-shock.

All-mountain frame features: Scott took advantage of Shimano’s PressFit bottom bracket system to boost strength and stiffness by widening the bottom bracket/seat tube as far as possible. An ISCG chain guide mount is built into the left side of the monocoque and Scott attaches a red-anodized inner guide plate to keep the chain in control and to protect the carbon from injury should the chain be forced off the inside sprocket. In the rear, the post-mount brake caliper boss is tucked inside the frame to keep the caliper out of harm’s way. A Scott and Trek exclusive for 2012 is an internal hose routing for its RockShox Reverb seat post remote-control. Scott also attaches its direct-mount front derailleur to the swingarm instead of the seat tube so the derailleur cage tracks the chain perfectly as the rear suspension compresses through its full travel. Finally, the Genius LT 10’s seat tube mast is angled back to lengthen the cockpit as the post is raised in order to accommodate taller riders and to move the rider forward in a more downhill position when the saddle is slammed low.

Scott Genius LT
  The Genius LT 10 makes use of the best qualities of carbon and aluminum. Massive-diameter carbon main tubes and wide-stance suspension pivot placements keep the chassis laterally stiff. The pull-shock configuration is novel, but performs quite well.

Rear-section: Peruse the most respected long-travel bikes from Scott, Specialized, Trek and you’ll find that an aluminum rear section paired with a carbon front is the theme that unites them all. Details are the key to successful aluminum construction, and Scott’s designers covered every trick in the welded aluminum handbook to pen the LT 10’s rear mech. The rocker link is forged in thin-wall halves and then welded into a single piece to ward off flexing. Forged bearing-journals, caliper mounts and dropouts provide rigidity while making the many contortions required to weave around key components, and also to provide ample clearance for tires up to 2.5-inches wide. Scott sells the LT 10 with a 142 x 12-millimeter through-axle system, but its interchangeable dropouts can also be configured to accept 135 x 12 and 135 x 10-millimeter through-axles.

Key numbers: A reversible ‘chip’ in the rocker link’s shock mount allows Genius LT 10 riders to alter the head angle by slightly less than one degree, which also changes the bottom bracket height. LT 10s roll out of the box with the head angle at 67-degrees – in the steeper of the two positions – which results in a BB height of 14.4 inches according to the charts. Switching the chip slackens the head angle to 66.3 degrees, with a corresponding shift to a 14.1 inch BB height. When one considers that the Fox 36 TALAS fork offers 40-millimeters of travel adjustment, you can then add another degree of angular adjustment to the settings that the chip offers (67 degrees becomes 68 with the fork compressed in the short TALAS option).

Scott’s seat angle is deliberately rear-set to lengthen the distance between the handlebar and saddle as the seat post is raised, so its quoted seat angles of 74.2 or 73.5 degrees are theoretical measurements taken at average saddle heights. The medium-size frame’s 23-inch top tube and 16.9-inch chain stays are pretty much standard fare for the all-mountain genre. Scott offers the Genius LT 10 in small, medium (tested) and large sizes.

Genius LT 10 Component Check

SRAM X.0 drivetrain components are the highlight of the LT 10, beginning with the nicely geared, 24 x 38-tooth crankset and its carbon bash ring. and ending with a mention of its crisp-feeling shift paddles. Extra credit goes to Scott’s choice of a RockShox Reverb Stealth Seat post – arguably the most reliable and useful of its kind. The LT 10 rolls on DT Swiss AM 10 tubeless wheels and aggressive 2.35-inch Schwalbe Hans Damph tires. Brakes were Avid Elixir 9RS with carbon levers and a 200-millimeter front and a 180-millimeter rotor in the rear. Cockpits items were all Syncros, including a 700-millimeter-width (27.5 inches) Carbon AM handlebar.

Fork details
  The Fox 36 TALAS fork is custom made for Scott. The blue dial on the left side reduces the stroke by 40mm while the Twinloc remote cable that runs to the right stanchion locks out the fork in conjunction with the shock.

LT 10 Suspension

Fork: There is probably no need to explain the benefits of the LT 10’s 180/140-millimeter-travel Fox 36 TALAS fork, as it has become an all-mountain standard. An exclusive for Scott, Fox adds a remote lockout mech to the top of the right stanchion tube that is paired with a remote shock lockout cable at the Twinloc handlebar lever. The lockout precludes the use of a low-speed compression adjustment which can be a sore spot for fastidious suspension tuners (more about that later).

Shock: The firework show begins with one look at Scott’s DT Swiss-made Equalizer 3 shock – a massive looking device that appears to be modeled after an oil refinery. Equalizer 3 offers three remote-controlled suspension modes: Lockout, limited-travel ‘traction’ mode and full travel. To get your head around the Equalizer, one must abandon all preconceived notions about how a standard shock operates.

Equalizer shock details
  The left side of the Equalizer 3 shock houses the cable-actuated valve body (thin tube in center) flanked by the two damper chambers. Negative and positive spring pressure is set with a pair of Schrader valves (bottom center). A detailed list of rider weight and spring pressures can be found printed on the left shock can. Red dials on each can are the rebound adjustments. The drive side of the Equalizer exposes the central pull shock that pumps oil to the two dampers. It has a sliding gauge near the top of the can that indicates suspension sag. The Equalizer appears complicated, but it is quite easy to get right.

To begin with, it’s a pull-shock, so compressing the suspension draws the shock shaft out of the body. The main chamber is basically an oil pump that shoves fluid into one or both chambers. The bike is suspended by two air springs, one in each of the adjoining reservoirs. When the suspension is wide open, the shock pumps oil into both reservoirs, which maximizes air volume and gives the spring a very linear compression rate. When the Twinloc lever is in traction mode, the larger of the two reservoirs is switched off so oil can only travel into the small air can – which limits the suspension travel from 185 to 110 millimeters, and the corresponding reduction in air volume also causes the spring rate to be very progressive. In lockout mode, the valve between the shock and both reservoirs is switched off and the damper simply can’t move. Because the Equalizer 3 is basically one pump that drives two separate shocks, it has two low-speed rebound dials, one for full travel and another for the Traction mode. Compression damping is preset internally.



Riding the Genius LT 10

  The LT 10's balanced feel and deep suspension made Southern California's hour-plus descents feel effortless. Avid's 9RS brakes, while not as powerful as we would like, were easy to modulate on the often rock-hard clay surface.

Measured by its wow-factor, Scott’s Genius LT 10 sets a high bar. Buttons, levers, paddles, hoses and housings bristle from the handlebars like a cell phone tower. The fact that all-mountain bikes must do a bang-up job as technical climbers and descenders is an invitation for mediocre compromise, though, and Scott’s handlebar array keeps the Genius LT 10’s performance sharp in both theaters of operation. After an adequate orientation period, the LT 10 rider will discover that using the Twinloc’s shock and TALAS fork modes is nearly a requisite to riding the bike.

One example that stands out happened when a test rider was lagging behind the group on a long climb. He pulled over to make an adjustment and soon passed us like we were pulling trailers. At the summit, he mentioned that although he was in short-travel traction mode on the steep climb, the 180-millimeter-stroke fork made the seat angle too slack and it was cramping his cockpit position. He said lowered the TALAS fork 40mm and the Scott climbed like a different bike. Every test rider reported a similar epiphany.

Setup: Suspension setup is critical with the LT 10. The tendency is to use too much pressure in both the fork and shock. The Equalizer 3 shock has printed recommendations for negative and positive spring pressures versus rider weight on the left-side damper body, and there is a sag meter on opposite side. Choose the spring pressure settings that result between 25 and 30-percent sag. Set the fork pressure to the same percentages. A parking lot test will feel too soft, but on the trail, it will be perfect. Commit to the remotes. Use the Twinloc lever for pedal time and run the suspension downhill soft. The Genius has seven inches of travel, so running the suspension high simply trashes its small-bump sensitivity and creates a high center of gravity.

Shock tip: Take the time to dial in the rebound separately for both the long and short-travel shock barrels on the Equalizer shock because you’ll be spending a lot of riding time in both modes.

Tire pressure: On another side of the setup, Scott chose Schwalbe Hans Dampf tires, which are excellent candidates for tubeless. We ran the tires stock with tubes for the first half of the test, and then yanked the tubes and remounted them with Stan’s sealant and the rigorous use of a floor pump. The performance increase was noticeable, with the high-volume, 2.35-inch knobbies rolling faster on the flats and sticking better around corners. Tire pressure settings are important with Hans Dampf tires. We found 22psi front and 25psi rear was about perfect for a 165-pound rider.

Scott Genius LT
  Scott's Twinloc lever (top) operates with a push-push action that mimics SRAM shift paddles. The black lever tensions the cables - one click for Traction mode and a second push for full lockout. Pushing the blue Twinloc lever beneath it reverses the steps. New riders tended to 'shift' with the Twinloc, a mistake that sent a couple of us down steeps fully locked out. It only takes one of those events to remember which is which.

First impressions: Rolling out on the long-legged Scott felt more like we were riding a trailbike. It seemed too lightweight to handle the beating that an all-mountain bike is intended to take. The tendency was to baby the bike through rough sections and steep descents instead of straight-lining the rocks and simply pounding through parts of the trail that presented no clear option. For the first few rides we exited technical sections thinking we could have hit them faster and harder. Once we committed, the more we pushed the LT 10, the more it impressed us.

Learn the levers: The tendency for test riders was to avoid the myriad of handlebar remote options unless presented with a long stretch of terrain that forced the issue. To get the most from the LT 10, though, one must become as fluid with the Twinloc lever as dropper devotees are with the remote seatpost controls. With the shock and fork wide open at full travel, the LT 10 sits slightly low in the rear and its head angle slackens a degree or so – perfect for steeps or (as was the case for much of our testing) pounding down rock gardens that offer no intelligent line choices.

Climbing in the open configuration is not all that bad, but a switch to traction mode raises the tail a bit and makes the steering feel a degree sharper – a sweet setup for short climbs and ridge running. For extended climbs, reach down and drop the Fox fork 40-millimeters with the TALAS dial to brighten up the Scott’s climbing efficiency even more. Same goes for cornering. Switching on traction mode makes the LT 10 feel more nimble around tight singletrack turns, where carving quick right-left-right combinations is a useful trait, while leaving the Twinloc lever wide open is the preferred option for shoveling dirt around high-speed corners. The bottom line is that Scott’s adaptive technology defines the Genius LT 10’s performance. Use it and the bike shines in nearly every corner of the all-mountain/trail envelope. Ignore the Twinloc lever and the LT 10 rides like an elite version of the one-trick ponies that crowd the base line of the AM genre.

Scott Genius LT
  Scott chose moderately wide Syncros handlebars for the Genius LT 10. Not many bikes have seven housings sprouting from the bars. Ugly perhaps, but without the remotes, the LT 10 would lose much of its fun factor.

Suspension: Scott’s Genius LT 10 is hard-wired to its Equalizer 3 pull shock and modified Fox 36 TALAS fork, so you’ll have to live with any idiosyncrasies in its suspension. Riders used to a pro-level shock with a full compliment of high and low-speed damping controls and end-stroke adjustments will find the Scott Equalizer’s options to be inadequate, and its remote fork lockout eliminates the low-speed compression dial up front. That said, the Scott feels very smooth over a gamut of terrain features, from that’s-gonna’-hurt maximum impacts to annoying bike park braking bumps. Like with most good gravity bikes, the rear wheel stays glued the ground in the long-travel setting to the point where it needs to be popped over smaller features to get it airborne. In traction mode, the Scott’s rear end feels much like a five-inch trailbike. The tail can be lifted with a flick of the ankles and it pops off of any kicker, but the firmer shock setting means that the rear end will skip a bit over chatter bumps under hard braking.

We struggled initially with the Fox 36 TALAS fork. Its small-bump sensitivity was a disappointment. There were two issues involved: the first was that setting the fork’s spring pressure low enough to get the fork to feel supple caused a good deal of brake dive when we were descending steeps. The second issue was a lot of friction in the fork that could be only be mitigated by lubricating the wiper seals every other ride. To be sure, there is a learning curve involved with a 180-millimeter-travel dual-purpose bike. There is no way one can set the fork to feel XC firm in the pedaling department and still achieve full travel. We discovered that the best setup was to tune the fork and shock soft and supple for full-travel descending and then depend upon the Twinloc’s traction mode for all pedaling sections. As a bonus, the fork performed better when it was sagged lower into its travel.

Handling notes: Looking at the big picture, Scott did a good job on the LT 10’s numbers. The kicked-out front end is slack enough to descend with conviction and it doesn’t feel too floppy when pedaling on the flats or up rollers. The 16.9-inch (428mm) chainstay length is tight enough to make the Scott an easy climber and yet the bike feels balanced in the corners as if it had a tad longer wheelbase. On the subject of steering, the bike is nimble enough in the long-travel settings to make quick lane changes when necessary. We found that it could weave through boulders with surprising dexterity. The Scott’s handling and steering reflects that the carbon/aluminum chassis is quite rigid in the lateral sense, which was a pleasant surprise for a 180-millimeter-travel bike that only weighed 30 pounds.

As a side note on handling, we wouldn’t recommend the low bottom bracket suspension option unless you were planning on riding park all day or shuttling downhill runs with your big-bike friends. We banged the crankarms often enough in the higher setting to question why the option was there. The Scott’s laid-back seat angle, designed to stretch the cockpit for taller riders, becomes much too set back when riding with the seatpost extended. On level ground, or when climbing, the suspension compresses and pushes the pedaling ergonomics from marginally bad to just plain bad. With the saddle lowered and the bike pointed down hill, however, the low BB option comes into its own.

key components
  Scott is one of only two brands to feature the new RockShox Reverb dropper post with the internal hose routing. It really cleans up the bike's appearance. Other Star players were its 2.35 inch Hans Dampf tubeless tires, Avid HRS Carbon brakes and low-geared SRAM X.0 crankset. The LT 10 frame has ISCG-05 chainguide mounts
.
Technical report

• Avid’s 9RS Carbon brakes do not stop as hard as we would expect from a top-drawer AM brake paired with a 185-millimeter rear and 200-millimeter front rotor. That said, the big rotors ensured that there was ample braking power at hand when needed, and the exchange for the lack of authority at first squeeze was a more moderate feel that was easy to modulate when traction was sketchy.

• Cornering on Schwalbe’s Hans Dampf tires was a treat. Without the pronounced edging blocks of downhill-type tread patterns, there are times when the meaty Schwalbe knobbies will slide a bit before finding their groove, but the slide feels firm and grippy and does not throw the LT 10 off its line. Braking performance is also wonderful and because the Hans Dampf is an Omni-directional tire, the same straight-line grip makes for invincible climbing traction. Considering that the Hans Dampf is an expensive tire, we figured that Scott must have liked it as much as we did to spec it.

• Scott chose a 700-millimeter Syncros AM Carbon handlebar, which was a bit narrow for some test riders. The feel of its bend and its 20-millimeter rise were judged unanimously to be just right for the bike.

• Cheers for SRAM’s low-geared two-by crankset and its bash guard. Paired with a 36-tooth cog in the rear, the 24-tooth granny offers up a low enough climbing gear to put the bike’s grippy knobbies to task. We would even go so far as to ask for a 22-tooth granny so we could top the big hero climbs.

What We Would Change

Two items stand out as potential improvements for the LT 10. For riders who's stature fits within the design's sweet spot, the slack seat angle serves its intended purpose of adjusting the effective top tube length for taller or shorter riders. Once the post is elevated beyond a certain point, though, it destroys the bike’s front/rear weight balance. A shorter-travel bike can handle such an arrangement because its rear suspension doesn’t settle as much when the weight shifts back for climbing or when G-forces build up in a turn, but for a long-travel bike like the Scott LT 10, moving the rider back a couple of inches un-weights the fork and sags the rear end too far into its stroke. Put a six-footer on the medium frame and, unless the fork is set to minimum travel, the front wheel skips off the ground going uphill and the rear end sags with every pedal stroke on the flats. Scott might do better to add a fourth size and use a more conventional seat tube angle. Consider this when you size your LT 10.

The second item is less of a complaint and more of a suggestion for future Twinloc technology. We found that the Fork’s TALAS setting was far more important to maximizing the LT 10’s performance than its lockout feature. We would happily sacrifice the lockout option completely if the Twinloc lever automatically reduced the fork travel as it does the shock. It is almost funny that we had to reach down while riding to turn the fork’s TALAS knob before a climb on a bike that has seven remote control cables and hoses sprouting from its handlebar. In fact, eliminating the fork lockout in favor of a remote TALAS option would return the more-valuable low-speed compression adjustment which we needed to keep the fork from diving under braking.

  Setting the LT 10's rear suspension to ride softer and lower in its travel moderated the brake dive of the Fox 36 TALAS fork. The new downhill tune improved cornering as well.

Pinkbike's take:
bigquotesMany All-Mountain designs serve up intelligent compromise in an effort to provide a balance between DH quality descending and XC pedaling, but the Scott Genius LT 10 manages to avoid the compromise part of that equation. Want just-right climbing geometry? Pop the saddle up, push the Twinloc lever, twist the TALAS dial and hear the angels sing. Big trouble ahead? Drop the post, open up the suspension and descend with conviction. Big road climb to the trailhead? No worries, set the seat to full height, shove the Twinloc lever to lull lockout and the LT 10 will roll happily up the highway for an hour or more. The LT 10 is not for everyone - it is a thinker's machine and by that, we mean that its performance must be managed by a rider who stays ahead of the bike as well as the terrain. A flow-type rider might find that switching ten gears and a bunch of handlebar levers all day is too much trouble. The Genius LT 10 suits a hard-driving style and a rider who wants to own the entire mountain. If that sounds like you, it would be a tough bike to beat. -RC




Scott's Genius LT 10...




193 Comments

  • + 116
 meh its okay... it only has 7 cables coming off the handlebars. i don't think thats enough
  • + 10
 thats exactly what i thought...u could probably spare another kilo just by all those cables...but jokes apart, its a nice concept...as every good product in this world, u have to start somewhere, to get somewhere...and as the technology grows everyday, i imagine what will this bike will be in the next 10 or 5 years...probably really the only one bike that we need?..why not?...now i wouldnt buy one...why? mostly because of the price...this kind of tec is not comin cheap..still....and as many of us voted, for the price u can get 2 pretty good bikes..one for the trails and one for the gravity stuff...but i have to admit that my interest in this kind of bike lives in me..because even tho i already own the 2 bikes that i need, i have also to admit that i miss the times when i only had 1 bike for all (giant reignX), and its was very uncomplicated to have only one for all...so...this could actually be the one bike for me...in the future tho...
  • + 5
 now one thing that ive just notice, is WHY no chainguide???!!! even specialized Stumpys have them!! common Scott......
  • - 59
flag WAKIdesigns (Feb 13, 2012 at 2:57) (Below Threshold)
 Yea I wonder how many more cables we need to notice that all this technology makes MTB more and more gay, year after year... I mean it has nothing to do with homosexuals, it's just that when I see a guy on a bike with seven cables going out of his handlebar, a Go PRo on his head, a GPS, then the only word coming to my mind is: what a fag. Beigist techno-bigot
  • + 19
 would be great to see a direct comparison between this and the Cannondale Claymore...ok, i will stop posting now i swear...
  • - 4
flag WAKIdesigns (Feb 13, 2012 at 4:28) (Below Threshold)
 I would love to see a direct comparison between this and Orange Alpine 160... might be SC Heckler if you like
  • + 9
 Yeah, 7 cables and 9 levers on one handlebar lol.
  • + 17
 7 cables comming from the handlebar, but you have a dropper post and adjustable suspension from a button push away within finger reach. Aside the front, the cables are hidden and the bike looks very clean! And regarding the price... You get a sub 14kg, 180mm of travel, carbon, high end spec'd all around rig. That means only one awesome bike to take care of. I'm willing to do a test ride on this baby and I'm damn serious.
  • - 21
flag WAKIdesigns (Feb 13, 2012 at 5:47) (Below Threshold)
 You can have 10 cables and post vids from Go PRo 3 on your FB profile and still, they won't take you anywhere from the skills you have now.

How many can manual here? How many always ride with chin up and always look into and out of the corners? Who can say they ride in neutral attack position no matter what, instead of hanging way too much off back when terrain gets steep. Who can ride standing for 1 hour? Who can do a proper bloody bunnyhop? - I can't neither but I know that switching levers on gadgets won't make me put a single "checked" on that list.

Stuff that makes you have more fun or be faster if you like, weighs a lot and is found on gym. Then it takes time to go to the car park and do skill drills, then to the woods on trail to train vision and stance and single skills. Let's get ready to humbleeee
  • + 20
 Those gadgets don't really help your technique itself, but they make climbing (travel adjust) and descending (dropper post) easier and convenient. I'm no pro rider, but I know a few things about what to do on roots, rocks, loose terrain, sand, steep descents etc etc. And I can do wheelies to nearly infinite, manuals not so well though. I don't ride to cut 1/100th of a second off a lap, I ride because my friends ride and because I love riding and nature.

We don't really need them, but they make it easier and gives the ride more fun.
  • + 8
 i think you are beeing obtuse...biking is for 99% of us all probably just a hobby..u dont have to be the best or be able to do all those stuff that u mentioned to have fun...the MAIN reason why we ride, is just to have fun...and if u can have only one bike, that will do everything and lower ur costs (consider the Genius LT40 weights only 14.2kg and costs only 3200euros) because u own and maintain only one bike instead of 2, thats makes the sport even more fun, because u are not going "homeless" because of ur hobby....and to all those levers on the handlebar...whats the problem? when u want to climb a wall, u can...when u want to follow sam hill down a mountain, u can..and those levers are there to help you, and make up for THOSE TALENTS YOU DONT HAVE!! and still lower then the 14.5kg mark...wich is still very low for a bike this size/travel...and with the LT40 u also get a Alu frame...something that will put some peace in many peoples heart (mine, for exemple)...so...reconsider your point of view if u agree with me...and unless you are a professional, stop taking the hobby sooooo seriously in such a way that new stuff even bothers you...when one gets to this point, u have have to stop and rethink your values...NOW i will stop posting, i swear again....
  • - 24
flag WAKIdesigns (Feb 13, 2012 at 6:44) (Below Threshold)
 Biking for you is just a hobby and all that, a very nice theory (in fact promoted everywhere), until the very moment of truth: you stand there with this super expensive bike when someone on a simple bike rides by you with a way more ,strength, speed and style. And these things don't make up for the skills and fitness you don't have, they make you cheat yourself, because they make things a little bit easier while the big picture sucks. BTW you know that for 3200 euros you can fly from Germany to Colorado and take hours of personal skills clinics with worlds probably best skills coaches Hamilton, McCormack and Wilson?

If you do spend sooo much money on stuff, then it is damn serious. It is time to grow big balls and face the truth - no bullsht - for the sake of having more fun, it takes commitment and patience. A Thing is: you can be sure of good results for spending time on skills and fitness (building a pumptrack) unlike earning money for parts.

Sons of MTB: they can take your Kashima, they can take your levers, but they will never take your SKILLS! let's do it! Follow meeee!
  • + 15
 ????? do you even read what you are writing??? "biking for me beeing a hobby" is a "nice theory??? now YOU want to tell ME what i think about my sport??? how old are u?? 12 ??? And if someone passes me on the trail with "more spee, strenght and style", i DONT CARE!!!!!! i dont have to "face the truth"!!!!! i used to be )back in the days) a Motocross professional rider! i dont have to prove anything to anyone!! u want "the moment of truth"?? good! we dont even have to go as far as the mountain is, just come over to my house and enjoy looking at my trophys!!! i have to prove nothing to nobody!!! and why the hell would i buy ticket from here to colorado to go to those clinics to do what?! if i can BUY A BIKE with that money?!!! as i said! if are NOT a professional! (as most of us ARENT!) just buy the bike that FITS u and that u HAVE FUN on!!!! stop beeing a "kashima freak" that think that beeing the best with the least is the last word oh "performance"!! And dont say that alone spending so much money on products that its already "damn serious"! U dont have to be a race driver to buy/own a nice car! and thats a lot more expensive then a bike! if the guy has the money and enjoy on a sunday morning going for a drive on his Ferrari or so, then leave him alone!!! Same goes to the bikes! if i have fun on my expensive bike, then i DONT CARE that some narrow-minded kid passes me on the trail at 100mph on a hardtail!! I AM HAVING MY OWN FUN!!! LEAVE ME ALONE!!!!....and get a life......
  • - 29
flag WAKIdesigns (Feb 13, 2012 at 7:30) (Below Threshold)
 Whooops, tell someone something about bike tech and you stand on his finger but tell someone something about skills and you might step on his Willy...
  • + 8
 ok, u do are 12......tell someone something about bike tech and the conversation is about a common item, that CAN BE DISCUSSED....tell someone something about skills AND U ARE GETTING PERSONAL! and u dont know me, so simply dont do it!! wanna get personall?? good! send me your email and i will send you pictures of my trophys and me standing on the top of many podiums!! or not! cuz i have nothing to prove u!!! so, as i said...dont tell ME what i think, dont tell ME what is "the moment of truth", dont tell me your personal thought about my own stuff, cuz i just dont give a hotdog....and stop getting personal on the web...it looks really bad to bark while standing behind bars, and running away when facing me! so just dont do it....
  • - 21
flag WAKIdesigns (Feb 13, 2012 at 7:59) (Below Threshold)
 u got some really big ego for being 22 - good, just use it well
  • + 10
 do even know what ego means? dont worry Pinkbike, i will stop this pointless discussion with this post....not worth it anyway...
  • - 19
flag WAKIdesigns (Feb 13, 2012 at 8:11) (Below Threshold)
 yea your EGO makes you behave as if someone from PB would fkn care what we are writing here...
  • + 8
 ok, u dont know what ego means...
  • + 13
 "I just don't give a hotdog" - awesome, totally awesome.
  • + 3
 If I'm good at reading, I'd be at the library now, not pinkbike.
  • + 7
 I agree with you pperini discussion about bike tech is one thing but trying to tell someone about their skill on a bike is personal, i ride DH have done for about 5years now, i aint the fastest person on a DH bike, i can ride most trails yet i still have things to learn like everyone does, i ride with some guys that race who are yes obviously an awfull lot quicker than me but i don't care as im happy riding how i ride. Back on topic, i think the tech on this is pretty nice and the idea is good but as mentioned for that price you can get 2 bikes, the 7 cables may seem excessive to some folk but again as mentioned if you want to drop you seat post for a descent you don't want to have to stop, get off, put it down to get back on, simple flick of a lever and you don't need to stop, the shock is a good concept too with the 3 stage setup all at a the flick of a lever
  • + 3
 thank you
  • + 2
 At first glance looks like a fighter jet!
  • + 13
 "u got some really big ego for being 22 - good, just use it well"
How old is our current world DH champ?

Are you trolling, or are you really as stupid as you sound?
  • + 4
 can i please say, WAKL get off your high horse and let riders ride how they want. At the end of the day its your bike and I hope you have it how you want it and dont give a shit what others say.
  • + 2
 Coastal Crew should say something. That's an opinion you could bank on.
  • + 6
 And i find it very funny that a German and a Polish man are in a argument.
  • + 3
 for the record, im not German, im Brasilian..and even if i was a german, whats so funny about that?
  • + 10
 wow WAKI who pissed in your cornflakes? Sometimes you are funny. This time not so much
  • + 4
 This WAKI guy is wack in the head
  • + 5
 That whole argument had so much irony in it that its rediculous. WAKI shud realize that he is just jealous that he doesn't have 7 cables. And where was there any bike tech, it was just a rant about wasting money and having no skills lol
  • + 1
 Waki is a smart guy, he's mostly right and I often agree with what he says. He has a lot of knowledge and shares it with many people (as long as ACTA doesn't control intellectual property, cuz I'm sure he'd get rich fast). Sometimes people just don't understand something, perhaps I didn't this time but more people agree with me because my point of view seems more acceptable?

We all have opinions, we have all said a lot of bullcrap a lot of times. Sometimes we're funny and smart, sometimes we're not.

All those comments about people being wrong don't really add any meaning to what has been said, so aren't we all a little wack in the head?

Now, I'm going to have a good night on mcpp and mdxx Wink
  • + 2
 Robby - you expressed yourself without getting personal about it. I'm not sure why WAKI took that tact. Ordinarily I wouldn't care but WAKI is far from the ordinary PB hit and run substanceless commenter (as are you - both of you usually have interesting things to say fwiw) and I for one just expressed surprise.
  • + 2
 I was surprised aswell. Meh, let's forget about this Smile
  • + 3
 thats exactly my point, i have also already noticed the people that say things with sence here on pb..and yes WAKI is usually one of them..but..oh well, just read his comments and i wont have to explain anything...i just think its unacceptable to start such a "provocation" on the web, mostly because of some cables, and specially with someone u dont know....smart?? not really.....and i better not even tell u all his personal messages to me! he would probably be deleted from PB for writing me those stuff...
  • + 1
 you're right Robby - no need to dwell on this!
  • + 3
 Never seen so many negatives. Hope you weren't planning on running for president Waki.
  • + 6
 I would like to apologize to anyone that felt attacked by me. I must admit that in my limited mind I don't see what is the big deal about here. What I meant was that this bike with 3 dials more than usual is a gadget. Well they say that assumption is the mother of all fk-ups, but I still assumed that most of us here have trouble with some fundamental bikes skills (including me), and the only thing industry throws at us is moar technology masking these problems. I wanted to point out, that the problem lies within ourselves, not with too little cables, stanchions that are not slick enough, or bike that is not light enough. I really don't know why it got so personal. I think we would be all way better off if companies sold their bikes with a discount on a skills clinic or training program, spare parts, maybe a litre of fork oil, some bearings.

taletotell - heh I am not running for a president, and I got over -120 for one single post once, so well I can deal with that.

as to pperini - you are coresponsible for all that here, from the very first moment you were aggressive with capital letters, even though I haven't aimed my post at you at all - I feel I really stepped at your big MX balls - you are a self centered cock, and I'm perfectly fine with it no words can express how much less I care what do you think about me after what you wrote. And heh you wrote me PM first, what did you expect: a letter of appreciation in return?!

So I apologize everyone who felt attacked, because I didn't mean to attack anyone, and sorry for loosing it because of pperini
  • + 2
 loosing it because of me? ...hm....and using the capital letters is, by no meanings at all, an act of agression, my intends was to accent some points that i was making..thats all. enough, everyone looses theyre minds sometimes, and i know (by other posts) that u are a guy that has good things to say usually, so lets just forget this...
  • + 2
 and sorry, i just neg proped u now by accident...great timing from my side!!....
  • + 1
 Can someone please explain to me what "trolling" means? I see this all the time on pinkbike "troll, trolling". Sorry I just dont get it...
  • + 2
 trolling is mhm... I am a typical "troll" - a guy with a vibrant online life, a nerd if you like, one that loves to argue. So I am trolling, you can troll something, you can be nerding bladi bla. There is also a Swedish expression that should be used here in this discussion long before: "mata inte trollen": do not feed the troll. Basicaly it means, don't argue with the troll, he will never stop, stop feeding him with fuel for discussion MATA INTE TROLLEN!
  • + 2
 Oh... I see. Thanks for the clarification "Troll"...j/k. I had no idea prior, thanks again!
  • + 0
 Hmm the most up to date cutting edge suspension and top of the line groupo but still using a faux-bar linkage... not my favorite but I guess it will do...

@Rider656: I totally thought you were trolling with your original question haha
  • + 2
 No just "elfing" next time ill "E.T."
  • + 0
 I think you are trolling on LOTR...
  • - 1
 jesus crist u guys are like little fucking kids.
  • + 1
 Cchadwick12 you replied, how does that make you any different?
  • + 1
 im not the one fighting bout dumb stuff. i was just making a statement and besides i wasnt talkin bout u i was talkin bout the idiots that were bickering back and forth before
  • + 0
 cchadwick, no need to point that out...
  • - 2
 cchadwick - why so negative
  • + 0
 Cchadwick is very negative. Only positive statements are allowed on pinkbike...
  • - 3
 If you were right I would be in sodomized in jail at the moment
  • + 21
 Got a genius LT 30 from LBS for a test last year and must say I was impressed. Mostly because I rode out my freeride trail in first atempt hitting all the jumps, switched to lock out mode and easily pedaled all the way up to do it again. Far closest to "do it all" bike I've ever ridden.
  • + 1
 Test-rode the model below this at my LBS about a week ago, and it is truly a different beast once you know what to do with all the technology you're sitting on! If I could afford it, I'd have one!
  • + 16
 I'd love one...wouldn't complain...another excellent comprehensive article RC...
  • + 10
 While this is awesome, I wish bike companies would start trying to make their bikes less expensive. While carbon fiber frames and all that jazz is awesome and necessary for your elite riders I don't think it's always necessary for your average rider who just wants to shred with friends etc. again, nothing against these new bikes they are absolutely awesome. But a college student like myself can afford fancy carbon fiber frames and whatnot unless I run shitty components.
  • + 3
 Just buy used man, you find killer deals on here and on e bay everyday! I haven't bought a new bike in 4 years and even then it was only a BMX frame.
  • + 9
 It's a great looking bike, but the fact that it's got SEVEN cables coming out of the cockpit is a turnoff to me. The most fun bikes I own are the ones that have the least amount of "stuff" going on. Simplicity makes things easy and fun. The construction looks solid, but I'm a little weary of the carbon. Every one of my trail and AM bikes have scratches and dings all over them. I know carbon is supposed to be tough, but it would scare the heck out of me hearing rocks bounce off my down tube. To me simplicity trumps all. I mean, if someone gave me this bike I'd ride the hell out of it, but for the price (and possible frustration due to the complicated bits) it's just not a justifiable purchase.
  • + 5
 Which is why I'll stick to my singlespeed. the more I think about my bike the less I enjoy the ride.
  • + 8
 It would be nice to see Genius LT vs. Claymore comparison. Original design of both is by Peter Denk so I guess pretty much the same bikes, but Claymore alu frame seems a little more capable to take some beating on the downhills. Weight vs. durability.
  • + 3
 Well Scott do make the LT30 and 40 which are both full-alu bikes. But I'm sure durability is not a concern with a carbon front end, even DH bikes are carbon now.
  • + 5
 Okay, I know no one is going to read this since its not at the top of the page, but still, I'd like to make a prediction. When Scott came out w/ their genius line w/ 150mm of travel, it was mind-blowing that we could have 6-inch travel bikes in the 25-26 lb range w/ real-world parts. But they're not the last ones to move in that direction. Perhaps the most sought-after bikes in the aggressive trail/ light AM segment are the Mojo HD and the Nomad c, which can be built up light, but w/ parts that can take the abuses that we throw at them.

I think the advent of this AM bike signals the future. Bikes will continue to get longer travel, and lighter and more efficient as well, all the while becoming tougher and more competent. We'll continue to push toward the impossible dream of bike that's both a 29er hardtail on the climbs and a DH rig on the backside of the ride.

Here's to an uber-tough, real-world, 27-lb Santa Cruz V-10 carbon, that has all the lever-flipping control of Scott's current Genius LT.

Just saying Scott has previously ushered in a new dispensation.

The Genius LT is a prophet.

ps www.pinkbike.com/photo/6922044/#top
  • + 4
 lots of good concerns brought up. What we need is a bike shootout. It really doesn't matter to us how well a bike performs, it matters how well it performs against the competition. Given a budget constraint, what is the best option for [dh,all mountain, etc]?

We really want to know how this thing does against a claymore. A nomad. Mojo HD. i have a kona coilair within two pounds of this bike, but if i dropped $$$ i could prob get it the rest of t he way. My bike has not a single extra stupid cable. Is there any reason for me to sell it for this bike? These are the questions we need answered.
  • + 7
 What a beautiful machine. I wish that I was a Scott dealer!
  • + 0
 No.... not really. Their road stuff is pretty nice, but having sold and ridden the dualies I can't stand the creaking they make. They never felt quite right to me either. But creaking.... fuuuuu... you always know when a Scott is coming down the trail.
  • + 3
 You guys who go on about "It's too complicated for me..." better go and check your local car trader magazine to see if Fred Flintstone is selling his car...
Because obviously you won't be able to handle driving with all those things like accelerators, clutches, brakes, gear sticks, steering wheel, indicators, light switches, radio/cd/mp3 players, electric windows, air conditioning...
Geez-louise... GET REAL PEOPLE!
You Genius 'haters' are just doing it cause you could never afford to spend that much on a bike...
Not because you've got first hand experience...
It's more likely an envy related comment than experience related comment...
But I bet the guy who does own a bike like that, is grinning from ear to ear every time he rides it!
Wish I could read comments and opinions from those 'Genius owners' instead...
  • + 7
 the bike looks f$%# hot... really wish i had that in my garage!!!
  • - 10
flag Wolf183 (Feb 13, 2012 at 6:46) (Below Threshold)
 I'm stuck on the fact that the bike is being tested by someones grandfather....
  • - 5
flag Tr011 (Feb 13, 2012 at 6:49) (Below Threshold)
 Us young guys would put that sex on wheels through its paces
  • + 3
 @Wolf183, @Tr011
You both know nothing about they cycling industry or else you would know who RC is. He has been doing reviews for longer than you have been graduated from training wheels and I guarantee that he would thoroughly embarrass you on any trail. Dude is a living, shredding legend.
  • + 2
 Amazing how people can jump to conclusions without any first hand experience???
I ride a Ransom, complete with rear shock twin-loc remote and added reverb dropper seat post.
Throw on a handle bar light for winter nights and a Garmin for training and you could call it a busy bar.
But i've never found it too complicated, in fact it all becomes second nature and besides, the extra cables are attached to things that give you added advantages...
The ability to totally adjust your ride on the fly is a dream and just adds to the flow of all-mountain riding... Try it yourself and you'd soon see...
Fact is... that Genius looks killer and no doubt it confidently does everything you could ask of it extremely well!
Funny how people hate on things they don't/can't have or don't/can't understand...
  • + 1
 I'we demoed both the carbon Ransom ant the Genius (not the LT though, '10 model) and they were great! I would take the Ransom over the Genius LT any day though.
And what you say for the cables is absolutely true!
  • + 0
 Adjusting on the fly with all those gadgets? Sounds like you're compensating for lack of skill. But whatever floats your boat I guess.
  • + 2
 It sounds like compensating, and I must admit that I don't like all those adjustable seatposts and all that adjustable stuff, but I was pretty impressed how these bikes work. Anyway, I would never give that much money for this bike... so I'll stick to my Haro with 150mm front and rear and 1x9 (and to my skillz). Big Grin
  • + 3
 "Compensating for something"... Here's the stock or default answer given when there's a lack of actually intelligent debate...
You could look at that and say yes! It is compensating!
Compensating for the impossibility of being able to ride three bikes up a mountain at the same time!!!!
How else can you ride a hardtail up the track of a mountain, a XC bike across the ridge of the mountain and a DH bike back down the side of the mountain, unless you embrace the the future of remote lockout shocks???
What a bike like the Genius encompasses is really the epitome of ALL MOUNTAIN riding!
So please... Put the pitch forks and flaming torches down angry villagers!
Welcome to the future...
Tractors plough fields better than horses... Fact!
  • + 0
 You just further proved my point. Riding three bikes up a mountain is lack of skill/ edurance, if you have to have a hardtail to go up, and what not.... I climb my bottlerocket running 1x9 with 5.5 in the back and 7 up front, I go up, down, all around, huck, drop and jump on one bike...
  • + 3
 Wow! Your like superman! Only a 16 year old version... :-/
  • + 1
 Also, it's about advancements in technology and equipment not skill and endurance...
By your logic then, you personally, should start riding bikes from 15 years ago, you know, when you were a baby...
Although remember, they didn't have the advancements back then that you take for granted on your bike today...
But hey you think making new improvements to technology is a crazy idea and just compensating for a lack of skill!
So going by your own logic... By riding the bike you do... you are compensating for your lack of skills... Wink
  • + 2
 How reliable is that shock?
Scott have been chucking out frames with those multi-chamber edifices for nearly a decade now, is this one any more reliable than the last umpteen generations or is it still the reason your bike will ALWAYS be needing a service?
  • + 1
 mine works perfect 1 service in 3 years no problem tho mine is a different equaliser
  • + 2
 I think we will be seeing a lot more bikes like this in the future. Lighter DH bikes are becoming more common and are way more fun to descend on, but still don't climb like an all mountain bike. I am certainly not going to give up my big bike, but this is one more step in the direction of the do it all bikes for some riders. A lot of all mountain bikes are still crap when it comes to descending because they are too biased towards climbing. I've tried a lot. Having more DH friendly geometry that can be steepened easily for climbing can only be seen as a positive. Think of how many times you use your dropper post and what a differrence that can make. Now think of altering travel and geometry on top of that. Yah there are extra controls, but there is no reason you couldn't trigger everything with one switch. Mechanically quite simple. If you are climbing, drop the fork, post, reduce the rear travel and possibly even alter the effective rear shock mount at the same time to further steepen the head angle. Fox used to have a rear shock that could be shortened or lengthened like a Talus fork. Head downhill and release everything back.
  • + 2
 Having ridden a genius, the twin-loc take a little getting used to. But when you remember to think about suspension, it comes naturally. The genius climbs like a billy goat, and personally the dropper post is a waste of time. You dont have to spend 6500$ to get one either, the aluminum version is like 32lbs, and has the same fork as the $6500 carbon version. Its can take a beating too, Im a big guy and i was skeptical about riding a carbon bike. Needless to say i crashed around on it and it held up. Needless to say, its a sweet ride, how many 7in bikes come in at 32 or less lbs?
  • + 2
 Keeping on-topic with this clan of pee wee's is going to be tough... Last time I looked around at a race or group trail ride, I noticed most-to-all bikes sporting 4 cables. Some have five if they have a dropper post. My Scott Genius has 6, as I don't have the post option... don't need it. My Genius is the MC 40, Aluminum. Maxxis High Roller and HR II, Talas Fork, Equalizer 2 shock, DT-Swiss rims and Shimano bits, XT Deore cranks and Avid Elixir 5 brakes. I'm adding a MRP 2x chainguide.... just because.... take the big ring off.
  • + 2
 Could be great to see a video of this bike in action, jumping and droping. Its a 180mm travel bike but what we see here is a guy climbing hill with small a cross country helmets and a big travel bike. I understand that they want to show the bike in climbing action but, carbon fiber for a all mountain - freeride bike is a great idea you think? Is it enough toff... I want see a real ride with that bike. And what kind of guarantee offers Scott for this frame... It look like the Cannondale Claymore but the Claymore is a alluminium frame. Any idea why Cannondale dont make the Claymore in carbon?... I know compagnie make DH bike in carbon but I still woried about a big crash with a carbon fiber frame... and 180mm look like to much travel for full adjustable travel bike. 160mm is enough I think like the Trek slash.
  • + 2
 Sorry about the low-energy photos. A change in travel plans forced Ian to shoot the bike on short notice at a local trail before his flight out. We had a killer location in mind that would have showcased the bike quite well... but. RC
  • + 1
 sh*t happen I guess Smile
  • + 2
 i want one, i have a scott ransom which smashes everything i throw at it and whilst im no bearclaw, i do give it some abuse and it takes it. On my bike i have 2 brakes 2 shifters and tc control for the back and i want a seat dropper on there none of these things get in my way when im riding but im not throwing down 360 tailwhips (but if i could id be doing them on a jump bike anyway). The equalizer is a brilliant invention and mine still works perfectly, but some people hate scott and other people are sheep if you are a sheep buy what everyone else buys, if you hate scott why look on a page devoted to one of theyre bikes, i have not ridden one of these yet but on the basis of my carbon ransom it should be worth the money
  • + 1
 I demo'd both the carbon ransom and the Genius (not the LT though) and they were great! I especially liked the Ransom. Those many cables are not such a bad thing when you get used to use them. But If i had to chose, I would take the Ransom any day over the Genius.
  • + 2
 I had a Ransom (still have one, technically, just the frame + shock) and I found out that Scott's AM bikes are just for people that like to endlessly fiddle with their bikes. I'm certainly not one of those people. If you are, then a Scott AM bike is totally for you.
  • + 0
 i have a ransom i barely look after it cause all i have time for is work and riding when i finish my ride ill leave my bike dirty because i then enter pothead mode and even with my lack of maintainance still works perfectly, Im guessing im lucky then.
  • + 2
 For me, being able to fly through technical trail, then down a steep run with switchback and some jumps, then back up the other side - all without having to "lean down and flick a pro pedal switch" is brilliant!! If you can't figure out how to flick a twinlock lever, which is exactly the same as switching gears, then you my friend should not be riding bikes. You control your bikes travel during the run. Nuff said? sweeeet.

All the fubub above is a waste of electricity. If you want more details on this review, fire away. I have one - although not the LT. Same basic bike though, minus one inch travel.

So to the dude who reviewed this fine machine.... "Cell phone tower"? Really?? It has two extra cables compared to 95% of bikes you see.

Oh, and to the transition Bottlerocket guy/gal... yes, you may ride up, down, flat on yer rocket. But at what speed?? When I blow by you on the up and down... we'll see who's smilin'.

Last point - and a tad cheesy, but true. Seldom do I ride in the woods without someone stopping me in the parking lot after and asking about the bike. Trying it, sitting on it etc etc. Immediate "wow" factor if you're into that. I know I am.
  • + 2
 I have a Genius 20 with a Reverb seatpost. I can confirm both of the complaints listed in the end of the article, I'm glad that I'm not alone in thinking the seat angle is too laid back. I've been running it in the low BB position and will immediately switch to the high and try it out. However, after recently buying an Ellsworth Moment, I say it's both a better climber and descender. It has a slacker head angle, steeper seat angle and much more supple suspension. On several hard rides through the local rock garden, the Scott only seems at home with the throttle wide open, where the Moment is at home no matter what the speed. just my 2c
  • + 1
 Besides all that, the Ellsworth is not looking like a geeks bike! Big Grin
  • + 3
 Why couldnt they make this without resorting to a proprietary shock? Is the current crop of suspension offered by Fox, Marzocchi, Rock Shox and Manitou just not good enough? I wouldnt buy it just because of that.
  • + 3
 dont diss, the equalizer has proven itself enough to deserve being on the bike
  • + 1
 Yep, at least on the Ransom, you could swap it out. The old version was not good (speaking from1st hand exp), but maybe this new even more complicated one will be better...
Not entirely sure why they gone from a push to pull shock though?
  • + 1
 higher profit margins? my mate is very happy with his LT20
  • + 1
 i'm not that sure... the old equalizer on the scott ransom (which was a regular "push"-shock or whatever that's called) was not really known for long lasting and working properly. i know, this is a different shock and maybe with this one it is better, but since i haven't read many comments such as "works fine, no problems at all" i'm still a bit prejudiced against it.
  • + 1
 you guys need to drop your dongs and ride this bike. Its amazing! yes all of the controls can be overwhelming at times but they serve there purpose and put a huge smile on my face! (when i remember to use them properly) Point being if you enjoy riding bicycles you will enjoy riding this one! you may decide you do not want to own it but you will enjoy the ride.
  • + 1
 Must say I'm not a fan but with dropper seatposts and all we have to get used to having more controls on the bar. At least they are trying things. At the end of the day, if you're looking at the cables instead of the trail then you're in trouble. Personally I like to ride bikes more than look at them.
  • + 1
 Seen a brand new (older version) one of the shorter travel version a while back and the rear drop outs weren't in line! There was at least 1&half cm height difference between the 2 sides, where the f*ck was qurality control? Haha
  • + 1
 Here's a question for everyone... I've been saving, have a few months left before i can splash out. I went to the LBS and hefted the LT30 (all aluminium version) and she weighs a ton! So i'm in between a LT 20 (same frame, worse components) and a Spesh Enduro. Any informed opinions?
  • + 1
 buy the enduro evo..IMHO
  • + 1
 Check out the Cannondale Claymore or Jekyll before you pull the trigger. I love my Jekyll.
  • + 1
 Hi Vonplatz, I actually had the Enduro. Sold it to buy my Scott Genius. The genius, in my opinion, is a better bike. On the trails, it is a lot easier to handle and offers more travel - or so it feels at least. That's my 2cents. The twinlock is awesome. You will love it! The Equalizer is, again in my opinion, better than the Fox R with Pro Pedal or the the S Brain crap. I hated mine... but that's just me. Sold it. moved on... OH, and my Scott is now the coolest kid on the block now that they signed The Coastal crew and a few other, shall I say Top-O-the-line riders!!!!! ya baby. Scott is the brand to beat.
  • + 1
 I tested a 2011 LT30 in september and i have to say it's really good at climbing and the fork (rock shox lyrik) can be lowered from the handlebar control which is an advantage over the fox talas fork. At the descends the fork and the rear shock were missing the high/low speed compression settings so i wasn't able to get exactly what i wanted from the bike. Still this bike is something i'd buy in a year or two, but not the LT10 because it's too expensive.
  • + 1
 I don't care how well it rides, it's just a bit too complicated for me. Cables irritate the hell out of me, I only have front and rear brake and rear mech. No need for a front mech full stop, especially if this bike pedals as well as it's supposed to. As for TALAS, no need for that either, makes no difference to me. Lockout on fork/shock can be useful, i use the propedal on my shock all the time, however I have no problem leaning over and quickly flicking the lever. That's what I do whenever I go ride and i'd prefer it to having a lever on the bar. Same goes for the fork and dropper post. Granted bar mounted controls can be good, but I'd rather not have all the extra cables that go with them. Looking forward to people coming up with wireless controls! I'm sure it'll happen soon!
  • + 1
 Hells yeah- bring on the Long Travel trail bikes!! Not a big scott fan, but at least they are pushin' longer travel and lighter weights. This thing has my Yeti ASR7 beat by 2.5 lbs... plus its got an inch more in the front. daaaaaamn.
  • + 1
 If a medium is going to cause a six foot tall person problems I do not understand why they would need to add a forth size. Why wouldn't that person just get a large? It seems to be a legitimate problem you outlined but your example seems a bit off. Unless you meant a large and then I could see your point, otherwise I am a bit confused.
  • + 2
 If Possible, I would love to see a shootout between this bike and a Cannondale Claymore. As far as Specs go, Carbon seems to be the main difference, but I would love to see how they perform side by side.
  • + 1
 Shock placement is also a huge difference. I agree though, would love to see a comparison.
  • + 1
 how much heavier would it be in aluminum? How much cheaper?
I guess that's why my bike weighs 35lbs with only 160mm's of travel. Of course for another 500 bucks mine would weigh 32lbs and still be way cheaper than this beast.
  • + 1
 I had a replacement bike supplied by an insurance company -went from a cannondale prophet one (ridden twice before theft) to a specialized camber evo 29er - hated it swapped with a guy on ebay 4 months ago got me a scott genius LT 20 2011 - love it and all he levers - it takes tme to remember everything to get most out of it but it is 26" and goes places 29ers just cant negotiate like switchbakes. I love the scott
  • + 1
 This bike in my opinion is a bit too complicated for its own good. I don't really see the point of all of those travel adjusting levers, they are nothing but heavier replacements for reaching down and turning a convenient switch or undoing a seat QR. Despite the great technological advances this bike presents, the huge price tag doesn't seem to give you much more than your average Giant Reign X, GT Sanction, or Specialized Enduro, all of which can do pretty much the same job, but for cheaper, with far fewer unnecessary levers.
  • + 1
 @180mm it would have been nice to see a vid or discussion of all that travel moving with rock gardens, drops, & jumps. the technology one bolts on to climb has been pretty obvious and @180mm potential, climbing ability, would be my last concern realistically. the long travel attributes should have gotten a lot more insight. i know there can be alot to cover but it was like a review of an XC bike. this bike is mini dh travel territory.
  • + 1
 I have my Genius LT 10 since 2011 and is almost the perfect "all in one" bike. Mine is actually 12,7kg.
Contrary to the review, I think is better in the lower BB position of the travel-chip. Although I'm going to mount a 650b front wheel and I will try the upper position to compensate.
I have passed with this bike very technical and agressive downhill tracks that I coud never do with other bikes, included my last ransom
The only negative point is the equalizer faillures. Twice in a year. Similar happens to the ransom, jekyll and claymore. But they should consider to make a more durable design.
  • + 1
 I had designed a bike sort of like this, with a massive amount of cable routing. I put two or three cable routings in a wider, more flat/rectangular housing so that there wouldn't be all that sh*t hanging off of the front end. That being said, I'd still be happy to own the bike.
  • + 1
 I'd love to try one but... It's a bike with a lot of travel. Maybe some people don't really care but I have a hard time convincing myself to drop well over 7000$ on a bike that just might get ditched mid air or eat sht in a rock garden... They have the voltage for that and its like 3500$ cheaper. Maybe for a carbon roadbike that will possibly never taste the dirt but for a bike with enough travel to take a serious beating? No.

If they're doing it it's because they most likely have the numbers backing the belief that it's going to work and I wish them the best but I feel like they're trying to bridge the gap with 2 entirely different markets with this bike. Don't get me wrong, I'm the first one who'd be more than happy to see "the one bike" dream happening, a pedalable DH sled in other words and it seems we're coming closer and closer to that happening but yeah. I'm not convinced it's here yet and at that price, I'll wait patiently some more.

I don't want to be a negative nancy but I wondered if I was the only one thinking this?
  • + 1
 my carbon ransom has ate dirt, plowed into trees and landed hard on rocks its still okay, im pretty smashed up but my bike perfect.
  • + 2
 I have no doubt the frame will take the abuse, it's everything else im worried about. The cost implies mean that its diehard riders that will want to pay that much but i have a hard time believing diehard xc fans will pay that much for travel they dont need and i also doubt diehard freeride fans will pay for a million switches, a talas, 2x10 setup and lockout options.

Still looks like a sweet bike and i'd love to give it a try. Also very happy scott is trying to push the boundaries, someone has to do it! But then again I really don't see myself paying that much for it and according to the poll im not alone on this one. Why? First the twinloc controls. People say the reverb remote is prone to get smashed, same goes for the twinlock I bet. But since its a scott product good luck finding a replacement one. Same problem with the proprietary shock, if that thing breaks on you, have fun finding a scott dealer (that carries spare shocks like that). This is why i also stay away from bikes like the trek ones with the drcv shenanigans.

I haven't got to try it yet but i read reviews of dw split pivot bikes that feel like hardtails when climbing out of saddle even though the shock stays completely active... Without even having to mess around with propedal levers and you don't need a proprietary shock or custom tuning either. That's the kind of technological advances I find everybody wins with.
  • + 1
 This bike was a tough decision for me to purchase at the time. I read everything I could find regarding the DT Swiss Equalizer shock, and about Scott in general. But I too had worries such as some of the points listed above. But man, every time I walked into the bike shop, I fell in love with the Genius. Cool bike!
So... I test rode it. Loved it!! I purchased it over one year ago. Sold my Nomad for best offer. Glad to rid of the "Brain" crap. I love my Genius. It rocks any trail... up, down... fast...slow.

I have never had to service the bike. Not once. I have replaced both stock Schwalbe Nobby Nics with Maxxis. Oh, and I put a Syncros AM Head set on. Custom flats for pedals. That's it. best bike I have ever owned. 6" travel with lock-out - and it works! Great for DH as well as AM Enduro rides.
  • + 4
 Looks like a marvle of technology yet l would rather have a Cannondale Jekyll.
  • + 1
 well...I have a jekyll 5 and I must say its a all around bike....
  • + 1
 Excellent Functionality... complicated. It takes five motions to switch from climbing to descending (twinlock, seatpost, fork, 2 shifters).
The Evoloution: One "Trilock" lever on the left releases the seatpost and adjusts Fr and Rr suspension from 4-7in. One shifter on the right controls a 1x10. The new rear hubs allow 9-36t cassette, which combined with a 26t front chainring give the same ratios as the standard 2x9 ( 22/32 front, 11-32 rear) setup. Simplicity.
Scott, Fox (or anybody) hear me please!
  • + 3
 Mine is on the way. It won't be my only bike but I'm betting it's going to be a fun one!
  • + 1
 i prefer having two bikes so if (when) youe crash and prehaps break something improtand you have a standby bike if i just spent over 6000$ on a bike that i crash and then cant use for a couple of days id be pretty peeved
  • + 1
 I don't even have to see the price tag to know its way too expensive, just like most other new bikes in recent years. I'll keep to the 2nd hand market, thats where you pick up the real deals!
  • + 1
 but it does look good saying that Big Grin
  • + 1
 Scott Genius LT40 - same thing aluminum frame... 3,000$
  • + 2
 no brake jack, not pedal feedback, fully active suspension under load? Wow,,,they managed to fix faux bar's (read: single pivot) biggest limitations....impressive.
  • + 1
 Actually they didn't, but like all faux bar brands, they claim they have.
  • + 2
 yeah, my sarcasm may not have been as apparent as it was to me....lol.
  • + 1
 This is one of the most thought out designs I ever seen. Next time I hit the lotto I cop one and be a trail genius. Hopefully that reverse pull shock works because they usually don't.
  • + 1
 I nearly got one of these last year. The main reason I went with summit else was the amount of things to wrong. And if those things did go wrong it would have to go back to Scott to get sorted. Long. Tidy bike tho.
  • + 4
 I'll take one! and it's okay, I don't need a bag..
  • + 3
 I would buy it if the "DH mode" had a slacker angle, something like 65° to make it more freeride than All-mountain
  • + 1
 I use an LT10 with custom build for SD and FR. It was fast enouh to beat Mark Weir and really is a do-it-all bike. I sometimes trail ride the 10mi to the dirt jumps, then hit every line.
  • + 2
 i rode a Genius last year the rear shocks are nuts they are so good with the remote lockout and traction mode , this bike looks sick
  • + 2
 Looks like a sweet rig, but any need for a fourth size? Surely a 6 foot tall and above (such as me) would go for a size large?
  • + 4
 Great Scott thats a complicated bike.
  • + 1
 well said
  • + 4
 Looks like a fun bike.
  • + 1
 i have a lt 20 and i love it, does everything i need it to and some!, cant wait to get a reverb seat post so i can have another cable!!! Smile
  • + 1
 Admittedly, haven't ridden it. However, what I see is fancied up faux-bar bike that will have all the limitations of that design.
  • + 3
 If tron made a mountain bike.....
  • + 1
 haha amazing... ok wait till Subservient Bikes opens for business. Then you will see amazing.
  • + 1
 looks like a nice bike but the messy cables just make me want to get them all neat looking.
  • + 1
 first crash and that twin lock lever will be toast . hope they supply a couple of spares for the $6500 price
  • + 2
 Do it all bikes are compromises. Better get three bikes for that price.
  • + 2
 With that many cables, how about some internal routing.
  • + 1
 Progress? Until all of those knobs and switches do it for me I'll be sticking to my old Mt. Vision.
  • + 1
 I'd be interested in this bike if it had a traditional shock, no remotes, and a 1x10 drivetrain.....
  • + 1
 Fancy an Ibis Mojo? Wink
  • + 1
 Subservients first bike is gonna be a dh bike with traditional shock but 2x9 drivetrain. ill mention a 1x10 to the designer.
  • + 1
 1x10 is great for trail/XC but a wide-range cassette seems unnecessary for DH. a 10sp road block is commonplace on elite and pro level whips, as 10sp shifters and chains are provided by Shimano and SRAM to sponsored riders.
  • + 1
 so what do u suggest for a downhill rig
  • + 1
 You mean for drivetrain, or a whole bike? For a drivetrain, I cited the usefulness of a close-ratio road cassette. The wide-ratio 11-36 mountain cassette's not that necessary for a gravity sled.
  • + 1
 yeah, drivetrain. i appreciate ur input. And if there are any other suggestions on the subject they would be greatly appreciated
  • + 1
 For privateer racing, which it seems you're getting into, I suggest riding what you can afford, and expect that some stuff is going to break. 9sp cassettes, shifters, and derailleurs are all readily available still (even though 10sp is the 'new thing') so I say just run that, learn how to be a better racer, and study other riders. There are lots of great training videos out there, and I think one of the best is made by SImon Lawton. He's a local pro here in the NW (who also shares a fondness for Diamondbacks like you and I). His video "Fluidride: Like a Pro" is great. Also, learn how to tune/repair your own gear - it's essential if you're going to be a successful (and not penniless) rider! Get after it, son!
  • + 2
 im already an excelent mechanic on these things. and im even building my own frame from scratch. ill watch the videos and see where that leads me. but im excited to start riddin a new dh bike that noone has seen in the spring. Thanks for the advice man.
  • + 1
 I think that the only - but HUGE - drawback of this bike is that it's way too much complicated!
  • + 2
 Looks like an amazing bike, no way i can afford that though.
  • + 0
 There ransom sucked the shock had so many problems. Hopefully they got it all figured out with the new shock. All those cables look crazy. Cluster F@*K.
  • + 1
 i disagree i have a ransom and like it. Never had a shock problem and its been serviced once in 3 years
  • + 2
 sounds like they forgot the switch that makes the bike pedal. luz
  • + 3
 I"M IN LOVE
  • + 1
 This doesn't tickle my fancy at all, I'll stick with the Carbon Nomad thanks.
  • + 1
 Funny I was thinking exactly the same Smile
  • + 2
 I would like a review of Cannondale's calymore and jekyll to compare...
  • + 2
 My question: HOW DO THEY MAKE THE BIKE STAND ON ITS OWN!?!?!?!!!
  • + 1
 Dang now i will be thinking about that all day!!!!!!
  • + 10
 there's a remote for it.
  • + 3
 there is a lever on the handlebars...,
  • - 1
 Pull shock? Those blow up real good. Lets see it work, when I looked at that thing I thought I could race dh on that. I think it would die in my world, I'm gunna spend my money on a moto instead.
  • + 1
 Boo...long cage derailleur and double chain ring. When will companies learn?
  • + 1
 That's my bike I've got the 2012 model and hot it for $3500
  • + 1
 Sorry, but yours is a 2011 and it is not a LT10
  • + 1
 If your looking for a Scott check mine out!!
  • + 1
 I really would rather have two bikes...
  • + 1
 I have 2 bikes..........whaaaaat
  • + 1
 So many controls ....it's like driving a Formula 1 .
  • + 1
 and driving a F1 car is such a bad thing!?!
  • + 1
 I think coastal crew should way in on this. They shred on these bikes!
  • + 1
 it is good to see they made a nice affordable bike -_-
  • + 0
 they do, the LT40 is much less expensive at 2,500$ The LT10 is the top of the line carbon framed bike. shit there are road bikes that cost more then 7 grand.
  • + 1
 $7000 usd.... WHAT?
  • + 0
 the LT 40 is much less expensive. and 7Gs is not nearly the most expensive bike out there. fk road bike cost more and have no suspension. wtf?
  • + 0
 Road bikes are designed for, well, the road. They will be lighter, faster shifting, more aerodynamic, blah, blah, blah. Wtf would a road bike want suspension for? Don't even try to compare this mountain bike to a road bike, the road bike would (duh) be faster on the road and the mountain bike is obviously built for trails.
  • + 0
 and still no Kashima for $6499 thought that would be on oem bikes by now
  • + 1
 Awesome.
Below threshold threads are hidden

Post a Comment



You must login to Pinkbike.
Don't have an account? Sign up

Join Pinkbike  Login